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Wade Watch Matchups season, nished with 14 points and four rebounds. The Blue Raiders would lose 80 – 76 to Maryland. The tortoise quartet combined for 60 points and 28 rebounds.

Battle for the Wade By Zena O. Lewis

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or the 2006 – 2007 season, 29 women projected to revolutionize women’s basketball have been chosen. Proof of the game’s evolution is displayed in different facets of their game - every shot, dribble, block, rebound, pass and dunk. At the end of the season, only one will stand as the victor and become college basketball’s female player of the year, winner of The State Farm Wade Trophy. Following special guidelines and criteria, a committee selects the winner of The State Farm Wade Trophy. The NCAA Division I Kodak/WBCA All-America player must embody the spirit of women’s basketball pioneer and Delta State University coaching legend Lily Margaret Wade. Statistical feats, past and present achievements, overall ability, leadership, academic standing, character and their effect on the team are analyzed. In 1978, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for the Women’s championship featured two basketball legends: Ann Meyers (UCLA ‘78) vs. Carol Blazejowski (Montclair St.’78). UCLA defeated Montclair State, 85-77. Blazejowski, a scoring machine, racked 40 points and pulled down seven rebounds. Her Bruin counterpart tallied up 19 points, 14 rebounds, eight assists and six steals. Meyers led her team to the nal game and championship victory. The game displayed two of the nation’s top scorers. Even with a crucial defeat and championship run negated, Carol Blazejowski walked away with the rst ever Wade Trophy. Both athletes were candidates for the award. What was the difference maker? What was the edge that made Blazejowski victorious in receiving the wade?

Kristi Toliver (Maryland) vs. Alison Bales (Duke)

In lieu of the classic game, even if it is not etched in stone, one has to consider the play between two unique players when making the nal decision on whom to bestow The State Farm Wade Trophy. Bear in mind, the importance of the outcome in one-on-one

play. Be aware of, the Wade Watch match-ups. The month of November featured nine match-ups that would jumpstart the season. The time of the year to give thanks opened the bountiful gates of tremendous play that would make a player feast or famine. The Terrapins of the University of Maryland unleashed their pre-season Wade Watch List foursome of Kristi Toliver, Crystal Langhorne, Marissa Coleman and Shay Doron. Middle Tennessee State University’s (MTSU) Chrissy Givens, who was placed on the Wade Watch at mid-

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The four Terps combined for 65 points to take their team over the century mark to defeat the Rebels of Ole Miss. The Rebels’ Wade Watch candidate senior Armintie Price was held to nine points. The Terps took over, beating Ole Miss 110 – 79. Doron scored 23 points, 9 of 11 shooting; Toliver 12, Coleman 13, and Langhorne tallied a doubledouble of 17 points and 13 rebounds. Stanford Cardinal Wade Watch duo Candice Wiggins and Brooke Smith together could not out-score Lady Vol standout Candace Parker. Wiggins and Smith combined for 24 points while Parker shot 10 for 17 scoring 25 points to compliment her nine rebounds. She led the Tennessee Lady Vols to victory, defeating the Cardinal 77 – 60. Parker, a sophomore, and Wade Watch List mate senior Noelle Quinn of UCLA met for the rst time during the 2006 – 2007 season. Noelle Quinn (UCLA) The Lady Vols vs. defended their home court against Eshaya Murphy (USC) the UCLA Bruins winning 83 – 60. Parker scored 22 points, pulled down six rebounds while shooting 10 of 15. Quinn led UCLA with 20 points. Quinn would have another 20-plus performance scoring 22 points against Courtney Paris and the Oklahoma Sooners. Paris’ 10 of 14 shooting, 24 points and 17 rebounds was the foundation of a 77 – 57 Sooner win over UCLA. Parker continued to protect home court against in-state Wade Watch candidate Chrissy Givens and the MTSU Blue Raiders. Givens scored 26 points, outscoring Parker by 10. However with 16 points scoring, Parker was nearly perfect shooting 7 for 9 from the eld. The Lady Vols won 88–64. Ohio State’s (OSU) Jessica Davenport and the University of Southern California’s (USC) Eshaya Murphy led their teams in scoring in their rst Wade match-up of the season. Davenport scored 26 points and shot a perfect eight for eight from the free throw line to lead the Buckeyes past the Trojans 73 – 58. Eshaya Murphy tallied a respective 20 points and pulled nine rebounds. Baylor University and Louisiana State University matched up in Wade Watch competition. Bernice Mosby scored 21 points overshadowing Sylvia Fowles’ 14 points and four rebounds. The Baylor Lady Bears defeated the LSU Tigers 64 – 60. Later in the month, Fowles met Tulsa University’s Wade Watch candidate Jillian Robbins. Both neutralized each other; Fowles scored ve points, while Robbins tallied four. The low scoring stand-off ended with the LSU Tigers defeating Tulsa 48 – 37. December featured some of the best match-ups of the season. Before the mid-season curtain closed, Wade Watch candidates dug deep into the athletic arsenal to help their team during conference play.

