Page 1

Z i l s a l i n a J. M e n d i e t a

Architectural Portfolio


contact zilsalina june mendieta zjmendieta@gmail.com 954.682.6811


18'-4 1/16"

21'-4 3/16"

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

CONTENTS

Aluminum Frame Insulated Glazing

Exposed Wall Finish

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

REFERENCE TABLES 102

T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Gainesville, Florida 32611

18'-4 1/8"

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

18'-4 1/8"

CMC ARCHITECTS

18'-2 5/16"

CIRCULATION DESK 101

1 A2.02

4

The Florida House | Indian Lagoon, FL

8

Gene Leedy Office Case Study | Winter Haven, FL

2 A2.02

001

1

3/16"=1'-0"

A3.01

10 20'-7"

Sarasota Rowing Facility | Sarasota, FL 15'-7"

14

Permeated Striations | Sarasota, FL T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

Exposed Wall Finish

Special Collections Pavilion

Building Section

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

111

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

REVISIONS:

T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Reinforced Concrete 2 A2.01

Tile

20

107

Special Collections Pavilion | Gainesville, FL 1 A2.01

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 03-27-2012 04-23-2012

103

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

Drawn By: Z. Mendieta Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Building Sections Scale: 3/16"=1'-0"

24 Building Section 3/16"=1'-0"

Atemporal Synthesis | Florida Eastern Coastline

A3.01

2 A3.01

DATE : April 30, 2012

30

Permutated Ecologies | St. Petersburg, FL

38

Light Carving Ground | St. Petersburg, FL


THE FLORIDA HOUSE Indian Lagoon, FL Critic: Martin Gundersen

Situated within a dense forest of young pines along the Indian Lagoon Coast, this small beach house becomes a favorable haven detached from the fast-paced routine of urban living. Indian Lagoon is located on the Florida panhandle at the far western end of Apalachicola Bay, where it meets the Gulf of Mexico. The surrounding land is extremely fertile, filled with unspoiled beaches, and rich estuaries. The natural landscape provides an abundant source of water-based activities including fishing and a natural wildlife park left untouched and unaltered by man. This meditative retreat is used as a safe haven away from the mundanity of everyday life. The house is built for a maximum of two people. The two-story house becomes a transitory space in with the edges between indoor and outdoor become blurred. The glazing system and system of openings allow for the extension of the conditioned space into the surrounding landscape and the intrusion of wildness into the house.

A

B

C

D

4

E

A Shading Canopy B Central Steel Structural System C Pivoting Window Walls D Structural Anchoring Walls E Reprogrammable Pocket Balconies


5


The Florida House

3 1 2

Ground Floor 1 Entry 2 Outdoor Patio 3 Storage

6


Spatial protrusions of these living spaces extended out from the house in a series of reprogrammable balconies that alter and shift in use depending on weather, season, necessity, and individual use.

5

2 3 6

1

4

4

First Floor 1 Entry 2 Outdoor Patio 3 Storage 4 Reprogrammable Balconies 5 Bedroom 6 Bathroom

7


THE FLORIDA HOUSE Case Study | Leedy Architects Office Winter Haven, FL Critic: Martin Gundersen Group: Kimberly Connell Tim Beecken Melissa Cortes Amanda Byars Marut Ang Exhibit: Modernist Architecture in Florida Gene Leedy is a renowned architect of the Florida Sarasota School. Along side Paul Rudolph, Leedy pioneered the Florida modernism movement. Leedy Architects Office was the first completely pre-stressed concrete building in the world, allowing for Leedy’s contribution to modern architecture to have a resounding effect on Florida’s architecture. This case study serves as a means of understanding Florida Modernism and reinterpreting its impact on Florida architecture.

8


9


TIMING HUT Sarasota Rowing Facility Sarasota, FL Critic: William Tilson

The project begins to focus on the manipulation of an overhead condition and its reactive ground. Set in Sarasota, FL, portions of necessary components of a rowing facility are designed to be inserted and react to the carved ground condition. This interaction is dictated by the effects of sunlight and how it can be manipulated through the space with the use of both overhead openings and ground carvings.

10


11


STARTI N G TO W E R Sarasota Rowing Facility Sarasota, FL Critic: William Tilson This interaction is then translated tectonically into a double-skin system present in all components. As an occupant experiences the spatial characteristics of each component, tactile and visual stimuli work in tandem to create an experience that allows the body to interact with the architecture on both horizontal and vertical dimensions.

