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where inspiration lives

100%

Australian homes

50+

pages

Triple TREAT

HOME RENOVATION ideas

Making room for three generations

BUYER’S GUIDE

Benchtop appliances HEAVEN SCENT

10 exciting new roses

TIMELESS STYLE Finding the key to a balanced interior

PRINT POST 100007368

APRIL *$7.95 *NZ$8.90 (*incl. GST)

UNEARTHED! Our Garden of the Year winners

renovation

WISDOM

BONUS! Flooring lookbook

VA L UA B L E L E S S O N S A N D E N D U R I N G D E S I G N S O L U T I O N S


Find a place for everything with 40% off MAXIMERA & VARIERA kitchen drawers and organisers.* Offer valid 18 March – 17 April.


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*BMW ConnectedDrive Terms and Conditions apply. Please refer to www.bmw.com.au/ConnectedDrive or contact your preferred BMW dealer for further information.


The all new BMW X1

133 BMW bmw.com.au


APRIL RENOVATION WISDOM D E C O R AT I N G & D E S I G N 19 Inspired By April’s palette. 20 At Home With Design-savvy

33 41

50 53

Photograph by Maree Homer.

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owners interpret a ‘modern farmhouse’ aesthetic in NSW. Bright Ideas Dept Innovative designs for living life well. Forever Modern Raw materials, clean lines and judicious colour combine for ever-modern style. Masterclass Darren Palmer on getting bathrooms right. World View New wares tap into the rich traditions of craftsmanship. Lime Light Chartreuse and lime make up an intoxicating cocktail of directional designs.

O N TH E COV E R 20 50+ Home Renovation Ideas 41 Timeless Style: Finding The

Take a leaf from our Gardens of the Year, page 127

Key To A Timeless Interior Renovation Wisdom: Valuable Lessons and Enduring Design Solutions 100 Triple Treat: Making Room For Three Generations 127 Unearthed! Our Garden Of The Year Winners 144 Heaven Scent: 10 Exciting New Roses 190 Buyer’s Guide: Benchtop Appliances 203 Flooring Lookbook

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108 Personal Space A graceful Sydney

RENOVATION SPECIAL

terrace travels through time.

116 Blue Yonder Against an ocean backdrop, two Perth properties become one amazing residence.

83 Real-life renovators transform homes of different eras.

GARDENS 127 H&G Gardens Of The Year Meet the creators of our winning gardens as they describe their pride and joy. 143 Clippings News for gardeners. 144 Rosy Outlook Top 10 new roses.

LIVING 150 Park And Parcels Delicious picnic recipes for a moveable feast.

158 In The Mix Mixed-varietal wines. 160 Cruise Control Fair sailing from Barcelona to the French Riviera.

162 Mane Game Help for fine hair. 164 Fat Chance Choose healthier fats.

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ADVICE 168 Renovator’s Notebook From a pair of semis to one great family home.

172 Play It Cool Cold, hard fridge facts. 177 Ask An Expert Professional advice. MY IDEAL HOUSE 59 New Vision Our exciting competition to discover and build a new Australian family home design.

SHOPPING 176 Easy Does It Must-have Australian House & Garden wares from Myer.

181 Chill, Out! Nestle into cosy autumn accessories as temperatures fall.

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INSIDER 67 Nest Welcome to Ali McNabneyStevens’ artistic Melbourne abode.

68 Insider Design news and reviews. 74 Design Moment The pioneering gardens of Australian landscape designer Edna Walling.

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HOUSES 84 Track To The Future A 1940s

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

red-brick bungalow in Sydney gets a thoroughly modern makeover. 92 Retro Fits The transformation of a ’70s-vintage Melbourne townhouse. 100 All Rise Accommodating three generations meant taking this Brisbane home to the next level.

187 Cheese Boards Hit platters. 188 Affordable Artwork Browse the galleries to dress your walls.

190 Buyer’s Guide Small appliances. 194 Where To Buy Stockists’ details. 202 Things That Make Us Smile COM MUNIT Y 16 Your H&G Readers’ letters. 194 Bauer Media Privacy Notice 199 Show & Tell A place where you can share ideas and insights.

OFFERS AND PROMOTIONS 146 Subscribe to H&G and receive a free copy of our Great Australian Gardens book, valued at $59.99!


o u y s g n

thi

v o e l From trends hand-picked from around the world, to designs discovered right here at home, we’ve created over 30 new season looks to inspire you to create the one you love. Explore them in store and online and fill every room with beautiful things for a warm and stylish winter.

ZAHRA 3 SEAT SOFA in alpha natural $2199 Feather-blend cushioning • Solid timber plinth • Durable linen-blend fabric (also available in leather) MyFreedom member price. Joining fee applies.

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H&G E D I T O R’ S L E T T E R

REMODEL CITIZENS

Photograph by Darren McDonald (Lisa).

W

ho can resist a good renovation saga, an often-emotional tale of desire (owner’s), passion (design professionals) and envy (readers)? I love our renovation issues and the human behaviours they reveal and provoke. Other people’s renovation journeys can have you applauding their resourcefulness and fortitude, or perhaps feeling a wistful pang of envy as you identify your ‘dream’ home on the pages before you. Many readers will tear-sheet an idea they’ve been trying to articulate, look up brands on the iPad while turning the pages and snap clever solutions on their phone (I know it’s not just me). The great thing about a renovation-mad nation is that the narrative is ever-evolving, with themes driven by available housing stock and location, not to mention wildly dif ferent budgets, needs, persona l philosophies and renovating styles.

When we renovated, a little over a decade ago, newspapers beneath the floors dated the less-than-marvellous extension that had preceded our purchase (that and the glass brick bathroom wall). A discarded wedding ring in the bathroom drawer pointed to the reason for the hasty makeover. As we prepare to undertake a bit more work on the house, it amuses and slightly terrifies me that ’90s homes and renovations are now being dismantled. Fashions shift, of course, and every new nester will want to make their mark. Families expand and contract, and homes need to adapt. A well-designed, well-built home will do so too and, as architect Caroline Pidcock points out this issue, will be more sustainable over time. This issue runs the gamut of renovation projects: a single-level red-brick bungalow, floorplan flipped to suit a young family; a ’70s architect-designed townhouse tweaked but honoured by an appreciative couple; a weatherboard cottage raised and extended to welcome grandma; an elegant urban terrace revamped to welcome in children and glamour (no, they’re not mutually exclusive); and a ’90s coastal home adapted to suit a blended family. Good stories all. Meanwhile, we’re a tiny bit excited about delving into the entries in our $25,000 design competition, My Ideal House. The shortlisted finalists will be revealed next issue. Don’t miss out on seeing what the next generation of family home promises.

CONTRIBUTORS

H E L E N YO U N G Gardening expert This month we tour the winning gardens in our biennial Garden of the Year competition. Helen, H&G’s go-to gal for all things gardening, was a willing judge. “I relish the chance for gardeners show me their gardens,” she says. “It seems to me that gardeners are always lovely people. And the way they express themselves in a garden can be so different.”

ROSA SENESE Subeditor and writer This month Rosa covered the transformation of an inner-Sydney terrace into a family haven (page 108). “I’ve covered many fields as a wordsmith but I find home stories to be particularly revealing and always inspirational,” she says. “The way people experience their living environment says so much about modern relationships and values.”

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H&G L E T T E R S

YOUR H&G I want to thank you for jumpstarting the broken-down car that was my partially renovated kitchen. Frustrated with my tired-looking kitchen, I began tearing down tiles and repainting shelves, but before long I hit a roadblock: I was no longer happy with my plans. Then I stumbled upon the wonderful kitchen on page 152 of the March issue and I can now say that I have the inspiration I need to put the pedal to the metal and finish my renovation with confidence! Joanna Feng, North Ryde, NSW

We have a small home and the room that previously housed all our homeoffice equipment and paperwork has recently been converted to a nursery. Short on space, we have been using the dining table, but the clutter has been driving me nuts. February’s Home Offices feature gave me new ideas for how to create an office nook in a small space using some nifty storage. We are now looking forward to reclaiming the dining table. Jane Trembath, Dover Gardens, SA

Domestic bliss My partner and I have been contemplating renovating our kitchen for some time. My taste is drawn from my childhood in country Victoria, while he’s partial to clean lines and unadorned surfaces. Cue your January issue! The custom-built K3 layout from

Cantilever Interiors is truly the answer to our prayers. It satisfies my love of natural timber while the clean white lines and tiles exude peace and serenity. Overall, it looks like a delightful place to be. Peter Davis, Coburg, Victoria

Mum’s the word My husband gifted me a subscription to H&G when I was pregnant with our son, who is now 15 months old. As we are nearly ready to begin renovating, I find myself poring over H&G, pulling out bits of design genius as well as gorgeous recipes and beautiful gardens. Lately I have been volunteering to sit in the car with my little one while he sleeps. But I confess an ulterior motive: it means I can browse uninterrupted through the most recent issue! Lucy Barker, Mt Colah, NSW

WRITE IN TO WIN The author of every letter published receives $50. Our favourite also wins a great prize. This month, Joanna Feng wins a Nespresso Inissia coffee machine, valued at $249, from Breville; www.breville.com. au. Email your letter to h&g@bauer-media.com.au with your full name and address or post to Your H&G, PO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

FLOWER OF THE MONTH BOUVARDIA Colours White, pinks, red, yellow and orange.

Shape Small clusters of tubular flowers with star-shaped petals and soft, dark-green leaves. Look for “Tight ball-shaped buds that will open into star-shaped blooms once you get them home,” says florist Georgie Bennett of Lilac and Willow. “Look for healthy leaves and strong stems.” Best displayed “A mass of white bouvardia creates a gorgeous, soft statement,” says Georgie. “I love it in a simple glass or white ceramic vase, or a copper pot. Bouvardia also works beautifully with a mix of other soft blooms such as garden roses, gardenias and dahlias.”

Lilac and Willow, Rose Bay, NSW; (02) 9371 1993 or www.lilacandwillow.com.au. See Georgie’s floral display using bouvardia on our Pinterest page in April.

Illustration by Allison Langton. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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H&G I N S P I R E D BY

COLOUR CODE

Taubmans Coral Vista

Artwork image courtesy Michael Reid Sydney; (02) 8353 3500 or michaelreid.com.au. Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Haymes Paint Geranium

the palette Showing his customary lavish application of paint and explosive colour, this work by Alesandro Ljubicic has a magnetic pull, and influenced our colour palette this month. Australian designers take the credit for this super sofa and clever clock, both launched at the recent Maison et Objet fair in Paris. And the bird? We thought he had personality.

Bristol Blue Whale

RICH INSPIRATIONS Quin Scarlet Paynes oil painting on linen, 2015, by Alesandro Ljubicic. Dotty clock by Australian designer Abi Alice for Alessi; www. alessi.com. Harvest Puffball, limited-edition glass bird figure from Finland’s Iittala; www.iittala.com. Melbourne designer Nick Rennie’s Softly sofa, for Ligne Roset, comes in deep-blue velvet. Available from Domo; domo.com.au.

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“We pinch ourselves to check it’s real! We get to drive past green paddocks with cows instead of concrete and skyscrapers,” says interior designer Nicki Dobrzynski, pictured with her husband Chris, daughter Eva and Bailey the Rhodesian ridgeback. While Nicki’s style is influenced by classic American design, she describes her home as ‘modern farmhouse’. Outside, the garden is an idyll of rockery beds, European trees and a former pond converted to a vegie plot. Cumquats and star jasmine, The Potting Shed. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

GREEN ACRES A design-savvy couple from Sydney find their patch of paradise in NSW’s Southern Highlands. S T ORY DE BOR A H GR A NT / S T Y L I N G NIC K I DO B RZ YNS K I P HO T O G R A P H Y M A R EE HOM ER


H&G AT H O M E W I T H

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ike many expectant couples looking for their first home, the clock was ticking for Nicki and Chris Dobrzynski. In 2012, the landlord of their rental property in the NSW Southern Highlands announced she was selling just a few months out from Nicki’s due date. The Dobrzynskis – who’d left Sydney just a year earlier – knew they wanted to stay in the area and were prepared to move quickly when they found ‘the one’. Nicki, a commercial interior designer who had just established a residential design practice called Cottonwood Interiors, and Chris, a property valuer, began inspecting local homes. They loved the generous plots, which range between 2000-4000m2, and the shaded streets but it was something entirely different that

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

drew them to the house they decided to buy; an elegant 2m-high hedge and country-style gates. “Chris and I joke about buying the property because of the hedge,” says Nicki. “But one like ours, a cotoneaster, would take 15-20 years to mature. The 2200m2 gardens were also lovely, though overgrown.” Unfortunately, the 1980s-era house wasn’t as alluring. “It was red brick with mustard-yellow windows and doors, but the windows were big and timber so I knew we could work with them,” says Nicki. A month later, the Dobrzynskis moved in and began a hasty makeover. “We painted the inside of the house ourselves and had the three bedrooms recarpeted, just in time for Eva’s birth.” Four years on, a lot more has been done and the 200m2 home is almost >

ABOVE / In summer, the family flings open the doors and spends most of the day out on the north-facing terrace. Nicki bought the teak table from Coco Republic and sells the wicker chairs through her business. Metal lanterns, Barbara’s Storehouse. OPPOSITE / “We use every room of the house so we don’t have ‘good’ rooms as such,” says Nicki. Her living space includes a sofa from Town & Country Style, coordinated with a coffee table from Suzie Anderson Home. Heirloom mirror. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.


‘Out on the terrace or curled up next to a fire, there’s a room or space for every mood.’ Nicki Dobrzynski


H&G AT H O M E W I T H

‘The kitchen is a V-groove design, a departure from my usual Shaker-style cabinetry. It was tricky to get right but I love it.’ Nicki

THESE PAGES, CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT / A plump cushion in a John Robshaw Textiles fabric makes a nice place to perch in the study. Now a large open-plan space with adjacent scullery, the kitchen was designed by Nicki and installed by Harrington Kitchens. The benchtop and splashback are Carrara marble. At one end is the family meals area, with vintage Windsor chairs and table from Barbara’s Storehouse. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

>


H&G AT H O M E W I T H


< unrecognisable. “We kept the layout

ABOVE LEFT / Wall lights from Laura Kincade flank the mirror in the ensuite. As in the main bathroom, Carrara marble was used on the floor, vanity and bath surround. ABOVE RIGHT / Nicki ordered the upholstered bedhead from Horgans. Throw, Pottery Barn. Navy cushions, Coco Republic. OPPOSITE / Bailey guards the entry to the garden room/study, where Nicki and Chris occasionally work. Cushions, Studio McGee. Rug, Dash & Albert Rug Company. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.

and the french doors,” says Nicki. “But we completely renovated the bathrooms and opened up the kitchen by converting the old laundry into a scullery, where we wash pretty much everything. We added new joinery, appliances and fittings, as well as a new island bench. We also laid 20mmthick American-oak floorboards. “One of the house’s issues was noise, so we put a lot of thought into wall insulation and soundproofing using cavity and solidcore doors. It was well worth the effort because we’d spent two years whispering so Eva wouldn’t wake up!” says Nicki. The decor was, of course, her domain, though she collaborated with Chris on big changes; for example the decision to replace the roof tiles with Colorbond and covering the brick exterior with board and batten cladding. “It isn’t a look commonly seen in Australia,” says Nicki, “but it’s popular in New Zealand and the

US. It gives a farmhouse feel and totally changed the home’s facade.” Inside, the home is what Nicki describes as ‘modern farmhouse’, an aesthetic that reflects the couple’s childhoods spent constantly moving between city and country. “We don’t like things too modern or traditional and love country/farmhouse touches that are appropriate here. I like people to relax and I pretty much slipcover everything so I know I can wash it!” What Nicki enjoyed most about the project was experimenting with new products and ideas. “It was different to working with clients because I wasn’t afraid of things not working out,” she says. And the result? “Though it was hard juggling the demands of a baby, growing a business and renovating a home, moving here has been a such a positive lifestyle > shift. We haven’t looked back.” Cottonwood Interiors, Bowral, NSW; www.cottonwoodinteriors.com.

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H&G AT H O M E W I T H

M AT E R I A L S PA L E T T E

The farmhouse references are evident but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a modern edge to this country home, now ďŹ nished and furnished to a standard that meets its mature garden surrounds. Black is well-used to sharpen a materials palette of wicker, wood and white.

Taubmans Wizard Grey

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Albion jute rug in White (1.8x2.7m), $349, Freedom; www.freedom.com.au. Penny floor lamp, $190, Aero Designs; www.aerodesigns.com.au. Halong steel coffee table with timber top, $836, Satara; www.satara.com. au. Budding Box faux greenery in antiqued terracotta pot, $120, Rogue; www.roguehome.com.au. One-drawer oak bedside table in White, $510, Lavender Hill Interiors; www. lavenderhillinteriors.com.au. Windsor timber dining chair, $469, La Maison; www.lamaison.net.au. Pierre MDF wall clock, $170, Amalfi; www.amalfihomewares.com.au. #

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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bright ideas dept. NEWS

INNOVATIONS

INSPIRATION

THE SWING OF THINGS

Produced by Sarah Pickette.

Copper, timber and rope add up to more than the sum of their parts when upcycled into a cool swing, $450. Hung from a tree or a high point indoors, the Sibella Courtdesigned swing is fun for kids and a visual treat for design lovers. thesocietyinc.com.au.

Black b e au t ie s Make room at the table for t he c o o l n ew k i d i n town. Robert Gordon Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Au tu mn / Wi n t er c ollection features the Hardware L ane ra n ge, i n spi red by vintag e cut g lass and f inished in a r i c h ma t t gl a ze. P ieces start from $30/cake p late; www.ro ber t go rd o naustralia.com . >

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H&G B R I G H T I DE A S

Li g h t t o u ch Lighting meets sculpture

Li n e n c r us h S he r i d a n’s m a s te r w e a v e r m a y ha v e c re a te d the pe r fe c t shade of grey in the new Abbotson Marl B e l g i a n l i n e n b e d d i n g . F rom $ 10 0 / pi l l ow c a s e . w w w. s he r i d a n . c om . a u .

in the intriguing Nu light (right) by Melbourne lighting designer Ilan El. The four illuminated panels, crafted from American-oak ply, can be manipulated to from myriad shapes. $2310; www.ilanel.com.

O U T S I D E T H E S Q U A R E J A PA N E S E B R A N D N E N D O H A S CO N C E I V E D A C U S H I O N F O R O U R T I M E S ( A B OV E ) . S E C U R E YO U R TA B L E T O R S M A RT P H O N E I N O N E O F T H E FA B R I C S LOT S A N D S W I P E AWAY. W W W. N E N D O. J P/ E N .

T I L E S T Y L E Fresh from the design studio of the acclaimed Bouroullec brothers comes a new range of tiles for cutting-edge Italian ceramics firm Mutina. The series features square tiles, diamond mosaics and a three-dimensional wall tile (all pictured at left) that creates a corrugated effect. The tiles will be ranged in Di Lorenzo Tiles showrooms from April. www.dilorenzo.com.au.

Mi r ro r, m i r ro r Ideal for a petite b ath room or pow der room, Parisi’s new L otus-Ash 1000 mirrored w all storage cab inet (righ t), $769, delivers plenty of mirror area w ith no door b reaks. It rises smooth ly and silently to reveal a w ood-grain interior. A selection of match ing vanity and storage units is also availab le. w w w.parisi.com.au. >

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


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H&G B R I G H T I D E A S P ro l i f i c F re n c h d e s i g n e r

P hi l ippe St a rck h a s a p p l i e d It a l i a n fa s h i o n h o u s e E m i l i o P u c c i ’s s i g n a tu re ka l e i d o s c o pe pr i n ts to c re a te a da zzling l i m i te d-e d i ti on c ha i r c ol l e c ti on for Ka rt e ll. T he v i v i d Ma d a m e P u c c i c h a i r i s $ 1 19 0 a n d a v a i l a b l e f rom S pa c e . w w w. s pa c e f u r n i ture .co m.a u.

B A S I N B E AU T Y Fabulous finishes continue to flow in bathroom design. Pittella has just released three new basins, each as gorgeous as the next. Shown above, from left: the Venice basin, $1062, made from coloured glass and has a beautifully textured handmade exterior; the Luna basin, $2044, inspired by natural stone but is rendered in concrete and glass; and the dazzling Mosaic basin, $899, cleverly constructed from a polymerbased material that comes in a range of colours from gold-leaf to platinum. www.pittella.com.au.

C h e e rs fo r id e a s

V E ROSO L H A S R E L E A S E D A C L E V E R N E W B L I N D FA B R I C , C RYSTA L SC R E E N , W H I C H P ROV I D ES P ROT EC T I O N F RO M H E AT A N D G L A R E W I T H OU T B LO C K I N G T H E V I E W. M A D E F RO M U LT R A-T H I N G L A S S F I B R ES A N D BAC K E D W I T H R E F L EC T I V E A LU M I N I U M , I T CO M ES I N S I X N E U T R A L TO N ES . W W W.V E ROSO L .CO M . AU.

Ad d ress i n g t he i ss ue of what to do with t he (ra rel y rec y c l a ble) re ce pt a c l e o n c e y o ur c a n d l e ha s bu r n ed d o wn , A’sh c a n d l es are d e s i gn ed t o be u s ed as c o c kt a i l gl a ss es . Ev en better, a portion of each s a l e go es t o Wo r l d Vi s i o n . $ 50 ; www. ash c a n d l es s y d n ey . c o m .au.

Kud o s to UNSW Art & Design graduate Madeleine Dennis, whose Original Seed fruit bowl (above) won Best Product Innovation at the 2015 International Green Interior Awards. Dennis mixed ground avocado seeds with a biodegradable resin to form the material used to make her fruit bowls. “I wanted to show that the things we throw away can be repurposed into something useful and beautiful,” she says. # 36 /

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


CREATE the latest

‘on trend’ look

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Our new collection of light fittings allows you to add a touch of retro to create the ‘on trend’ look, in any room of your home. The affordable Brilliant lighting range is available from Bunnings Warehouse. Start creating your new look at brilliantlighting.com.au *floor lamp available at independent lighting stores.


NEW COLOUR COLLECTION 15 AVAILABLE NOW


Styling by Kate Nixon. Stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistants Sarah Maloney, Ben Woodbury, Mia Lazareff, Harriet Webb, Roberta Gallo, Julieanne Henry, Nick Bryan-Brown, Nicola Cooper. Photograph by John Paul Urizar. Artworks by Joshua Yeldham (over mantel), Peter McConchie (right, top) and Sara Morowetz (right, bottom).

Symmetry and sensibility... decorating for keeps

For product details, turn to page 46.

DECORATING

INSPIR ATION / MASTERCL ASS / TRENDS


H&G DE C O R AT I N G

FOREVER MODERN With clean lines and tried and true materials as the foundation, a little pattern and colour goes a long way. S T Y L I N G KATE N I XON / P HO T O G R A P H Y JOHN PAUL URIZAR


COOL & COLLECTED Harness the industrial style of concrete, steel and timber for a gallery-worthy living space.

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT ErgoFocus steel fireplace, $12,000, Oblica. HK Living leather pouf, $385, Luumo Design. The French Connection Replik Industrial Concrete wallpaper in Steel Grey, $99/10m roll, Wall Candy Wallpaper. ARTWORKS ON WALL clockwise from top left Black Lines by Jasmin Zara (77x77cm), $550, The Design Hunter. Samba Herringbone abaca wall panel, $1445, Globe West. 45-15 Yellow on Red by Karl Wiebke (128x99cm), $25,000, Liverpool Street Gallery. The Levels by Kristina Krogh (50x70cm), $139 (unframed), Luumo Design. Sublet by Kathryn Dolby (23x30cm), $495, Small Spaces. Giraffes by Conway Ginger (15x15cm), $180 (framed), and Bush Medicine Leaves by Annie Nelson Nungala (83x44cm), $400, both The Gallery Shop. Topshelf Rustic MDF and ash-veneer shelf (90cm), $55, Shelvingshop. ON SHELF from left Iwantja Arts clap sticks, $70/pair, The Gallery Shop. Wooden Nias Necklace sculpture, $280, Contents International Design. Leather and metal tealight holder, $24, Black Pebble Design. Small Black Bird framed artwork by Conway Ginger (17x12cm), $185, The Gallery Shop. Crassula plants, $25/each, in carved grinder, $250, all LuMu Interiors. Tjanpi basket by Janet Inyika, $89, Small Spaces. Shellinspired bronze bowl, $195, Contents International Design. Black Horizon ceramic bottles by Keiko Matsui, $150/each, Small Spaces. Cone oak and metal floor lamp, $1289, BoConcept. Volley metal and wood rocker, $1450, with Maharam Paver seat cushion, $360, Tait. Nelly Patterson wool-cotton cushion cover, $65, The Gallery Shop. Alchemy concrete side table, $375, Oishi Furniture & Homewares. See Concept reading glasses, $50, Until. Linear Gold stoneware coasters, $59/set of four, West Elm. Studio Arjoh porcelain sip cup, $32, Luumo Design. Vittoria three-seater sofa, $3915, and linen slipcover, $1975, Globe West. Mudcloth throw, $210, The Design Hunter. Obi bamboo silk-cotton rug (2x3m), $1790, Citta Design. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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Temple carved acaciawood panel (used as bedhead), $1249, Papaya. ON BED from rear Linen pillowcase in Black, $80/pair, European pillowcase in Sage, $95/pair, standard pillowcase and queen-size flat sheet in White, $380/sheet set, and queen-size linen quilt cover set in Sage, $335, all Cultiver. Two-tone cotton cushions, $45/each, Loft Furniture. Juliette linen blanket, $139, Papaya. Harry oak stools, $1010 (high) and $940 (low), Spence & Lyda. Mootwingee – Red Dirt Country Series (top), $2200, and Soaring Above – Red Dirt Country Series by Susan Sheridan, $2000, Wagner Art Gallery. Lean brass wall light, $1325, Great Dane. Hammer suar stool, $517, Satara. ON STOOL Indian brass chapati dish, $85, LuMu Interiors. Circle marble and brass clock, $229, BoConcept. Copenhagen metal pendant light, $725, Great Dane. Hugo teak bedside table, $825, Satara. Bird’s nest fern, $49, and vintage basket with handles, $145, LuMu Interiors. Grey & White Stripe goat hair kilim (2.3x1.8m), $990, Atolyia. Alby wool-nylon floor cushion, $709, Jardan. Texline Essence vinyl flooring in Walnut Clear, $50/m2 (installed), Gerflor. Wall painted Porter’s Low Sheen Acrylic in Buckskin, $46/L, Porter’s Paints. OPPOSITE H&H Collection Whisk wire-wrapped banana leaf fibre pendant lights, from $575/each, Project 82. ISSY by Zuster and Reece wall mirrors, $1268/each, Zuster. Metropolis brass wall mixer sets, $889/each, Astra Walker. Laufen Livingsquare 360 SaphirKeramik counter basins, $912/each, Reece. ISSY by Zuster and Reece Z1 Ballerina American oak vanity units, $3550/each, Zuster. ON VANITIES Marble cleat boxes, $49/each, West Elm. Horn cup, $34, and leather dishes, $35/each, all The Design Hunter. Menu Norm steel and plastic toothbrush holder, $95, Top3 by Design. Truva cotton hand towels, $29/each, Atolyia. Tribal basket (left), $79, and Paper Twine basket, $64, Black Pebble Design. IN BASKETS Alacati cotton Turkish towels, $79/each, Atolyia. Odemis terracotta urn, $1100, LuMu Interiors. Faux yucca, $110, Florabelle. Sahara Weave hemp mats (50x140cm), $175/each, Armadillo&Co. Metropolis brass robe hook, $88, Astra Walker. Truva cotton bathmat (used as towel), $59, Atolyia. LID laundry basket, $239, BoConcept. Pia Wallen wool slippers, $125, Top3 by Design. Texline Essence vinyl flooring in Borie Nature, $49/m2 (installed), Gerflor. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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PERFECT IMPERFECT Symmetry serves to soothe the eye. Create some tension with unexpected lighting and a patinated pot.