Seniors Ivory Latta and Erlana Larkins matched up against Lady Vol Candace Parker. Latta scored 12 points with eight assists to aid Larkins’ 17 points and 12 rebounds. UNC defeated Tennessee 70 – 57. Despite the lopsided score, Parker was unstoppable in the paint, scoring 27 points and hauling in 10 rebounds. She defended tenaciously, blocking four shots. The Duke University Wade Watch trio of senior Alison Bales, senior Lindsey Harding and sophomore Abby Waner led the Blue Devils against Matee Ajavon and the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. The trio scored 51 points (Bales 11, Harding 19, Waner 21) to win 85 – 45. Ajavon had 14 points. Ajavon’s scoring was stied against Ole Miss. She scored four points and was outscored by Ole Miss’ Armintie Price’s 33 points in a tough loss, 89 – 84. The Duke trio went on a scoring frenzy and tallied 37 points to defeat the University of Texas Longhorns 80 – 52. Wade Watch candidate Tiffany Jackson was held to eight points in the loss. Later in the month, Jackson faced Tennessee’s Candace Parker. The Lady Vols held Jackson to eight points from 2 of 13 shooting. Parker’s double-double of 12 points and 12 rebounds helped the Lady Vols win 67 – 46. The WBCA’s December National Player of the Month, Courtney Paris, went 9 for 15 from the eld, scoring 24 points and pulling in 13 rebounds, leading the Sooners over Tulsa 72 – 49. Wade Watch candidate Jillian Robbins would match Paris with 24 points in the loss. Paris’ 22 points and 13 rebounds were not enough to defeat the Buckeyes of Ohio State. Jessica Davenport shot 6 of 7, tallying 14 points and 10 rebounds. The premiere match-up between two of the nation’s best centers ended with Ohio State defeating the Sooners 74 – 67. Earlier in December, Davenport matched up against another center stand-out. Sylvia Fowles and the LSU Tigers lost 75 – 51. The centers paired well with both Wade Watch candidates racking a double-double. Fowles nished with 18 points and 16 rebounds. Davenport answered the battle with 14 points and 13 rebounds. The Lady Toppers of Western Kentucky University (WKU), led by Wade Watch candidate Crystal Kelly, faced Jazz Covington and Louisville. Louisville was victorious defeating WKU 70 – 58. Kelly scored 20 points, outscoring Covington (8 points, 8 rebounds) by 12. Kelly and the Toppers would later fall to MTSU 76 – 62. Chrissy Givens came out on top, scoring 22 points and adding 12 rebounds to her season stats. Kelly countered with 14 points, shooting 4 for 7. The Blue Raiders added another win for the month. The University of Georgia’s Tasha Humphrey’s rst Wade Watch match-up featured the Lady Bulldogs against Givens and MTSU. Humphrey, not yet seasontuned, scored only seven points. Givens scored 25 points to help MTSU upset Georgia 70 – 62. Bernice Mosby and Baylor University visited Noelle Quinn and the UCLA Bruins. Quinn’s 19 points were not enough to neutralize Mosby’s 20 points. Baylor won, 83 – 70. Quinn’s December theatrics continued against Ashley Walker and the University of California, Berkeley. Walker scored 14 points, while Quinn added another double-double, scoring 10 points with 12 rebounds. UCLA defeated the Golden Bears 77 – 68 in overtime. Two days later, Quinn’s 17 points and 9 rebounds could not defeat a Cardinal team without Candice Wiggins. The Stanford Cardinal rallied behind Brooke Smith’s 13 points and ve rebounds to beat Noelle Quinn (18 points, 8 rebounds, 8 of 17 FG) and the Bruins 68 – 59. Smith would then lead the Cardinal past USC 62 – 46. Smith captured

Women’s Basketball Coaches Association


Wade Watch Matchups a double-double of 14 points and 12 rebounds. USC senior, Eshaya Murphy, scored 22 points. Murphy and the Trojans then visited Ashley Walker and the Cal Golden Bears. Both Wade Watch standouts would pair with 17 points. However, Walker would edge her counterpart with 13 rebounds while shooting 11 out of 12 from the free throw line. Cal defeated USC, 62 – 53. The new year brought resolutions to a few scoring woes as some Wade Watch candidates began to nd their niche, while others kept their scoring ame kindled keeping their teams among the USA TODAY ESPN Top 25. The month of January featured historical and legendary play from The State Farm Wade Trophy hopefuls. The Wade Watch trio of Waner, Harding, and Bales would set the mid-season tone for the undefeated Duke Blue Devils as they faced the Maryland Terrapin foursome of Langhorne, Toliver, Coleman, and Doron. All eyes in the world of collegiate women’s basketball fell upon the teams with the most Wade Watch candidates. They battled for sole possession of the USA TODAY ESPN Top 25 number one ranking. Langhorne’s 14 points, Doron’s 11 points, Coleman’s six points, and Toliver’s eight points were no match for the combined Duke trio scoring of 57. The Blue Devils gave last year’s National Champions their rst loss of the season defeating the Terps 81 – 62. Waner, Harding, and Bales later in the month visited Candace Parker and the Lady Vols. Harding scored 21 points and distributed seven assists. Bales racked eight points and eight rebounds. Waner shot 9 for 15 and added 24 points to a 74 – 70 victory over Tennessee. Candace Parker would not back down from the challenge, manifesting a doubledouble of 22 points and 10 rebounds. Parker and the Lady Vols then faced a Lady Bulldog team led by conference foe Tasha Humphrey. The two defended and held each other below average. Parker scored 10 points and Humphrey answered with eight. The Lady Vols took the conference victory, 52 – 41. LSU faced Ole Miss in conference play with Sylvia Fowles edging Armintie Price in scoring 25-18. Fowles’ 19 rebounds were not enough as the Rebels upset the Tigers 77 – 74.

(USF) Wade Watch candidate Jessica Dickson met her rst match-up when the Bulls hosted Sylvia Fowles and the LSU Tigers. Dickson’s 22 points countered Fowles’ 15 points and 12 rebound effort. The Tigers left Tampa, Florida, with the victory, 60 – 48. Dickson continued to anchor her team, pulling 12 rebounds and outscoring Rutgers’ Matee Ajavon 13 – 6. Rutgers defeated USF 62 – 36. In a Big East Conference showdown, Ajavon was held to another single-digit scoring effort. The junior scored seven points to Louisville’s Jazz Covington’s 13 points. The Cardinals squeaked by the Scarlet Knights 53 – 50. USF then pulled off the upset against Jazz Covington and the Cardinals of Louisville, 74 – 58. Dickson’s 15 points with nine rebounds topped Covington’s nine points and 14 rebounds. Ohio State’s Jessica Davenport and Purdue’s Katie Geralds both scored 12 points in the mid-west match-up. The Buckeyes defeated the Boilermakers 64 – 55. Geralds repeated another 12 point performance against Texas’ Tiffany Jackson. Jackson scored 20 points to lead the Longhorns past Purdue, 64 – 60. The 2007 Wade Watch battle for Texas featured Jackson and Baylor’s Mosby. Mosby out-gunned Jackson’s eight points, scoring 23 and adding 12 rebounds. Baylor would win, 63 – 59. State and conference rivals UCLA and USC met in a thriller. UCLA’s Noelle Quinn and Eshaya Murphy scored shot for shot. Quinn scored 17 points and had nine rebounds. Murphy scored 18 points and also pulled nine rebounds. The women of Troy defeated UCLA 75 – 72. Frenzy in February matriculated as teams prepared for March Madness. Wade Watch candidates take advantage of rematches, observing opponent’s techniques and strengths and simultaneously exploited weaknesses with every opportunity.