12


13


PE R M EATE D STR IATI O N S Sarasota Interpretive Center Sarasota, FL Critic: William Tilson Published: University of Florida’s Exhibiting Sarasota


3 1

4

2

5


This overheard condition works in tandem with the ground to provide an experience for the occupant that is most drastic. In a sense, the vast manipulation of both of these conditions is the most spatially influential form of architecture. The straitions created within the ground condition allow for a multitude of experiences within a confined space within Sarasota.

7

First Floor 1 Outdoor Plaza 2 Entrance Lobby + Reception 3 Gallery 4 Cafe 5 Studios

6

Second Floor 6 Gallery 7 Auditorium 8 Administrative Offices 9 Indoor Atrium

9

8

17


Permeated Striations 1

2

3

4

5

6

18 Tectonic Roofing System 1 Circulation Light Wells 2 Canopy Condition 3 Steel + Glass Enclosure 4 Primary Canopy Structuring System 5 Secondary Supporting Structuring System 6 Striated Ground


19 This overheard condition works in tandem with the ground to provide an experience for the occupant that is most drastic. In a sense, the vast manipulation


CMC ARCHITECTS

Project Benchmark Marked Elevation=124.8’

Typical Mullion

47'-6 3/16"

The Special Pavilion is designed to serve as a new reading room and to hold the special collections for the Gainesville Community Library. The project required for a finalized set of architectural construction documents under the Florida Building Code-2007 Edition. The project includes: site plan, life safety plan, all architectural plans, exterior/interior elevations, building sections, full wall sections, and schedule specifications. The following is the portion I contributed to the project. .

Gainesville, Florida 32611

Gainesville, FL Critic: Mark McGlothlin Group: Kimberly Connell Danae Cardenas

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

S PE C IAL C O LLE CTI O N S PAV I LI O N

46'-4 9/16"

Special Collections Pavilion

20'-3 1/2"

6'-0"

EXISTING BUILDING SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PAVILION 33'-11 5/16"

-0’-3”

-0’-3”

17'-7 9/16"

78'-3 1/8"

59'-8 7/16"

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 0’-0”

6'-8"

14'-0"

10'-10"

10'-10"

8'-0"

-2 R11'

11TH STREET

6'-10 7/16"

12'-0"

18'-0"

6'-0"

21'-4 7/16"

1/4"

1/4"

21'-4 7/16"

21'-4 7/16"

36'-0"

36'-0"

10'-11 11/16"

21'-4 7/16"

-2 R11'

12TH STREET

6'-10 7/16"

R11'2 1/4"

14'-0 15/16"

N

R11'-

2 1/4"

7'-5 13/16"

REVISIONS:

7'-5 13/16"

-0’-8”

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 03-23-2012

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendieta LEGEND Concrete pavers Grass Water Florida Privet Dogwood

Site Plan

1

1/16"=1'-0"

Green Ash

G1.01

Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Site Plan

Scale: 1/16" = 1'-0"

G1.01 DATE : March 13, 2012

2 A3.01 18'-4"

18'-4"

18'-4"

18'-7 1/2"

Typical Column O.C.

93'-2 1/2" 59'-8"

6" 9'-1"

18'-6 1/2"

Men's Restroom 108

1'-0"

1'-6"

21'-0 1/2"

7'-4 1/2"

3'-0"

2 A2.02 1'-0"

8"

8"

6'-10 1/2"

7'-0" Typical Mullion O.C.

12'-11"

3'-11"

7'-5"

6'-6 1/2"

1

3'-8 1/2"

4'-5 1/2"

4

Computer Terminal 109

20'-7"

1'-6"

Informal Reading 110

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

6"

Janitor's Closet 105

3'-0"

57'-0"

57'-0"

1

11'-11"

1 A3.01

6'-4 1/2"

A5.03

10'-0 1/2"

38'-10"

21'-6 1/2"

1 A2.02

3'-0"

12'-6 1/2"

21'-0"

20'-10"

6" 18'-6 1/2"

Women's Restroom 107

6'-6"

6" 10'-0 1/2"

Mechanical Room 106

1'-0"

19'-0 1/2"

9'-1"

19'-7 1/2"

10'-10 1/2"

19'-6 1/2"

3'-0"

11'-0 1/2"

13'-11"

Book Stack Area 103

Reference Tables 102 3'-11"

32'-5 1/2"

32'-5 1/2"

3'-0"

1

Storage Room 104

N

5'-8"

15'-7"

16'-0 1/2"

20

Circulation Desk 101

Special Collections Pavilion

19'-6 1/2"

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

CMC ARCHITECTS

2 A2.01

8"

D

11'-0 1/2"

53'-1 1/2"

4'-3"

6'-0"

4'-0 1/2"

7'-0"

7'-0"

Typical Mullion O.C.

