Page 1

2011

PORTFOLIO

C AT H E R I N E NGUYEN

Bachelor of Architecture C a l P o l y, S a n L u i s Obispo


Catherine Nguyen 11 Fairview Avenue. Piedmont. CA 94610 Phone: 510.269.3950 zminnu@gmail.com

Education

California Polytechnic State University

San Luis Obispo, CA 94305 Participation: Danish Study Abroad Institute (DIS) August 2009 - May 2010

BArch, expected June 2011 Current GPA: 3.67 Earned and financed 50% of college tuition and living expenses.

Honor s DIS. Student

Scholarship [2009] R.L. Graves Scholarship [2009] D. Stewart Kerr Scholarship [2008] Participated in Mission to Mars: Sojourn to Station [2008]

Design Village 2008

hosted by Cal Poly, SLO

Cal Poly Dean’s List

[2007]

Exper ience

Cal Poly Architecture Publications

[September 2010 - ] Created graphic layouts for publications Conducted interviews with faculty members and students

Tom Di Santo and Karen Lange Cal Poly professors

Handel Architects

[June 2010 - September 2010] Collaborated ideas for concept studies on skyscrapers Modeled both analogue and digital models Researched data for exisiting museums in San Francisco

DIS. Danish Institute for Study Abroad

Equinix Headquarters

Lowney Architecture

John Ishihara jishihara@handelarchitects.com 415 495 5588

[August 2009 - May 2010] Jon Mayfield, Johanne Riegels Østergård Research architectural destinations for study tours Copenhagen, Denmark Prepared study tour guide handbooks + 45 33 76 54 52 [August 2009] Designed a visual layout for contruction documents

[June 2008 - September 2008] Organized portfolio layouts Developed ideas for office’s new studio space Assisted in site analysis

Skills

Karen Wu. kwu@equinix.com 650 513 7007

John Skrivanich. John@LowneyArch.com 510 836 5400

Fluent in English and Vietnamese Adobe CS3/4 Suite (Photoshop, Indesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Premiere) Rhino 4, AutoCAD 2010, SketchUP, MS Office Model making

[Language] [Software]


C O nt e nt s 01

Ye a t ’ s S a n c t u m o f S o l a c e

03

COP 15 Pavilion

05

Nyhavn Performance Center

07

Hølmen Row Housing

09

Flippic: Furniture Study

11

Graphic Layout

12

Artworks


01

A P O E T ’ S R E T R E AT

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

zminnu@gmai l.com

2011

Yeats' sanctum of Solace Location: Santa Margarita, CA A poem is often depicted as a string of words expressing one’s emotions or opinions. Hidden below its text is a structure, which often goes unnoticed. Just as the poetry contain structure; the establishment of the poet retreat also contains a hidden structure that begins to surface through a deeper observation. The poet retreat becomes a slow transition withdrawing one from the distractions of the everyday world into another reality allowing the mind to freely roam. As one enters the site, they are greeted by an overhead, which marks the beginning of the poet retreat experience and the beginning of a transition to another reality.

Past the overhead plane and the first void they will observe 4 distinct forms of voids. These voids appear to be scattered in almost a chaotic manner. However, the voids help establish a reflection of the natural surrounding landscape: the spontaneous ridges and valleys of a mountain range. The voids incorporate a sense of nature’s spontaneous forms into the site. In juxtaposition with these voids are three walls that return the order to the simple rectangular, sloped site. Each of the walls is positioned diagonally across the site, which eludes the public’s eye from violating the privacy of the poet’s retreat. The walls reflect the perpendicular boundaries of the site, and it also functions as a guide. The first encountered wall brings

the visitor directly to the reading area, located under the canopy of the largest tree on the site. There is a flushed deck hidden behind the furthest wall on the site, with sunlight shimmering through the canopies of the surrounding trees. This is a remote place, where one can reflect and observe beyond his borders. As one curves around the edge of the walls they will reach the shelter that is specifically designed for Mr. W.B.Yeats. Hidden behind two trees, the main shelter seeks to provide comfort to the poet, reminding him of the beautiful garden he enjoyed as a child. Located on the uppermost part of the site, the poet is exposed to an endless view of the natural environment, lifted on pilotis; a feeling of detachment to

the existing environment is made, leaving a willingness to explore the unexplored. The shelter marks the end of the transition of the poet’s retreat for at the end of the day, he will either resign to the sleeping area or the working area. The working area in the shelter is showered with immense light, creating the feeling of openness, allowing him to open his mind.Towards the sleeping space the light in the shelter begins to dim, bringing him into a tranquil and detached atmosphere, where he can dream with no interruption. Together the elements of the site unite to create a common motive, transition. Through the progression of time, one can remove oneself from one place to another place of interest.