‘Give an outdoor space the indoor treatment. Use pendant lights, soft cushions and texture to build a cosy setting.’ Kate Nixon, stylist Trojan iron coffee table with parquet top, $2420, Boyd Blue. ON COFFEE TABLE Naef Bauhaus wooden chess set, $790, Top3 by Design. HK Living ceramic espresso cups, $59/set of six, Luumo Design. Safari cane and steel armchairs, $690/each, MCM House. Bogolon mudcloth cushions (on armchairs), $125/each, LuMu Interiors. Raphael concrete stool, $195, Papaya. Pyrmont elm bench seat, from $1295, Urban Couture. Farin Tufted Squab cotton cushions, $40/each, Citta Design. Pyrmont elm dining table, from $2795, Urban Couture. Malawi water-reed armchair, $480, Orient House. Design Kiosk Stevie timber-veneer dining chairs in Sage Green, $455/each, Project 82. ON TABLE from left Vintage copper planter, $800, LuMu Interiors. Fox & Ramona concrete bowl, $65, Tait. Bastille iron pendant lights, $400/each, Boyd Blue. Odemis terracotta urn, $1100, LuMu Interiors. Faux monstera foliage, $7/stem, Albi Imports. Polaris teak three-seater sofa with Sunbrella upholstery, from $4180, Satara. Old School Cool Wool wool blanket, $159, Atolyia.

FROM PAGE 41 CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT Connor iron side table with burnt-oak veneer top, $549, Me & Mo Homewares. Canvas notebook, $30, Cult. Kontor pen, $20, Kikki.K. Vide Poche by Henry Wilson bronze tray, $200, Small Spaces. Kathryn armchair with linen-cotton upholstery, $1450, Orson & Blake. Bandhini Homewear Design Velvet cushion, $99, and Phulkari cotton-viscose cushion, $99, Project 82. Avalon Staggered Tasmanian oak bookcases, $1490/each, Custom Designs Furniture. ON LEFT BOOKCASE from top Chinese porcelain pot, $360, MCM House. Vintage beaded box, $330, LuMu Interiors. Klong Svante brass water jug, $138, Funkis. Lever-arch folders, $13/each, Kikki.K. Chevron basket, $40, Oz Design Furniture. Agni Kyoto Owl limited-edition print by Joshua Yeldham (100x80cm), $4000 (framed), Arthouse Gallery. ON MANTEL from left Papier-mâché hippo, $34, Loft Furniture. Klong Constella brass candleholder, $160, Funkis. Studio Twocan concrete vessels, $85/each, Jardan. York timber mantel, $795, and Schots Nottage cast-iron fireplace, $995, Heritage Building Centre. ON RIGHT BOOKCASE from top Chinese porcelain pots, $360/each, MCM House. Chevron basket, as before. Coconut-inlay boxes, $50 (small), $70 (medium) and $200 (large), The Design Hunter. Folders, as before. Normann

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Copenhagen Agnes porcelain vases, $135/ each, Luumo Design. Geneva M digital radio, $999, Top3 by Design. Fungia coral on stand, $110, LuMu Interiors. Didde porcelain vase, $99, BoConcept. Moomin by Kimie Kitamura sculpture, $125, Small Spaces. Ligne Roset Bloom sculpted-foam ceiling light, $395, Domo. Stingray Hunter framed print by Peter McConchie (98x72cm), $850, Jardan. Quanta 2012 by Sara Morowetz framed artwork (65x85cm), $1350, Small Spaces. String metal and string basket, $115, BoConcept. ClassiCon Pegasus powder-coated steel desk with walnut and leather top, $9620, Anibou. ON DESK Brass lassi cup, $45, The Design Hunter. Phi gold-plated scissors, $63, Cult. Vide Poche by Henry Wilson bronze tray, $375, Small Spaces. Half Moon marble desk lamp with metal shade, $299, West Elm. Clover chair with polyester upholstery, $405, Globe West. Dhoku wool kilim (2.6x3.4m), $2450, Koskela. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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H&G DE C O R AT I N G

SPACE MISSION Use low-line furniture and a simple palette to free up visual space in a compact courtyard.


H&G DE C O R AT I N G

Antique French wooden doors with iron scrollwork, $2000/pair, Imperfect Perfections. Rowan Black iron chandelier, $1395, James Said. Yandil Granite Country artwork by Bec Juniper, $11,000, Wagner Art Gallery. Carved timber triple coat hook, $35, Loft Furniture. Knowledge by Lisa Waup mixed-media knowledge bag, $2950, Baluk Arts. The French Connection Replik Moroccan Tiles wallpaper, $99/10m roll, Wall Candy Wallpaper. Vaughan elm console, $1650, MCM House. ON CONSOLE from left Babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tears in iron dulchi pot, $265, and stone Sumba statue, $165, LuMu Interiors. Wedding glass vase, $85, BoConcept. Fox & Ramona concrete candleholders, $22/set of two, Tait. B239L nickel and wood table lamp with poly-cotton shade, $616, Bloomingdales Lighting. Rio square woven basket, $220, Globe West. Alchemy concrete side table, $375, Oishi Furniture & Homewares. Faux areca palm (includes pot), $110, Florabelle. Hodde polypropylene runner (200x80cm), $50, Ikea. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.

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MASTERCLASS #13

BATHROOMS A well-designed bathroom will deliver daily pleasure. Follow Darren Palmer’s guide to create a space that looks good and works wonders.

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he bathroom is one of the home’s hardest-working spaces, and increasingly a place for relaxation and retreat. So how do you create a bathroom that is ultra-functional and beautiful to boot? Lighting When you’re shaving or applying make-up, lighting should be even and come from the front. This can restrict your design choices, however, since you’ll have to either customise lighting into face-level storage or buy a mirror with lighting built in. The next best option is to position lighting over the tap, making sure the same amount of light hits both sides of your face – either one light right above the tap, or a pair of lights either side of the mirror, an equal distance apart. This is your best opportunity for even light: with the light coming from the front, and reflecting off the mirror itself, you will have less shadowing on your face. Think about the position of lighting in the ceiling, considering the other areas you need to highlight, such as the toilet, a feature wall or bath as a whole, so that the reflected ceiling plane looks good as well as being functional. Having one downlight above the bath might seem like a great idea, but staring up at it when in the bath will soon put paid to relaxation. Storage There are three types of bathroom storage: face-level storage, under-bench storage and what I call ‘opportunistic’ storage. Face-level storage is about functionality and convenience. Some may not find a mirrored cabinet over the vanity aesthetically pleasing, but the convenience of having oftused products to hand is invaluable. You can buy perfectly good-looking mirrored shaving cabinets online or in stores that simply slot into a cavity wall. Buying off-therack saves on design and construction of custom cabinetry, but bespoke joinery solutions will give you optimum storage results. Under-bench storage is a given. If possible, opt for large drawers rather than cupboards. Drawers allow you to pack every spot tightly while still being able to access everything easily. Opportunistic storage depends on your bathroom’s layout. In previous homes, I’ve had storage included behind the toilet so the toilet brushes and paper are out of sight. In another instance, a cupboard above the pan served the same purpose. Your bathroom will have its


H&G D E C O R AT I N G

ON THE TILES

✚ TO SEE DARREN PALMER’S Photography by John Paul Urizar (this page top), Shannon McGrath/bauersyndication. com.au (this page bottom), Brooke Holme/bauersyndication.com.au (opposite).

VIDEO ABOUT BATHROOM DESIGN go to www.homestolove.

com.au/houseandgarden

own nooks, crannies and voids that you can take advantage of to squeeze extra amenity from your room. Bench space While in planning mode, focus on how you use your bathroom. You will notice things that you need, on a functional level. If you blow-dry your hair, think about where the dryer will rest if you need to put it down during use. Think about where the children’s bath toys might go. Or the steps in your daily beauty routine. When it comes to bench space, you can never have enough. Fittings and fixtures There is no one right choice for style, finish or shape when it comes to fixtures and fittings in your bathroom; some spaces call for traditional options, others for ultra-contemporary and there are any number of options in between. Whether the accessories you like are a powder-coated colour or metallic with a polished or brushed finish, it’s important to choose models that suit your home’s architecture and interior style. Make sure the same shapes and finishes apply to all of the fittings, such as taps, towel rails and toilet roll holders. Pay attention to whether accessories have a square or round profile, if your taps are bright and shiny or dull, brushed or matt. There are few things simpler to get right and having mismatching tapware and accessories is a # real bathroom no-no.

Buying tiles can be difficult simply because of the sheer volume of choice. Here are a few quick pointers: Natural stone There’s nothing quite like the patterning, colour and textural qualities of natural stone to create a sense of luxury. Be aware that stone must be sealed before use and resealed every two years or so to keep it in tiptop condition. Acidic substances can etch the surface of stone so it can be problematic in bathrooms, especially around toilets. Buffing and resealing can however repair any damage caused by etching. Porcelain is a type of ceramic. It is non-porous and hardwearing, but also difficult to cut so it can be somewhat expensive. Rectified means ‘with a sharp edge’. Rectified tiles can be prone to chipping, which can increase wastage and therefore cost. On the other hand, these tiles look crisp and modern, so if you love them, go for it. Glazed means that the pigment is coated on the face of the tile only. Full-bodied means the colour goes all the way through the tile. So should the tile get chipped, the colour will remain consistent even though the surface has been compromised.

TILES from top La Chic glazed porcelain tiles (200x200mm), $185/m2, Di Lorenzo Tiles. Soho Lantern porcelain tiles (52x52mm), $109/m2, Perini Tiles. Folio Manhattan rectified ceramic tiles (300x600mm), from $48/ each, Beaumont Tiles. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.


AN INDUSTRIAL

EVOLUTION IN

LIGHTING THAT’S BRILLIANT!

Our industrial inspired collection can either be fixed to a ceiling batten or used as a pendant, allowing you to create a timeless look in any room in your home. The affordable Brilliant lighting range is available from Bunnings Warehouse. Start creating your new look at brilliantlighting.com.au *floor lamp available at specialist lighting stores.


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TRENDS

WORLD VIEW Ground your home with a collection of pieces of a handmade nature. Woven, wrought or hewn from natural materials, this earthy offering owes much to a global community of makers.

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1 / Nomad Collection assorted textiles, POA, Mokum; www.jamesdunloptextiles.com. 2 / Dayo cotton-blend cushion cover, $60, Citta Design; www.cittadesign.com. 3 / Phoenix Feather pen in Speckled, $41, Jot It Down; www.jotitdown.co. 4 / Black timber bowl on stand, $210, St Barts; st-barts.com.au. 5 / Tulip timber vases with removable lids, $264/set of three, Satara; www.satara.com.au. 6 / Batongo ilala-palm basket (57x63cm), $385, Boyd Blue; www.boydblue.com. 7 / Monet Neutral #34 wool rug (2.2x1.8m), $1440, Pampa; www.pampa.com.au. 8 / Malawi bamboo and water reed chair, $550, Eco Chic; www.ecochic.com.au. 9 / Poco Rochas leather pouche in Tan/Piton, about $249, Art Hide; www.arthide.co. 10 / Bamileke feather headdress (50cm diameter), $375, Safari Fusion; www.safarifusion.com.au. #


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TRENDS

LIME LIGHT

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BEST BUY $23

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1 / Vintage mid-century armchairs with wool upholstery in Chartreuse, $5500/pair, Fenton & Fenton; 2 / Stelton 1L ABS plastic vacuum jug in Lime, $130, Top3 By Design; www.top3.com.au. 3 / Koziol Cry $36/set of four, Optoco; www.optocoonline.com. 4 / Crane cotton cushion with fibre insert (50x50cm), $82, Linen & Moore; www.linen moore.com.au. 5 / Don’t Leave Me powder-coated steel side table in Yellow, $388, Hay; www.hayshop.com.au. 6 / Margo Malaysian oak armchair with Delaine polyester upholstery in Olive, $599, Dare Gallery; www.daregallery.com.au. 7 / Colour Cloth cotton multipurpose household cloths in Yellow, $23/set of two, Hay. 8 / Mad Rabbit Kicking Tiger Carter felt backpack in Olive Green/Coffee, $125, Top3 by Design. 9 / Joseph Joseph Orb porcelain mortar and pestle with soft-grip handle, $50, The Design Gift Shop; www.thedesigngiftshop.com. #

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DISCOVER THE SLEEK EDGE OF CO N C E R T O

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SHOWER BASE $206

SINK MIXER $167

GLASS SHELF $59.92

Create your dream bathroom for a stunning price with CONCERTO, one of seven unique and affordable styles from Mondella.

TOILET ROLL HOLDER $35.80

bunnings.com.au


PRETTY SMART

ARCHITECT, PHILIP M DINGEMANSE chose COLORBOND® steel in the colour MONUMENT® to clad this revolutionary home in St Leonards, Tasmania saying “…The vertical lines contrast with the stretched linearity of the building across the site, with the COLORBOND® steel uniting its continuous form…and the ventilated wall design improves condensation management, which is good practice in the Tasmanian climate”. Congratulations to #COLORBONDbyDesign Winner, PHILIP M DINGEMANSE. His design has shown us that the beauty of COLORBOND® steel is more than skin deep.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT COLORBOND® STEEL CALL 1800 702 764. COLORBOND®, MONUMENT®, BlueScope and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2016 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved. Photography: Luke Hesketh. AHG33162


NEW VISION Boundaries are pegged and competition entries have been lodged. Our plans to build an exciting new family home are underway!

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bare block of land at the moment, the My Ideal House site is nonetheless a place that’s buzzing with possibilities. Located at Crest by Mirvac, a master-planned community emerging at Gledswood Hills in Sydney’s south-west, our 416m2 site will soon be a hive of activity. Next month, we’ll share the short-listed home designs in the running for a $25,000 competition prize. With innovation, flexibility, affordability and sustainability at its heart, the My Ideal House project aims to create a blueprint > for Australian family homes of the future.

‘With My Ideal House we have the opportunity to shine a light on good design and come up with a family home that’s perfect for our own context.’ NSW Minister for Planning, Rob Stokes

An aerial view of ‘our block’, at Crest by Mirvac, Gledswood Hills, NSW. LEFT The Honorable Rob Stokes officially launches the My Ideal House competition in February.

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LIVEABLE HOMES

ALL ABOUT EASE

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great home is a pleasure to spend time in. Walk in the door and you are aware of well-ordered rooms that feel generous, are endowed with natural light and have an easy, logical flow. Put simply, it looks and feels good. Everything just works. “This is the essence of liveability,” says Peter Cotton, national practice director, Mirvac Design. “That your home and the spaces around it have everything your family needs to live comfortably and well.” From these principles of practicality and comfort, liveability extends out to take in ‘cradle to grave’ design, which centres on making a dwelling useable by the greatest number of people, to the greatest extent possible, with minimal adaptation or renovation. “Inclusion and eco-friendliness are what it’s all about,” says Melissa Wittig of Healthy Interiors. “Children are easily accommodated; so are older family members and everyone in between. A well-designed, liveable home is accessible and easily adaptable. It’s not too big or too small; it’s constructed from quality materials and embraces passive-design principles so running costs are kept to a minimum now and in years to come.” Liveability is a prime motivator of H&G’s My Ideal House competition. The initiative, in conjunction with project partner Mirvac, explores the possibilities for contemporary home design to encourage a better way of living. “The winning design will be eminently liveable,” says H&G editor in chief Lisa Green. “The intention is to come up with a blueprint for an Australian family home that works beautifully now and can adapt to a household’s changing needs.” When home design misses the mark, you soon know about it, says Peter Cotton. “The niggling

irritations and frustrations quickly become apparent. It’s the inconvenience of having to squeeze past someone in the hallway, or jostle for bench space in the kitchen when cooking. They may seem like small things, but they affect your quality of life.” It’s important to consider bigger issues, too. Do you feel hemmed in by low ceilings, poor storage options or neighbours looking into your backyard? If you broke a leg and needed crutches, would you be able to use your bathroom? A spotlight on liveability at the design stage can prevent these problems – and numerous others – from arising. “It doesn’t necessarily add anything to your costs to make a home more liveable,” says Sophie Pickett-Heaps, the chair of Livable Housing Australia (LHA). LHA is a not-for-profit property industry group that has devised a set of guidelines to help architects and building designers make new homes more accommodating for all generations. The guidelines call for safe, continuous and level passage from the street or driveway into your home; wide internal doors and corridors to allow unimpeded movement through the home; and in bathrooms, easy access to a shower (a level floor). And while efficiencies are an important element of liveability, so is the love invested in a home that’s well designed. “A home that’s a delight to live in will be well cared for, with respect paid to the embedded energy that’s gone into its construction,” says Sydney architect Caroline Pidcock. “Such a home is comfortable year-round, offers a meaningful connection to the garden and neighbourhood, and brings joy every day. Above all, a liveable home enables a lifestyle that is low impact but rewarding.” >

‘Flexible, well-considered design reduces the need for high-impact, wasteful renovations, while a house that’s energy- and waterefficient keeps its footprint minimal long after you’ve moved in.’ Caroline Pidcock, architect

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Text by Sarah Pickette. Photograph by Derek Swalwell/bauersyndication.com.au.

It stands to reason that successful home design should embrace ‘liveability’. It’s essential to a happy home.


TAKE OUR LIVEABILITY TEST How many of Livable Housing Australia’s guidelines does your home meet?

✚ There is at least one step-free entrance into your home.

✚ Light switches and power points are easy for everyone to reach.

✚ The windowsills are at a height that enables you to see outdoors from either a sitting or standing position. ✚ There is a step-free path from the street or parking area to the house. ✚ Internal doors open enough to allow unimpeded movement. ✚ The kitchen has been designed to support ease of movement and adaptation. ✚ Handles and hardware on doors and taps are easy to use. ✚ There is a space on the ground floor that can be used as a bedroom. ✚ The bathroom is designed for easy access and the shower is accessible to everyone. ✚ Floorcoverings are slip-resistant and unlikely to cause trips. www.livablehousing australia.org.au.

✚ READ ABOUT THE

JUDGES ONLINE AT

www.myidealhouse.com.au


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PLACE RELATIONS NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH Demographer Bernard Salt shares his thoughts on the changing notion of community: “Up until the 1980s, there was a great sense of community in suburbia. This was forged mainly by the women who spent their days there, raising children, and who knew their neighbours. That doesn’t happen as much now. It’s not uncommon for the house to sit empty for 12 hours while everyone is at work. Today, community doesn’t necessarily refer to a physical neighbourhood. The people you regard as your community you’re more likely to know through your interests, from playdates and activities like cricket and ballet, or your workplace. Social media has also changed the way we perceive community; for some of us, it is possible to satisfy the need for connection online. Because our sense of community doesn’t extend out from the home any more you could argue that there isn’t the need for our houses to be as open to the street. In the future we might live in homes that function like a tortoise shell: they would appear as a concrete fortress with a roller door; the 4WD goes in, the doors roll down and life happens behind those walls. Picture-perfect Edwardian homes and Victorian terraces were all about showcasing wealth. Today we worry about being robbed, so we display our wealth inside our homes. The gleaming benchtops and gooseneck taps are status symbols that say ‘Look how successful we are’. That’s another reason we need to feel we’re part of a community: what’s the point of being well-to-do if no one can see your wealth?”

Engaging with the community around you is the key to feeling truly ‘at home’ where you live.

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umans have a fundamental need to enjoy an affinity with the people and places around them. And we expect our streets, neighbourhoods and towns to deliver. “Connection is what we’re all looking for,” says Dr Hazel Easthope, senior research fellow at UNSW Australia’s City Futures Research Centre. “Everyone wants to have a sense of home and to feel like they belong in their community.” The environment you live in can influence the way you feel about yourself and whether or not you’re comfortable and happy, says Dr Easthope, and that very much underpins your wellbeing. “It’s not just about saying ‘Hi ’ to your neighbour,” she says. “It’s about how saying hello to your neighbour makes you feel. Your sense of community develops from the way you experience places, even if that experience of place is only felt at a subconscious level.” Connection to the community around you can be a source of great personal happiness, says Jo Gillies, architect and director of Sydney firm Archisoul Architects. “It’s been proven over and over that the quality of these relationships can determine how much joy your surrounds spark, and they can boost your wellbeing and longevity.” Community is also a key part of the liveability equation: enjoyment of your home and its surrounds comes naturally when you feel you ‘fit in’ where you live. Through its design a house can help facilitate good connections with the people around you, says Gillies. “A sense of community is forged when your home feels integrated into the street and neighbourhood, and you’re close to green spaces, schools and shops.” Enabling this sense of belonging is especially important when devising new, master-planned communities, says Mirvac Design’s Peter Cotton.

“We put a huge amount of thought into where to place the shops and amenities, where the parks will be. Homeowners should be able to comfortably walk from their dwelling to their nearest piece of open space.” Liveability extends far beyond the walls of your house and out into your neighbourhood, he says. “It’s fostered in houses that are open to the street, through having spaces where you can bump into your neighbours and where you can see your neighbours walking past.” One of the 10 guiding principles behind the One Planet Living sustainability initiative, supported by Mirvac, is a tenet on ‘culture and community’. This promotes the involvement of people in shaping their community and creating a new culture of sustainability. “The more people feel an ownership of their community spaces, the better,” says Cotton. “Meaningful social interaction occurs, and that’s what everyone wants.”

A survey of H&G readers found that 55% regarded neighbourhood preference as the most important factor when deciding where to build or buy a house. It out-rated land size (49%) and proximity to public transport (39%).


The power game Battery storage is set to revolutionise the way we run our homes, writes Harvey Grennan. Text by Sarah Pickette (opposite). Photograph from Alamy (trees), Tony Scott/bauersyndication.com.au (bike).

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COMPETITION UPDATE

Entries in the My Ideal House design competition presented by Australian House & Garden and Mirvac closed on March 6. Those who make the shortlist will be notified on or before March 11, with final judging taking place in early April. The expert panel includes H&G editor in chief, Lisa Green; national practice director, Mirvac Design, Peter Cotton; KPMG demographer, Bernard Salt; architect, UNSW academic and sustainability expert, Steve King; principal of Tribe Studio Architects, Hannah Tribe; and architecture design historian and lecturer at UNSW Australia, Judith O’Callaghan. Learn more about our judges and the competition at www.myidealhouse.com.au.

he emergence of lithium-ion batteries is a game-changer for householders wanting to save on power costs. Until recently, it has not been possible to economically store power produced during the day for night-time and rainy days. The scaling down and abolition by state governments of ‘feed-in tariffs’ – money paid to householders who feed their excess solar power back into the electricity grid – had made solar panels less economically attractive. Battery storage has put them back in the picture. So, can the average householder exist off-grid? Caroline and Arthur Jefford of Bowral in the NSW Southern Highlands have just spent $22,000 on solar PV panels and batteries. They will save $2000 a year on power bills, which means they will pay for the system in 11 years and enjoy mostly free power thereafter. If they had added a few more panels and a small diesel generator they could have gone off-grid and become entirely immune from blackouts and price gouging by power companies. Australians are already the most enthusiastic adopters of solar power in the world. Now, with arrival of economical and effective battery storage, it’s easier than ever before to generate electricity independent of power companies. Power providers have seen the writing on the wall and are beginning to offer battery storage themselves. Investment bank Morgan Stanley has forecast that 2.4 million homes could be using battery storage within 10 years. The Climate Council goes further, predicting half of all Australian households will adopt solar systems with battery storage. A recent government study predicts that by 2020 the cost of home batteries will fall dramatically – by 40 to 60 per cent – as has already happened with the cost of solar panels. These predictions make the solar/battery storage scenario a compelling one indeed and there are several > players entering the market.