Fowles’ 20 points on 10 for 14 shooting and 12 rebounds delivered the knockout blow to the Lady Bulldogs. LSU defeated UGA, 57 – 55. Humphrey succumbed to Fowles’ defense and scored only eight points.

In the early part of the month, the Blue Devils defended their top ranking against Atlantic Coast Conference rival UNC. Alison Bales (7 points, 14 rebounds), Lindsey Harding (16 points, 9 rebounds, 7 assists) and Abby Waner (16 points) exemplied balanced team scoring defeating the Tar Heels 64 – 53. Ivory Latta scored nine points and Erlana Larkins was held to four.

Armintie Price would hold her statistical momentum and tally 11 points with 11 rebounds, but could not pull her team past Tasha Humphrey’s 32 points. Humphrey outweighed Price’s double-double, adding 14 rebounds to her stats. The Lady Bulldogs defeated the Rebels 69 – 60. After losing to Duke, Maryland would face another team with multiple Wade Watch candidates - the University of North Carolina (UNC). The Terps’ Wade Watch candidates scored 56 points. The foursome’s efforts were not enough to outlast the Tar Heel charge. With a perfect eight for eight from the free throw line, January WBCA National Player of the Month Ivory Latta’s 32 points along with Erlana Larkins’ 20 points and 13 rebounds combated Maryland, winning 84 – 71. Brooke Smith (16 points) and Candice Wiggins (17 points), outscored Cal’s Ashley Walker as she stacked up 16 points and 12 rebounds. The Cardinal defeated the Golden Bears 69 – 44. The Sooners and Courtney Paris ventured south to the state of Texas for conference matches. Paris’ 32 points and 16 rebounds were enough to defeat Baylor 76 – 63. Baylor’s Bernice Mosby stood up to the scoring challenge tallying 28 points and 11 rebounds. Texas’ Tiffany Jackson stacked 22 points and 13 rebounds to lead the Longhorns over the Sooners 67 – 62. Courtney Paris continued her inside dominance scoring 25 points with 18 rebounds in the loss. After two months into the season, the University of South Florida’s

Courtney Paris (Oklahoma) vs. Jessica Davenport (Ohio State)

The ACC battle continued, the Terrapins welcomed the Blue Devils with intentions of avenging their previous meeting. Langhorne led the Terrapin play, shooting 7 for 9, scoring 15 points with 12 rebounds. Harding backed up a scoreless Waner, scoring 29 points. Bales complimented with a double-double, 12 points and 12 rebounds, extinguishing the Terps, 69 – 57. The rematch of Parker vs. Humphrey displayed talented scoring feats by both Wade Watch candidates. Parker (22 points, 11 rebounds) edged Humphrey (17 points, 10 rebounds) in scoring. The Lady Vols defeated

Women’s Basketball Coaches Association

the Lady Bulldogs 73 – 57. Candace Parker kept the heavy punches rolling, hitting 9 for 16, scoring 25 points and grabbing 10 rebounds against Ole Miss. Armintie Price was succumbed to a tough defense, scoring 13 points as the Rebels fell 81 – 69. Candace Parker scored 27 points and grabbed 13 rebounds in a crucial conference victory. Parker outscored Sylvia Fowles’ 18 points. Fowles added another double-double to her career with 16 rebounds. The Lady Vols clinched the SEC regular season title defeating the LSU Tigers 56 – 51.

Sylvia Fowles (LSU) vs. Candace Parker (Tennessee)

The Fowles and Humphrey’s rematch proved that the SEC is home of some of the best frontcourt play in the nation. Two points would seperate the two teams for a second time. Georgia squeaked by LSU, 53-51. Fowles scored 17 points and added 18 rebounds to her stats. Humphrey also had a double-double with 15 points and 12 rebounds. The Paris and Jackson rematch would end with a different victor. The Sooners defeated the Longhorns 78 – 58. Paris stepped it up a notch, shooting 11 for 18, scoring 27 points with 15 boards. Jackson scored 19 points. Cal and Stanford would meet again, Brooke Smith (16 points) and Candice Wiggins (17 points) combined for 33 points. Ashley Walker’s six points and six rebounds were not enough to retaliate. However, the Golden Bears’ team cohesion led them past the Cardinal 72 – 57. Walker bounced back scoring 11 from the free throw line to nish with 17 points and 13 rebounds against USC. The Golden Bears defeated the Trojans 62 – 53. Eshaya Murphy scored 17 points. The Blue Raiders defeated the Lady Toppers for the second time, 78 – 63. However, the scoring shifted to Givens instead of last meeting’s scoring equilibrium. Givens nished with 22 points and 12 rebounds. Crystal Kelly scored 14 points. Quinn answered Murphy’s double – double of 13 points and 11 rebounds, scoring 18 points. The Trojans defeated the Bruins 62 – 55 to sweep the regular season. The dust settled in Texas with the Lady Bears taking the season series against the Longhorns, winning 71 – 56. Baylor’s Mosby scored 10 points and Texas’ Jackson scored 12 points and hauled in 13 rebounds. With March Madness nearing, among the 29 State Farm Wade Trophy hopefuls, some will begin to drop from the Wade Watch list. At the end of the season, the one who continues to stand strong during competition and help their team to victory will become a part of history. She will fall in line of the greats that have hoisted the trophy. With every dribble, shot, and rebound, the person must continue to drive their team and become recipient of The State Farm Wade Trophy.

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Bracket Blues LSU has no seniors and has displayed some of the best defense holding teams to under fty points per game.

By Zena O. Lewis

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our team is ranked number one in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. They sweep through the season defeating ranked and unranked opponents by double- digits. They move through the conference tournament like a Sunday morning stroll capturing the title.