02


03

COP 15

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

zminnu@gmai l.com

2011

COP15 Pavilion Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

SITE: Gammel Torv

Situated in the midst of a plaza with the longest and busiest pedestrian street ‘Strøget’ along its side, the pavilion is subjected to a large volume of people passing by constantly. The pavilion becomes a resting point for people, while also providing an informational space for the Copenhagen Climate Conference. The design of the rectilinear form transcends from the increasingly frequent use of the cargo shipping containers, yet interpreted in

The Story Unfolded 1 . A PA C K AG E D d e l i v e r y 2 . T i m e t o U N PAC K ! 3 . MUSIC! PEOPLE! GALLERIES! C o m e J O I N T H E SPIRIT of the Climate Change Conference

plastic form.The form derived from the “mash-up” of the matchbox and the shipping containers. Like a shipping container, the pavilion is tightly packaged, convenient for easy delivery. Yet it functions like a matchbox with its fluctuating interior size. The pavilion space is designed as one story sheltered structure where the sides can slide out of place to create a secondary open space on top of the structure as well as an extended interior space.

Once the package has reached its destination, it slowly unravels. Pulling, pushing, sliding and lifting its wrapping away, its contents is slowly appears.The transformation of the package is through the means of simple manpower. The plastic sides are anchored in place by the steel structural system. Once unwrapped, the interiors space increases, a public space is created as well a space for relaxing and enjoying the surprises that the package masked earlier, for the sole purpose of marveling its audience. The pavilion is designed to function at all times of the day. Rain or shine. Windy or still. Day or night. Catering different functions as well. Gallery show or a cinematic screening. A meeting or a social event.


04 SECTION Entry

+ 7.2m

+ 4.0m Top of Balcony

+ 3.2m

First Floor

+ 2.5m

INTERIOR RENDERINGS

PHYSIC AL MODEL

PLANS + ELEVATIONS

2.5m

SLIDES OUT

02// GALLERY/MEETING SPACE

02// EXTENSION

gallery/meeting space 02

floor plan

gallery/meeting space 02 extension

SLIDES OUT

scale: 1:50

Plywood base 1.

+ 3.2m

balcony

+ 2.5m

first floor

Steel structural frame 2.

Plastic corrugated panels 3.

+0m

ground 4m

Black steel perforated panel 4.

7m SOUTH ELEVATION

4m

WEST ELEVATION

UP

TIME

SECTION 01

to act and protect ourfuturegeneration

STORAGE

now is the

01// GALLERY/MEETING SPACE


05

PERFOMANCE CENTER

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

zminnu@gmai l.com

2011

NYHAVN PErFOrmING ARTS CENTER Location: Copenhagen, Denmark Latched onto the site, the new performance space seeks to unify itself with the existing landscape. Like a balancing act between the performers the built and the landscape must find harmony with each other by grasping on the other yet pulling and pushing with equal force. bounders the transition from Sankt Anne towards the Copenhagen harbor. The Performance space occupies three different levels. The entry begins at ground level and the space transcends into a long ramp that slowly descends into the ground into the performance space and the auditorium. Towards the end of the long ramp there is a staircase that takes the visitor above ground into the studios. The studios are lifted into the air and begin to diverge from the original axis, opening itself towards the harbor and the Opera House. The long ramp within the Performance Center becomes a the physical transition between the built and the landscape. It is connected to the public landscape on both ends. Adjacent to the Performance Space is an entry into the public landscape park. The entry starts off narrow, however it immediately opens up rapidly, allowing the visitor to grasp the site as they are slowly

The Royal Playhouse location Amalienborg (behind )

Operaen

y r a nd

u

o b e

sit

Operaen

Spontaneous car parking

The Royal Playhouse

Amaliehavn

Amalienborg DESERTED

pulled away by the wooden deck to observe the inner waterscape, and the water activities offered there. Walking alongside the performance space, the architecture soon

A

Cone of vision at point A ABOVE: Perspective from point A looking onto the existing site.

transitions from neighbouring wall to a generous shelter while opening up the landscape. Towards the end of the landscape, the path leads the visitor away from the

large waterscape back onto the main landscape bridging the new landscape into the historical site, Amalienborg.