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H&G DE S I G N <

The following partners are supporting this exciting initiative:

PLATINUM SPONSORS:

This year the Tesla Powerwall battery will come onto the market with the full weight of Tesla’s marketing power and the promise of reduced costs. A leader in the electric-car market, Tesla sold an incredible $800 million worth of the groundbreaking Powerwall in a week – before the manufacturing facility was even built. Other forms of battery technology are in development too. Graphene and nanoflow technology (the latter an Australian invention) may even, in time, outdo lithium-ion batteries. But solar is the tip of the iceberg if you want to save on heating, cooling and hot-water costs. Geothermal heat-pump technology has also become more cost-effective for domestic use in the past couple of years. The US Environmental Protection Agency says geothermal heat-pumps can deliver “the most energy efficient, environmentally clean and cost-effective space conditioning system available”. Solar and geothermal heat-pump systems work well together; solar produces power for lighting and

appliances, geothermal heat-pumps cover heating and cooling. Geothermal heat-pump technology manipulates the temperature difference in the air above and below ground and transfers heat to or from the ground. Pipes are inserted in the ground vertically, in a horizontal grid, or in concrete footings. Temperature-controlled air is delivered via the heat pump, through ducting, radiators or in-slab elements. Air-source heat-pump systems work on the difference in indoor and outdoor air temperature, but are not quite as efficient. Another Jefford, son Richard, is at the forefront of this technology through his company, Highlands GeoExchange. “Geothermal or geoexchange costs about 70-per-cent less to run than natural gas,” he says. “And it is more comfortable because of the lower-velocity airflow in a ducted system.” Richard puts the cost of installing both solar PV panels and geoexchange space heating for an average home at $30,000$70,000, with savings on power paying off the # system in seven to 10 years.

‘Geothermal or geoexchange costs about 70-per-cent less to run than natural gas.’ Richard Jefford, Highlands GeoExchange

MAKING THE SWITCH

GOLD SPONSORS:

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Publisher Kylie Ahern decided to go ‘off-grid’ while renovating her tiny worker’s cottage in Sydney’s inner-west suburb of Newtown. “Like many Australians I want to do more to reduce my impact on the planet and save resources. There’s no need to renovate to take your house off-grid. It just happens that I am doing both at once,” she says. And by off-grid she really does mean off-grid: no mains power or gas, no water or sewerage connections. Electricity will come from solar panels with battery storage ($29,000) and hot water from an air-source heat pump ($3500). Quality ceiling and wall insulation ($3000) means no air-conditioning or heating will be required. Water will come from the sky into a 5000L underground

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

tank ($10,000, pictured); sewage will be treated by an aerated waste-water treatment system ($7500) later in the project. A grey-water system ($1900) will take care of flushing the toilet and watering the garden using dual plumbing pipelines (an extra $1000) – one potable pipe for drinking, cooking, showers, hot water; another non-potable pipe for flushing toilets, clothes washing and garden. Kylie expects to save $1500 a year on electricity, gas and water bills in addition to saving 90,000L of dam water, 345kg of food from landfill by composting and 97,000L of stormwater polluting the harbour and ocean. Kylie is being guided by sustainability expert Michael Mobbs, who has made his own

inner-Sydney home self-sufficient. “You can take your first step to going off-grid by simply buying efficient appliances when you replace old ones, investing in a rainwater tank or replacing your hot-water system with an efficient model,” he says. Kylie blogs at kylieoffgrid.com.au.


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Aust. residents 18+ only. Max 1 entry per person. Ends 5pm AEDT 15/4/16. Keep receipt and product barcode. The Paint in 8 Project must take place at a residential premises owned by the entrant. Full terms and conditions and location of privacy notice visit http://www.taubmans.com.au/promotion-terms-and-conditions, incl. entry req.’s. The promoter is PPG Industries Australia Pty Limited ABN 82055500939,


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ALI McNABNEY-STEVENS Artist M Y F AV O U R I T E T H I N G S Mirror From Montreux in Prahran, my all-time fave shop.

Painting One of my works, called

Produced by Christina Gee. Text by Julia Green. Photograph by Armelle Habib.

Lupins. The flowers remind me of my grandmother’s house in Northern Ireland. Chair Opulent yet understated, I often wonder where it lived in a previous life. I found it at Montreux. Rug This gorgeous Boucherouite rug is from Loom Rugs. Teacup A piece of Carlton Ware I found at Camberwell Market. Shoes I love brogues. I have them in a number of colours but these pink ones from Zara are the best.

Artist Ali McNabney-Stevens lives and b re a t hes bo l d c o l our – and her p assion is f re el y express ed i n the vibrant, tex tural and wo n d er f u l l y ec l ec tic Melbourne hom e she share s wi t h her hu s ba n d Jay, their children Molly, Louis a n d C ha r l es, a n d Teddy, a rather handsom e cockerpoo. To see more of her work, go to www. a l i mc n a bn eystevens.com . >

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WO R K / L I F E BA L A N CE

A

s the heart of the home, the kitchen is the place where households gravitate to eat, socialise and, increasingly, to work. So it’s timely that Australian industrial designer Charles Wilson (inset) has developed the versatile Carafe table, a dining table that responds beautifully to the needs of modern living. “In my apartment, the dining table is the most-used piece of furniture,” says Wilson. “A good dining table should be able to seamlessly segue from functional work area to elegant entertaining surface and back again.” The perfectly proportioned table features cantilevered shelves at either end and a faceted drawer: just the thing for stashing electronic devices, homework, reading material and stationery when it’s time to dine. Discreet cut-outs for cables in the base of the drawer keep you connected so you can pick up where you left off after dinner. Available in white oak, cherry wood (left) or black-stained ash (above). From $5360 (1340x860cm).

I love what chef René Redzepi and Noma stand for. René’s brief for Noma Australia was that the design should be uniquely Australian. It should incorporate the use of fire in the cooking and focus on coastal regions. From a design perspective, we distilled this into simply ‘Land and Water’. The colours speak of the meeting point between land and water: earth tones and dark timbers, light-golden curtains

and flecks of green to signify new growth. In a restaurant, you first experience the space on a macro scale – things such as light and architectural forms – and then at a very personal level when you’re seated at the table. With a degustation, you can be sitting at the table for up to four hours, so the detail is vital. The experience all comes down to the senses – tactility, smell, acoustics, ergonomics and aesthetics. Foolscap Studio; (03) 9012 6637 or foolscapstudio.com.au. >

Living Edge; 1300 132 154 or www.livingedge.com.au.

D ES I G N E VO LU T I O N

Liebherr fridge

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1954

1966

1987

The fridge company is founded by Hans Liebherr in Germany.

The FrostSafe system improves frozen food storage.

NoFrost technology eliminates the need to defrost fridges.

Text by Christina Gee (Charles Wilson) & Georgia Madden (Adele Winteridge). Photography by Maree Homer (Charles Wilson) & LendLease (Noma Australia).

TA S T E O F H O M E Interior designer Adele Winteridge of Melbourne’s Foolscap Studio gave pop-up restaurant Noma Australia (pictured below) a local flavour.


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H&G I N S I DE R

Double duty beauty

S E AT S E N SAT I O N A THREE-SEATER SOFA BY DAY, THE FELIX STUDIO BED CONVERTS TO A COMFY BED AT THE TOUCH OF A BUTTON – IDEAL FOR ROOMS THAT NEED TO DO DOUBLE DUTY. AVAILABLE IN A WIDE CHOICE OF FABRICS AND LEATHERS, FROM $5460. WWW.KINGLIVING.COM.AU.

MEET THE MAKER

All sorts of pretty Eve Simmons, the heart and hands behind Liquorice Moon Studios ceramics, talks us through her creative process.

How did you get started working with ceramics? I began exploring working with clay two years ago while a stay-at-home mum. I was instantly hooked. There’s something about creating with clay that calms the mind. How would you describe your style? It’s quite eclectic and earthy. I’m not an orderly person and simplicity is a challenge for me, so I try to work with the ‘organic beachie boho’ vibe. What is your creative process like? Organic and unplanned.

I often come up with new ideas by accident, experimentation, or when something goes ‘wrong’ in the kiln (my kids and I call these happy accidents). I studied fashion design after high school, so that taught me to focus on creating a collection of pieces. How do you stay inspired? I find inspiration comes quite easily. I think if you love what you do, the ideas just flow. I’m very driven to learn new things so I put a lot of energy into becoming better at what I do. I also surround myself with beautiful collected objects; things with a story. liquoricemoonstudios.etsy.com.

S U R FAC E PA R A DI S E Featuring rich warm-grey veins and darker, more delicate background veins drifting over a soft white surface, Caesarstone’s new Statuario Maximus combines the aesthetic power of marble with the practicality of a stone composite. $1200/m installed. www.caesarstone.com.au. >

1996

2006

2009

2015

Liebherr’s BioFresh technology extends the life of fresh produce.

A refrigerator with five temperature zones is released.

The new SmartSteel finish reduces the visibility of fingerprints.

The dark good looks of BlackSteel hits the market.

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HANGING FOR... Melbourne brand Porcelain Bear has reinterpreted its I-O-N pendant lights as wall sconces, with round, square and arched shapes influenced by the windows in Play School. Priced from $520-$650. www. porcelainbear.com.

Euro flash Ciao bella! Fanuli will open the first Australasian showroom for the elegant Flexform Mood collection this month, with the Italian brand’s team on hand to oversee the fit-out. www.fanuli.com.au. First look Sydney’s Boffi showroom has just installed a high-end, steel-framed modular kitchen system designed by Spanish creative supremo, Patricia Urquiola (pictured below). Salinas was inspired by Urquiola’s grandfather’s kitchen – complete with herbs on the sill. The modules are finished in a mixture of metallics such as zinc, copper, brass and aluminium and can be mixed with glass, lacquers and textured concrete. “I love the patchwork of materials,” says Edwina Withers, director of the showroom. “It allows you to create your own kitchen composition.” www.boffistudio.com.au.

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H I G H ST Y L E MYER IS STEPPING UP ITS FURNISHING OFFERINGS! WE LOVE ITS AMALFI MILO PINE AND MDF BOOKSHELF, $899/ 39X1800X80CM; WWW.MYER.COM.AU.

Into the blue Right on trend and unapologetically opulent, Ted Baker’s Go To Bed With Ted marble-print cotton sateen bedding brings seductive glamour to the bedroom. $250/queen-size quilt cover. Available at www.myer.com.au.#

Text by Elizabeth Wilson (retail round-up). Photograph by Pablo Martin (Boffi).

RETAIL ROUND-UP


H&G I N S I DE R

WALLING’S LEGACY

EDNA WALLING Embracing the virtues of relaxed, liveable gardens, this landscape designer was a pioneer in her field, writes Chris Pearson.

Y

oung Edna Walling (pictured above right) began studying at Melbourne’s Burnley School of Horticulture in 1916. Graduating the following year, her big break came when an architect asked her to create a garden for a house he had designed. Walling’s reputation flourished and by the mid 1920s, she was the go-to person for pergolas and dry-stone walls, designing gardens for Elisabeth Murdoch, Sir Frank Packer and Dame Nellie Melba. Her modus operandi was to take existing features such as the contours of property, rocks and trees, sculpt them, and add architectural features for structure. These she softened with dense planting. Dry-stone walls, stone steps, pergolas, rock pools and meandering paths were signatures, while more affluent gardens featured classical colonnades and archways. Landscape designer Paul Bangay has had a long association with Walling

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gardens, not all of it good. Early in his career, he innocently levelled one in Toorak (“fortunately, there weren’t too many original features left,” he says). He has since made amends by restoring three. “She had a wonderful sense of architecture,” says Bangay. “It was gutsy – Australia had never seen that. Her sense of scale and rock work were genius. And it’s amazing how many of these features remain today.” With its sweeping staircase, Mawarra (pictured above), in the Dandenongs, is a favourite. Against this hardscaping, Walling combined natives with exotics, then an unconventional marriage that marked the beginning of a truly Australian style of gardening, says Bangay. Also in the 1920s, she designed a whole village, buying 1.6ha of undulating bush at Mooroolbark, near Mt Dandenong, and subdividing it. She thinned out the natives, retaining the finest gums and blackwoods and built 16 cottages in the English Arts

and Crafts style. Then she planted exotics, such as oaks, cherry trees and hawthorns. “Walking into Bickleigh Vale village the first time was amazing,” says Trisha Dixon, who has cowritten two books on Walling. “It has a perfect sense of scale and intimacy.” Over the years, Walling’s gardens became less structured, with boulders, rock outcrops and more native plantings. “How pompous, imagining that we can do better than to re-establish the most desirable of the native flora peculiar to the district,” she wrote in 1948. In 1967, seeking a warmer climate, she moved to Buderim, Queensland. By that time, she enjoyed a formidable profile, having written myriad magazine columns and books including Gardens in Australia (1943), Cottage and Garden in Australia (1947), A Gardener’s Log (1948) and The Australian Roadside (1952). Walling passed away in Buderim in 1973. # www.ednawalling.net.au.

Photography from State Library of Victoria (portrait) and courtesy of Trisha Dixon (Mawarra).

DESIGN MOMENT

“Walling encouraged a relaxed style of horticulture; gardens to live in rather than for show,” says author Trisha Dixon. She sowed the seeds of water conservation, using drought-tolerant plants and dense groundcovers. About a quarter of her 300 designs remain, including Mawarra and Bickleigh Vale in Victoria, and Markdale in NSW.


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84 Five vastly different renovations; many fabulous ideas

84 NSW Behind a charming 1940s brick facade lies a ďŹ&#x201A;exible, modern home.

116

92 VICTORIA An owner-architect fashions a functional family home from his â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s gem.

100 QLD A majestic old Queenslander rises to the challenge of accommodating three generations under one roof.

108 100

108 NSW An elegant Sydney terrace is refreshed for a growing young family.

116 WA A contemporary ocean-front home establishes a new connection to the outdoors.

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HOUSES RENOVATION WISDOM


H&G RENOVATION SPECIAL 1940s bungalow f lip

Track to the

FUTURE In Sydney, a 1940s facade hides a sizzling 21st-century home. S T ORY J U DY BAROUCH / S T Y L I N G LOUISE BIC KLE P H O T O G R A P H Y MA RE E HOME R

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REAR EXTENSION / A wraparound clerestory window was designed to capture northern light. The rear elevation is clad in James Hardie Scyon Axon cement-composite panels. Dining table, Space. Chairs, Freedom. Sofa, Fanuli. Cushions, Citta Design. Side table, Jardan. Rug, Koskela. Artwork by Angela Hawkney, commissioned through Design Art Solutions. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194 .


KITCHEN / Christine with Alessia and Xavier at the island bench in Caesarstone Frosty Carrina; its waterfall end is angled to echo the new roofline. Replica Tractor stools, Matt Blatt. Jug, Collector Store. EXTERIOR / A new front door and Sunbrella awning amp up the home’s street appeal. The old carport is now a lock-up garage. Doormat, Koskela. Letterbox, Ute Design. LIVING / A low-lying strip window brings in green views. DINING / Christine slides open the door to the library/games room, which can also be employed as a guestroom or used to hide kids’ clutter. Designer buy: Gubi Semi pendant lights, from $349/each, Cult.

T

here aren’t many people who would allow themselves to be woken through the night to check the progress of a 24-hour roast, but Carlo and Christine Rinaudo have no such qualms. Pride of place in their new outdoor kitchen is a gourmet ceramic barbecue designed for slow-cooked meals such as pulled pork, brisket and American-style ribs. “The oven’s digital thermometer ‘talks’ to Carlo’s phone and if the temperature cranks up too high, he gets up and rushes out to check on the meat,” says Christine. “A lot of love goes into Carlo’s slow cooks!” Perfectionism is a hallmark of the couple’s approach to cooking and is also evident in the minimalist yet detailed renovation by architect Mark Szczerbicki of their 1940s bungalow in Sydney’s inner west. The owners loved the character of the property and elected not to render its red-brick facade. Instead, a new entry door, fence, awning and landscaping have freshened up its street appeal. The internal layout, however, was back to front for the couple and their two young children, Xavier, six, and Alessia, five. “The main living area faced the street and had no connection to the rear garden,” says Mark. “The bedrooms were at the back with only a single door and little stairway leading outside.” The family moved out in May 2014 and by the time they moved back in six months later, the floor plan had been flipped. The front sunroom was converted into the main bedroom while an ensuite was created from part of the adjoining dining room. Two mirror-image bedrooms for the children were positioned on the northern side of the house > 86 /

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Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4 .


H&G H O U S E S THE PALETTE

Dulux Natural White interior, throughout

Colorbond Surfmist picket fence

Colorbond Monument extension exterior


H&G H O U S E S

This is the life Christine and Carlo both have busy work lives, so they like their home to be as calm and ordered as is possible with two young children. Multiple storage options throughout the interior ensure a clutter-free environment. The ace up their sleeve is a set of sliding doors alongside the kitchen/dining area, concealing a multipurpose room. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any stray toys can be quickly thrown in there and we simply close the door,â&#x20AC;? says Christine.

THE LAYOUT

Bed

Bath Entrance Bath

Bed Bath

Laundry Bed Games

Kitchen Living

Dining Playroom Deck

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‘To avoid sibling rivalry, the children’s rooms were designed to have the same features.’ Carlo Rinaudo

MAIN BEDROOM / Here and throughout the house, custom joinery by Ital Furniture features a mix of display and hidden storage. Quilt, throw, cushion covers and bag, Citta Design. ALESSIA’S ROOM / Alessia shows off pretty jewellery boxes and books on her display shelves, while her brother prefers to feature Lego in his. Bedlinen, basket and artwork, Lilly & Lolly. Smart buy: Daisy rug, from $210, Lilly & Lolly. BATHROOM / A lightwell illuminates moody charcoal ceramics. “At night, LED strip lighting makes the water from the rainshower glisten,” says Carlo. Forme bath, Harvey Norman. Ellisse tap, Parisi. Tiles, Skheme. Stool, Koskela. Towel, Citta Design. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.

< in order to best access sunlight, while the new internal family bathroom is illuminated by a large, operable lightwell. At the end of the corridor, down four steps, lies the new open-plan kitchen, dining and living area. A large sliding door merges this flexible zone with the compact backyard, providing a perfect indoor-outdoor space for a family that loves entertaining. In a masterstroke, a small rear garage hugging the boundary was converted into a playroom; one wall was partially removed and the room now opens via glazed sliding doors onto a deck and the back garden. While the reworked building is still modest in size – an area of just 55m2 was added to the original 190m2 footprint – any family paraphernalia is kept in check with plentiful custom joinery. “Carlo doesn’t like clutter. He prefers everything concealed, like a secret service,” says Christine with a laugh. This is a shoes-off house, and just inside the threshold there’s a walnut-veneer unit for storing shoes and gumboots, plus schoolbags and raincoats. The adjacent full-height entry door impressively captures shards of sunlight through a series of vertical Perspex strips. Telegraphing Christine and Carlo’s eye for detail, it hints that beyond the unassuming exterior, a contemporary style feat awaits. Not that most guests notice. They are too intent on heading out back to see what’s cooking. > Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio, Five Dock, NSW; (02) 9713 9223 or www.markszczerbicki.com.

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Before

Reno snapshot Renovation cost $700,000+. Goal To create a connection between the living zones and backyard, and a private bedroom zone at the front. Solution The internal layout was flipped and a garage fitted with glass sliding doors to function as a playroom (and occasional disco) adjacent to the outdoor entertaining area. Words of wisdom “Invest time in choosing your architect and builder,” says Carlo. “This decision can make the project either enjoyable and rewarding, or stressful and over budget.”

FEATURE PLANTS FRONT PATH

Sedum ‘Gold Mound’ NORTHERN BOUNDARY

Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) SOUTHERN BOUNDARY

Slender weaver’s bamboo (Bambusa textilis ‘Gracilis’) BACKYARD

Sir Walter buffalo grass


H&G H O U S E S

DECK / Carlo tends to one of his epic slow cooks as the rest of the family relaxes under a retractable Eureka Awnings shade. Primo grill. Tucker Horizon barbecue, BBQ Factory. Custom table with Carrara marble top. Chairs, Ikea. Tray and planter, Tait. CABANA/PLAYROOM / “We celebrated Carlo’s 40th birthday here with a party for more than 50 and used the cabana as a disco,” says Christine. Console, Orient House. Armchair, Ikea. Chair, Freedom. Play table, yellow stool, rug and artwork, all Lilly & Lolly. Rope quoits set, Koskela. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

#

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H&G RENOVATION SPECIAL 1970s townhouse tweak

Less is more was the name of the game with this 1970s Melbourne townhouse reno. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a refreshed family home that honours its architectural era. S T ORY STE PHE N CRA FTI / S T Y L I N G RUT H W EL S BY / P H O T O G R A P H Y EV E W IL SO N

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FRONT GARDEN / Boston ivy and other creepers drape over the facade of this architect-designed townhouse. STAIRWELL / Owners Jamie Sormann and Alice Maloney with their son Henry. The artwork is an original wood-block print by Sadao Watanabe. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

FEATURE PLANTS Japanese maple Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) Frangipani Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) Creeping ďŹ g (Ficus pumila)


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rchitect Jamie Sormann and his partner Alice Maloney conducted a thorough search of Melbourne’s inner suburbs before coming across the two-bedroom townhouse they now call home. Designed in the 1970s by Morris and Pirrotta, the architecture of the concrete-block house particularly resonated: as a student Jamie had worked with Michael Morris. The structure was in good nick and the location – within walking distance to the city and Jamie’s office – was perfect. The interior, however, needed a few tweaks to bring it into the 21st century. Jamie and Alice were up for the job. “I was looking for a small project, a place we could put our stamp on without having to do a major overhaul,” says Jamie. “When we 94 /

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moved in, the interior was predominantly brown with beige carpets. There were orange pine lining boards on the walls and upstairs ceiling too.” The layout is spread over two floors, both of which are split level. While there was good flow overall, the lower level was divided by a partition wall into two pint-sized spaces, the kitchen and dining room. “The south-facing kitchen was far too dark and there wasn’t sufficient space in the dining area to accommodate a good-sized table,” says architect Jo Foong, Jamie’s co-director at Foomann Architects, who worked closely on the project. Jamie and Jo’s solution was to remove the partition to create a more generous open-plan kitchen/dining space. A new L-shaped kitchen was installed to optimise >


KITCHEN/DINING / this page and opposite right Storage is tucked into every available space. Joinery by Woodman Cabinets & Joinery (throughout). Vintage Danish Deluxe dining chairs. Rug, Armadillo&Co. Smart buy: Philips Aquafit ceiling light (used as wall light), $40, Bunnings. STAIRWELL / Reducing the depth of the nib wall opened up the stairs as a seating option. Large-format bluestone pavers replaced the dated beige carpet. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

‘It’s a relatively small space, so I was mindful of making each gesture appear generous.’ Jamie Sormann, owner/architect


This is the life The north-facing front garden was previously overgrown and under-utilised. Today, the family uses the area as if it was another room, says Jamie. To strengthen the gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s connection to the indoors, the front porch was elevated to align with the living area and the same bluestone tiles used inside and out. A Japanese maple, underplanted with star jasmine, shades a slatted cedar bench that provides extra seating for large gatherings.


H&G H O U S E S

THE PALETTE

Dulux Fair Bianca half strength, throughout

Try these accents

Resene Jet Stream

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Murobond Paint Monet

< floor space, with the dining table doubling as an additional prep area when required. Given the size of the home, a mere 80m2, maximising storage was essential. In the living room, thin-profile steel shelves were mounted at ceiling height to retain useable space at ground level, an idea also employed in Henry’s bedroom. There is additional storage in a new crawl space under the house. “The living room floor was elevated about 1.5m above the ground, so we poured a concrete paving slab in this sub-floor space to create a clean area for storage,” says Jamie. “Having a whole level dedicated to storage allows us to live in a reasonably uncluttered environment,” says Alice. “Without it, we’d be constantly stepping on toys or tripping over the pram.” In the bathroom, the existing shower cubicle was converted into a laundry area and a new walk-in shower installed. In keeping with the home’s 1970s sensibilities, terrazzo tiles were laid from f loor to ceiling. “With projects such as this, it’s often about taking things away and rationalising spaces so they can be used in multiple ways,” says Jamie. The most significant impact came from one of the smallest alterations. By reducing the length of a nib wall enclosing the staircase, Jamie created more breathing space in the living room and improved sightlines through the house. “It’s a relatively small space, so I was mindful of making each gesture appear generous,” says Jamie. Today, the home is a beautiful blend of hallmark ’70s design and 21st-century practicality – and the family > couldn’t be happier. Foomann Architects, Melbourne, Victoria; www.foomann.com.au.

LIVING / The original Cassina Tentazione sofa previously belonged to Jamie’s mother, who received it as a wedding gift. The exposed beams are made from refurbished oregon. Vintage chair, Modern Times. Stool, Arteveneta. Floor lamp, ECC Lighting+Furniture. Coffee table designed by Foomann Architects, made by Kyran Starcevich. Rug, Armadillo&Co. Artworks by Susan Purdy (left) and Simon MacEwan & Finn Robertson. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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THE LAYOUT GROU N D FLOOR

HENRY’S ROOM / Henry’s room, at the rear of the house,

Living Front garden Entrance

Kitchen/dining

FI R ST FLOO R Store Bed

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Bath/ laundry

Bed

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features a floor-to-ceiling window that is externally shaded by a curtain of ivy. Cot, Stokke. Custom-designed shelves, Foomann Architects. Artwork by Fideli Sundqvist. Ravine carpet in Pewter, Hycraft Carpets. BATHROOM/LAUNDRY / By rethinking the layout, Jamie and Jo were able to create a more functional multi-use space. Tapware, Brewers. Custom shower screen. Smart buy: DF Arabescato Bianco terrazzo tiles, $95m2, Defazio Tiles & Stone. MAIN BEDROOM / Painting the house white throughout brightened the interior, which feels more spacious. Bedlinen, I Love Linen. Painting by Ruth Howard. HD2 wall light, ISM Objects. The bedside table is a hand-me-down. Planter, Wingnut&Co. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4 . #


Before

‘With projects such as this, it’s often about taking things away and rationalising spaces so they can be used in multiple ways.’ Jamie Reno snapshot Total cost About $150,000. Goal Simplifying the interior of this 1970s modernist townhouse for a lighter, more generous and contemporary feel. Solution Consolidating the kitchen and dining downstairs and bathroom and laundry upstairs was critical. These multipurpose spaces now have improved functionality and capacity, and are more enjoyable to be in and use. Words of wisdom “I wish I’d had a better grasp of the cost and complication of dealing with construction waste before starting,” says Jamie. “But by doing what work I could myself and sourcing factory seconds and reclaimed materials, we kept overall costs down.”