Expectedly, they nish the season undefeated and are seeded number one in the national tournament. They become legendary with jaw dropping hardwood play in the wake of their pursuit of the NCAA National Championship. The nal game is reminiscent of a preseason match up; they destroy the last team that stands between them and glory. The tournament attendance record crowd cheers and cameras ash as your team is announced National Champions. They hoist up the USA TODAY ESPN WBCA Coaches’ Trophy and the perfect season is now complete. Unfortunately, collegiate women’s championships do not come that easy. The conclusion of the 2006 NCAA Division I National Championship placed one team at the top and left sixty-three others disappointed. For a large number of ranked and unranked teams, making the 2007 National Tournament is the norm. For a select few, a chance to make the NCAA Women’s Final Four still lingers. For the seven teams who made their rst appearance, the taste of the tournament serves as motivation for the season. During the rst half of the 2007 season, some women’s basketball programs remain competitive. Other programs are crippled due to graduating seniors, injuries and the loss of marquee players. On the contrary, teams have used their tournament success to fuel their season. And for the unexpected, the hunger for a rst ever tournament appearance builds intensity. The new kids on the top, the Terrapins of the University of Maryland, shocked the collegiate basketball world winning the 2006 NCAA National Championship. The team has displayed cohesion with a near ninety points per game average and an inside-outside balance scoring attack with six Terps averaging points in double digits. Led by State Farm Wade Trophy candidates Crystal Langhorne, Kristi Toliver, Marissa Coleman and Shay Doron, the Terps have defeated three teams in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. The team returns ve starters and at midseason, their play mirrors last year’s championship run. With one of the nation’s top recruiting classes and the leadership of seven returning players, the Univerity of Maryland Duke University Blue Devils have jumped out to a sensational season start. With the absence of junior Chante Black due to injury, midway through the season the Blue Devils have amassed a perfect record and have convincingly defeated six teams ranked in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll.

With State FarmWade Trophy candidates Ivory Latta and Erlana Larkins, the University of North Carolina has displayed impressive ball play during the rst half of the season. Latta, a 2006 Kodak/WBCA All-American, is averaging over 14 points per game, adding to the Tar Heels’ average of over ninety points per game. The team has accumulated twenty wins and is on track to becoming one of the toughest teams to beat in this year’s tournament. At midseason, the University of Connecticut’s winning record consists of only two losses from top-ranked opponents. The Huskies will continue to move in a championship direction behind the balanced scoring attack of all ve starters. Kalana Greene, Renee Montgomery, Charde Houston, Mel Thompson and Tina Charles are averaging over ten points per game. Clearly one of the best teams in the nation, watch for the Huskies to build momentum during the latter part of the season and make a return to the tournament spotlight. The Cardinal of Stanford have raised an eyebrow due to last year’s tournament play. The Cardinals were one game short of making an NCAA Women’s Final Four appearance. The team beat a tough Florida State squad, defeated higher-seeded Oklahoma, and nearly pulled of an upset over Louisiana State. During the top half of the 2006-2007 season, the Cardinal’s only losses have been from ranked teams. State Farm Wade Trophy candidate and 2006 Kodak/ WBCA All-American Candice Wiggins, State Farm Wade Trophy candidate Brooke Smith, along with Jillian Harmon are averaging points in double-digits and are on pace to leading the Cardinal deeper into this year’s tournament. Midway through the season, the University of Tennessee Lady Volunteers is one of the nation’s Candice Wiggins top teams. Leading the scoring effort is State Farm (Stanford) Wade Trophy candidate and 2006 Kodak/WBCA All-American sophomore Candace Parker. Senior Sidney Spencer and junior Alexis Hornbuckle have stepped up combining for a 22 points per game average. The Lady Vols early season play should provide momentum for a push to the title game. After upsetting number one seed Ohio State University in last year’s tournament, the University of Utah’s 2006-07 season looked very promising. However, The Utes only returned two starters from last year and began this season losing four of their rst ve games, tallying an 11- 6 record in the rst half of the season. Sophomore Morgan Warburton’s double-digit scoring average and the experience guard play of Heidi Carlsen have sparked the Utes, pushing them into a winning streak in the early part of 2007. At the season midpoint, the Lady Bears of Baylor University are still one of the toughest teams in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. Senior transfer Bernice Mosby has played an intricate part of the Lady Bears’ early season success. Mosby is averaging close to 20 points per game. With one of the nation’s best freshmen classes, the Lady Bears’ youth, with upperclassmen leadership, could mature quickly and make a strong run at the championship.

Duke’s young squad has displayed veteran poise. Compared to last year’s 8.9 points per game average, sophomore Abby Waner has stepped up, scoring close to 15 points per game. The Blue Devils’ seniors, State Farm Wade Trophy candidate Lindsey Harding and Allison Bales have combined for almost 30 points per game. With one shot keeping them from last year’s National Championship title, the Blue Devils are expected to return to the title game.

After their rst ever Sweet Sixteen appearance in school history, the DePaul Blue Demons, with ten lettermen and four starters returning, were expected to begin the rst half of the season in good standings. Even with the combined scoring average of over forty points per game from team leaders, junior Allie Quigley, junior Caprice Smith, and senior Jenna Rubino, DePaul has vanished from the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. Even with six losses at midpoint, the Blue Demons are experienced to make a tournament run.

With the graduation of the 2006 State FarmWade Trophy recipient and team leader Seimone Augustus, the Lady Tigers of Louisiana State University are moving toward a crack at the national title. Halfway through the season, the Lady Tigers, led by State Farm Wade Trophy candidate Sylvia Fowles, have won six out of seven games against last year’s tournament teams.