Program vs. Circulation Program Circulation

Program Office Studio Library Lobby Hall Auditorium Performance Space

SANKT ANNÆ PLADS

7

INTERIOR RAMP

THE ROYAL PLAYHOUSE

PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS

E N T R Y TO P A R K

4. Entry/ Library 5. Office 6. Lobby Hall 7.Studios

PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS

Private

1. Performance Space 2. Stage 3. Auditorium

KVÆSTHUSGRAVEN

Public vs. Private Public

PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS. PROCESS

06

5 A

6

4

KØBENHAVNS HAVN

1

2

3

A U D IT O R I U M PERFORMANCE SPACE OFFICE

ST U D I O S L O B BY H A L L L I B R A RY

+ 500 (Roof)

500

+ 300 (Office roof)

300

+ 0 (Ground)

0 -250

AA the continuous path


ROW HOUSING

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

H AV N

HOLMEN ROW housing Operaen

Royal Academy in Copenhagen Academy

K Ø B E N H AV N

CAR ENTRY

PEOPLE ENTRY

residential

Christiania Park

SITE

CAR ENTRY 0

50 ft

0

U N I T V I E W S VS. C I R C U LA T I O N COMMUNAL GREEN SPACE COMMUNITY

1000 ft

NEIGHBOR

WATERSCAPE

BEDROOM 01

S IT E C O M P O N E NT S

NEIGHBOR RESIDENTIAL GREEN SPACE

ENTRY

ENTRY 02

DN

LIGHT WELL

BALCONY DINING RM

BATHRM

WORKSPACE

BEDROOM 02 KITCHEN UP

UP READING RM

PRIVACY

CARS

BIKES

DENSE

PRIVATE

SPARSE LANDSCAPE

TRANSPORT ACCESS

TERRACE OPEN TO BELOW

LOUNGE RM PUBLIC

07

ENTRY 01

00 .

GROUND FLOOR

01 .

FIRST FLOOR

02 .

SECOND FLOOR

zminnu@gmai l.com

2011

Location: Copenhagen, Denmark Row housing became a popular concept in Copenhagen when the demand for affordable homes rapidly increased. The idea is still popular today as communal row housing enforces the idea of a micro-community that encourages a safe tight knit community. This concept also reflects their Viking ancestors’ tribal values. The selected site is on the corner of the Holmen. It is situated between a recreational park and a canal that separates it from the Christiania district. Surrounded by these two distinct features, they became guidelines to the arrangement of the row houses. Row houses are comprised of two sides with opening and usually two shared walls, which limit the opportunity of a variety of views. Thus, locked in a grid like form the row houses are slightly slanted from the site and each other to improve the opportunity of views where neither unit can block the other from the view to the land nor the water. The design of the row housing arrangement is derived from the idea of sharing, but slowly the space transforms into the private space for the occupant as well. There are two focal community spaces; this space is surrounded by the intermediate public space, which is connected to each of the units’ backyard. The intention is to create awareness of one’s neighbors. Each unit was a duplicate of the next. The design was driven by the idea of recovering the green space that is taken over by the built. In order to substitute the old, green space is lifted up onto the second floor as an extension of the living space. On the third floor there is a terrace that pushes the occupant back into the outside space again.


08 Concrete structural shell encases unit Wooden shade encases staircases

Second floor terrace

MODEL back corner of unit showing the volumetric components of the unit

Front

Right side

First floor shared greenspace for residents

Axonometric + 8.5m

Roof

WORK + 5.5m Studio

L IV E + 2.5m Entry

SLEEP T H E N EW G R E E N S PA C E S

1. PUBLIC ZONE_no restricted access 2. SEMI-PUBLIC ZONE_ access restricted to residents creating miniaturized communal space and an opportunity for neighbors to meet and know each other, contributing to a more safer neighborhood.

entry 3.

3. PRIVATE_this space is for the occupant use alone. It offers an atmosphere of isolation.

2.

1.

ELEVATION row houses’ facades

1.