H&G RENOVATION SPECIAL 1920s cottage addition

ALL RISE Seeking a home that would nurture three generations, this Brisbane family realised the only way was up. S T ORY A MANDA STUBBS / S T Y L I N G L A NA C AV ES / P H O T O G R A P H Y ELOUIS E VA N R IET- GR AY

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GARDEN / Owner Claudine Sheppard watches her daughters Evie (left) and Georgia play. Outdoor rug, Ikea. Smart buy: Girly Girl teepee, $100, Mocka. LIVING / Antiques and family treasures play a starring role in this home. “I’d like to think that my favourite pieces will be handed down to my girls and I buy with this in mind,” says Claudine. Antique sideboard, Botticelli House. Lamp, Oliveaux Interiors. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

FEATURE PLANTS Palmetto buffalo grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum ‘SS100’) Lilly pilly Chinese elm Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii)


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desire for independence at close quarters led Claudine and Kane Sheppard to seek a home that offered plenty of play space for their daughters Evie, six, and Georgia, four, plus self-contained adjoining accommodation for Claudine’s mother, Junette. “I knew exactly what I wanted,” says Claudine. “A two-storey home that provided easy access to the outdoors for our family on the lower level, and a separate residence upstairs for Mum.” The house they fell in love with was a character-filled 1920s cottage in Brisbane’s east. But with only three bedrooms over a single storey, they would need to renovate to create the space they desired. Undaunted, the Sheppard clan moved in and began putting their ideas on paper. After a year of planning, the renovation took just six months to complete. The cottage was raised and refurbished to create a selfcontained two-bedroom unit for Junette. Underneath, they built a spacious new three-bedroom family home. Next, the backyard was levelled to enable the children to roam freely between indoors and out. Claudine says completing the project within the $350,000 budget was a challenge given their wish to respect the craftsmanship of the original home and the need to excavate in order to level the site. But bring it in on budget they did. “We saved a lot of money by using the same classic white tiles and marble throughout – there’s no wastage as offcuts could be used elsewhere,” says Claudine. “We were fortunate also that > 102 /

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‘I love being involved in the wonderful birthday parties that we have in the back garden.’ Junette

LIVING / “We painted the walls and ceilings the same crisp white to create a gallery feel,” says Claudine. “Using the same colour greatly reduced the costs too since no cutting in was required.” Sofas, French and English. Armchairs, Gilles & Franck. The coffee table is a revamped family piece. Rug and lamp, Oliveaux Interiors. Sideboard, Botticelli House. Painting by Gunnar Zilo. Side tables found on Gumtree. DINING / The dining table, a custom-made piece bought second-hand from Claudine’s friend, interior designer Judy Elliott, is teamed with slip-covered chairs from Ikea and carver chairs from Gilles & Franck. Chandelier, Early Settler & Recollections. Painting by Richard Bressy. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

H&G H O U S E S


Before

THE PALETTE

Dulux Lexicon quarter strength, throughout

Reno snapshot Renovation cost $350,000. Goal To enable the Sheppards to live as an extended family on the property and to provide Claudineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother with her own sanctuary. Solution Raising and renovating the two-bedroom cottage and building a new abode beneath. Claudineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother lives upstairs and the Sheppard clan downstairs in a three-bedroom home. Words of wisdom Expect the unexpected! Allow for an additional 10 per cent, at least, on top of your budget.

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Taubmans Royal Cloak

Resene Mantis


H&G H O U S E S

< we were able to purchase some beautiful furniture second-hand and bought all our appliances on sale.” Kane designed the garden himself, another significant cost saving. The front yard is formal in design, while the backyard is taken up with an expanse of lawn for the girls to play on. “Kane is very much a lawn man,” says Claudine, laughing. “He spent ages researching the perfect low-maintenance turf, before settling on Palmetto buffalo grass.” While Kane took care of the garden, Claudine set about feathering the nest. She engaged interior designer Amanda Harris of Oliveaux Interiors to help create her own spin on Hamptons style, one that artfully blends family treasures with antiques and budget-friendly accessories. Amanda says the artworks, some from Claudine’s existing collection, some newly sourced, were the secret to success. “The paintings honour the heirlooms and were really cost-effective – vintage original artworks like these range from $200-$800.” The Sheppards couldn’t be happier with the lifestyle their new home provides. “The dual-living arrangement works really well for us,” says Claudine. “We all have our privacy but still enjoy plenty of time together as a family.” > Oliveaux Interiors, Coorparoo, Queensland; (07) 3394 2477 or www.oliveaux.com.au. Abode Construction, Sandgate, Queensland; (07) 3269 7993 or www.abodeconstruction.com.au.

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THE LAYOUT

GROU N D FLOOR

FI R ST FLOO R

Outdoor sitting

N Dining

Living

Kitchen

Kitchen

Pantry

Laundry

Sunroom Wardrobe Bath

Bed

Bath

Bed Living

Bed Bath Entrance

Verandah

Bed Bed

Workroom


HALL / Evie and Georgia love having Grandma just a staircase away. Paintings by RW McGivern (top), Grace Edwards (centre left) and anonymous artists. Lamp and hall table, both Oliveaux Interiors. Blackbutt flooring, Finlayson’s Timber & Hardware (throughout). KITCHEN / The downstairs kitchen is bright and spacious, with a butler’s pantry beyond to keep mess contained. Vintage oil painting. Westinghouse stove, The Good Guys. Tapware, Reece. Splashback tiles, Beaumont Tiles (throughout). Carrara marble benchtops (throughout). Pendant lights, Early Settler & Recollections. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.

This is the life Located just a stone’s throw from the city and a short stroll to cafes, the Sheppards have everything they need within reach. “On weekends we head to the local skate park to do a bit of scootering,” says Claudine. “When we get home we might pop the girls under the sprinkler or on the water slide in the back garden.” Every Sunday night, the extended clan comes together for a roast dinner. “It’s a tradition we all enjoy.”


‘Tea parties with Mum on the top verandah are a part of everyday family life.’ Claudine Sheppard MAIN BEDROOM / The accessories reference Claudine’s love of blue and white china. Rug, Milk & Sugar. Lamps and cushions, Oliveaux Interiors. The console table was a gift. ENSUITE / Fittings with a 1920s feel connect the new structure to the period cottage above. Tapware, Reece. Light fitting, Early Settler & Recollections. Smart buy: Songe mirror, $169, Ikea. BEDROOM / Vintage artworks add an inviting splash of colour in the guestroom. The vintage coat rack was found in a market in Paris. Heirloom bed. Custom-made lamp. Bedside table, Sasson Home. Carpet, Andersens. VERANDAH / Claudine’s mother, Junette (seated) has a workroom just off the verandah where she enjoys sewing clothes for Evie and Georgia. Awning, Kresta. Vintage cane table, Oliveaux Interiors. Cushions, Target. Rug, Armadillo&Co. Smart buy: TineKhome bamboo dining chairs, $290/each, Scandinalia. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4. #

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H&G RENOVATION SPECIAL Terrace transformation

Personal

SPACE

A thoughtful revamp of this graceful Sydney terrace gave its owners everything they wanted â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and more. S T O RY ROSA S EN ES E / S T Y L I N G JANE T JA MES P HO T O G R A P H Y M AR EE HOME R

COURTYARD / Owner Katie and her daughter Grace share a moment in the light-drenched courtyard. Landscape design by Melissa Wilson, construction by Matthew Wood of Earth Stone Wood. Cedar battens. Moooi Container table, Space. Laser-cut aluminium screen and planters, Garden Life. Travertine paving, Granite & Marble Works. Cushion, Grace Garrett. Barbecue, Electrolux. Designer buy: Tio chairs, $515/each, Spence & Lyda. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.


FEATURE PLANTS Snow pear (Pyrus nivalis) Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) Japanese box (Buxus japonica) Geraniums (Pelargonium)

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THE PALETTE

Dulux Dieskau interior, throughout

Try these accents

Haymes Paint Plumage

Taubmans Hampton Inn

This is the life By opening up the heart of this 19th-century terrace, interior designer Tonka Andjelkovic brought the property into the current day – and futureproofed it. The bright, streamlined layout works equally well for day-to-day living and social scenarios. Multiple living and dining spots enhance the entertaining potential. “We can all be in the same space but have enough room to do different things,” says owner Katie.


Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

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‘The first step was to look at the volume of spaces, how they will be used and how people will interact with, and within, them.’ Tonka Andjelkovic, interior designer

KITCHEN / this page and opposite The island bench is the visual and social focal point in the kitchen. The Vintec wine fridges are lit from within, adding another element of sophistication to the slick kitchen at night. Ilve stove. Carrara marble benchtops and splashback, Granite & Marble Works. Vola mixer tap, Candana Bathroomware. Cab stools, Cult. Artwork by Colin Pennock. Flowers from Susan Avery Flowers and Events (throughout). Designer buy: Gervasoni Gray 07 armchairs, $4375/each, Anibou. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.

D

esign compatibility deserves some credit as a predictor of marital harmony. When Katie fell for the man who would become her husband, the two discovered they had a great deal in common, not least their tastes in residential architecture. So the couple was thrilled to find a three-level Victorian gem in Sydney’s inner east that offered all the romance of a classic terrace with few of the usual drawbacks. “We loved the old-fashioned look of the place and it had a wonderful feel,” says Katie. “It’s also unusually wide for a terrace, with a good amount of natural light.” Despite a partial renovation in the late 1980s, the house needed professional expertise to bring it into the 21st century. The new owners turned to interior designer Tonka Andjelkovic to create a comfy, liveable home for themselves and the children they wanted in the future. Tonka devised a detailed plan to transform the interior, both aesthetically and structurally. On the ground floor, a wall between the hallway and front living room was demolished and an awkwardly situated laundry removed in order to open up the layout. Next, the kitchen was remodelled and a long island bench installed to direct the eye through the house and out to the sunny courtyard. Upstairs, the changes were less dramatic. On the first floor, one of two bathrooms was renovated and one of the three bedrooms on that level converted into a study. The main bedroom, on the second floor, was simply redecorated. Across all levels, elegant and timeless decor unites rooms and eras. “We were after a classic Parisian feel,” says Katie. Beginning with > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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‘We wanted the decor to be classic and calming, but also practical for young children.’ Katie

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THE LAYOUT SECO N D FLOO R

Bed

FI R ST FLOO R Bath Bed

Bed

Terrace

Bath

Study

N GROU N D FLOOR

Living

Dining

Courtyard

Kitchen Entrance

Bath

LIVING / The B&B Italia Charles sofa from Space was a judicious splurge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My clients loved the look and its comfort, and considered it an investment,â&#x20AC;? says Tonka. The Tufty-Too ottoman/coffee table, also from Space, was selected for its child-friendly soft edges. W Collection rug, Whitecliffe Imports. Artworks by Jeff Gardner. Designer buy: B&B Italia Tufty-Too ottoman, from $2620, Space. DINING / The Roll & Hill Modo 10-globe chandelier from Space is a modern interpretation of the chandelier that might once have illuminated dinner parties here. Dining table and chairs, Cavit&Co. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

>


Before

Reno snapshot Renovation cost $450,000. Goal To adapt a classic Victorian terrace to reflect the way a modern family lives, relaxes and entertains, while honouring the home’s heritage characteristics. Solution The ground floor was reconfigured to improve indoor-outdoor flow. The courtyard was transformed into to a dreamy useable ‘room’. Words of wisdom “Tonka had to push us into being realistic about the amount of storage we needed,” says Katie. “Now that we have a family, we know how important it is.”


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< the shade of grey the owners had already used on the walls, Tonka

‘Storage is so important. Wherever I can find a space, I like to build something in.’ Tonka

GRACE’S ROOM / Sunshine yellow is a fun counterpoint to the soft grey palette. Armchair, Jardan. Lamp, Space. Carpet, Carpet Forum. Artwork by Craig Clough (left). ‘Grace’ work by a family friend. Elephant print bought in Bali. Designer buy: Leander convertible cot/junior bed, $1400, Danish by Design. MAIN BEDROOM / “I had the bedhead hand-stitched in velvet to create another layer of detail,” says Tonka. Michael Anastassiades pendant light, Hub Furniture Lighting Living. Framed photograph by Tim Georgeson. BATHROOM / Floor-to-ceiling Carrara marble, including a custom-made basin, feels wonderfully luxurious. Vola tapware, Candana Bathroomware. Pendant light, Hub Furniture Lighting Living. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

built up a moody palette with subtle golden highlights. The scheme is full of details that ooze sophistication – brass tapware, sumptuous Carrara marble and hand-stitched soft furnishings, to name a few. The result is a well-balanced merger of traditional architectural forms with contemporary fittings and furnishings. Character-rich details such as architraves, ceiling roses and fireplaces were retained; the perfect foil for new designer furniture. When it came to practicalities, Tonka’s design experience proved invaluable. Katie and her husband were hesitant to sacrifice precious space for extra cabinetry, but after moving into the newly renovated house with baby daughter Grace, now three, and all the paraphernalia of parenthood, they recognised the value of Tonka’s storage strategies. Today, with five-month-old Harriet having joined the family, they continue to be thankful for the home’s child-friendly features. The chic, cosy ambience of the interiors extends into the courtyard, which is enclosed in warm timber panelling. Together with newly planted trees and relaxed indoor-outdoor furniture, this creates a warm and utterly private zone. It’s only when you catch sight of the surrounding high-rise buildings that you remember the home’s urban location and fully appreciate its best-of-both-worlds character. “It feels like a retreat,” says Katie. “Sitting out there, I feel as though # I’m getting away, even though I’m in the middle of the city.” Tonka Andjelkovic Design, Bondi Junction, NSW; 0418 479 581 or www.tonkaandjelkovicdesign.com.

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H&G RENOVATION SPECIAL 1990s home revamp

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BACKYARD / The architecture and landscaping combine to shelter this coastal site from harsh sun and strong southwesterly winds while maximising glorious ocean views. “The Manchurian pear tree in the garden provides a canopy of shade to eat under in summer and sheds leaves in winter to provide us with northern light,” says owner Katie. The outdoor dining setting came with the original house. Cushions, Freedom. Built-in seating upholstered in an outdoor textile from Warwick Fabrics. Barbecue, Electrolux. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4 .

BLUE YONDER

The ocean is the star in this lifestyle-led renovation on one of Western Australia’s most iconic beaches. S T O RY & S T Y L I N G AN NA FLANDE RS / P HO T O G R A P H Y A NGE L ITA B O NET T I


This is the life Katie and Darien love the lifestyle aspect of their renovated home. While Darien’s adult children have their own wing downstairs, the family can come together on the indoor-outdoor first floor – and the parents have their retreat at the top. The renovation has also been a huge success for their young boys. “We don’t need to get out of the house any more to entertain them,” says Katie. “There is so much to do here.”

DINING/KITCHEN / Katie, pictured with little William and poodle-cross Harrison, loves this open-plan zone’s sleek layout, clean-lined furniture and concealed appliances. Dining table and benches, Dash Design Furniture. Carafe and glasses, Empire Highgate. Throw, Pure Linen. Mixer tap, Galvin Design. Clinker pendant lights, Innermost. Smart buy: Naoshima stool, $715, Mobilia. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.


H&G H O U S E S

W

ith jaw-dropping views over the Indian Ocean and airy yet protected living spaces, this home renovation capitalises on its location in an iconic beachside suburb of Perth. It stands today in stark contrast to the original 1990s house the owners purchased back in 2009. Although the original house stretched over three levels, owners Darien and Katie knew major work was required to bring it up to scratch. They needed ample living space for themselves and young sons Thomas, now four, and William, two, as well as Darien’s elder daughters, Lilly and Annabelle. Enter Klopper & Davis Architects. “The house was not functioning. It was upside down, with living on the top floor but no connection to a backyard or garden,” says architect Sam Klopper. “Our proposal to Darien was that he buy the house next door, knock it down and fill the resulting block up to the top level of their existing house to create a backyard.” Having nurtured similar ideas for some time, Darien approached the neighbours and a deal was struck. It was a tricky concept to manoeuvre through council, but they got approval and built up the rear block by 3m to create a backyard with pool, plus additional utility and garage space. Sam reconfigured the home’s main living level, went up another floor and designed an L-shaped addition for the new piece of land. This provided the desired space for the whole family and capitalised on the views, while creating outdoor spaces sheltered from the harsh sun and south-westerly winds. The redesigned kitchen is in the same place but now connects to both front and rear, thanks to new glazing and a repositioned island bench. The boys’ bedrooms, playroom and bathroom occupy the L shape and are off a glazed walkway that takes in a full view of the garden. The main bedroom suite of old has been converted to an inviting > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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‘It’s nearly impossible to see this house from street level. It’s like a bird’s nest that looks down on the beach and is completely private.’ Darien

LIVING / Harrison finds these Time sofas from Mobilia irresistibly comfy. Coffee table, Chinta. Throw, Remedy. Rug, The Rug Studio. Candleholder, Empire Highgate. Console, Empire Claremont. Artwork, The Studio Gallery. ENSUITE / Bathrooms feature elegant cabinetry in crown-cut American white-oak veneer. Alape basin, Reece. Vivid tap, Phoenix Tapware. Fishbowl vase and stool, Empire Highgate. PLAYROOM / Built-in storage keeps toys corralled in this dedicated play space. World map, Corner Store. Toy car (right), Uber+Klein. The rocking horse was a Gumtree find. Smart buy: Mojo MyMiniChair children’s beanbag seats, $100/each, Bunnings. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194 .

>

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THE PALETTE

Dulux Whisper White interior, throughout

Dulux Vivid White doors, interior painted steel

Try this accent

Porterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paints Blue Fin

FEATURE PLANTS FRONT YARD

Olive tree (Olea europaea) BACKYARD

Manchurian pear tree (Pyrus ussuriensis) White gum (Eucalyptus) Various dune plants


Before

THE LAYOUT N U N D ERCRO F T

Bed

Bath

Gym

FI R ST FLOO R

GROU N D FLOOR

Living

Living

Bed Entrance

Reno snapshot Renovation cost $2m+. Goal To reconfigure and extend an ‘upside-down’ house, creating new social, personal and play spaces. Solution The kitchen island was rotated to improve the flow of the home. Living spaces now open to the new yard, which is protected from the strong sea breezes. Words of wisdom “Don’t be afraid to workshop with the architect. This house is about version 20,” says Darien. “We kept working on it until we achieved our perfect home.”

Garage Wine cellar

Bed

Dining

Playroom

Kitchen

Bath

Bath Laundry

Outdoor kitchen

Bath Bed Garage

SECO N D FLOO R

Lawn Bed

Pool Bed

Bath

FRONT BALCONY / Feline family member Monty joins Katie on an all-weather sofa with an idyllic view of the Indian Ocean. Sofas and footstool, The Outdoor Furniture Specialists. Cushions, Freedom. Throw, Pure Linen. POOLSIDE / opposite, top and bottom A pool completes the lush new backyard, the frameless glass fence ensuring visibility from the house. Monsoon column shower, Sussex. Towels, Freedom. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 194.

TV Study


H&G H O U S E S ✚ FOR MORE RENOVATION INSPIRATION VISIT

homestolove.com.au/ houseandgarden

< TV room, and Katie and Darien now have full command of the new top storey. Their bedroom opens to the striking ocean view, with an ensuite bathroom located behind and a walk-in wardrobe tucked under the roofline. The entry level remains as Darien’s office and the girls’ wing. Below that is another garage, gym and cellar. The entire new, southern side of the home is covered in a zinc roof that begins at ground level and wraps up and over to shield the backyard. “It has the sense of a wave crashing over the building,” says Sam. “We used zinc because it’s a very stable material that weathers slowly over time to a dusty silver. It will last forever.” When it came to the overall ambience of the home, the brief was to embrace its seaside location. “We wanted it to be a beach house. We wanted it to feel natural and not pretentious or too ‘done’,” says Katie. “And it was important to get a f low between the old and new.” A simplified palette of white walls, mid-tone timber veneers and Europeanoak flooring gives the house a grounded interior, with appreciable warmth and that much-loved Australian coastal vibe. “Living here feels like we are on holiday,” says Katie. “We use the rear outdoor area everyday – we eat out there and I play out there with the boys. Even on days when there is a raging 30-knot wind, it’s like a calm summer’s day in the backyard. It’s truly magical.” # Klopper & Davis Architects, Subiaco, WA; (08) 9381 4731 or www.kada.com.au.

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H&G G A R DE N S O F T H E Y E A R

Prize plots revealed!

H&G GARDENS OF THE YEAR Our biennial hunt for talented gardeners yielded gardens of beauty, rich and rare. Congratulations to all of the award winners. T E X T BY HE LE N YOUNG / P ROD U C E D BY EL IZ A B ET H W IL SO N

Photograph by Jared Fowler.

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reen thumbs from Perth to Penrith entered H&G’s 2015 Garden of the Year competition. Covering a breadth of styles, each garden has plant-lovers and passionate gardeners in common. Thank you to everyone who entered. On the following pages we unveil the five finalists – and the overall Garden of the Year winner. Each finalist will receive a $500 voucher to spend on outdoor furniture from our competition sponsor, Tait. And our winners, Jill and Kim Robinson, are off to the Singapore Garden Festival, Asia’s premier garden show.

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PARADISE MADE It began as a bare patch in a new housing development, and this tropical wonderland, boasting a thoughtful and cohesive design, has won our Garden of the Year gong. P HO T O G R A P H Y JA RE D FOW LE R

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H&G GARDEN OF THE YEAR WINNER

Walk this way A wide merbau boardwalk and pergola link the house with the garden. Tiger grass (Thysanolaena maxima) forms a tall screen behind.

Focal points Statues and pots stand amid the lush foliage of Strelitzia nicolai, agave, heliconias and a large clump of false cardamom (Alpinia nutans) at right.

WINNER Medium garden Garden owners/creators Jill and Kim Robinson Where Brisbane outskirts, Queensland Garden size 823m² Garden age Three years


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he lush, layered and immersive beauty of Jill and Kim Robinson’s garden makes it a worthy winner of our Garden of the Year competition. Entering their home is like walking into a luxury resort set among lush tropical gardens of the type favoured by high-end designers. The house and garden are intrinsically linked, offering a variety of indoor and outdoor spaces to entertain, relax and dine. All of this – from the design to the labour – is the work of this recently retired couple. Jill’s expertise in design, plant selection and styling is self-taught, while Kim did all the construction work, from retaining walls to the timber boardwalk, pergola, screens and planter boxes. More surprising is that the garden is less than three years old and began life as a bare, sloping block in a new housing estate. Already, the neighbours are invisible. “I sketched the garden design while the house was being built,” says Jill. “We wanted to make living in the house like living in the garden. We brought a truckload of plants with us from our old house, particularly bromeliads, as well as the statues we’ve collected over the years. “I’ve learned that to have a garden with wow factor, you have to mass plant,” she says. “It also cuts down on maintenance. I still love working in the garden though!” Near the house are several water features, focal points from inside and out. There’s an outdoor room with pizza oven and barbecue as well as a bar and cosy, well-appointed sitting area. At night, the garden feels magical, thanks to the extensive lighting Kim installed. It’s no wonder there is a steady stream of people knocking on the door to ask who their landscape designer was. > CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Strelitzia nicholai,

Agave attenuata and a bold clump of false cardamom (Alpinia nutans) feature along the covered walkway. Colourful coleus. The Buddha statue is one of many in Jill’s collection.


KEY PLANTS Tiger grass (Thysanolaena maxima) Bromeliads Cordyline fruticosa ‘Rubra’ Gingers and heliconias Yucca (Yucca elephantipes) Golden cane palm (Dypsis lutescens)

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Kim and Jill under the pergola with crotons, heliconias and a large, potted Neoregelia. Decorative screens from Eco Outdoor are paired with silver-blue agave and Strelitzia nicolai. Bougainvillea. An authentic Balinese pavilion houses a spa, adding to the tropical resort feel.

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PALETTE PLEASER

When she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t daubing paint on canvas, this artist applies her love of colour and composition to her expansive plot in country Victoria. P HO T O G R A P H Y SCOTT HAW KINS

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WINNER Pretty garden Garden owner/creator Janet Lucas Where North-east Victoria Garden size 0.5 hectare Garden age 16 years

Rambling rose

By hook or chook

Flower and stone

Bean there, done that

Climbing ‘Pierre de Ronsard’ roses thrive in this climate.

The chook house, with rooster sculptures on the roof and feed bins in front, has a thornless ‘Smooth Splendour’ rose climbing over it.

Swathes of dwarf English lavender spill over the driveway of local granite, crushed by Janet’s resourceful farmer father.

Janet bought the Indian bean tree (Catalpa bignonioides) as a tiny $2 plant.


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estled into the Wooragee Valley, in the rolling hills between Beechworth and Wodonga in Victoria, lies the fragrant, flower-filled garden of Janet Lucas. Banks of lavender line the driveway leading up to the hilltop home, from where expansive views across the surrounding country are framed by flowerbeds that hug the home. After some years away, Janet returned in 1994 to her family’s large property accompanied by her partner Michael, with a dream of building a home in which to raise a family. But before commencing on the house, Janet began planting the garden around the proposed residence. “There was only one tree here when I started, and I didn’t really know any plant names,” says Janet. “Mum’s a keen gardener though, and she gave me lots of bits and pieces from her garden. I madly planted deciduous trees, bucketing water from the dam for them.” After moving into the new house in 2000, Janet gradually developed her own style, expanding the garden to half a hectare over the years. “Thistle-like plants are my favourites, including sea hollies ( Er y ngium ) a nd cardoon ( Cy nara cardunculus),” says Janet. “I also love roses, and all the cottagey perennials like lupins, foxgloves, penstemons and euphorbias. And sweet peas – I adore their smell.” Janet aims to have colour in the garden all year, so there are drifts of spring bulbs, which start blooming as early as June, with liliums in summer and dahlias in autumn. “The hellebores star in winter,” says Janet. “I love combining purples, claret and lime green.” Her skill in combining plants is evident throughout the extensive garden beds, each with its own special flavour or theme. Although the granite-based soil is good and two large dams provide water, the climate can be harsh, with hard frosts to -7˚C as late as November, and long, hot spells in summer. Under those conditions, a garden displaying such a wealth of beautiful plants is the sign of a very good gardener indeed. > 13 4 /

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The maidenhair tree (Gingko biloba) turns a lovely butter-gold in autumn. BELOW The rose-flanked walkway became the wedding aisle when Janet and Michael married in 2012.