During the rst half of the season, the University of Georgia Lady Bulldogs have faced nine of last year’s NCAA tournament teams, winning ve of nine. Tasha Humphrey, 2006 Kodak/ WBCA All-American, combines steady scoring and rebound, which has placed her on the State

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Women’s Basketball Coaches Association


Bracket Blues Farm Wade Watch List for the 2006-07 season. Facing some of the best teams in the nation early on may benet the team’s effort for a national championship run. Michigan State University starters, senior Victoria Lucas-Perry, senior Renee Haynes, sophomore Aisha Jefferson and freshman Allysa DeHaan, have contributed over ten points per game in the early half of the 2006-07 season. The balanced team scoring has placed the Spartans among the nation’s top 25. Team cohesion and consistency will play a factor in the Spartans improving from last year’s Elite Eight appearance. After last year’s upset loss to Utah, Ohio State University is right on track to becoming a tougher team to beat in this year’s NCAA Championship Tournament. The Buckeyes is among the nation’s top ten teams in the early part of the season. Halfway through her senior year is two-time Kodak/WBCA All-American and State Farm Wade Trophy hopeful Jessica Davenport. Davenport leads the Big Ten in both scoring and rebounds, averaging nearly 20 points and over 10 rebounds per game. With only one loss, the Buckeyes are preparing to make a gallant rush to the championship round. Leaving last year’s tournament sooner then expected was the University of Oklahoma. Halfway through this season, the Sooners have only one loss and are ranked in the nation’s top ten. With the tournament experience of seniors Chelsi Welch and Leah Rush, the team is capable of moving further in the 2007 NCAA National Jessica Davenport Tournament. In addition to sophomore State Farm Wade Trophy candidate Courtney Paris’ near 25 point (Ohio State) scoring and 16 rebounds per game average, the Sooners could extend their tournament trail to the championship round. As the fourth seed in last year’s NCAA National Tournament, the Purdue Boilermakers were expected to make a Sweet Sixteen appearance. Midway through this season, the team has idled their position in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. Senior Katie Gearld’s scoring average of over 17 points per game has placed her on the 2006-07 State Farm Wade Watch List. In addition to Lindsay Wisdom-Hylton’s double-digit scoring, the Boilermakers could push pass the third round and make a Final Four appearance. Rutgers University in the early half of the season is jousting with several different starting lineups and has slowly moved out of the nation’s top 25. The Scarlet Knights are ve games over .500 and are only out-scoring their opponents by a slim margin. Junior and State Farm Wade Trophy candidate Matee Ajavon is averaging close to ten points per game, while junior Essence Carson, sophomore Kia Vaughn and Epiphanny Prince combined points of more than 40 points per game gives the Scarlet Knights over half of their total point average. In the second round of last year’s NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship, St. John’s (N.Y.), Boston College, George Washington, UCLA, Vanderbilt, Southern Cal, University of Kentucky, Virginia Tech, Florida State University, and Brigham Young University were expected to make the second round but could not get pass the higher-seeded squad.

nation’s top teams. Halfway through the season, the Sun-Devils have tallied nearly twenty wins. Pulling off rst-round shockers and making the tourney’s nal 32 were New Mexico, Texas Christian University, Tulsa and Hartford. Texas Christian University broke into the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll with a half-season of basketball left to play. The Horned Frogs are led by Adrianne Ross and with ten letter winners returning could advance further into this year’s tournament. After making the NCAA Tournament for the rst time in school history, the Golden Hurricanes pulled a rst round upset against North Carolina State. The University of Tulsa is led by State Farm Wade Trophy candidate senior Jillian Robbins and senior Tandem Mays. The University of Hartford shocked the tournament defeating top seed Temple University. The Hawks, through midseason, are barely over .500, but could still make a run for an automatic bid. Even with the upset against the University of Florida in the rst round, New Mexico is no stranger to the NCAA Tournament. The Lobos return team leader Dionne Marsh and Katie Montgomery and debuted early this season in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll, but slipped out of the poll by midseason. With another half of the season yet to play, the Lobos can still put themselves in for another upset. In the rst round of the tournament team records, statistics and rankings are never important. The University of Florida, Texas A&M, Temple, Minnesota and N.C. State were all eliminated in the rst round of the tournament by lower-seeded teams. Texas A&M (12-3), Temple (13-4), Minnesota (11-7) and N.C. State (13-5) are on track to return to this year’s tournament. The University of Florida Gators may not have recuperated from last year’s tournament upset. Halfway through the year, the team is six games under .500. Top-ranked Bowling Green (14-2), Middle Tennessee (15-3), Louisville (17-1) at midseason with stellar records are pushing toward making it past this year’s rst round. California, Chattanooga, Coppin State, Dartmouth, Iowa, Liberty, Louisiana Tech, Marist, Missouri, Missouri St., Notre Dame, Northern Arizona, Oakland, Old Dominion, Pepperdine, Southern University, Stephen F. Austin, UWGreen Bay, all made rst-round appearances in last year’s tournament and could repeat. Making their rst appearances in the NCAA tournament were Army, Florida Atlantic University, Sacred Heart, SE Missouri State, University of South Florida, and UC-Riverside. Their performances in conference tournament play will decide if they return to dance for a second time.

Chrissy Givens (Middle Tennessee)

Vanderbilt and George Washington University have taken a serious approach to this season. At midseason, both teams are ranked in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. The Commodores have moved their way up from a preseason fteenth place, while GWU has slowly made their way up the top 25. After losing to fth-seeded Utah in last year’s tournament, Arizona State has become one of the Employers

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13


WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:00 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

Contact: Summer McKesson Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112 smckesson@wbca.org

For Immediate Release March 31, 2007

WBCA and Kodak Announce NCAA Division I Kodak/WBCA All-America Team ATLANTA, Ga. -The Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) and Eastman Kodak Company announced today the 2007 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Kodak/WBCA AllAmerica Basketball Team. This year’s team marks the 33rd year of the longest running sponsorship in women’s athletics. Selection committees in each of the eight WBCA geographical regions select ten of the top women’s basketball players in the nation to be honored. The members of the 2007 NCAA Division I Kodak/WBCA All-America Basketball Team are as follows: Name Jessica Davenport Sylvia Fowles Lindsey Harding Crystal Langhorne Ivory Latta Angel McCoughtry Courtney Paris Candace Parker Armintie Price Candice Wiggins

Institution The Ohio State University Louisiana State University Duke University University of Maryland University of North Carolina University of Louisville University of Oklahoma University of Tennessee University of Mississippi Stanford University

Year Sr. Jr. Sr. Jr. Sr. So. So. So. Sr. Jr.