64'-2"

14'-3 1/2"

14'-9"

1'-0"

REVISIONS

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 04-23-2012 04-30-2012

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendieta Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Lower Level

Scale: 3/16” = 1’-0” 1 A2.01

Site Plan 1/16"=1'-0"

A1.0

1 G1.01

DATE : April 30, 2012


2 A3.01

59'-8"

19'-8"

18'-3"

18'-4"

12'-6 1/2"

21'-0"

8" 17'-7 1/2"

30'-4 1/2"

1'-0"

11'-0 1/2"

10'-0 1/2"

T.O. PARAPET 16’-2”

4'-5 1/2"

1'-0"

12" x 12" Concrete Base Roof Paver

7'-0"

7'-0" 10'-2 1/2"

7'-4 1/2"

1'-0"

12'-11"

7"

4'-0"

11'-7 1/2" 44'-9"

5'-9"

8"

10'-10"

Terrace 112

Guardrail 20'-7"

57'-0"

1 A3.01

7'-0"

7'-5"

46'-2"

7'-0"

6'-0"

21'-1 1/2"

Open to Below

Mezzanine 111

K

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 13’-0”

12'-3"

15'-7"

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 0’-0”

21 N

REVIS

1'-0" 7'-0 1/2"

11'-2" 18'-3"

49'-1 1/2"

10'-1" 60'-3"

93'-2 1/2"

7'-0"

7'-0" 14'-9"

1'-0"

02-14 03-1 04-2 04-3

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K Connell, Z. Me

Checked By: Prof. McGlothl

Mezzanin

Scale: 3/16" =

Mezzanine Plan 3/16"=1'-0"

A1. 1 A1.02

DATE : April 30


Building Section

1

3/16"=1'-0"

A3.01

Special Collections Pavilion

20'-7"

15'-7"

Exposed Wall Finish

111

T.O. Guard 16’-2” T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Reinforced Concrete 2 A2.01

Tile

107 103

Building Section

2

3/16"=1'-0"

A3.01

18'-2 5/16"

18'-4 1/8"

18'-4 1/8"

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

Aluminum Frame Insulated Glazing

Exposed Wall Finish REFERENCE TABLES 102

CIRCULATION DESK

22

101

1 A2.02

001

Building Section 3/16"=1'-0"

1 A3.01

18'-4 1/16"


Special Collection

TPO Membrane T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

Vapor Barrier

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

2

Cant

A5.01

High Density Plastic Bearing Strip

1'-2" 8"

6"

Ballast TPO Membrane Rigid Insulation Vapor Barrier

1'-2"

Precast Concrete Cap

6"

2"

6"

Form Tie

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

Roof Deck

Form tie

Flashing Reinforced Concrete

Form Tie

Reglet 12" x 12" Concrete Base Roof Paver

Sealant

Pedestal

Precast Concrete Cap

Vapor Barrier

1 A2.01

12" x 12" Concrete Base Paver

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 03-27-2012 04-23-2012

Deck Drain

Cant High Density Plastic Bearing Strip

TPO Membrane Drawn

By: Z. Mendieta

Reinforced Concrete

High Density Plastic Checked Bearing Strip

By: Prof. McGlothlin

Reinforced Concrete

2" Rigid Insulation

Rigid Insulation

Building Sections

T.O. Tile 6’-0”

Scale: 3/16"=1'-0"

A3.01

5" x 5" Tile Grout Bevel Finish

5 A5.01

Latex Portland Cement Isolation Joint

Gravel

Mortar Bed Bond Coat Mortar Bed DATE

5

Isolation Joint

Water Barrier

Screed Finish

French Drain

A5.01

: April 30, 2012

REVISIONS: 02-14-2012 03-13-2012 04-23-2012

Grout

T.O Finished Floor 0’-0”