INTERIOR view from living room to kitchen (second floor)


09

F U R N I T U R E S T U DY

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

zminnu@gmai l.com

2011

FLIPPIC Initially drawn from the puzzle game, the rubic’s cube, the endless choices of the game has created a timelessness to the interest to the cube. This furniture study is a deviation from this idea of the endless compositions and choices that the rubics cube offer, the main idea now evolves to what happens when this cube becomes untangled? The idea soon evolved to a plane composed of repetitious element to create new combinations of forms. The rubics cube is a series of cubes with different colored surfaces, each cube holds a par ticular position that the player must find. While the ultimate goal of the Unscramble cube, is to return this string of cubes to one larger cube. What happens if these cubes were all interconnected by one surface, but there are slits here and there allowing different adjustments depending on that cube’s location. Composed of 10x10 cubes, made from foam and corrugated board, the cubes are sown together to create one single surface with var ying slits, to create a variety of potential seating arrangements which, accommodates seating from one to six person.

UNSCRAMBLED CUBE

”04 nalp

INITIAL STUDIES

”08

”01

”02

”08

OPTION A ”04 nalp

nalp

”08

”01

”02

”08 semulov lanoitidda

”01

”02 noitavele

OPTION B

noitavele


10

30”

rotates 90-180

o

Fabric #01 Fabric #01 60”

Upholstery Foam

Composed of 10” x 10” x 10” cubes

a three by eight grid

five cuts are created in the grid to allow different folds + compositions to take place

TOP fabric pattern

Relax

Play

Sit

Lie down

Intimate Social Space

Reserved Social Space

Read

Configure

BOTTOM fabric pattern


G R A P H I C WO R K

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

ADD 2011 DIS Study Abroad Spread [information on student life and interview with professor]

zminnu@gmai l.com

DISCOURSE: MARC JAY

DIS: København [dk] our throat. It became a natural ritual to read the free newspaper on our daily commute, to work hard during the day and to stay up all night on the dance floor, so we stayed up listening to the music, having a hygge time with our friends. The bonds grew as we journeyed through Europe, on the buses, trains, planes for days and as we witnessed the aftermaths of the Icelandic Volcanic Eruptions, the terrible weather conditions that obstructed our travels and the strikes that elongated our adventure abroad. It has been an unforgettable year.

ADD: First of all, thank you for sharing your thoughts with us today.

ADD: As a student at DIS, I observed a strong degree of emphasis on certain methods of architectural production that are not emphasized to the same degree at Cal Poly, namely a preference encouraging physical modeling techniques an enforcing the quality of programmatic solutions. These issues and related preferences impact every architecture school to a certain degree, however it is a high degree of cohesive emphasis at DIS that made these objectives standout. How would you characterize this educational mindset in comparison to other Danish schools of

ADD 2011 DIS Study Abroad Spread [students’ work]

3 Architecture?

of weakness in design or production processes you feel are specific to Cal Poly students?

MJ: Model building is a very common tool in all schools of Denmark. I think it’s dangerous only relying on digital media for three-dimensional impressions. Inventing the computer did not make the model building obsolete; it is just a new tool that gives us even more possibilities. When considering the position of physical modeling within one’s design process, I see this method of manifestation as the ultimate design proof. You can always find an interesting view in a digital model but the physical model gives you both the “goods and the bads.” You cannot cheat yourself. I think that the programmatic approach at DIS is a result of an administration that is very focused on functionality as a result of their work outside of the DIS academic environment. Personally, I find that the digital media has made it easy to make everything look good. ADD: Due to your exposure in both practice and education to many international students other than those from Cal Poly, are there certain areas

MJ: Cal Poly is such a big school with so many different students... Diversity and hard work might be my first thought when considering the positive aspects as I see it. I’m impressed that many of your students manage to do both classes, study trips, partying, and traveling in Denmark and Europe while at the same time are able to produce good projects. On the negative side, but that’s not specific for Cal Poly, I think that digital media and the internet has resulted in a generation of architecture students that do not always put sufficient emphasis on two-dimensional drawing and physical modeling. Swapping between media types often gives the best results. ADD: Lastly, as a practitioner and educator, what advice would you give to the current genration of architecture students soon to enter the workplace? MJ: Architecture is great. Enjoy and make sure always to have fun.