Pos. C C G C G F C G/F/C G G

Hgt. 6-5 6-6 5-8 6-2 5-6 6-1 6-4 6-4 5-9 5-10

Throughout the 2006-2007 season, these ten players have been a pleasure to watch and have proven themselves to be deserving of this honor,” said WBCA CEO Beth Bass. “The growth of our game is in the hands of many of these young student-athletes and we look forward to watching their future in women’s basketball continue to unfold. "For the past 32 years, Kodak has partnered with the WBCA to celebrate the best in women's college basketball. Kodak is in the business of helping people capture and share memories. It is gratifying for us to help honor these student-athletes whose highlights have thrilled us for so many years," said Carl Gustin, Chief Marketing Officer and Vice President at Kodak." We are proud to recognize the accomplishments of these young women and the positive recognition they bring to their schools, their communities and the game. " The following have been recognized as Kodak/WBCA All-America Team Honorable Mentions for NCAA Division I:

http://www.wbca.org/releases/KAATRelease2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

Name Charel Allen Jolene Anderson Alison Bales Amanda Brown Essence Carson Tina Charles Dee Davis Jessica Dickson Natalie Doma Robyn Fairbanks Katie Gearlds Chrissy Givens Carmen Guzman Kamesha Hairston Devanei Hampton Kiera Hardy Tasha Humphrey Tiffany Jackson Crystal Kelly Erlana Larkins Andrea Lightfoot Ali Mann Lyndsey Medders Renee Montgomery Carrie Moore Mandy Morales Bernice Mosby Eshaya Murphy Lauren Neaves Noelle Quinn Jillian Robbins Adrianne Ross Joi Scott Brooke Smith Tyresa Smith Nicole Soulis Carla Thomas Kia Vaughn Marcedes Walker Emily Westerberg Lindsay Wisdom-Hylton Hanna Zavecz

7/18/10 1:00 PM

Institution University of Notre Dame Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison Duke University Penn State University Rutgers University University of Connecticut Vanderbilt University University of South Florida Idaho State University Utah Valley State College Purdue University Middle Tennessee State Univ. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham Temple University Univ. of California, Berkeley University of Nebraska University of Georgia University of Texas Western Kentucky University University of North Carolina Idaho State University Bowling Green State University Iowa State University University of Connecticut Western Michigan University University of Montana Baylor University University of Southern California Rice University UCLA University of Tulsa Texas Christian University Murray State University Stanford University University of Delaware UW-Green Bay Vanderbilt University Rutgers University University of Pittsburgh Arizona State University Purdue University University of Wyoming

Year Jr. Jr. Sr. Sr. Jr. Fr. Sr. Sr. Jr. So. Sr. Sr. Sr. Sr. So. Sr. Jr. Sr. Jr. Jr. Jr. Sr. Sr. So. Sr. So. Sr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Jr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Sr. So. Jr. Sr. Jr. Jr.

Pos. G G C F/C F C G F C C G G G F C G F F F F G F G G G G F G F G F G F C G F F/C C C F F F

Height 5-11 5-8 6-7 6-4 6-1 6-4 5-7 5-11 6-3 6-1 6-1 5-11 5-9 6-0 6-3 5-6 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-1 5-8 6-1 5-9 5-7 5-9 5-9 6-1 5-11 6-2 6-0 6-1 5-8 6-0 6-3 5-10 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-3 6-0 6-2 6-0

About Eastman Kodak Company Kodak is the world's foremost imaging innovator. With sales of $13.3 billion in 2006, the company is committed to a digitally oriented growth strategy focused on helping people better use meaningful images and information in their life and work. Consumers use Kodak's system of digital and traditional products and http://www.wbca.org/releases/KAATRelease2007.html

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services to take, print and share their pictures anytime, anywhere; Businesses effectively communicate with customers worldwide using Kodak solutions for prepress, conventional and digital printing and document imaging; Creative Professionals rely on Kodak technology to uniquely tell their story through moving or still images; and leading Healthcare organizations rely on Kodak's innovative products, services and customized workflow solutions to help improve patient care and maximize efficiency and information sharing within and across their enterprise. More information about Kodak (NYSE: EK) is available at www.kodak.com. Founded in 1981, the WBCA promotes women's basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit WBCA.org.

--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/KAATRelease2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:00 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

For Immediate Release March 27, 2007

Contact: Summer McKesson Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112 smckesson@wbca.org

Harding’s Tenacious Defense Earns Her National Recognition ATLANTA, Ga. - The Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) has selected Duke University’s Lindsey Harding as the WBCA National Defensive Player of the Year. The WBCA Defensive Player of the Year Award honors the best defensive collegiate Division I women’s basketball player. All Division I Conference Defensive Player’s of the Year are eligible to be nominated for the award and the selection committee makes the final decision on the winner. “The old adage, ‘Offense sells tickets, defense wins games’, holds true when Lindsey Harding hits the court,” said WBCA CEO Beth Bass. “The WBCA is elated to present the inaugural WBCA Defensive Player of the Year Award to Lindsey for her ravenous defensive efforts.” Harding has not only garnered national recognition for herself, but was a key factor to Duke’s success throughout the season. This Houston, Texas, native helped to lead the Blue Devils to a No. 1 National Ranking in the USA TODAY ESPN NCAA Division I Top 25 Coaches’ Poll. Her defensive efforts also led Duke to the nation’s second-best scoring defense, as the squad held opponents to an average of 51.4 points per game. For her outstanding play this season, Harding was selected as the ACC Player of the Year, ACC Defensive Player of the Year and was named an All-ACC First Team selection. She averaged 13.6 points, 4.0 assists and 1.5 steals per game. This season, Harding became only the sixth player in ACC history to register over 1,000 points, 500 rebounds, 500 assists and 250 steals. Harding will be formally recognized at the WBCA Awards Luncheon presented by State Farm and Jostens at 12:00 p.m. (ET) on Tuesday, April 3, 2007, in the Crowne Plaza’s Grand Ballroom. This event is part of the WBCA National Convention and is held in conjunction with the NCAA® Women’s Final Four® in Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1981, the WBCA promotes women's basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit WBCA.org.