Water Barrier

Screed Finish

T.O Finished Floor 13’-0”

Vapor Barrier

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

Isolation Joint

Special Collections Pavilion

7"

REVISIONS: T.O. Deck 12’-2”

Protection Board

Screed Finish

Gainesville, Florida 32611

Ballast

1 A5.01

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

Drip

CMC ARCHITECTS

1 A5.01

Screed Finish

T.O Finished Floor 0’-0”

T.O Finished Floor 0’-0”

21'-4 3/16"

Rigid Insulation

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendieta

Water Barrier

Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

3/4" = 1'-0"

T.O. Guard 16’-2” T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Scale: 3/4" = 1'-0"

Gainesville, Florida 32611

West Wall Section

2 A4.01

Wall Sections

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

South Wall Section

3/4" = 1'-0"

CMC ARCHITECTS

Steel Reinforcing Steel Reinforcing

A4.01

3

A4.01

DATE : April 23, 2012

23

2 A2.02

llections Pavilion

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”


ATE M PO RAL SYNTH E S I S Reenvisioning + Readapting Florida’s Skyline Florida Eastern Coastline Critic: Nancy Clark + Martha Kohen Published: University of Florida’s Florida-Sao Paulo Dialogues The current condition of the High rise towers along the Florida coastline have no prepatory measures for the rising sea level. Much of the high rise buildings are secluded from basic necessities needed to sustain a population. Occupation of these high rise towers are limited to upper middle class and high class individuals. Automobile transportation is the primary mode of access. Upon further analysis of the high rise conditions of each region of Florida, three typologies become apparent. Towards the northern section of Florida, high rise density is limited to high class citizens and congregate near connecting points on either side of bodies of water. Within central Florida, sporatic high rise residential buildings emerge in a linear fashion along the Coastline and are strictly residential buildings created for those of a higher socioeconomic status. A third typology is created through the synthesis of the north and central typologies. This typology created within South Florida is a unique kind. The density of high rise buildings allow for a selfsustaining interconnected city with a multifaceted infrastructural organization.

Water Bodies Water Bodies

NaturalNatural Edge With EdgeWater With Water

PrimaryPrimary Circulation Circulation

Marsh Marsh Conditions Conditions

Secondary Secondary Circulation Circulation

Occupational Occupational Densities Densities

Water Access Water Access Densities Densities

City Form City Form

Sea Level SeaRise Level Rise

NaturalNatural Land Land

North Florida

Strategic High-Rise Nodal Clusters

24

Central Florida

Linear Configuration

South Florida

High Density Hybrid Multilevel Clusters


Site Plan

1:1000


Atemporal Synthesis

Reinforce Structural System

Integrated Public Amenities

Existing Housing Towers

26


27

Conceptual Section


Phase IV

Phase III

Phase II

Phase I

Atemporal Synthesis

Tower + Podium Section Perspective


29


PE R M UTATE D E C O LO G I E S Reforming the Edge of St. Petersburg St. Petersburg, FL Critic: Stephen Belton Group: Kimberly Connell Melissa Cortes Danae Cardenas George Howard III

Located on the Pinellas Peninsula, St. Petersburg was incorporated as a town in 1892 and later as a city in 1903. It is bordered by Tampa Bay on the East, the Gulf of Mexico on the West, and Boca Ciega Bay to the South, possessing a land mass of roughly 61 square miles. The highest elevation above sea level is 61 feet, with the topography of the city being characterized by its flatness. In addition, St. Petersburg features some of Florida’s most pristine beaches, parks and preserves— creating an environment in which people are able to hike, paddle, sail, and bike. Included within the city is direct access to the Pinellas Trail, a 34 mile long dedicated recreational trail. With its designation as a green city, St. Petersburg has adopted a focus on water conservation, preservation of green space, pedestrian friendly development, energy efficiency of new constructs, and a tight control on emissions from government vehicles. St. Petersburg possesses over 2292 acres of park land, and many of the nature preserves have expanded or are under major restoration to preserve their integrity.