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KEY PLANTS Euphorbia (‘Mrs Robert’s Bonnet’, ‘Craigieburn’, ‘Blackbird’) Roses Lavender (‘Hidcote’, dwarf English and others) Hydrangea macrophylla Fairy Wings poppy (Papaver rhoeas ‘Fairy Wings’) Eryngium

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Janet and her blind pet chook Dorothy, who follows her everywhere. The family home. Hollyhock. Rosa ‘Pierre de Ronsard’. Rosa ‘Red Pierre de Ronsard’ romps over an arbour.


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FROM THE ASHES Having withstood the Black Saturday bushfires of 2009, this garden has continued to flourish under the watchful eyes of two passionate custodians. P HO T O G R A P H Y MARTINA GE MMOLA

Sensory delight Fragrant mock orange (Philadelphus) contrasts with purple-leafed Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’. The low hedge is tough-as-nails fuchsia (F. magellanica).

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WINNER Large garden Garden owners/creators Judy and Robert Henry Where Kinglake, Victoria Garden size 2 hectares Garden age 40+ years

White magic This shed – Judy’s domain – is fronted by a mass planting of Agapanthus ‘Snow Storm’.


‘The different seasons are so dramatic. There’s always something that surprises us.’ Judy Henry

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obert and Judy Henry have loved their 2ha plot for more than 40 years. At its heart is the home Robert built, surrounded by a gently rambling garden of interesting trees and an eclectic mix of plants. “I like my garden a bit wild,” says Judy. “We place the trees then plant around them and let the pathways dictate their own terms. We move plants around a lot too, even trees.” The result is a journey through dappled glades, across informal lawns and past colourful f lowerbeds. Elsewhere, there are substantial vegetable beds, chooks, a glasshouse for Judy’s collection of cacti and succulents, a strawberry patch, and a fabulous hedge of raspberries, laden with fruit. The property is blessed with rich, red mountain soil and quality bore water, but there have been hard times. The bushfires of 2009 licked at their doorstep, destroying sheds and equipment, but thankfully not the house. “I think the rhododendrons we planted 20 years before helped protect us,” says Robert. “Although they were terribly damaged, they came back beautifully.” Most of the surviving trees in the front garden still bear blackened trunks (H&G featured a story about this resurrection in the February 2015 issue). The garden is rich with coloured foliage. Many trees are unusual species, sourced from specialist suppliers or propagated by the Henrys themselves. Judy and Robert were not gardeners to begin with, but their skills have grown along with the garden. This is a garden where every turn brings a new delight, a change of mood or a place to pause. “The different seasons are so dramatic,” says Judy. “There’s always something that surprises us.” > 13 8 /

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CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE Judy, Robert and

their whippet Xanny in the shady dell, where an array of ferns thrive. The silver birch grove, replanted after the bushfires, is thriving once more. Judy’s succulent house is arranged botanically by family group. Princess lilies (Alstroemeria).


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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT

Silver-leafed lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina). Raspberries ripe for picking. The hedge of raspberries is an unknown variety, started from a friend’s cutting 25 years ago. White-flowered dogwood (Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’) and purple-leafed Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’ frame the view along a path towards the house. Robert’s shed is fronted by a box-edgd garden of mixed perennials that love hot, dry conditions.

KEY PLANTS Silver birch (Betula pendula) Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’ Wedding cake tree (Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’) Purple Norway maple (Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’) Silver elm (Ulmus minor ‘Variegata’)

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WINNER Edible/sustainable Garden owner/creator Maggie McDermott Where Ballarat, Victoria Garden size 460m² Garden age Five years

FAMILY AFFAIR This magical garden “cost little yet returns much” says its creator, who used reclaimed items and gardening nous to create a special place for her whole family. P HO T O G R A P H Y M ARTI NA GE MMOLA

‘Mrs Gunner’s Garden’ complete with picket fence, recreates a cottage garden of earlier times with Shirley poppies and pyrethrum, blue borage and orange wallflowers (Cheiranthus) at the entrance. Upturned terracotta pots atop stakes prevent eye injuries and double as plant labels.


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his extraordinary edible garden is a lesson in making the most of a small space, and on a shoestring at that. It provides food and a creative outlet for its creator, Maggie McDermott, as well as a precious space to share with her grandchildren. It’s a garden made for play, learning, foraging, love and laughter. Maggie bought the pretty 1870s cottage after seeing it on the internet five years ago. “I saw it and said ‘That’s my house’,” says Maggie. “I didn’t realise that the house was a wreck inside and the garden was nothing but weeds!” Today the garden is a multi-faceted wonderland. Garage sale and roadside finds are arranged in whimsical tableaux. Most of Maggie’s plants come from cuttings, seeds and markets. “I like the challenge of seeing what I can do for little money,” she says. The area dubbed ‘Mrs Gunner’s Garden’ pays homage to Maggie’s greatgreat grandmother, who lost three children to diphtheria in one week. It contains medicinal plants of the era – rue, echinacea, chamomile, mint, mugwort, and valerian. Sweet peas, in memory of Maggie’s mother, ramble over the fence. With a climate that veers from severe frost to 40˚C-plus, the variety of produce in the garden is testament to Maggie’s gardening skills. Raspberries, grapes and strawberries, along with black- and redcurrants are favourites in the foraging patch. There are also quince, plum, pomegranate and nectarine trees, beeattracting borage and lavenders, rhubarb and potato patches, plus sorrel and chard for the chickens. Several barrels collect rainwater, while the chooks provide fertiliser, eggs and pest control. >

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Blackcurrants. Maggie with Rainbow the chook in front of the berry-filled foraging patch she planted for her grandchildren. Old chairs and tubs have been repurposed as planters. Maggie’s miniature birdhouse collection on the shed wall.

KEY PLANTS Sweet peas (Lathyrus odoratus) Cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus) Shirley poppies (Papaver rhoeas) White valerian (Centranthus ruber ‘Alba’) Quince (Cydonia oblonga) Plum (Prunus domestica)

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WINNER Small garden Garden owners/creators Lesley and family Where Sydney’s inner west Garden size 10m² Garden age Two years

Magnolia ‘Little Gem’ is the hero tree, providing a focal point at the end of the garden; Agapanthus ‘Snowball’ adds textural contrast and summer blooms at the base of the star jasmine, which drapes over the fence. CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT Lesley in her garden. Ptilotis ‘Joey’ at the front door.

KEY PLANTS

Magnolia ‘Little Gem’ Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) Agapanthus ‘Snowball’ Mandevilla ‘Aloha Crimson’

WARM WELCOME It may be tiny, but this garden delivers a big make-yousmile welcome to all who pass by its gate. P HO T O G R A P H Y SCOTT HAW KINS

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ur small garden winner is proof that valuable gardens can be created in the most petite spaces. When Lesley moved into her 1901 workers’ cottage four years ago, it was falling down. Restoring her home is a work in progress but early on she decided the front garden was a priority. “We were living in a rundown, cracked and leaking house and I needed to come home to something appealing and pleasant,” she says. “It made the world of difference.”

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Lesley began by removing a slab of concrete that flooded every time it rained, along with a heavy brick fence that tilted alarmingly over the public footpath. Both were demolished and she tackled the work of removing the concrete, digging a large drainage pit and installing a membrane around the house. The collapsed porch was rebuilt and along the way, Lesley planned the new garden in her head. “I wanted it to be not just something we walked past, but something we could use.

It faces northeast so it’s a lovely spot to sit in winter. In fact, it can be the warmest spot in the house!” she says. “It’s a quiet cul-de-sac and a friendly street. Lots of people who walk by stop and say how much they love the garden.” This is not the first garden Lesley has made but it is the smallest. “Even though it’s tiny I can still switch things around. I come out and potter, moving things around if they don’t work, and trying different plants in the pots.” #


H&G G A R DE N I N G

clippings T H AT ’ S H A N DY Plant and prune safely with a pair of pretty long-sleeved gardening gloves, made from durable coated cotton. $26; www. annabeltrends.com.au.

Produced by Elizabeth Wilson.

T H E N E W LY F O R M E D O P E N G A R D E N S V I C TO R I A I S F L O U R I S H I N G ! T H I S M O N T H YO U C A N V I S I T T W O B E A U T I F U L G A R D E N S I N T H E DA N D E N O N G S ; T H E N O O K ( A B OV E ) A N D H I L L C R E S T, O N A P R I L 2 3 - 2 4 . $ 8 E N T RY E AC H . F O R D E TA I L S , G O TO W W W.O P E N G A R D E N S V I C TO R I A .O R G . A U . Pot luck Struggling to find large-scale yet lightweight pots to use in her clients’ gardens, landscape designer Claudia Nevell sourced her own – and now you can buy them too. Made in Vietnam from fibre-reinforced concrete, the range includes these stylish Hishi Tall planters, from $79. Go to www.gardenexpressions. com.au. To see Claudia’s garden and more of the range, be sure to pick up a copy of Great Australian Gardens ($59.99, Bauer Media Books).

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OF THE BEST

garden events this month

1

Frogmore Garden Design Workshop, April 11. Hosted by guest speakers Michael McCoy, Cathy Newing and Jack Marshall at Frogmore Gardens, Trentham (above left). Tickets, $95. www.opengardensvictoria.org.au.

2

TEA TIME Treat your garden to a restorative brew with Billy Creek’s Tonic Tea For Your Garden. Mix 1 tablespoon with water, steep, and apply fortnightly. Available in a jar, $13, or tin, $9. Billy Creek; www.billycreek.com.au.

Perth Garden Festival, April 28-May 1. Show gardens and a huge plant market plus the latest ideas in landscaping and sustainable living (centre). McCallum Park, Victoria Park, $20/$14. www.perthgardenfestival.com.

3

Garden RELEAF, April 9-10. In support of beyondblue, gardening centres around Australia will hold events to encourage people to get out in the garden and have fun. Peter Cundall (above right) is one of the campaign’s ambassadors. gardenreleaf.com.au.


IN THE GARDEN

ROSY OUTLOOK Rose-lovers will swoon over this year’s new releases. Here, gardening expert Helen Young shares her top 10.

Fearless

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oses are the most romantic of flowers, seducing with their fragrance and lovely shapes. The best are those grown at home, lovingly chosen for their colour or perfume, or they may hold an emotional association. Florists’ roses may be large and long-stemmed, but they rarely have a scent and never last as well as freshly cut garden roses. Each year, many new releases vie for attention, offering new colours and shapes, and healthier plants. Here’s my pick, in no particular order:

1 Fields of Fromelles Floribunda rose (1x0.7m) The first Australian-bred rose to be exported to France will be planted in the Australian Cemetery at Fromelles as a centenary memorial of that battle and the 5530 ANZAC soldiers who died there. This scarlet rose produces large clusters of full-petalled blooms in regular flushes and has a light fragrance. Ross Roses; www.rossroses. com.au.

2 Per-Fyoom Per-Fyoom Bush rose (1.4x1m) The intense fragrance of this romantic rose has won it a swag of international awards. Wafts of traditional rose, myrrh and apple blossom surround the fairy-floss pink blooms, which appear in clusters of five or more. The glossy, dense foliage is vigorous and disease-resistant. Knight’s Roses; www.knightsroses.com.au.

3 Fearless Hybrid tea rose (1.5x1.2m) Intense orange is a fiery colour that excites the soul and the garden. A bronze-medal winner in the Australian Rose Trials, this beauty has leathery green, disease-resistant

Per-Fyoom Per-Fyoom Brindabella Jewel

Fields of Fromelles

foliage. It produces regular flushes of blooms on a tidy, upright bush. The best colour and size come in cooler temperatures. Swanes Roses; www.swanes.com.au.

4 A Daughter’s Gift

A Daughter’s Gift

Hybrid tea rose (1.5x1.2m) The large blooms of deep, velvety red petals with white reverse come either singly or in clusters, and have a delicate, sweet fragrance. This is a fundraising rose for Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital leukaemia research, established by the mother of a young woman who died from cancer. Landsdale Rose Gardens; www.landsdalerosegardens. com.au.

5 Brindabella Jewel Bush rose (1.2x1.2m) The latest in the Blackspot Buster range that focuses on developing disease-free and perfumed roses, this is a highly fragrant, salmon pink to apricot rose on a very bushy plant. It repeat-flowers in flushes every seven weeks through the warm months and copes well in the heat. Brindabella Roses; www.brindabella-gardens.com.au.


H&G G A R DE N I N G

Wollerton Old Hall

K N O W YO U R ROSES ✚ Hybrid tea roses: single,

6 Dark Desire Hybrid tea rose (1x0.6m) This rose combines rich colour, beautiful form and an intense fragrance of classic rose, with a touch of lemon and rose geranium. It is an international award winner for performance and disease tolerance, and is in the Parfuma collection by Kordes. It forms an upright, vigorous bush. Treloar Roses; www. treloarroses.com.au.

large blooms on each stem, perfect for picking. ✚ Floribunda roses: clusters of smaller blooms on each stem, which open in turn, giving a better show in the garden. ✚ Bush roses: single or cluster flowers, borne repeatedly, on a dense bush. ✚ Shrub roses: similar to bush, but larger and more spreading.

7 Coconut Ice

Pro Hart

Dark Desire

Floribunda rose (1.2x0.8m) The unusual bicolour of these luscious, cup-shaped blooms features rich musk pink with soft white on the reverse of each petal. The blooms occur in clusters of three to five flowers, on a neat, upright bush with firm stems. The dark, lustrous foliage is resistant to disease. Treloar Roses.

8 Wollerton Old Hall English shrub rose (1.6x1.3m) or a climber that can grow to 3m. This is one of the most fragrant of the David Austin roses. It is intensely floral with hints of myrrh and apricot. Plump buds with f lashes of red open to chalice-shaped blooms of soft apricot, which fade to cream. It is repeat flowering and has few thorns, making it almost irresistible. David Austin Roses; www.davidaustinroses.com/australian.

9 Origami Coconut Ice Origami

Floribunda rose (1.2x0.9m) This rose’s name was inspired by its angular shape, which is similar to a paper folded flower. Clusters of red buds open to ivory blooms edged in crimson, with a light rose perfume. It was a gold medal winner at the Australian Rose Trials and has highly diseaseresistant foliage. Corporate Roses; www.corporate roses.com.au.

10 Pro Hart

TIP Order new-release roses early as they sell out.

Floribunda rose (1.2x1m) As it celebrates Australian artist Pro Hart and his distinctive paintings, it’s fitting that this is an Australian-bred rose. It features dusky, rich purple, ruffled blooms that cover the bush in a purple haze. The flowers have an intense damask-rose fragrance. Ross Roses. #

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+ FREE DELIVERY of the magazine with either option GREAT AUSTRALIAN GARDENS This glorious book takes readers on a virtual stroll through some of Australia’s loveliest gardens. From sprawling country properties through to cleverly planned and planted urban plots, this stunning book showcases an edited selection of the magnificent gardens from the pages of Australian House & Garden magazine. Moving from romantic, flower-filled wonderlands through to sculptural, water-saving native gardens, bountiful edible plots and rural oases, Great Australian Gardens pays homage to the life-affirming, stunning beauty of a lovingly-tended patch. Generous layouts, images from Australia’s best garden photographers and insights from the owners of these special properties will delight true gardeners and aesthetes alike.

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Styling by Michaela Le Compte. Photograph by John Paul Urizar.

Recipes and tips for a delightfully stylish picnic

LIVING ENTERTAINING / DRINKS / TR AVEL / BEAUT Y / HEALTH


Park and parcels Rustle up some delicious, portable fare and rally a bunch of friends for a posh picnic. R E C I P E S LISA FEATHE RBY & EM M A K NOW L ES / S T Y L I N G M IC HA EL A L E COM PT E P HO T O G R A P H Y JOHN PAUL UR IZ A R

Folding stools and linen cushions, Ici et Là. Linen table runner, Papaya. For similar folding table, try Ray’s Outdoors. Vintage picnic baskets and flowers in mason jars, Seasonal Concepts. Throw, Papaya. Hat, Seed Heritage. Belize (grey) and Torquay timber lanterns, Papaya. Vintage copper lantern, Seasonal Concepts. Vintage mobliette bicycle, Ici et Là.


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CHILLED SOUP MAKES A NATURAL ALFRESCO ENTRÃ&#x2030;E. TRANSPORT IT IN A COLD THERMOS TO SERVE REFRESHINGLY COOL.

Chilled pea & mint soup

Dessert bowls, tray and teak serving board, all Papaya. Bamboo cutlery, House2Home. For similar acrylic tumbler, try Domayne. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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Roast pork rolls with apple slaw

Scotch eggs

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT / Serving boards, Papaya. Vintage basket, Seasonal Concepts. Vintage pewter tray. White bowl, Country Road. For similar salt dish, try Mud Australia. Stool, Ici et Là. Olivia arranges flowers for the picnic. Cushion, Ici et Là. OPPOSITE / Platter and toast tongs, Papaya. Stool, Ici et Là. Glass bowl, Papaya. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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H&G L I V I N G

SUCCULENT ROAST MEAT AND SALAD IS ALWAYS A WINNING COMBINATION. FOR CUTLERY-FREE DINING TUCK IT INTO SOFT ROLLS.

White bean salad

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Lattice tart

INDIVIDUAL DESSERT POTS, A HOME-BAKED CAKE OR TART CAN WITHSTAND A BIT OF JOSTLING. SEASONAL FRUIT IS A TOP OPTION.

Side plates, Papaya. Syrup jug and bamboo forks, House2Home. Jar, Woolworths. Vintage chopping board, Ici et LÃ . Linen table runner, Papaya.


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Chocolate pots

Glass pots, House2Home. Grey paper napkin, Papaya. For similar woven tray, try Honeybee Homewares. FO R W H ERE TO BU Y, SEE PAGE 19 4.

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Chilled pea & mint soup

Scotch eggs

Roast pork rolls with apple slaw

Prep: 20 mins + chilling. Cooking: 10 mins. Serves 8 as a starter.

Prep: 30 mins. Cooking: 20 mins. Serves 6.

Prep: 30 mins. Cooking: 2 hrs 45 mins + resting. Serves 8.

2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp (20g) butter, softened 1 onion, coarsely chopped 2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped 3 cups (750ml) vegetable or chicken stock 1kg frozen peas, defrosted 1 bunch mint, coarsely chopped 2 tbsp crème fraîche, plus extra to serve (optional) 1 tbsp lemon juice Garlic croutons 16 thin baguette slices (about 1/3 baguette) Extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing 1 clove garlic, halved 1 / Place oil and butter in a saucepan and heat over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, add onion and garlic and sauté for 15mins or until tender. Add stock and bring to the boil; add peas and return to the boil. Remove from heat and use a stick blender to process until smooth. Season to taste and refrigerate until well chilled. Stir through mint, crème fraîche and lemon just before serving. 2 / To make garlic croutons, preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C). Place bread slices on an oven tray, brush both sides with olive oil and bake, turning once, until golden, about 5mins. While still warm, rub croutons with cut side of garlic, season to taste and set aside to cool. Store in an airtight container for 1-2 days. 3 / Serve chilled soup with garlic croutons, cracked pepper and an extra dollop of crème fraîche, if you like.

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600g pork mince ½ onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1½ tbsp Dijon mustard 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce 1 tbsp thyme 1 tsp Tabasco, or to taste 6 eggs, at room temperature, plus 2 extra eggs, lightly beaten, for eggwash Seasoned plain flour, for dusting 3 cups (150g) fine dried breadcrumbs Vegetable oil, for deep-frying Lime wedges, to serve Lemon mayonnaise 2 egg yolks 2 tbsp white wine vinegar 1½ tbsp Dijon mustard 350ml olive oil Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon 1 / Combine pork, onion, garlic, mustard, Worcestershire, thyme and Tabasco in a bowl. Season; refrigerate until needed. 2 / For lemon mayonnaise, place egg yolks, vinegar and mustard in a food processor and whiz to combine. With motor running, add oil in a thin, steady stream until thick and emulsified. Add lemon zest and juice, season to taste and refrigerate until needed. 3 / Bring a saucepan of water to a simmer over medium heat. Add eggs and cook, stirring occasionally, until done to your liking (7mins for soft-boiled, 10mins for hardboiled). Drain, refresh in cold water, drain and peel. Dust in flour, shaking off excess. 4 / Shape 1/6 pork mixture into a cup in your hand, place a boiled egg in the indent and mould mince around to enclose. Repeat with remaining pork mixture and eggs. 5 / Dust each egg ball in flour, followed by eggwash, then breadcrumbs. Refrigerate until required. 6 / Heat oil to 180˚C in a deep-fryer or deep-sided frypan. Fry eggs in batches, turning occasionally, until breadcrumbs are golden and pork is cooked through, about 6-7mins. Drain on absorbent paper. 7 / Serve warm or cold with lemon mayonnaise and lime wedges.

1 tsp fennel seeds, coarsely crushed ½ tsp ground coriander ½ tsp ground allspice 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp finely chopped thyme 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, plus 2 heads garlic, halved Finely grated zest of 1 orange 2 green apples, thickly sliced 1.2kg pork belly, skin and fat scored at 1cm intervals 250ml dry apple cider 1½ tbsp apple cider vinegar ¾ cup (225g) mayonnaise 8 soft rolls, to serve Apple slaw 60g sour cream 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 1½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 400g cabbage, shaved on a mandoline 2 green apples, thinly sliced 1 golden shallot, thinly sliced ¾ cup coarsely torn mint 4 long pickled chillies, thinly sliced 1 / Preheat oven to 220˚C (200˚C fan). Roast spices in a frypan over medium-high heat until fragrant, then place in a bowl with oil, thyme, chopped garlic and zest; season. Place apple and heads of garlic, cut-side up, in a roasting pan and place pork on top, skin-side up. Rub spice paste all over pork, scattering extra salt over skin, then add cider and 3 tsp vinegar to pan. Roast until skin begins to crackle, 30-40mins. Reduce oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan) and roast until skin is crisp and golden and meat is tender, about 1-1½hrs. Rest 15mins; shred before serving. 2 / For apple slaw, place sour cream, vinegar, oil, zest, juice and garlic in a bowl; whisk to combine. Add cabbage, apple, shallot, mint and chillies, season and toss to combine. 3 / Squeeze roasted garlic from skins, mash with a fork. Stir garlic and remaining vinegar into mayonnaise; season. Serve pork and slaw in rolls spread with garlic mayonnaise.


White bean salad

Lattice tart

Chocolate pots

Prep: 30 mins + soaking. Cooking: 1 hr. Serves 6.

Prep: 20 mins + standing. Cooking: 2 hrs. Serves 8.

Prep: 15 mins + chilling. Cooking: 10 mins. Serves 6.

3x 400g cans cannellini beans ½ cup (125ml) extra-virgin olive oil 110g baby capers in vinegar, rinsed ¼ cup (60ml) lemon juice, or to taste 3 golden shallots, finely chopped 6 anchovy fillets, finely chopped ½ preserved lemon, pith and flesh removed, zest finely chopped 1 clove garlic, crushed 1 cup firmly packed mint, torn 1 cup firmly packed flat-leaf parsley, torn, plus extra for garnish Place all ingredients except herbs in a bowl, toss to combine and season to taste. Add herbs just before serving.

Roast beef fillet with green goddess dressing Prep: 25 mins + resting. Cooking: 30 mins. Serves 6-8.

1½ tbsp vegetable oil 1.2kg beef fillet, trimmed and tied Green goddess dressing ½ cup (125ml) mayonnaise ½ cup (125g) sour cream 2 tbsp (40ml) lemon juice, or to taste 2 cups loosely packed flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped 2 golden shallots, finely chopped 7 anchovy fillets, finely chopped ¼ cup chives, finely chopped 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp capers, rinsed, finely chopped

1 / Preheat oven to 180˚C (160˚C fan). Heat a large frypan over high heat, add oil, season beef to taste and cook, turning occasionally for 1-2mins, or until browned. Place on a wire rack over a roasting tray and roast until cooked to your liking (about 30mins for rare); tent loosely with foil and set aside to rest. Slice thickly just before serving. 2 / Meanwhile, combine all dressing ingredients in a food processor and pulse until combined; refrigerate until required. Serve roast beef with some of the dressing drizzled over and extra on the side.

435g sweet shortcrust pastry, such as Carême Vanilla Bean Sweet Pastry 1 egg, lightly beaten with 1 tbsp milk 2 tbsp demerara sugar Pure icing sugar, for dusting Softly whipped cream, to serve Rhubarb and strawberry compote 1kg rhubarb, washed, cut into 3cm pieces 500g strawberries, hulled and some halved, some left whole 2 cups (440g) caster sugar Juice and finely grated zest of 1 orange Juice of 1 lemon 2 cinnamon quills 150g almond meal 1 / To make compote, toss rhubarb and strawberries with sugar in a bowl and stand to macerate for 20-25mins. Place in a saucepan, add orange and lemon juices, zest and cinnamon. Simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until almost tender, about 6-8mins. Remove from heat and stand 5mins to soften. Strain liquid into a clean saucepan, returning cinnamon quills to pot. Transfer strained fruit to a large bowl, fold in almond meal and set aside. 2 / Bring fruit cooking liquid to the boil and cook until reduced to a thick syrup, about 20-25mins. 3 / Meanwhile, preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan). Place pastry on a sheet of baking paper and trim edges to fit a 4-cup, 25cm pie tin with edges overhanging, then use pastry to line tin. Cut remaining pastry into 1.5cm-wide strips and refrigerate until slightly firm. Pour fruit and almond meal mixture into pastry case, brush edges with eggwash and arrange pastry strips on top in a lattice pattern. Trim edges, brush eggwash on top, scatter with demerara sugar and bake until golden, about 50mins-1hr. (Cover edges with foil if pastry browns too quickly.) 4 / Dust pie with icing sugar and serve with softly whipped cream and drizzled with warm rhubarb-cinnamon syrup.