http://www.wbca.org/releases/WBCANationalDefensivePOY2007.html

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--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/WBCANationalDefensivePOY2007.html

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Against the Odds The Road Less Traveled: Cruising from High School to the Collegiate Ranks By Zena O. Lewis

T

he road to become a Division I head coach is a long one to travel. Some coaches spend years as an assistant before garnering the opportunity. What qualications would a person need to head a Division I basketball program? Many would believe that it takes years of assisting some of the country’s best coaches and accumulating hours attending basketball workshops.

could match wits or brains or whatever with those coaches,” Coach Insell said. “I never really pursued a lot of coaching opportunities in college. I often thought if Vandy or, in particular, Middle Tennessee was to open up, I would be interested. In ’92, I interviewed for the Vandy job, and Jim Foster got it. He did a good job and probably deservingly so got it. When Stephany (Smith) left (Middle Tennessee), two years ago, I was able to get an interview with Chris Massaro. We hit it off and that was the beginning.” Marist College Head Coach Brian Giorgis coached girls’ high school basketball for 19 years before venturing into the collegiate ranks. He received offers to assist Agnes Beranato at Georgia Tech, but graciously turned them down.

Imagine a coach who has never coached outside the realm of high school basketball and has never had to deal with the tedious task of recruiting or familiarizing his or herself with NCAA rules and regulations. Can they handle the perks, pleasures and pains of coaching Division I basketball? For the many that choose the lengthy path of climbing step-by-step up the ladder to reach Division I coaching, there are a few that have leaped from the high school rankings to the collegiate level. Before piloting the University of Oklahoma women’s basketball squad, Head Coach Sherri Coale coached high school basketball. In 1990, Coale became head coach of Norman High School. She took a weltering program and created a state powerhouse, winning two 6A state championships. To go from high school coaching to leading one of the nation’s top-ranked teams was never a long-term goal for Coale. “Never really thought about it until the opportunity presented itself at the University of Oklahoma. I always wanted to coach ball. I was a high school teacher, I loved teaching, and I taught English,” said Coach Coale.

Sherri Coale, Univ. of Oklahoma

Even though coaching on the college level was not a goal, Coale realized she had the tools to coach Division I when University of Connecticut Head Coach Geno Auriemma visited her practice.

“Stacy Hansmeyer (Norman High School ’97, UCONN ‘01) and a class of kids came through Norman High School who were nationally recruited. Stacy was being recruited by Connecticut. After Geno came to watch us practice he asked if I ever thought of coaching on the next level. I said no, not really,” Coach Coale said. “He said you could do it. You are better than half the coaches I see on a regular basis. If the opportunity presents itself you should think about it. I just stored it away as a compliment. Never really thought about it, because I didn’t want to move anywhere. Then at the end of the year, the job opened up at Oklahoma. A lot of local people encouraged me to apply for it and that is really how it all began.” Contrary to Coale’s satisfaction with coaching on the high school level, Middle Tennessee State University’s Rick Insell always thought of the opportunity to coach college basketball. “It was not necessarily a goal. I often thought about it,” said Coach Insell. “It was not something I got up every morning and thought I might like to do. When the Middle (Tennessee) job opened up, at that point in my career, I was kind of in a rut and I needed another challenge.” Insell created a girls’ basketball dynasty at Shelbyville High School leading them to ten 3A state championships and two USA Today National Championships (1989, 1991). In 28 years as a high school coach, he accumulated a record of 775-148. “You always think about it. I knew most of the Division I coaches across the country on a rst name basis because they had recruited a lot of my players from Shelbyville. As you see some of your players play on the national spotlight stages, sometimes it crosses your mind. Hey! I wonder if you

“There were various degrees in the process, but basically when Marist called me, it Brian Giorgis, was one of those times to Marist College sit down and think about it. One, it was a school I really wanted to go to. It’s a great academic school. Two, it was real close and it’s in the community. Three, I felt I had done everything,” said Coach Giorgis. “The big key was security, because I had been at Our Lady of Lourdes High School for twenty-ve years. I felt very secure there. As we got through the process and the contract came along, the athletic director and principal at Lourdes looked at it and said, you need to try this. That was huge. Knowing that if I could not do it at this level they would take me back. Plus three of my former players were already here.” Oklahoma Head Coach Sherri Coale has played an intricate part in the resurgence of Sooner Basketball and has turned OU into one of the nation’s top programs. In her eleven years at the helm, Coach Coale has amassed a record of 232 - 118. She has guided her team to ve Big 12 regular season championships, four Big 12 Tournament Championships and eight NCAA appearances. Within those appearances, the Sooners have made ve trips to the Sweet Sixteen and one NCAA Final Four appearance. Continuing his coaching success, Rick Insell has orchestrated the Blue Raiders of Middle Tennessee State University to back-to-back Sun Belt Tournament Championships and NCAA National Tournament appearances, a feat seldom accomplished by coaches in their rst two years of coaching. Within six years Brian Giorgis has turned Marist College into one of the most talented teams in the nation. He has directed the Red Foxes to the program’s best record and all three-tournament appearances, including an appearance in the Sweet Sixteen. However, all three coaches believe that their experiences coaching at the high school level has prepared them. Despite the seldom move from high school to Division I, the coaches credit their present success to the knowledge they have gain coaching at the high school level. “When I took the job at Oklahoma, I didn’t know anything about recruiting from the inside out, but I knew a lot about it from the outside in. I had players who had been recruited, so I knew what worked. I knew what kinds of things high school kids read and I knew what kinds of things they threw in the trash,” Coach Coale said. “I knew what worked with me in approaches from college coaches who were trying to get in with the high school coaches to nd out about student-athletes. I saw all kinds of mail and I had saved all kinds of stuff. When I started recruiting, I did not have any practical experience. I was armed with a lot of information. I paid attention when my kids were being recruited. That helped tremendously.” Coach Insell’s experience as a high school and junior league coach served as the cornerstone of his coaching philosophy that has continued the success of MTSU.