30

Initial Site Development Studies


Uplands Master Plan 1 Entrance Sculpture Landscape 2 Art Center 3 Waterfront Promenade 4 Amphitheatre 5 Urban Sculpture Park 6 Market Plaza 7 Transportation Hub 8 Market 9 Outdoor Pavilions 10 Sunken Garden

31


Permutated Ecologies

2625

ft

1312

ft 295

ft

WALKING DISTANCES 295 ft - 1 min 1312 ft - 5 min 2625 ft - 10 min

CIRCULATION PATHWAYS Bicycle Trail On-Street Bike Routes Canoe + Kayak Trails

GREEN SPACE USAGE High Medium Low

Circulation

32

Proposed Shoreline Contour Carvings

Visual Arts

Lynn Merhige Gallery Bluelucy Mindy Soloman Gallery Donna Gordon Gallery Red Cloud Indian Arts The Studio @ 620

Museums

Dali Museum Museum of Fine Arts St.Petersburg Museum of Natural History Florida Holocaust Museum

Performing Arts

Greenspace

Mahaffery Theatre American Stage Theatre Company Class Act Downtown Palladium Theatre Morean Center The Studio @ 620

Existing Vehicular Transportation + Proposed Bicycle Circulation

Art/Sculpture Anchors + Pedestrian Axis


Programmatic Anchors + Sculpture Zoning

The project began analyzing the importance od pedestrian traffic in respect to the existing art and sculpture avenue. The site acts as a natural extension of the art avenue already established by the St. Petersburg urban fabric. To further promote pedestrian walkability and bicycle transportation, the site would act as a continuation of the existing pedestrian walkways, easily stitching itself into the St. Petersburg city fabric.

33


Permutated Ecologies

B

A

Vehicular Access

34

Sculpture Landscape

Art Center Exterior Gallery

Art Center Interior Gallery

Art Center Lecture Halls + Classrooms

Urban Sculpture Park + Constructed Green Areas


Exterior Reprogrammable Marketplace

Marketplace

Constructed Landscape

Waterfront Pavillions

Constructed TideDependent Waterfront

Section A | Through the Art Center and Marketplace

35


Permutated Ecologies

B

Docks

36

Transportation Hub

Marketplace

Constructed Water Features

A

Exterior Reprogrammable Marketplace

Constructed Water Features


Pedestrian Docks

Waterfront Pavilions

Constructed Landscape

Section B | Through the Marketplace and Transportation Hub

37


LIGHT CARVING GROUND Sculpture Center + Arts Market St. Petersburg, FL Critic: Stephen Belton Moving into the individual design process, this same premise of duality continues to filter itself through the differing scales of the overall site plan. This duality continues to become exemplified primarily through the programmatic functions of the proposed flexible arts market area and its anchoring permanent sculpture center. The sculptural center anchors the market to the site, providing a more permanent display of local sculptures and artwork while the arts market becomes a flex space of visiting crafts/supplies vendors.


6

6

6

7

7

6

1

2 5

4 4 4

40

Ground Floor 1 Museum Shop + Cafe 2 Offices 3 Outdoor Sculpture Garden 4 Galleries 5 Extrance Lobby 6 Visiting Art Vendor Markets 7 Outdoor Pavilions


Along with a programmatic and spatial duality, a tectonic duality occurs between the two, focusing primarily on a language of construction that begins as a statement and radiates itself into the landscape. Moments are created using landscape and constructed water pools that begin to penetrate and extend through the market that make this a seamless transition from the outside sculpture parks to the interior flex spaces of the market and sculpture center.

1

1 2 3 1 1 1 First Floor 1 Galleries 2 Entrance Lobby 3 Main Circulation Stair Well

41


Light Carving Ground Museum Shop

Museum Shop + Cafe

1150 sq. ft.

Bathrooms

1150 sq. ft.

1175 sq. ft.

MEP

1175 sq. ft.

1175 sq. ft.

Bathrooms

Bathrooms

1150 sq. ft.

Indoor Auditorium

Offices

Offices

1300 sq. ft.

3590 sq. ft.

3590 sq. ft.

Outdoor Amphitheatre

Flex Space

Flex Space

1660 sq. ft.

1175 sq. ft.

1175 sq. ft.

Outdoor Amphitheatre

Archive/Storage

Cafe

1660 sq. ft.

7515 sq. ft.

2000 sq. ft.

Kitchen

2750 sq. ft.

Offices

Circulation + Vendor Space

3590 sq. ft.

Circulation

20000 sq. ft.