1 cup (250ml) pouring cream 1 cup (250ml) milk 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 4 egg yolks 80g raw caster sugar 300g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), finely chopped, plus extra grated to serve Créme fraîche and biscuits such as crostoli, to serve

1 / Place cream, milk and vanilla seeds in a saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Remove from heat. 2 / Place yolks and sugar in a bowl and whisk until pale. Add warm cream mixture to yolks and whisk to combine. Return mixture to saucepan and stir continuously over medium heat until mixture coats a spoon thickly, about 4-5mins. Remove from heat, add chocolate, whisk until smooth and combined, then divide among 6x 150ml serving glasses. Refrigerate until completely chilled and set, about 3hrs. 3 / Serve topped with a dollop of créme fraîche, dusted with extra grated chocolate and biscuits for dipping on the side. #

At your service Having good, ready-to-serve containers is almost as important as what you put in them. Screw-top jars are easy to transport and a fun way to serve all manner of goodies. There are plenty of salad bowls with lids available too. Transport chilled soups in thermoses so they’re ready to pour, and stock up on modern melamine plates to lighten your load. The best picnic tools are of course your hands. Don’t forget the napkins!

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H&G L I V I N G

DRINKS

IN THE MIX Explore the world of mixed-varietal wines and discover blends with unique character and wonderful fragrance that are brimming with flavour, writes Toni Paterson.

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Mixed-varietal vineyard blocks are not very common in modern winemaking countries such as Australia. Local wines labelled field blends are often a mix of the different varieties grown across the whole property prior to fermentation, in a proportion determined by the winemaker – essentially a form of co-fermentation. Look out for the excellent 2015 Cherubino Laissez Faire Field Blend, $25. A blend of gewürztraminer, pinot grigio, riesling and sauvignon gris (a clonal mutation of sauvignon blanc), it is full-flavoured and gentle with soft fruit and spice. For a premium example of a more traditional blend, look out for the 2011 Voyager Estate Cabernet Merlot, $70. The individual parcels were vinified and aged separately, then blended prior to bottling. It has excellent purity, clarity and harmony. Also excellent is the Kir Yianni Petra, $26, a blend of white varieties roditis and malagouzia from Greece. It is bone dry with a grapefruity vein. Blends add colour and energy to a wine category. A case in point is Australia’s most well-known wine, Penfolds Grange, a blend of shiraz and cabernet sauvignon. And of course, the consistency of nonvintage Champagne comes from blending up to three varieties. Blends, however constructed, offer an excellent wine adventure, especially if you have been exclusively buying # straight varietals.

TONI’S TOP DROPS 2012 Yalumba The Scribbler, $22 A classic Australian blend of cab sav and shiraz with vibrant red fruit and richness. Decant prior to serving to reveal spice and dark chocolate nuances. 2015 Swinney Tirra Lirra Riesling Pinot Gris Gewürztraminer, $30 The varieties were separately fermented then blended before ageing. Aromatic complexity, a little flesh and steely acidity. 2015 La Prova Bianco, $20 Individually vinified pinot grigio, fiano and garganega are skillfully blended to create an incredibly fresh and balanced wine with faint fruitiness. 2014 Montevecchio Bianco, $23 A co-fermented field blend of vermentino, fiano and moscato giallo. Deliciously dry and light-bodied with a little minerality.

Photograph by Ben Hansen.

M

i x e d -v a r i e t a l w i n e s a r e experiencing a welcome revival. Eclectic blends of lesser-known grape varieties are adding colour and interest to the wine category, plus classic varietal mixes continue to offer balance, harmony and value. In old wine regions such as France, Italy and Portugal, it is not uncommon to see different varieties growing side by side in the same vineyard. This sometimes occurred when vine cuttings were incorrectly identified prior to planting. In other cases, it may have been an inexpensive way of establishing a vineyard. Whatever the reason, it has the benefit of giving the vineyard a unique character. Wine made from such vineyards is sometimes referred to as a ‘field blend’, and the proportion of varieties in the final wine is determined by what is planted. For example, Blind Corner in Margaret River has a row of viognier in the middle of its shiraz block, which adds fragrance and interest to the final wine. Vineyard blending is just one of three ways to make a mixed-varietal wine, however. The most common way is to blend single varietal wines after fermentation; combining grapes prior to ferment (co-fermentation) is another option. Many winemakers prefer to blend post-ferment. Using this technique, many parameters can be adjusted, such as alcohol level, fruitiness, length, sweetness and oak.


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H&G T R AV E L

CRUISING

CRUISE CONTROL Gently cruising the Riviera, stopping off to explore the port cities and beyond, is the way to experience the Mediterranean, writes Judith Elen.

1

Barcelona

TRAVEL THE RIVIERA Cruising operates within broad extremes. Big liners ply the oceans, skimming coastlines, with a few fleeting hours in port; river cruisers moor beside towns and villages, never losing sight of land. Azamara Club Cruises rests comfortably between the two. Gently drifting around the coastal waterways of France and Italy in the mid-sized Azamara Quest allows us about as much time on land as on board. Two ships in the line, Azamara Quest and Journey, carry about 700 passengers each, dual-occupancy, on four main decks. Public spaces on three levels, plus sun deck, include most facilities you would find on a bigger ship. But port access is Azamara’s primary mission. They call it “destination immersion”. With overnight stays, late sailings (8 or 10pm) and night touring, the ship becomes a bridge and the coast a portal onto the land. And my Spain-to-the-Riviera itinerary has some truly magic portals. For itineraries, including around Australia, go to azamaraclubcruises.com.

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2

IN MARSEILLE, WEATHERED HISTORY IS INTERLACED WITH SLEEK ARCHITECTURE. FROM MY BALCONY, I PICK OUT THE GLEAMING CMA CGM TOWER BY ZAHA HADID. ON THE DOCK, THE MUSEUM OF EUROPEAN AND MEDITERRANEAN CIVILISATIONS EMBODIES THE NEW MARSEILLE. THE PETIT TRAIN TOURISTIQUE TAKES ME HIGH UP TO THE NOTRE-DAME DE LA GARDE (ABOVE LEFT), OVERLOOKING VIEUX-PORT AND THE S E A .

ALL ABOARD Azamara Quest is highly comfortable, with space for socialising and seclusion. There are provisions for leisure (pool, library, spa) and entertainment (casino, live shows). Excellent food is available in the allinclusive restaurants, cafes and poolside grill, as well as specialty restaurants Prime C and Aqualina, which offer delicious gourmet cuisine for a $25pp surcharge.

Photography from Getty Images (except Azamara Quest) and Brett Stevens/bauersyndication.com.au (Champagne). Judith travelled as a guest of Azamara Club Cruises.

Our starting point is the Spanish port of Barcelona, its streets studded with Antoni Gaudí’s contorted buildings. Embarkation begins at 11am and we sail at 10pm, so have hours to explore the city. Sliding open the door in my Veranda Stateroom, I step onto the balcony to enjoy the panoramic view, then stop by the Windows Cafe for fresh sushi with a cool glass of wine before heading into town. Once ashore, I simply walk along the port and into Barcelona.


3

PROVENCE

On a Land Discoveries tour (Azamara’s extensive optional program), I head off through the Provençal countryside on a four-hour trip to Aix-en-Provence (above), birthplace of Cezanne, site of Roman ruins and medieval churches, lavender fields and van Gogh’s sunflowers. Aix’s fabulous open-air market is overflowing with flowers, gourmet produce and all the local specialities, including big cakes of olive-oil soap.

4 Corsica, Cinque Terre, Portofino, Monte Carlo Simply wandering on shore is adventure enough and costs little; €1 for a glass of chilled rosé in Corsica (above), a few more for the tourist train. In Bastia I discover Chez Mireille, where mother and daughter conjure specialty breads and pastry. But Land Discoveries tours are a highlight, with brilliant local guides illuminating destinations further afield. On one such tour, we meander through the legendary Italian Cinque Terre (left), returning to the intoxicating seaside village of Portofino (below, left) with the evening still ahead of us. I am on the last shore-to-ship tender at 9.30pm. Next port is Monaco, where I pick up some memorable house-made terrines at Formia Boucheries in Monte Carlo for a picnic on the run.

A Z A M A R A O F F E R S A F R E E L O C A L E XC U R S I O N O N E AC H C R U I S E . O U R ‘A Z A M A Z I N G ’ E V E N I N G I N VO LV E S A N O P E R A S I N G E R , C H A M PAG N E A N D S T I LTWA L K I N G F I R E - J U G G L E R S AT 1 8 T H - C E N T U RY C H AT E A U D ’A L P H É R A N I N T H E P R OV E N Ç A L C O U N T RY S I D E . #


H&G L I V I N G

1

BEAUTY

2

MANE GAME If you have fine or thinning hair, don’t succumb to tress distress. The right products can lock in added fullness and volume, writes Elisabeth King.

CLEAN START Some volumising shampoos make hair too fluffy to style. The concentrated formulas of Moroccanoil Extra Volume shampoo (5) and conditioner, $38/each, use argan oil and keratin to add lasting volume and shine, even to overprocessed hair. Pricey, but a little goes a long way.

THE BIG BUILD-UP As we age, strands of hair shrink and locks become prone to flyaways. For an instant remedy, try Tresemmé’s Youth Boost Fullness Emulsion Spray (2), $11. Loaded with omega-3 acids, antioxidants and vitamins, the formula lifts hair at the roots and is claimed to make hair look twice as thick.

FRIZZ WHIZ Frizz is as much of a concern for women with fine hair as it is for those with thick, curly locks. And it’s a problem that grows worse if you regularly colour your hair. Redken’s lightweight Frizz Dismiss Smooth Force leave-in spray

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(6), $30, has been formulated for fine-to-medium hair, with a humidity-resistant complex for lasting control of flyaway hairs.

6

POWDER POINTS It can be hard for brushes to get a grip on freshly washed fine hair. Volumising powders help but when sprinkled directly on hair, they sometimes result in a sticky mess. The clever trigger delivery system of Bhave Gun Powder (4), $30, lets you direct the flow for added texture and a matt finish. A tiny amount is all that’s needed.

FINE AND DRY Dry shampoo can be a godsend, adding body to just-washed fine hair and extending the life of a blow-dry. Billed as ‘makeup for your hair’, Ambiance Dry Shampoo (3), from $35, uses a refillable applicator to deliver volume, conceal grey roots and cleanse between washes. Available in blonde, brunette, red, black or untinted versions. A small bottle lasts ages.

5

3

TREAT, SPRAY, LOVE Hairspray is essential for retaining waves and shape in fine hair, but avoid an extra-strong hold that’s hard to brush out or produces the dreaded ‘helmet’ look. Instead, lock in body with fast-drying Luxurious Volume All-Day Hold spray (1), $16, from John Frieda, which leaves hair soft and touchable. Spot-apply it near the roots, then style your hair as normal. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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4

Redecker round beech bath brush and Acca Kappa beech hairbrushes, Saison. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Ben Hansen.

F

ine hair is probably the only part of the body most people would love to deliberately ‘fatten up’. Fortunately, there’s a multitude of new hair products that can help create a lot out of very little. Whether your hair needs a boost because of stress, genes, damage or thinning, these body-building solutions can amplify fullness.

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H&G L I V I N G THE NUT CASE

FAT CHANCE We’re often given conflicting advice about which types of fat to incorporate into our diet. Here, Paula Goodyer delivers the good oil.

W

‘THERE’S A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN EATING A CROISSANT LOADED WITH BUTTER AND THE WAY BUTTER IS EATEN AS PART OF A TRADITIONAL MEDITERRANEAN DIET.’ DR CATHERINE ITSIOPOULOS

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hen it comes to healthy eating, fat is a tricky area to navigate. The science of fat is complicated and made more complex by conflicting opinions: is butter an artery clogger or a healthy fat perfect for sautéing kale? To help clear t hings up, Dr Cat herine Itsiopoulos, Associate Professor of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at La Trobe University, answers these questions: Is it possible for butter be part of a healthy diet? A lt houg h but ter is h ig h i n saturated fat, with the exception of trans fat, it’s not the type of fat that causes heart disease, but the quality of our diet as a whole, says Dr Itsiopoulos, author of The Mediterranean Diet Cookbook . “There’s a difference between eating a croissant loaded with butter and the way butter is eaten as part of a traditional Mediterranean diet – on crusty bread with tomato, for example,” she says. Can I get enough omega-3 fats without eating fish? It’s difficult, because the omega-3 fats in plant foods are different to those in fish. Although our bodies can convert omega-3 fats from

plants into the same type of omega 3-fats found in fish we can’t produce enough of it. “Ideally we need to eat oily fish twice a week and try to include plant sources of omega-3 fats each day in the form or chia or flax seeds, walnuts and leafy greens,” says Dr Itsiopoulos. Which are the healthiest fats to cook with? Dr Itsiopou los rates monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, peanut and canola, avocado and macadamia oil as the best choices. “I would put them ahead of polyunsaturated omega-6 oils. It’s not that polyunsaturated fats are unhealthy but western diets are too rich in them,” she says, “and too low in the omega-3 fats found in fish and some plant foods.” Is it safe to heat olive oil? Yes. Olive oil is a good all-rounder that can be used for most types of cooking, says Dr Itsiopoulos. As with any type of oil, it’s important to avoid either heating it to the point where it smokes or reheating it. These can produce harmful chemicals. “Refined olive oils can be used for frying because they have a higher smoke point, but are stripped of antioxidants so they are not as healthy as extra-virgin olive oils. #

Illustration by Dominic Bahmann.

HEALTH

If they’re packed with fat and high in kilojoules, why are nuts touted as a useful food for weight loss? There are two reasons, says Dr Itsiopoulos: They’re a great snack food because they’re nutrient-rich and filling. And not all the fat is digested, so we don’t absorb all the kilojoules. “They are a good replacement for other snacks such as biscuits, which are less satisfying. But portion control is important. If you eat nuts all day you’ll put on weight.”


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Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by John Paul Urizar.

How to create space and add value

An opportune purchase and thoughtful renovation has provided one Sydney family with a bright and spacious home that has more than doubled their happiness. To share the journey, turn the page...

ADVICE RENOVATORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTEBOOK / THE GREEN HOUSE / ASK AN EXPERT


Kai and Charlotte reap the benefits of a double-size block. The rear of the house, painted in Dulux Mud Pack, has a new deck paved with Classico tumbled travertine from Marble & Ceramic Corp.

RENOVATORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTEBOOK

DOUBLE VISION

Lateral thinking led this Sydney couple to convert two adjoining semi-detached houses into one roomy family home. S T O RY J UDY BAROUCH / S T Y L I N G KAYLA GE X P HO T O G R A P H Y J OH N PAUL URIZA R


H&G A DV I C E

M

ichelle and Wayne Flekser were living in a semi-detached cottage in Sydney’s east, dreaming about expanding their living quarters, when they spied a For Sale sign on a pair of 1920s semis in the next street. They realised it was a perfect opportunity to turn two into one. “The selling agent was promoting the idea that each semi could be built up a storey with the new owners retaining one half and renting out its twin, but we had other ideas,” says Michelle. “We immediately visualised creating a one-level family home similar to the one we loved living in, but on a more spacious scale.” An amazing transformation followed, with much of the building retained by reassigning rooms. The party wall was kept at the front but knocked out at the rear to make way for an open-plan kitchen/living/dining area, which takes the place of the old sections that had contained bedrooms, dining rooms and kitchens. For the parents’ suite, a small front bedroom was enlarged by merging it with the adjoining balcony; and it gained an ensuite and petite walk-in wardrobe from a converted side porch. The two former living rooms became the children’s bedrooms and one semi’s bathroom was converted into a family bathroom. The other semi’s bathroom made way for a side entrance hallway. “A new entrance at the front would have been expensive and we would have had to sacrifice a room,” says Michelle. >

AT A G L A N C E Who lives here Michelle Flekser, a marketing

manager, Wayne Flekser, a digital marketing specialist, and their children Charlotte, six, and Kai, four. Timeline Planning and DA approval took four months; construction a further four. Design/construct Cape Cod Australia; www.capecod.com.au. Colour consultant/kitchen designer

Dwell By Jo, Jo Simhi; 0414 562 055 or www.dwellbyjo.com.au. Size of home pre renovation 190m² Size post renovation 240m²

Before

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B

D

C

For Where to Buy, see page 194.

A

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H&G A DV I C E < A Hallway The front door was enlarged and a frosted glass side panel added to allow more light into the entrance area. Michelle says the coathooks have proven their worth and are indispensible for quick-grab hats, bags and jackets.

B Kitchen

Deck

Kitchen

Dining

Kitchen

A F TER Bed

Dining

Living

Dining

B EFO RE

The kitchen, by Attard’s Kitchens & Cabinetry, reflects the classic nature of the house. Two-tone joinery – with Dulux Bearsuit on the island bench and Grey Pebble on the cabinetry – adds depth to the colour scheme.

Bed Bath Bath

Bath Living

C Kai’s bedroom Vintage hot-air balloons from Adrienne & The Misses Bonney add a fun touch to this space. The blind is from Homelife Furnishings.

Kitchen

Entrance Bed

Living

Bed

Bed Bed

Bed Bed Entrance

Entrance

Verandah Bath

Verandah

D Computer nook

N

A built-in desk is hidden behind concertina doors in a corner of the combined kitchen/living area.

Family bathroom (below)

Renovating tips from Michelle & Wayne

As this renovated bathroom (previously one semi’s bathroom) is for the children and guests, it required both a bathtub (from Sannine Bathrooms) and separate shower. A glass panel protects the wet area and ensures the room appears clean-lined and spacious.

✚ Stay a few weeks ahead of your builder’s schedule: prepare, pre-empt and plan in advance so that as much as possible is ready for delivery to your site. You don’t ever want to be the ones to hold up the build. ✚ Be on-site as much as you can. Invariably, things change at a moment’s notice and the quicker you can be there to make a decision, the smoother the renovation. ✚ Don’t be afraid to be the ‘bad guy’ but choose your battles carefully. If something is very important to you, don’t compromise because you will never be happy later. ✚ Keep your lifestyle in mind. If you spend your weekends entertaining and cooking, focus your renovation around your kitchen and living area to make it the best possible space it can be. ✚ Budget for experts such as a colour consultant or interior designer even if it’s just for a couple of key areas. It can seem expensive upfront but a wrong decision can # prove even more costly.

✚ FOR MORE RENOVATION INSPIRATION visit www.

homestolove.com.au/ houseandgarden

THE BUDGET Design Fees Preliminaries Council Fees Surveys & engineering Demolition Tip fees & cleaning Footings/concrete Brickwork & materials Carpentry & materials Plumbing & materials Electrical & materials Waterproofing & materials

32,258 49,739 7723 3747 15,171 53,102 9971 20,640 55,480 24,150 15,674 3946

Roofing & materials Gyprock & insulation Windows Rendering Timber Floors Internal doors & architraves Kitchen Internal/external paint Taps/tiles/vanities etc. Landscaping TOTAL

17,627 12,034 20,102 8742 17,150 7415 35,000 15,753 30,685 14,000 $470,109


H&G A DV I C E

the green house

playing it cool Ditch the second fridge and you’ll save a significant amount of money and power, writes Sarah Pickette. Introducing the world’s most liveable carpet...

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ere’s a cautionary tale for anyone who’s ever thought having a second fridge in the garage might be handy. A supermarket had a ‘buy two for the price of one’ offer on legs of lamb: one shopper thought this sounded like a good deal, so she bought the two legs of lamb for $30. She cooked one, and put the other in the freezer of her second fridge/freezer in the garage. “Three months later, when she went to defrost it, that second leg of lamb alone had cost her about $75 in electricity,” says Rene Hendriksen, manager of Fridge Buyback, a residential energy-saving program based in Sydney. “Running a second fridge typically adds an average of $300 to your power bill and contributes one tonne of carbon pollution each year.” Fridge Buyback works with 51 councils in NSW to pick up old fridges and pay small rebates (conditions apply), before safely disposing of the gases in old fridges and recycling the metals and other materials from the fridge. There is a similar program operating in the ACT.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

“Councils and governments are encouraging people to reduce their household power usage. Dispensing with a second fridge is one of the most effective ways to do this,” says Hendriksen. While the buyback program only pays $15, this can be enough incentive for people to finally do away with that extra fridge. Since the buyback program began in NSW in 2008, more than 54,000 fridges have been reclaimed and recycled. “That means $16.2 million worth of energy a year is not being used by those fridges,” says Hendriksen. “And 437,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases have not been emitted.” Older fridges can cost three times as much to run as today’s more efficient models, he says. “An old fridge would cost more to operate even if it was as-new but often the seals are lousy as well, and if it’s being kept in a hot location it will become even more inefficient. You can spend in the thousands of dollars running a # second fridge.” NSW: www.fridgebuyback.com.au. ACT: www.actewagl.com.au/fridgebuyback.

Photograph from Alamy.

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6897

From Includes stone benchtop, handles, and cabinetry with Alpine profile.

Classic U Shaped Kitchen price excludes Splashback, Flooring, Mondella Rococo Sink 5090190 $209, Bellini Rangehood 5102529 $249, Dorf Vixen Sink Mixer 5003232 $298, Bellini 90cm Gas Cooktop 5102304 $399, Bellini 90cm Electric Oven 5102292 $925. Appliances available in WA at Bunnings Armadale and Bunbury.

Create your dream kitchen for a warehouse price, with U shaped kitchen packages starting from just $3061. Get inspired by the possibilities in-store and online or book an in-home consultation on 1800 099 999 or search Bunnings kitchens


GROUP PENDANTS TOGETHER TO MAKE A STRIKING FEATURE PENDANTS FROM LEFT Home Design Ambra Tozzo $110, Ambra Tondo and Ambra Ciclo $94.90 each

LIGHTS ON RENOVATIONS Shine a light on your home reno with the new range of pendant, floor and table lights from Bunnings. LAY A GEOMETRIC PENDANT LIGHT ON THE COFFEE TABLE FOR INTEREST Brilliant Black Matrix pendant light $145.50

Add the finishing touch to your home renovation with statement lighting. Whether it’s a cluster of cool pendant lights above the kitchen island, or a metallic table lamp in your home office, the right lighting can make all the difference to your home’s look and feel. Take a look at these strikingly beautiful and functional designs.


Cafe Lighting Masco Light floor lamp $139

Home Design Black Conico floor lamp $59

Arlec New York Metal floor lamp $29.90

Harrison floor lamp $129

Sian floor lamp $199

Ciara floor lamp $140

BRAND PROMOTION

k lamp p $39

TREND ARBLE

TIPS AND TRICKS STANDOUT LIGHTI

sign Marmo ndant lights

01

First consider what type of lighting you need for the space. Is the light for style purposes only, or do you need more light for tasks? Treat your lighting like any other home accessory. Play around with colours and textures, and even ďŹ nishes like marble or concrete. Experiment with scale and numbering. Try one oversized pendant light or a cluster of smaller, different shapes over the dining table. Use lighting in non-traditional ways for interest. Replace bedside lights with ďŹ&#x201A;oor lamps, or lay a cage pendant on the coffee table.

02

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ogue Living Sakura pendant light $159 Home Design Bussi Concrete pendant light $59

Contact your local Bunnings for availability. Visit bunnings.com.au/indoorlighting


H&G P R O M O T I O N

EASY DOES IT

ON SOFA Ireby polyester-linen cushion in Blue, $50. Wirrainbeia cushion in Natural, $60. Haslewood polyester-linen cushion in Blue, $50. Brighton iron coffee table with mangowood top, $399. ON COFFE TABLE Amos 30.5cm marble serving board with leather handle, $50. Gibson etched-glass tumblers, $10/each. Tall two-tone stoneware vase in Blue & Black, $60. All exclusive to Myer; www.myer.com.au.

Styling by Ashley Pratt. Photograph by Shanon Franks.

Set the scene for relaxation with the natural textures and calming hues of Australian House & Garden homewares, exclusive to Myer.


H&G A DV I C E

ask an expert Interiors expert Rose-Marie Hillier shares the secrets of furniture selection for larger homes and reveals her top five favourite bedside tables.

WRITE IN Send your question, with your name and address, to Rose-Marie via H&G Advice, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028, or email h&g@bauer-media. com.au.

Q We recently moved into a new four-bedroom home with large living areas. We’re decorating from scratch and want to get it right, but I don’t like the idea of buying furniture simply to fill up the space. How do I begin?

Photograph by James Knowler/bauersyndication.com.au.

Alex McKendry, via email

A The aim is to create a home where you feel truly comfortable. To achieve this, you’ll need to pay attention to proportion. This means considering the size and scale of not only the furniture, but of the designs of wallpaper and fabrics. In a large home, you will need bigger pieces and more of them. It may mean choosing a four-seater sofa instead of a three-seater, and designating two conversation groupings in your living space, which may require the use of several easy chairs as well. Streamlined built-ins tend to make a room appear more expansive; in your case, try shelving to minimise the impact of a long wall. Displaying artwork at random will draw attention to vacant spaces, so go for larger canvases to fill walls with bold colour and pattern, or cluster artworks in different sizes in groups around the room. This is an opportunity to have a big, beautiful ‘look at me’ rug; importantly, its intention should be to anchor the furniture. Interior designer Greg Natale gives great advice about this in his book The Tailored Interior ($69.95, Hardie Grant). > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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FAST FIND

BEDSIDE TABLES Size, style and storage are the three defining features of a good bedside table. Whether you want everything on display, essentials within reach, or bits and bobs tucked away, there’s a design to suit every taste and budget.