HA

EB

ABI

SB

ABU

AH

MKE

MKI

MMI

MMR

GM

IM

CNA

CNG

JOH

JOL

BO

AP

MR

RS

GM IM CNA

CNG Catherine Nguyen BO JOH James Oh AP JOL Juanito Olivarria MR

PT

EB AB Hayley Anderson SB

2009-2010 DIS students HA

Juan Olivarria Professor Marc Jay The site is located west of the city center at the location of the old Western Gate, in the diverse, young vibrant district of Vesterbro. The name “Vesterbro” literally translated means “Western Bridge”, and refers to the paved road leading into the city through the Western Gate. Vesterbro is the area of the bridge into the city of Copenhagen, which was a much smaller city at the time when the name was created. During the first examination of the area and our site, I was fascinated by the disconnection of cultures and lifestyles simply separated by a body of water. Having three diverse cultures surrounding the lake with no means of integration is a problem. Because a city thrives off of diversity I immediately resorted to this assignment as a way to go further then a thermal bath, and to try and attempt to connect both sides of the lake with not only a bridge, but an experience. Thinking of this assignment as an “experience” made the program with itself. All of the spaces and forms created on this project are simply places for interaction, whether it be with the cold clean water on a hot Copenhagen summer day, or going to one of the bars, cafes or saunas with a close group of friends or business client.

JOL

Edward Becker Ashley Bidwell Scott Brereton

AB AH MKE

Ali Burquist MKI Aaron Hales MMI Maggie Keasler MMR

Matt Kingstreet Michael Meizen Marcel Mercado

hARBOuR BAth

Giancarlo Milei Isshin Morimoto Cass Nakashima

Brian Overman Allison Pell Megan Repka

RS PT BV

Reece Satava Patricia Tse Brian Vargo

BV

ORNAMENt hOuSiNg Edward Becker Professor Susanne Anderson Considering the formal repetition encountered in row house design, my scheme attempts to exploit the individualism of each inhabitant while creating a system that both responds to the local climate and addresses the idea of the “ornament” in contemporary design. Due to a dynamic water storage system integrated into the units structural core, each house is spatially different depending on the user’s water use habits .

5

2

There is an ideology surrounding Danish design, which includes both the idea and practice of quality through simplicity and materiality. In an age of digital technology, subjectively leading towards the development of a standard internationalism, can you comment on effects of digital tools (Rhino, Maya, Scripting, etc) found in both the international students you interact with at DIS and current international practices, as compared to both students and practices (including your own) in Denmark? MJ: It is difficult to do a comparison between Denmark and the US. You have SCI-Arc inspired offices and students in Denmark as well as “superdanish” inspired offices and students in the US. Trends are global and I have often had American US students with whom I agreed more than with my fellow Danish colleagues. But true... there is a predominant tendency towards a Danish modern architecture which is simple and expressive – minimalist, geometric acrobatics you might call it. American architecture is harder to categorize due to the size of the country and the amount of schools. But common for all of us is that 3d and scripting has made it possible to do a large quantity of complex geometric investigations in a very short amount of time. Furthermore both students and smaller practices are able to represent their projects in a way that, 10 years ago, was reserved only the large offices. I think that’s why you see so many young, up and coming firms all over the world.

2011

Once home to the vicious Vikings that roamed the Northern seas, Denmark is now home to the most friendliest and happiest people in the world. The city of Copenhagen was a truly an amazing place to be for the year. Although the winters were cold, and dark, with 5 hours of daylight, the city brought joy to my heart, there was never a miserable day. We drank øl under the sun and laughed without a care in the world. We learned the Danes fascination with lakrids, leverpostej, pølser, wienerbrød and we began to grow fond of these special delights as well. We learned to speak with all the muscles in

Architect M.A.A. (Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen 2005. Studies in Madrid, ETSAM (2001) With PLOT (2002-2003), Estudio Carme Pinos (2003- 2006), Project manager at BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group, Copenhagen) since 2006. WIth DIS since 2007. Founding Partner WEarchitecture 2009 (www.we-a.dk)

4

11

EB


A RT WO R K S

Catherine Ngu yen’s Por tfolio

zminnu@gmai l.com

Watercolor Island 01: an oceanic mechanical body

Watercolor Island 02: a spiraling borderline

Watercolor Island 03: alone in space

2011

12


1102

OILOFTROP

TH A N K YO U

C AT H E R I N E N G U Y E N Bachelor of Architecture C a l P o l y, S a n L u i s Obispo

CN Undergraduate Portfolio  

a compilation of selective undergraduate projects

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