+

=

5760 sq. ft.

Archive/Storage

Circulation

Original Program

Original Program

Galleries

16500 sq. ft.

50000 sq. ft.

6600 sq. ft.

8500 sq. ft.

Sculpture Center + Arts Market Total Area

Vendor Space

33000 sq. ft.

10000 sq. ft.

Archive/Storage

10890 sq. ft.

Halifax Farmers’ Market Total Area

Galleries

55000 sq. ft.

Nasher Sculpture Center Total Area

7515 sq. ft.

Program Consolidation and Mergence

Possible Programmatic Spatial Organization [Plan]

42

The overhead condition unifies the two and is constructed in similar ways but varying in opacities and layers to allow a wide spectrum of sunlight intensities into the underlying spaces according to its function. Circulation within the entire arts market and sculpture center becomes crucial in also unifying the two seemingly dichotomous functions. Landscape and waterscape play a role in dictating this circulation.


Section B

B

A

43


Light Carving Ground

44

The overhead condition unifies the two and is constructed in similar ways but varying in opacities and layers to allow a wide spectrum of sunlight intensities into the underlying spaces according to its function. Circulation within the entire arts market and sculpture center becomes crucial in also unifying the two seemingly dichotomous functions. Landscape and waterscape play a role in dictating this circulation.


Section A

B

A

45


Light Carving Ground

1

2

3

46

Tectonic Roofing System 1 Glass Roof 2 Aluminum Structural Roofing System 3 Interior Perforated Metal Paneling 4 Interior Aluminum Louver Facade + Sky Light

4


To further study the dichotomous nature ofthe project, a tectonic study was conducted as a means of understanding the relationship between light and ground at the occupationaly scale.

47


pedagogy School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2014 Architecture Design 4 Crit School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2013 Architecture Design 1 Crit School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2012 Architecture Design 2 Crit School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2012-2013 Architecture Design 1 Graduate Teaching Assistant skills Rhinoceros 4.0 + 5.0 V-Ray for Rhino Grasshopper for Rhino | Limited Proficiency AutoCAD 2013 Autodesk Ecotect | Limited Proficiency SketchUp 3D Modeling | Limited Proficiency Adobe Suite--PhotoShop, Illustrator, InDesign, DreamWeaver Microsoft Office--Word, Excel, PowerPoint | Windows + MacOSX Model-Making Lasercut Software Woodshop Machinary Drafting Sketching Post-Occupancy Evaluation | Energy Model Verification contact Zilsalina June Mendieta zjmendieta@gmail.com zmendieta@ufl.edu 954.682.6811


curriculum vitae

educat ion School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2012-2014 Master’s in Architecture School of Architecture, University of Florida | Gainesville, FL | 2008-2012 Bachelor of Design in Architecture | Summa Cum Laude p ublications + exhibitions Field of Fragments: A Study of Miesian Transcendental Spatialities Awards Exhibit | UF GSoA Modernist Architecture in Florida | University of Central Florida | Orlando, FL Florida-Sao Paulo Dialogues | Joint Studio w/ Sao Paulo University | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL Redesigning the Pier of St. Petersburg Exhibit | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL NAAB Accreditation | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL Exhibiting Sarasota: Cover | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL Luminaire Design Competition Exhibit | UF SoA | Gainesville, FL East Asia: 2010 Study Abroad Exhibit | UF SoA | Gainesville, FL

| | | | | | | |

2014 2014 2014 2013 2013 2012 2011 2010

awards + recognitions Architecture MRP Design Honor Award | UF GSoA | 2014 Arthur Blenn Anderson Scholarship Endowment | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL | 2013, 2014 Finalist for Top Design in Modernist Architecture in Florida | UF GSoA | Gainesville, FL | 2013 Member of Delta Epsilon Iota Honor Society | 2010-2012 Selected for East Asia Study Abroad Program | 2010 Member of National Society of Collegiate Scholars | 2008-2012 Member of Golden Key Internation Honour Society | 2008-2012 Dean’s Academic List | 2008, 2010 President’s Academic List | 2008 Florida Medallion Scholars Award | 2008-2012 Member of AIAS | 2011-2012

Architectural Portfolio | Zilsalina Mendieta  

M.Arch from the University of Florida 2014 Bachelor's in Design from the University of Florida 2012

Advertisement