Natural tree stump side table It’s not technically a bedside table (and may be a bit low for some beds), but I love the look of this solid cypress log ‘off-cut’. There’s room for a night light, glass and clock/radio. $299; 1800 239 516 or www.westelm.com.au. Stockholm bedside table Is this a spunky little table or what? Clever, too – two of the legs are adjustable for stability on uneven floors. Made from a combination of ash, beech and plywood, it features a handy essentials drawer. $99; www.ikea.com.au. Marguerite bedside table This MDF table draws inspiration from classic French styles. Also available in Soft Pink, Soft Grey and White, it would work with French provincial or Hamptons interiors. $149; (03) 9767 7700 or www.earlysettler.com.au. Oscar night table This table, by Progetti for Zanotta, has a simple ‘drawer on a frame’ concept and it’s all you need bedside. The steel frame is finished in chrome-plate or varnished graphite; the drawer is MDF with natural oak veener, stained wenge, grey or white. $2670; (02) 8339 7588 or www.spacefurniture.com.au. Park mirrored two-drawer bedside table There’s nothing like mirrored furniture for turning up the glamour factor. The key, howver, is to select one statement piece – and this ritzy bedside table could be that one. Evoking the symmetry of early 19th century Empire furniture, it’s made from poplar with hand-applied gilt trim and mirrored front, sides and top. $654; 1800 232 914 or www.potterybarn.com.au. # Have a look at these too… Oslo two-drawer bedside table Modern and neutral, the Oslo will sit nicely within any style of decor. $379; www.freedom.com. au. Southbank bedside table with technology pack This timber bedside table with drawer and open shelf features an automatic sensor light at its base and two USB ports. $799; www.snooze.com. au. Percy bedside table Mod-style design and sturdy timber construction. $100; www.zanui.com.au. Gramercy Park side table Featuring a rich timber finish, the round open-front table evokes the style of the 1940s. $595; www.maxsparrow.com.au. Strand bedside table This sleek timber two-drawer cabinet is designed by Italian firm Jesse. $2695; www.fanuli.com.au.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


Beacon Lighting Create a little black magic

Blum Space Tower provides ample storage

Maxwell & Williams Give your favourite

with these stunningly simple LEDlux Carter, Canteen and Pearson dimmable pendants. beaconlighting.com.au

space and guarantees easy access to items stored making it your ideal pantry solution. blum.com

dish the delicate presentation it deserves with the Cashmere Midnight Rain dinnerware range. maxwellandwilliams.com.au

H&G

ESSENTIALS Choices Flooring’s Inspiring Choices 2016 is integrated into this issue, to help you discover, create and live your style. choicesflooring.com.au

Freedom Timeless and elegant, the Golden Era print is ideal for any classically styled room. Available in store and online. freedom.com.au

Bunnings Warehouse The super-stylish Superfresco Easy Gloria Perle wallpaper is designed for simple application and removal. bunnings.com.au

C R E AT E A B E A U T I F U L LIFESTYLE AND HOME WITH THESE M U S T- H AV E P R O D U C T S .

Domayne Add a dramatic focal point to your space with contemporary copper, sleek black or concrete pendant lights. domayne.com.au

Jimmy Possum Inspired by the natural world, the Birds and Butterflies Collection features spectacular armchairs and cushions. jimmypossum.com.au

Sorbent No inks, no dyes, and no perfumes

Sara Lee The Incredibly range is incredibly easy to justify – crunchy cheesecakes, gooey lava puddings, creamy dessert ice-creams. saralee.com.au

Smeg The Smeg Speed oven is a full multifunction oven with state-of-the-art stirrer microwave technology. Clever! smeg.com.au

makes Sorbent’s Hypo-Allergenic paper the perfect balance of softness and strength. Available from leading supermarkets.


The better you sleep, the better it is for you. And the better your mattress, the better you sleep. The perfect mattress is the one that’s perfectly suited to your body shape, your posture and your sleeping position. You’ll know when you’ve found it. Because from the moment you lie down, you’ll feel your muscles relax and your mind grow quiet. You’ll awaken rested and refreshed after the most peaceful, wonderful and blissful


Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Will Horner. Bayville birch chair, $179, Provincial Home Living.

Alluring autumnal accessories

FROM LEFT Brass teapot, $140, East Coast Lounge. Two-handled ceramic vase,

$18, French Knot. Åtgång glass vase, $10, Ikea. Ridleys Classic dominoes, $20/28-piece set, Until. Melograno linen-cotton placemat, $100/four, Busatti. Bianco ceramic mug, $15, and salad plate, $15, Alfresco Emporium. Zodiaco linen-cotton napkin, $70/four, Busatti. Pyrenee linen-cotton tablecloth (220cm), $120, Provincial Home Living. Dolce linen-cotton cushion cover, $60, Citta Design. Vine Lattice canvas curtain (122x213cm), $49, West Elm. Flowers from Mandalay Flowers (throughout). Wall painted Wash & Wear 101 in Beige Royal, $46/L, Dulux. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.

SHOPPING 50 FAB BUYS FOR UNDER $150 / 9 BY DESIGN / BUYER’S GUIDE


50 FAB buys under $150

CHILL, OUT! Keep cosy when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool with a dash of autumn-inspired homewares for indoors and out. S T Y L I N G KAYLA GE X / P H O T O G R A P H Y W IL L HO R NER

ON WALLS from left Large metal coat hook, $12, French Knot. Neverful paper tote, $25, Kollab.

Metal Loop double coat hooks, $8/each, French Knot. Beige linen scarf, $130, East Coast Lounge. Classic wool hat, $90, Scotch & Soda. Sigurd beech and particleboard bench, $129, Ikea. ON BENCH from left Silver Sonnet melamine storage set, $50/set of three, Mozi. Textured cotton throw, $120, Emporium Avenue. Donna di Coppe linen-cotton cushion cover in Antique Pink, $120, Busatti. Square linen cushion, $89, Honeybee Homewares. Hunter Original Short rubber boots, $144, Busatti. Bird coir doormat, $29, Honeybee Homewares. Rattle lidded rattan and buri basket, $99, Freedom. Bensimon Ballerina canvas shoes, $70, Honeybee Homewares. Wall painted Wash & Wear 101 in Stowe White, door and background opposite painted Alluvial Inca, all $46/L, Dulux. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.


Rattan fruit/bread basket, $50, Satara.

,$ stop Bogart Pug door

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Retro metal and glass LED lantern, $12, Kmart.

, 60 s, $ res rp we flo

Rifle Paper Co soft-cover notebooks in Parisian, $27/set of two, NoteMaker.

ne yb ee Homewares.

bowl, $4 ater 2, F ew

vas collapsi bl can al

Tourista leather luggage tag, $90, Down That Little Lane.

and Far. ew

ig o bird ’s nest, $10, H

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Sow ‘n Sow.

Canvas wine tote, $60, Safari Living.

Glazed terracotta

Stylist’s assistant Sarah Maloney.

plant p

Thoughtful Gardener Bird House wooden bird feeder, $30, Until.

Leather gloves, $110, Scotch & Soda. >

ot, $30, Home Etc.

Silk Flare silk scarf in Ember, $95, Natural Base.


Indoor

PUR SUITS

ON WALL clockwise from top left Tropical Floral linen tea towel, $35, Bonnie and Neil, in Adler 9 timber wall frame (65x49cm), $119, Country Road. Ribba fibreboard frame (40x50cm), $25, Ikea. Adventure timber frame (28x36cm), $23, Officeworks. Mossebo fibreboard frame in Stained Oak Effect (21x30cm), $10, Ikea. All artworks, stylist’s own. FOREGROUND from left Berlin metal stool, $110, Pillow Talk. Two-handled ceramic vase, $18, French Knot. Hexagon ceramic vase, $7, Kmart. Stocksund chaise longue with poly-cotton upholstery, $649, Ikea. ON CHAISE from left No.5 Fringed cotton cushion cover in Coral, $70, Citta Design. Vintage suzani cushion, $95, Few and Far. Mongolian lambskin pillow cover in Pebble, $89, West Elm. Moroccan cotton cushion in Mustard, from $35, Emporium Avenue. Soft A5 journal with polyurethane cover, $17, Officeworks. Tejn faux sheepskin, $20, Ikea. Hyams wool-acrylic throw, $110, Few and Far. Natural jute rug (60x155cm), $80, Alfresco Emporium. Texline Urban vinyl flooring, $45/m² (installed), Gerflor. Wall painted Wash & Wear 101 in Beige Royal, $46/L, Dulux. FOR WHERE TO BUY, SEE PAGE 194.


Resin salad servers, $50/ pair (matching colours), Honeybee Homewares.

H&G S H O P P I N G

s. ork 18 cew of et , Offi le s 27 nd r, $ Bu lde sh ho Bru vas og can s H in ow es urr ush J.B ntbr i pa

Royal Apothic hand lotion, in Hothouse Peonie, $55, Few and Far.

ve Paper.

Baileys Home soap bundle in Orange Blossom, $14, Heaven in Earth. #

$4

Brass tea strainer, $13, East Coast Lounge.

Bellocq Tea No. 31 Siam Basil & Lemongrass tea, $39, East Coast Lounge.

wa re . ves sel, $69, Zakkia

Charcoal pencils, $15/pack of 12, Typo.

(includes pot mitt), Moz i. $25 e,

Silv er S o

et cotton oven g lov nn

Simpatico White Flower hand cream, $35, Home Etc.

Nesti Dante soaps in Emozioni and Il Frutetto, $14/each, Busatti.

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y notes, from Maple ick Leaf-it st

Metal jewellery hook, $20, Home Etc.

.95 ati /20, Pulp Cre

Glass and metal drawer pull, $12, Few and Far.

e ton es Speckl

Background painted Wash & Wear 101 in Gold Pheasant, $46/L, Dulux (this page).

e in ceram ndl ca

der, $16, Ho hol m ic e

Pe ar

Fabulous Flowers by Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara colouring book, $17, Dymocks.


SPECIAL LAUNCH OFFER

SAVE $110 on these stylishly elegant reds PLUS

3 FREE $63 WORTH

Plus FREE DELIVERY Yarrunga Field Special Reserve Shiraz 2015

Lake Breeze Chapel Road Shiraz 2013

Byron & Harold ‘Circle of Life’ Cab Merlot 2014

South Eastern Australia Help yourself to a large glass of this indulgently rich, spicy, dense and smooth Shiraz Reserve from Sam Trimboli, known as ‘Mr Medals’.

Langhorne Creek, SA Enjoy lashings of dark berries, spice and a touch of toasty oak from Greg Follet, a ‘magical winemaker’ at this 5 red-star, Champion Small Winery.

Great Southern, WA Classically dark, plummy Bordeaux blend from the “formidable” duo of Paul Byron and Harold Dunning. The ideal centrepiece with rare eye fillet.

Kilikanoon Dark Corner Steeple Block Cab ‘Baroota’ Reserve Durif Shiraz 2015 Sauvignon 2014 South Eastern Australia Currency Creek, SA Shiraz 2014 South Australia Customers can’t get enough of this lip-staining, peppery Shiraz exclusive from Halliday’s Winery of the Year 2013. One sip and you’ll taste why!

Australian House & Garden readers are personally invited to partake in a very special LAUNCH OFFER – thanks to our good friends at Laithwaite’s Wine People, you can taste 12 rich reds crafted at champion smaller estates, delivered to the door by a trusted wine specialist ... at below cellar-door prices. Perfect for stylish entertaining, these delicious reds are just $139.99 – save $110. Plus receive 3 FREE bottles of lavish Jip Jip Rocks Shiraz Cabernet (worth $63), awarded a rare Gold medal and, rarer still, a Double Gold. That’s $312.99 worth of wine for just $139.99, plus FREE DELIVERY! Enjoy wines in the home you love – call 1300 683 446 now quoting code ‘2476001’, then sit back and let Laithwaite’s Wine People do the rest.

“Magical things happen when Shiraz and Durif come together” (David Joeky, Dark Corner winemaker) – and this vintage just won Gold!

Discover the new ‘wine currency’ ... a ‘hush hush’ find from a ‘big name’ estate in McLaren Vale – we just can’t mention names! Rare ass hen’s hen s teeth. teeth

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FREE 3 bottles of multi-Gold Jip Jip Rocks Shiraz Cabernet (worth $63)

Order now on 1300 683 446 quoting ‘2476001’

brought to you by

(Lines open Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 9am-6pm)

or visit www.winepeople.com.au/2476001 Terms and conditions: Offer valid for new customers only. Maximum three bottles of Jip Jip Rocks Shiraz Cabernet 2013 per household. While stocks last. Orders not accepted (nor will wine be delivered to) persons under the age of 18 years. Most orders are fulfilled within a week but please allow up to 14 days. Unfortunately due to rising postage costs from our carriers we are now unable to ship to the Northern Territory. If a wine becomes unavailable, a similar wine of greater value may be supplied. Normal retail prices provided by the wineries. If you don’t like a wine for any reason Wine People will refund you and arrange to collect the wine. Fulfilled by Wine People Pty Ltd (licence no. 514 00724, LIQP770016550) 90 Chalk Hill Rd, McLaren Vale SA 5171.


H&G S H O P P I N G

BEST BUY $70

9 BY DESIGN

CHEESE BOARDS

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Styling by Kayla Gex. Stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistant Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Pablo Martin.

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1 / Modern Tribal resin platter in Ivory Swirl, $150, Dinosaur Designs; www.dinosaurdesigns.com.au. 2 / Slate Round serving board in Grey, $70, Citta Design; www.cittadesign.com. 3 / End to End marble and mangowood cheeseboard, $95, Few and Far; www.fewandfar.com.au. 4 / Stoneware and clay serving board in White On Natural, $82, Kim Wallace Ceramics; kwceramics.com.au. 5 / Gaston marble and mangowood cheeseboard, $84, Pottery Barn; www.potterybarn.com.au. 6 / Artesano Original acacia antipasti plate, $60, Villeroy & Boch; www.villeroyboch.com.au. 7 / Ceramic cheeseboard in White, $45, Dear September; www.dearseptember.com.au. 8 / Slate cheeseboard, $76, Lightly; www.lightly.com.au. 9 / Boheme marble board in Gold, $50, Eb&Ive; www.ebandive.com.au. Pewter cheese knife, $15, Dear September. Boston stainless-steel spreader knife in Black, $10, Few and Far. Basix Stripe linen napkin in Floss/Rosa, $22, Hale Mercantile Co; www. halemercantileco.com. Basix Stripe linen napkin in Sable/Nox, $22, Hale Mercantile Co. French Silver Hotel cutlery, $25/piece, The Country Trader; www.thecountrytrader.com.au. Flocca linen tablecloth in Nox (175x210cm), $239, Hale Mercantile Co. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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H&G S H O P P I N G 1 2

9 BY DESIGN

AFFORDABLE ARTWORK 9

BEST BUY $180

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Produced by Ashley Pratt.

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1 / Rocking Chair by Magdalena Tyboni print (30x40cm), $45, Norsu Interiors; www.norsu.com.au. 2 / Middle of Nowhere Misted Forest framed print (114x89cm), $389, The Shelley Panton Store; shop.shelleypanton.com. 3 / Bush Medicine Leaf by Gloria Petyarre acrylic on canvas (36x30cm), $180, The Gallery Shop; www.thegalleryshop.com.au. 4 / The Vacant Block Between by David Sayer oil on canvas (26x20cm), $350, Art2Muse Gallery; www.art2muse.com.au. 5 / Light As a Feather framed artwork (43x33cm), $165, Eco Chic; www.ecochic.com.au. 6 / Spanish Cream by Katka Adams print (21x30cm), $98, PaperCartel; www.papercartel.com. 7 / Giraffe framed print (32x40cm), $180, Urban Road; www. urbanroad.com.au. 8 / Field of Dreams IV by Trevor Salisbury acrylic on canvas (41x41cm), $275, State of the Art Gallery; www.stateoftheart gallery.com.au. 9 / Out of the Blue III by Ingrid Bowen framed artwork (31x23cm), $495, Saint Cloche; www.saintcloche.com.au. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

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Enviable cleaning performance

The SEBO K3 Premium.


H&G S H O P P I N G

BUYER’S GUIDE

SMALL APPLIANCES If you want to boost your cooking repertoire, prepare meals easily and eat healthier food, these benchtop marvels are right for you, writes Georgia Madden.

and ‘healthy’ appliances that allow you to enjoy fried treats minus the guilt. They’re not just smarter but betterlooking, too. Think super-sleek kettles, toasters and blenders in pretty pastels, and paintbox brights that promise to jazz up a plain kitchen. There are chic, retroinspired models in brushed metallics and appliances that perfectly match your fridge and oven for seamless kitchen styling. “Cookie-cutter appliances are a thing of the past. People are now looking for >

Photograph by Jess and Martin Reftel Evans/bauersyndication.com.au.

T

he latest benchtop appliances come boxed up with bold promises, but here’s the great news: they deliver on them, tackling some of the most common cooking complaints uttered in kitchens around the country. You’ll find all-in-one machines that allow you to prepare a different gourmet meal every night of the week in a single device; setand-forget models that can be programmed to do all those time-consuming prep jobs such as chopping, whisking and stirring;


KETTLES

TOA STERS

MORPHY RICHARDS WHITE

TA220 LONDON

ACCENTS TRADITIONAL

COLLECTION TWO-SLICE

PYRAMID KETTLE, $119

TOASTER IN GREY, $129

Classic design complements modern extras such as a safety lock, water-level indicator, optional whistle and removable filter in this cordless 1.5L model.

An 850W stainless-steel model with self-centering slots, six browning settings, high-lift lever and defrost and reheat functions. Pair it with a kettle from the same collection for understated chic.

Appliances Online; 1300 000 500 or www. appliancesonline.com.au.

BEST BUY $129

Sunbeam; www.sunbeam. com.au/londoncollection.

RHK72COP VINTAGE KETTLE

KMT2116 TWO-SLICE

IN COPPER, $120

TOASTER IN

The matt metallic finish of this 1.8L kettle will bring any kitchen right up to date. A water gauge, removable filter and a swivelling base with integral cord storage are just a few inclusions.

EMPIRE RED, $169

Russell Hobbs; 1800 623 118 or au.russellhobbs.com.

A feature-packed 1200W design with bold, smudge-resistant finish. It offers a ‘peek & see’ mode so you can toast to your taste, plus a keep-warm mode.

KitchenAid; 1800 990 990 or www.kitchenaid.com.au.

BKE830BKS

TSF01 RETRO

THE SMART KETTLE IN

TWO-SLICE TOASTER

BLACK SESAME, $170

IN PASTEL GREEN, $179

This 1.7L kettle with tough glass body has a soft-opening lid to prevent splash back as well as five temperature settings. It keeps water hot for up to 20 minutes.

Breville; 1300 139 798 or www.breville.com.au.

This 950W style statement is bound to draw attention to your benchtop. Attractions include extra-wide slots to suit thicker bread, self-centring racks and electronic reheating, defrosting and bagel-toasting functions.

KLF01 RETRO KETTLE

CTI 4003.W DISTINA

IN BLACK, $199

FOUR-SLICE TOASTER

Part of a new range of small appliances from a renowned Italian brand, this 1.7L electric kettle in enamel-coated stainless steel has an appealing retro feel. It boasts ‘quiet boil’ technology, a soft-opening lid, removable limescale filter and more.

IN PURE WHITE, $199

Smeg; www.smeg.com.au.

Smeg; www.smeg.com.au.

Chic yet powerful, this 1800W toaster has a matt metallic finish with chrome-plated details and electronic controls. Clever functions include defrosting and reheating.

DéLonghi; 1800 126 659 or www.delonghi.com.au.

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BENCHTOP APPLIANCES

BEST BUY $159

PSC-400A PROGRAMMABLE

EFP9804C MASTERPIECE

SLOW COOKER, $159

COLLECTION FOOD

You can prep food in the morning and have dinner ready when you get home, thanks to this 215W device with timer, keep-warm function and touchpad controls as well as a dishwasher-safe 4L ceramic pot.

PROCESSOR, $649

KFP800BSS

MUM57860AU MUM5PRO

POWER DRIVE DIRECT

KITCHEN MACHINE, $699

FOOD PROCESSOR, $200

This 900W European-made machine performs more than 40 functions, from whisking to chopping. It comes with a 3.9L litre stainless-steel bowl, 1.25L blender, citrus press and mincer.

Cuisinart; 1800 808 971 or www.cuisinart.com.au.

Compact and affordable, this 800W machine with 2L bowl can whiz through food prep. It comes with a set of accessories, including interchangeable blades and whisking disk, plus a storage compartment for the blades.

Kambrook; 1300 139 798 or www.kambrook.com.au.

With a 2000W motor, two bowls and an array of tools, including an adjustable slicing disk, this makes light work of kitchen tasks while looking elegant in copper.

Electrolux; www.electrolux.com.au.

Bosch Home Appliances; 1300 369 744 or www.bosch-home.com.au.

PHILIPS HD2137 VIVA

KVC5000B CHEF SENSE

COLLECTION ALL-IN-ONE

COLOUR COLLECTION MIXER

MULTI-COOKER, $239

IN DUSTED BLUE, $799

With a range of programs and a non-stick inner pot, this 1000W cooker is a great choice for time-pressed cooks. Choose from slow-cooking, sautéeing and pressure-cooking modes.

Pretty on the outside but tough inside, this 1100W stand mixer in die-cast aluminium has a 4.6L bowl and five tools, including a creaming beater, dough hook and the famous ‘K’ beater.

Harvey Norman; www. harveynorman.com.au.

Kenwood; www.kenwood world.com/en-au.

NUTRIBULLET RX

FE800A60 TEFAL CUISINE

10-PIECE SET, $399

COMPANION KITCHEN

This hardworking 1700W blender is perfect for healthy juices and smoothies. The set includes a high-torque power base, two cups, lids and more.

MACHINE, $1679

The Good Guys; 1300 466 348 or www.thegoodguys.com.au.

Replace up to 10 machines with one smart, quiet device that measures, cooks, steams, kneads, blends, emulsifies and more. The dishwasher-safe 2.5L bowl makes clean-up a breeze.

Domayne; www.domayne online.com.au.


H&G S H O P P I N G

< individuality, and they love curves, multiple appliances – such as your rice

Power Processing

character and colour,” says Jim Kalotheos, Smeg Australia’s national marketing manager. “They’re also looking at the kitchen as a whole. They want a continuous story, where there is a connection between large and small appliances.” Sunbeam’s head of product marketing, Tim Anderson, concurs. “The popularity of open-plan living means appliances are on show more than ever before, so for consumers, aesthetics are the most important aspect of any appliance,” he says. “In modern kitchens, appliances need to earn their place on the benchtop.” To this end, the iconic Aussie brand has recently collaborated with revered designer Marc Newson to create a futuristic collection of Sunbeam toasters and kettles. The results turn domestic appliances into functional works of art. When it comes to functionality, the latest models are all about saving you time and hassle. “Multi-cooking devices are ideal for the time-poor cook and among our most exciting new releases,” says Gary Brown, senior brand manager for home appliances at Harvey Norman. As an example, he cites the Tefal Cuisine Companion, which offers 11 functions including Prep, Mix, Whip and Cook. They’re also a great way to free up bench or cupboard space. You can now replace

Innovative chef Heston Blumenthal, a Breville ambassador, pushes his food processor beyond slicing and dicing. His top tips include: ✚ Creating emulsified sauces such as mayonnaise, beurre blanc and hollandaise. ✚ Whisking cream and eggs. ✚ Making French meringue. ✚ Kneading specialty doughs such as soda bread. ✚ Prepping entire dishes such as cottage pie or meatballs in one bowl. You can mince your own meat, chop and slice vegetables and herbs, then mix everything together in the processor.

cooker, slow cooker, pressure cooker and steamer – with a single device. Wi-fi capability further adds to their appeal, says Appliances Online CEO James Fleet. “You can choose smart appliances with apps, such as the Philips Viva AllIn-One multi-cooker or KitchenAid Cook Processor, which allow you to download recipes and shopping lists.” With food intolerances more prevalent and many of us looking to make healthy dishes from scratch, personalisation is key. Cutting-edge stand mixers are equally capable of kneading dough, spiralising vegetables and whipping up your favourite ice cream. Personal juicers give you drinks to grab and go by day and switch smoothly to cocktail-making in the evening. Food processors allow you to pulverise foods into the finest powder or select the thickness of individual vegetable slices. Air fryers don’t just make chips but cook entire family meals with little or no oil, and digital kettles let you set the perfect temperature for a cup of tea. In short, today’s benchtop appliances are designed to make workf low in the kitchen faster and simpler. “They are also designed to make life easier for the cook – including when it comes to cleaning up,” says Kalotheos. And that’s always a good thing. #

Smart styling in the kitchen Gillianne Griffiths, interior designer and creative director of Melbourne firm Griffiths Design Studio, reveals her top tips for storing and displaying kitchen appliances: ✚ If you intend to have your appliances on show, seek out a brand that offers a broad range so that you can achieve a unified look. Compact models are preferable as they won’t clutter up your benchtops. ✚ If you prefer a clean, streamlined look in your kitchen, it’s crucial to incorporate smart storage where you can hide appliances. Think deep drawers, cabinets and pull-out shelves. ✚ A hidden storage area with a pull-down rolling door is perfect for storing smaller appliances. Positioned from most- to least-used, they’re kept out of the way until needed, all housed in one convenient location. ✚ Don’t forget the power outlets. A good arrangement includes double power outlets on either side of the cooktop, on one or two sides of an island bench, and any other spots you may be using appliances regularly.

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H&G S T O C K I S T S

WHERE TO BUY Locate your nearest stockist by contacting the following suppliers. A Aalto Colour 1800 009 600; www.aaltocolour.com Albi Imports (03) 9474 1300; www.albi.com.au Alfresco Emporium (02) 9919 0601; www.alfrescoemporium.com.au Ambiance www.makeupforhair.com.au Andersens andersens.com.au Anibou (02) 9319 0655; www.anibou.com.au Armadillo&Co (02) 9698 4043; www.armadillo-co.com Arteveneta (03) 9510 0225; arteveneta.com.au Arthouse Gallery (02) 9332 1019; www.arthousegallery.com.au Astra Walker (02) 8838 5100; www.astrawalker.com.au Atolyia 0401 818 157; www.atolyia.com B Baluk Arts (03) 5975 5000; www.balukarts.org.au Barbara’s Storehouse (02) 4862 1942 Bauwerk Colour (08) 9433 3860; www.bauwerk.com.au BBQ Factory 1300 300 227; www.bbqfactory.com.au Beaumont Tiles www.tile.com.au Bhave www.bhavehair.com Black Pebble Design 0414 768 986; www.blackpebble.com.au Bloomingdales Lighting (02) 8345 6888; www.bloomingdales.com.au BoConcept (02) 8090 4438; www.boconcept.com.au Bonnie and Neil (03) 9384 2234; www.bonnieandneil.com.au Botticelli House www.botticellihouse.com.au Boyd Blue (07) 5527 0899; www.boydblue.com Brewers (03) 9579 2122; www.brewers.com.au Bristol 131 686; www.bristol.com.au British Paints 132 525; www.britishpaints.com.au Bunnings (03) 8831 9777; www.bunnings.com.au

Busatti (02) 9363 4318; www.busatti.com.au C Cabot’s 1800 011 006; www.cabots.com.au Caesarstone 1300 119 119; www.caesarstone.com.au Candana Bathroomware (02) 9389 8631; candana.com.au Carpet Forum (02) 9386 9227; www.carpetforum.com.au Cavit & Co (02) 9326 9161; www.cavitco.com.au Chinta (08) 9242 8887; www.chintadesigns.com.au Citta Design (02) 9360 7904; www.cittadesign.com Coco Republic 1300 000 220; www.cocorepublic.com.au Contents International Design (02) 9662 2443; www.contentsid.com.au Corner Store (08) 9336 3005; www.cornerstore.net.au Country Road 1800 801 911; www.countryroad.com.au Covered in Paint (02) 9519 0204; www.coveredinpaint.com.au Cult 1300 768 626; www.cultdesign.com.au Cultiver cultiver.com Custom Designs Furniture (02) 9663 2663; www.custom designsfurniture.com.au D Danish by Design (03) 9585 5944; www.danishby design.com.au Dash & Albert Rug Company www.wintonhouse.com.au Dash Design Furniture (08) 9385 5072; dashdesign furniture.com.au Defazio Tiles & Stone (03) 9387 2300; defazio.com.au Design Art Solutions designerartsolutions. wordpress.com Di Lorenzo Tiles (02) 9698 8737; www.dilorenzo.net.au Domayne domayneonline.com.au Domo (03) 9277 8888; domo.com.au Down That Little Lane downthatlittlelane.com.au Dulux 132 525; dulux.com.au

Dymocks www.dymocks.com.au E Early Settler & Recollections www.earlysettler.com.au East Coast Lounge (02) 9968 1658; www.eastcoastlounge.com.au ECC Lighting+Furniture (02) 9380 7922; www.ecc.com.au Ecolour 1300 326 568; www.naturecoverpaints.com.au Electrolux 1300 363 640; www.electrolux.com.au Emby Love 0417 530 334; www.embylove.com.au Empire Claremont (08) 6162 8077; www.worldofempire.com Empire Highgate (08) 9228 1022; www.worldofempire.com Emporium Avenue (02) 8014 0006; www.emporiumavenue.com.au Eureka Awnings retractable awningssydney.com.au F Fanuli (02) 9908 2660; www.fanuli.com.au Few and Far (02) 4441 8244; www.fewandfar.com.au Finlayson’s Timber & Hardware (07) 3393 0588; finlayson.com.au Florabelle www.florabelle.com.au Freedom 1300 135 588; www.freedom.com.au French and English (03) 9429 0888; www.frenchandenglish.com.au French Knot (02) 9146 4720; www.frenchknot.com.au Funkis (02) 9368 7045; www.funkis.com G Galvin Design www.galvindesign.com.au Garden Life (02) 8399 0666; www.gardenlife.com.au Gerflor 1800 060 785; www.gerflor.com.au Gilles & Franck www.gillesandfranck.com.au Globe West 1800 722 366; www.globewest.com.au Grace Garrett gracegarrett.com Granite & Marble Works (02) 9519 9900; www.granite marbleworks.com.au Great Dane (03) 9682 2777; www.greatdanefurniture.com

Gubi www.gubi.dk H Harrington Kitchens 1300 662 112; www.harrington kitchens.com.au Harvey Norman 1300 464 278; www.harveynorman.com.au Haymes Paint 1800 033 431; www.haymespaint.com.au Heaven in Earth (02) 4423 2041; www.heaveninearth.com.au Heritage Building Centre (02) 9567 1322; www. heritagebuilding.com.au Home Etc (02) 9976 5387 Honeybee Homewares (02) 9948 9908; www. honeybeehomewares.com.au Horgans (02) 9557 7800; www.horgans.com.au House2Home house2homecrowsnest.com.au Hub Furniture Lighting Living (03) 9652 1222; www. hubfurniture.com.au Hycraft Carpets 1800 630 401 I I Love Linen 1300 859 773; www.liovelinen.com.au Ici et Là (02) 8399 1173; www.icietla.com.au Ikea (02) 8020 6641; ikea.com.au Ilve 1300 694 583; ilve.com.au Imperfect Perfections 0403 685 003; www. imperfectperfections.com.au Innermost 1300 448 990; www.innermost.com.au Inspirations Paint 1300 368 325; www.inspirationspaint.com.au ISM Objects 1300 888 646; www.ismobjects.com.au Ital Furniture (02) 9796 2840 J James Hardie www.jameshardie.com.au James Said (08) 6180 3615; www.jamessaid.com.au Jardan (03) 8581 4988; www.jardan.com.au John Frieda 1800 468 318; www.johnfrieda.com K Kikki.K (03) 9645 6346; www.kikki-k.com Kmart 1800 634 251; www.kmart.com.au


Kollab kollab.com.au Koskela (02) 9280 0999; www.koskela.com.au Kresta 133 096; kresta.com.au Kyran Starcevich 0401 190 340; www.themakeryclub.com L Laura Kincade (02) 9667 4415; www.laurakincade.com Lilly & Lolly (02) 9699 7474; www.lillyandlolly.com.au Liverpool Street Gallery (02) 8353 7799; www. liverpoolstgallery.com.au Loft Furniture (02) 9588 2252; www.loftfurniture.com.au LuMu Interiors 0427 427 752; www.lumuinteriors.com Luumo Design 0420 726 882; luumodesign.com M Matt Blatt 1300 628 825; www.mattblatt.com.au MCM House (02) 9698 4511; mcmhouse.com Me & Mo Homewares (02) 9960 3663; www.meandmohomewares.com.au Mobilia (08) 9284 5599; www.mobilia.com.au Mocka www.mocka.com.au Modern Times (03) 9913 8598; moderntimes.com.au Moroccanoil 1300 437 436; www.moroccanoil.com Mozi (03) 9885 9789; mozi.com.au Mandalay Flowers (02) 9362 5000; www. mandalayflowers.com.au Mud Australia (02) 9569 8181; www.mudaustralia.com Murobond Paint 1800 199 299; www.murobond.com.au N Natural Base naturalbaseshop.com NoteMaker (03) 9314 4304; notemaker.com.au O Oblica (03) 9416 0400; www.oblica.com.au Officeworks 1300 633 423; www.officeworks.com.au

Oishi Furniture & Homewares (02) 9960 4200; oishi.com.au Oliveaux Interiors (07) 3394 2477; www.oliveaux.com.au Orient House (02) 9660 3895; www.orienthouse.com.au Orson & Blake (02) 8399 2525; www.orsonandblake.com.au Oz Design Furniture 1300 721 942; www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au P Paint Place 1800 008 007; www.paintplace.com.au Papaya (02) 9386 9980; www.papaya.com.au Parisi (02) 9648 1111; www.parisi.com.au Perini Tiles (03) 9421 0550; www.perini.com.au Phoenix Tapware (03) 9780 4200; www.phoenixtapware.com.au Pillow Talk 1800 630 690; www.pillowtalk.com.au Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664; www.porterspaints.com Pottery Barn 1800 232 914; www.potterybarn.com.au Primo www.primogrills.com.au Project 82 (02) 9360 1471; www.project82.com.au Provincial Home Living 1300 732 258; www.provincial homeliving.com.au Pulp Creative Paper (02) 9948 1191; www.pulpcreativepaper.com.au Pure Linen (08) 6399 0036; www.linenthings.com.au R Ray’s Outdoors 1800 641 867; www.raysoutdoors.com.au Redken 1300 650 170; www.redken.com.au Reece 1800 032 566; reece.com.au Remedy (08) 9431 7080; www.remedyonline.net.au Resene 1800 738 383; www.resene.com.au S Safari Living (03) 9510 4500; www.safariliving.com Saison (03) 9078 3747; www.shopsaison.com.au

Sasson Home (03) 9545 5161; www.sassonhome.com.au Satara (03) 9587 4469; www.satara.com.au Scandinalia scandinalia.com.au Scotch & Soda (02) 9267 8009; www.scotch-soda.com Seasonal Concepts 0430 044 383; www.seasonalconcepts.com.au Seed Heritage 1800 118 889; www.seedheritage.com Shelvingshop (02) 9997 6810; www.shelvingshop.com.au Sikkens 1300 745 536; www.tenaru.com.au Skheme (02) 8755 2300; www.skheme.com Small Spaces (02) 8399 3144; www.small-spaces.com.au Solver Paints (08) 8368 1200; www.solverpaints.com.au Sow ‘n Sow 0413 899 695; www.sownsow.com.au Space (02) 8339 7588; www.spacefurniture.com.au Spence & Lyda (02) 9212 6747; www.spenceandlyda.com.au Stokke www.stokke.com Studio McGee www.studio-mcgee.com Sunbrella www.sunbrella.com Susan Avery Flowers And Events (02) 9363 1168; www.susanavery.com.au Sussex Taps (03) 9308 6599; www.sussextaps.com.au Suzie Anderson Home www.suzieandersonhome.com T Tait (02) 9310 1333; www.madebytait.com.au Target 1300 753 567; www.target.com.au Taubmans 131 686; www.taubmans.com.au The Country Trader (02) 9698 4661; www.thecountrytrader.com.au The Design Hunter (02) 9369 3322; thedesignhuntershop.com

The Gallery Shop (02) 9369 3555; thegalleryshop.com.au The Good Guys 1300 466 348; www.thegoodguys.com.au The Outdoor Furniture Specialists www.tofs.com.au The Potting Shed 0419 154 860; thepottingshedbowral.com The Rug Studio (08) 6162 1645; www.rugstudio.com.au Top3 by Design 1300 867 333; www.top3.com.au Town & Country Style (03) 9500 1020; townandcountry style.com.au Tresemmé 1800 061 027; www.tresemme.com.au Typo 1800 420 176; typo.com.au U Uber+Klein www.uberandklein.com.au Until 1300 668 818; until.com.au Urban Couture (02) 9698 0736; www.urbancouture.com.au Ute Design 0417 562 250; www.ute.net.au V Vintec 1800 666 778; www.vintec.com.au W Wagner Art Gallery (02) 9360 6069; www.wagnerartgallery.com.au Wall Candy Wallpaper (02) 9331 5884; www.wallcandy wallpaper.com.au Warwick Fabrics 1300 787 888; www.warwick.com.au Wattyl 132 101; wattyl.com.au West Elm 1800 239 516; www.westelm.com.au Whitecliffe Imports (02) 8595 1111; www.whitecliffe.com.au Wingnut&Co wingnutand.co Woodman Cabinets & Joinery (03) 9334 5740; www.woodmancj.com.au Woolworths woolworths.com.au Z Zakkia zakkia.com.au Zuster (03) 9427 7188; zuster.com.au

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Lisa Green Creative director Melissa Heath Houses editor/social media manager Alaana Cobon Senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson Features Sarah Pickette Gardening Helen Young Interiors editor Kate Nixon Senior stylist Ashley Pratt Market editor Kayla Gex Art director Katrina Breen Senior designer Shayne Burton Designer Katlyn Macdonald Chief subeditor/travel editor Vanessa Walker Deputy chief subeditor Tamarah Pienaar Subeditor Rosa Senese Editorial assistant Christina Gee Western Australia editor Anna Flanders 0410 551 048 Contributors Domenic Bahmann, Judy Barouch, Louise Bickle, Angelita Bonetti, Lana Caves, Stephen Crafti, Judith Elen, Lisa Featherby, Anna Flanders, Jared Fowler, Paula Goodyer, Deborah Grant, Martina Gemmola, Harvey Grennan, Ben Hansen, Scott Hawkins, Rose-Marie Hillier, Maree Homer, Will Horner, Janet James, Elisabeth King, Emma Knowles, Allison Langton, Michaela Le Compte, Georgia Madden, Sarah Maloney, Pablo Martin, Darren Palmer, Toni Paterson, Chris Pearson, Amanda Stubbs, Derek Swalwell, John Paul Urizar, Elouise Van Riet-Gray, Ruth Welsby, Eve Wilson All Australian House & Garden enquiries: (02) 9282 8456

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On our cover Now renovated to match its stunning location, this WA abode fairly oozes ‘holiday at home’. To see more, turn to page 116. Photograph by Angelita Bonetti.

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Published by Bauer Media Group (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd and is used under licence. © 2016. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Moorebank, 31-37 Heathcote Rd, Moorebank, NSW 2170. Distributed by Network Services, 66-68 Goulburn St, Sydney, NSW 2000. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm AEDST or fax (02) 9267 4363 (24 hours) or mail letters to: Australian House & Garden, Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001 or subscribe online at magshop. com.au/hg. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.95 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$110 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$140 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, Australian House & Garden.

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Produced by Christina Gee. Photograph by Simon Griffiths (Stonefields).

Swat ch w a tch Textile designer Grace Garrett has sent us samples from her latest collection, Coastal, inspired by the pages of H&G. The selection of prints in pretty hues is available now as ready-made cushions, lampshades, bedheads, wallpaper and wall art. For stockists, go to www.gracegarrett. com. If you have a moodboard or project in progress that you’d like to show off, we’d love to hear from you. Send happy snaps along with a description to h&g@bauermedia.com.au.

Artist Janet Lucas, whose garden features on page 132, shares her love of flowers through greeting cards. See them at www.facebook. com/InspiredbyImagination.

O U T A N D A B O U T V I S I T STO N E F I E L D S , PAU L BA N G AY ’S G A R D E N I N R U R A L V I C TO R I A , O N A P R I L 1 6 - 1 7 A N D H E L P R A I S E F U N D S F O R ST E P H A N I E A L E X A N D E R ’S K I TC H E N G A R D E N F O U N DAT I O N . F O R M O R E , GO TO K I TC H E N GA R D E N FOU N DAT I O N .O RG . AU.

ARCHITECTS IN THE ’HOOD The inspiration behind our My Ideal House project, Designer Suburbs: Architects and Affordable Homes in Australia by Judith O’Callaghan & Charles Pickett (NewSouth Books, $49.99) captures Australia in the 1950s–’70s, when architects such as Harry Seidler designed affordable project homes. See Judith discuss the book at bit.ly/1QmTQRn. >

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< Pet benef it s

The blessings of pet ownership keep on coming, including dogs’ ability to sniff out illness. Watch the clip at bit.ly/Zch1eC for more insights. Pet care queries? Call Bayer’s Advantage Pet Care Line on 1800 678 368.

Who we’re following...

1 2

@kararosenlund (pictured) The photographer, stylist and author of Shelter: How Australians Live is a master of burnished colour and rough-hewn chic. @martyn_thompson This Aussie expat photographer captures interiors with a theatrical feel.

Stay in touch Roll up, roll up ... H&G teams up again with garden designer Ian Barker at this month’s Me lbo urne In t e r na t ion a l Flowe r & G a rd e n Show, March 1 6 -2 0 . D on’t m is s our l o v e l y MI FG S s how ga rde n – or ou r g oodi ef i l l e d Bonnie a n d Nei lde s i gn e d t ot e bag !

GARD SHOW

$1

Instagram @houseandgarden Facebook facebook.com/ australianhouseandgarden Pinterest pinterest. com/HOUSEnGARDEN

Q U OT E O F T H E M O N T H ‘ R E D I S T H E G R E AT C L A R I F I E R – B R I G H T A N D R E V E A L I N G . I C A N ’ T I M AG I N E B E C O M I N G BORED WITH RED – IT WOULD BE LIKE BECOMING BORED W I T H T H E P E R S O N YO U L OV E .’ D I A N A V R E E L A N D

T U S C A N T R E AT S Part cookbook, part culinary tour, Emiko Davies’ Florentine ($49.95, Hardie Grant) is an exploration of the fabulous food of the Tuscan capital, interwoven with personal anecdotes and accompanied by stunning photography. Best of all? The mouthwatering recipes are as easy to achieve as they are beautiful to behold. 2 00 /

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Digital Download the free Magshop app (on iPad) to buy an interactive digital copy of H&G. Homestolove.com.au/ houseandgarden for home tours, gardens and galleries.

Photograph by Lauren Bamford (Florentine).

It’s sh ow t ime

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Support your child with Kindervital!

On sale April 4

Infants through to teenagers need a constant supply of good food including vitamins and minerals needed to ensure healthy growth and energy. Kindervital For Children supports children during their growing years, helping them stay active, fit and alert. It is rich in vitamin C and calcium which supports the formation and maintenance of healthy bones, cartilage and teeth. Kindervital is a special liquid formula that: Tastes delicious Contains Vitamin C and Calcium Contains Vitamin D and B Vitamins Contains Vitamins A and E Contains natural herbal extracts

Inspiration lives here...

NO CHEMICAL PRESERVATIVES, NO ARTIFICIAL COLOURING, ALCOHOL FREE, YEAST FREE, LACTOSE FREE. HEALTHCARE SINCE 1916

AVAILABLE AT ALL GOOD HEALTH STORES, SELECTED PHARMACIES & SUPERMARKETS Enquiries, Nature’s Synergy Pty Ltd T: (02) 9499 7023 E: sales@cornell.com.au

www.floradix.com.au

CHC 71105-10/15

Photograph by Maree Homer.Artwork by Michael Commerford.

Always read the label and use only as directed.


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1 / Weave 3 copper wire pendant light, $210, Lightly; www.lightly.com.au. 2 / Warang y p , , g ; ww. tenthings.com.au. 3 / Brim glass tumbler, $50 (set of four), Freedom; www.freedom.com.au. 4 / Davis & Waddell Samba fringed apron in Emerald and Pink, $25, Davis & Waddell; www.davisandwaddell.com.au. 5 / OYOY beech and oak rabbit (7x13cm), $59, Designstuff; www.designstuff.com. au. 6 / Crayon Chick cotton bowl in Blush Pink, $45, Hard to Find; www.hardtofind.com.au. 7 / Robert Gordon Terra stoneware plate in White Scratch, $30, Living Edge; www.livingedge.com.au. 8 / Nordic oak tapas board in Blue, $87, Zanui; www.zanui.com.au. 9 / Bloomingville Etagere timber stand, $170, French Bazaar; www.frenchbazaar.com.au. 10 / Ceramic bowl in Blue with Black Spot, $15, Mozi; www.mozi.com.au. #

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Produced by Christina Gee.

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Terms & Conditions

about

Choices Flooring Like many modern success stories, the Choices Flooring Group can be traced back to humble beginnings. Early in 1959, a small group of independent Victorian furniture retailers met to discuss the possibility of forming an association to maximise the effectiveness of their business in the face of increased competition from large, franchised organisations. As a result of this initial meeting, Newfurn Floor Coverings Ltd was formed. Thirty four years later in 1993, they launched the Carpet Choice brand with 17 stores in Victoria. Since then, after a further brand update, Choices Flooring has rapidly grown to include over 140 stores across Australia, arguably becoming Australia’s most progressive retail floor coverings group and a major force in the Australian retail sector. To find out more about Choices Flooring visit choicesflooring.com.au

Join the Choices Flooring online community.

GET INSPIRED

A majority of products featured in this magazine carry Guarantees and Warranties, see choicesflooring.com.au for more details. Actual colour samples shown may vary due to the printing process. Selected products may not be on display at some stores, but can be ordered from all stores (except tiles). Refer to page 108 or choicesflooring.com.au for tile stockists. Featured products available until sold out or discontinued from the manufacturer. Tiles featured are for domestic use only and images are shown only for illustrative purposes. Pile reversal shading can occur on some carpets and is an optical effect, showing an apparent colour difference caused by light reflected or absorbed from disturbed carpet pile. When caused by foot traffic and vacuuming, pile reversal shading is temporary. Watermarking (also known as permanent pile reversal shading) can appear in some carpets as irregular shaped light and dark patches. Sometimes unpredictable, it is not a change in colour, but a change in pile direction that randomly appears, generally after use. Nested/random lengths of hard flooring can occur and affect panel sizes and box quantity. Pricing ranges featured in this magazine range from good quality ($) to better quality ($$) to best quality ($$$) and are based on the product only. Pricing ranges do not include installation, freight, or any extra services offered by some Choices Flooring stores, as such they are to be used as a guide only. Pricing for same product may vary from store to store. Prices may also vary in regional and rural areas due to freight to location. For more information on pricing see the inside cover of this magazine and visit choicesflooring.com.au. Cleaning and care tips featured throughout this magazine are to be used as a guide only and no liability will be held by Choices Flooring, their manufacturers’, stores, or associates for any damage caused to your flooring. For more care and maintenance advice download the brochure at choicesflooring.com.au. All information within this magazine was correct at time of printing – October 2015. STAINMASTER® and EverSoft® are registered trademarks of INVISTA. All props featured within this magazine are for demonstration purposes only and are not available for sale from Choices Flooring stores. For full terms and conditions visit choicesflooring.com.au

IN

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your cho ice s ACT Belconnen Fyshwick Mitchell

(02) 6251 1030 (02) 6280 4500 (02) 6241 9555

NSW Albion Park Rail Albury Alexandria Armidale Balgowlah Batemans Bay Bathurst Blacktown Byron Bay Caringbah Castle Hill Coffs Harbour Dubbo Erina Fairy Meadow Forster Griffith Heatherbrae Hornsby Kotara Mittagong Narellan North Bega North Parramatta North Richmond Nowra South Orange Parkes Penrith Port Macquarie Rutherford Silverwater St Leonards Tamworth Taylors Beach Tuggerah Wagga Wagga Warners Bay Young

(02) 4257 1877 (02) 6042 4828 (02) 9319 0551 (02) 6772 7999 (02) 9907 9077 (02) 4472 7001 (02) 6331 4866 (02) 9671 1800 (02) 6685 5503 (02) 9524 3755 (02) 9680 1340 (02) 6652 2473 (02) 6885 3397 (02) 4367 7329 (02) 4225 0900 (02) 6555 5334 (02) 6964 4111 (02) 4983 1883 (02) 9477 3857 (02) 4952 1835 (02) 4872 2158 (02) 4647 2888 (02) 6492 4496 (02) 9683 7749 (02) 4571 2300 (02) 4421 3833 (02) 6361 7575 (02) 6863 4463 (02) 4731 4242 (02) 6584 7180 (02) 4932 5122 (02) 9748 6846 (02) 8355 5925 (02) 6765 5513 (02) 4982 2522 (02) 4351 1550 (02) 6931 9500 (02) 4954 5511 (02) 6382 3991

NT Alice Springs Winnellie

(08) 8953 8166 (08) 8984 3402

QLD Alderley Atherton

(07) 3354 1544 (07) 4091 1482

Bald Hills Bundaberg Bundall Burleigh Heads Caloundra Cannon Hill Capalaba Fortitude Valley Helensvale Ipswich Jindalee Macgregor Mackay Maroochydore Mount Isa Noosaville Pialba Toowoomba Warwick Yeppoon

Blackwood Campbelltown Eastwood Hilton Keswick Mount Barker Modbury Mount Gambier Parafield Airport Port Lincoln Queenstown

(07) 3261 6677 (07) 4151 2241 (07) 5561 0355 (07) 5535 1744 (07) 5491 2755 (07) 3399 4644 (07) 3245 6683 (07) 3257 3377 (07) 5580 0711 (07) 3282 9555 (07) 3279 6566 (07) 3849 2244 (07) 4942 0433 (07) 5443 6280 (07) 4743 0444 (07) 5449 9319 (07) 4124 2689 (07) 4638 7019 (07) 4661 1466 (07) 4939 5505

(08) 8370 3899 (08) 8365 3494 (08) 8373 1064 (08) 8352 2055 (08) 8293 3833 (08) 8391 2222 (08) 8396 7600 (08) 8723 1234 (08) 8218 0292 (08) 8682 4194 (08) 8241 1109

TAS Cooee Devonport Hobart Kingston Launceston Midway Point Moonah

(03) 6431 1555 (03) 6423 6555 (03) 6231 1922 (03) 6229 5544 (03) 6344 9555 (03) 6265 2008 (03) 6228 2925

VIC Ararat Ashburton Bairnsdale Ballarat Benalla Bulleen Colac Dandenong East Bendigo

inspiration station NOW IN-STORE As at October 2015

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choicesflooring.com.au 108

TILE STOCKISTS

(03) 5352 2899 (03) 9885 6000 (03) 5152 1510 (03) 5332 7584 (03) 5762 6062 (03) 9850 8500 (03) 5231 4526 (03) 9791 9422 (03) 5443 0144

Echuca Euroa Ferntree Gully Frankston Geelong West Hoppers Crossing Horsham Kyabram Leongatha Lilydale Mansfield Mildura Moe Moorabbin Mornington Narre Warren Niddrie Nunawading Robinvale Sale Seymour Shepparton Stawell Sunbury Swan Hill Thomastown Wangaratta Warragul Warrnambool Wodonga Wonthaggi

(03) 5482 3883 (03) 5795 1211 (03) 9758 8182 (03) 9781 1466 (03) 5222 1555 (03) 8742 2299 (03) 5382 3374 (03) 5852 2388 (03) 5662 5030 (03) 9739 5755 (03) 5775 2688 (03) 5021 1116 (03) 5127 2499 (03) 9557 3300 (03) 5975 2600 (03) 9796 7733 (03) 9379 2900 (03) 9878 1921 (03) 5026 4095 (03) 5144 6349 (03) 5799 1905 (03) 5822 2777 (03) 5358 3374 (03) 9744 2364 (03) 5032 3701 (03) 9466 1444 (03) 5721 8900 (03) 5622 3558 (03) 5561 1411 (02) 6024 2200 (03) 5672 2148

WA Albany Bunbury Busselton Esperance Geraldton Joondalup Kalgoorlie Karratha Mandurah Margaret River Midland Morley Myaree Northam Osborne Park Rockingham

(08) 9841 5555 (08) 9791 3522 (08) 9754 4929 (08) 9071 1200 (08) 9964 1866 (08) 9300 0911 (08) 9021 4741 (08) 9144 2226 (08) 9535 5660 (08) 9758 8348 (08) 9274 3244 (08) 9276 5310 (08) 9330 6001 (08) 9622 1154 (08) 9444 9955 (08) 9527 1260

Profile for Zoran Rakezic

Australian house & garden april 2016  

Australian house & garden april 2016  

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