mer - the travel team in which you coach mostly all-stars,” Coach Insell said. “You take a little bit from everything. My philosophy is built all the way back when I was coaching junior pro ball. That was back in the early 70’s.” After graduating from SUNY, Coach Giorgis wanted to become a teacher and high school coach. With his current success, he credits his staff and players rst. He admits his 25 years of experience as an educator has helped him along the way. “Dealing with kids, adolescents or young adults, I have had a lot of experience,” said Coach Giorgis. “Even though they are a little more experienced, I have had a lot of experience working with a lot of different situations, and that’s what helped me the most.” Even with tremendous success on the high school level it is not an easy transition. One of the commonalities found in coaches who have moved from high school to Division I status is that they have staked a name nearby their respective institutions. “It’s much harder to go from high school coach to head college coach. They need that middle and become an assistant. If you look at the common denominator beside the success that Sherri, and Rick and I have had, we were all local high school coaches,” Coach Giorgis said. “If you look at it and check all the people that go from high school coach to head college coach, chances are they were local.” Even if the thought of returning to the high school level never enters their mind, some coaches cannot deny the fond memories - with the exception of the long hours of grading papers and hall duty. Coaches will admit that they hold dear the relationship between them and their student-athletes. In certain situations, high school coaches can aid students with personal conicts. That is where one of the differences between coaching on these levels exists. “I can’t imagine going back, but what I miss is the fact you could take care of your kids,” said Coach Coale. “You can ll their needs. Whatever kids needed you can be the kind of person you wanted to be and help your kids. I miss that level of impact more than anything. I miss a little bit of the innocence where kids truly play because they love basketball. They love the game. There are still a lot of kids like that on the college level and we try to recruit kids that operate within that vein.” Coach Insell has traded his daily tasks of checking papers and monitoring hallways to delegating his staff, but has never counted out returning to his beginnings. Coach Insell has coached on every level of basketball. From the beginnings of junior pro to one of the most respected stages of the game - Division I. “I don’t think anyone should ever say they wouldn’t go back and do something,” said Coach Insell. “I’m enjoying what I am doing right now, and coaching is coaching. My whole life I have enjoyed doing what I’m doing and that is coaching basketball.”

Rick Insell, Middle Tennessee State University

The decision to make a high school coach a collegiate head coach can only be made by the Director of Athletics. For the University of Oklahoma, Marist College and Middle Tennessee State University, the gamble was a protable success. When traveling down that long road to collegiate coaching…consider the detour to high school.

“Every coach has to go back to their beginnings, their roots. Mine would be, going back to junior pro, junior high, high school, and coaching in the sum-

Women’s Basketball Coaches Association

9


WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 12:59 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

For Immediate Release March 31, 2007

Contact: Summer McKesson Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112 smckesson@wbca.org

CP3 Rocks, Rolls In Women’s Basketball Top Honor ATLANTA, Ga. - The Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) announced today that the University of Tennessee’s sophomore Candace Parker has been named The State Farm Wade Trophy Player of the Year for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I. The WBCA presents this award annually to the top player in NCAA Division I. “Candace Parker has been one of the most-touted collegiate players on the hardwood this season,” said WBCA CEO Beth Bass. “Candace is an exceptional representative for Lily Margaret Wade, the WBCA and The State Farm Wade Trophy, and we are pleased to present her with this well-deserved honor.” Parker becomes the second Tennessee women’s basketball player to receive the award. She succeeds fellow Lady Vol and 1991 Wade Trophy recipient Daedra Charles-Furlow. Parker’s dynamic play has led the Lady Vols to their 17th Final Four and a 32-3 overall record. The 6'4 Naperville, Illinois native's relentless, majestic and versatile playing ability has her listed in the upper echelon of the best in women’s basketball. Parker is the fastest UT player to capture 1,000 career points. The Southeastern Conference (SEC) Player of the Year is averaging close to 20 points, 10 rebounds, three blocks and two steals per game. Parker’s 2006-2007 accomplishments include: John R. Wooden All-American, Associated Press AllAmerican, and ALL-SEC honors. Parker’s success does not stop on the court, but continues in the classroom as she was named to three All-Academic teams. "Congratulations to State Farm Wade Trophy Player of the Year Candace Parker," said Mark D. Gibson, Assistant Vice President of Advertising at State Farm. "Her outstanding accomplishments as a studentathlete, on and off the court, make her truly deserving of this wonderful honor. We look forward to seeing Candace fulfill the rest of her basketball dreams." The Wade Trophy, named after the late, legendary three-time national champion Delta State University head coach Lily Margaret Wade, debuted in 1978 as the first-ever women's national player of the year award in college basketball. Past winners of the Wade Trophy include: Carol Blazejowski (1978-inaugural winner), Nancy Lieberman (1979 and 1980), Cheryl Miller (1984), Rebecca Lobo (1995), Ticha Penicheiro (1998) and Sue Bird (2002). Last year’s recipient of The State Farm Wade Trophy was Seimone Augustus (Louisiana State University), who also received the honor in 2005. The WBCA has been in partnership with The National Association of Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) http://www.wbca.org/releases/WadeTrophyWinner2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

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for five years in presenting The State Farm Wade Trophy Player of the Year Award. A committee comprised of coaches, administration and media from across the United States selects the winner. Parker will be formally presented her award at the WBCA Awards Luncheon presented by State Farm and Jostens on Tuesday, April 3, 2007, at 12:00 (ET) in the Crowne Plaza’s Grand Ballroom. The State Farm Wade Trophy Player of the Year presentation is part of the 2007 WBCA National Convention, held in conjunction with the NCAA® Women's Final Four® in Cleveland, Ohio. About State Farm State Farm® insures more cars than any other insurer in North America and is the leading U.S. home insurer. State Farm's 17,000 agents and 68,000 employees serve over 75 million auto, fire, life and health policies in the United States and Canada, and more than 1.6 million bank accounts. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No.22 on the Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit statefarm.com® or in Canada statefarm.ca™. About NAGWS The National Association of Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) was established to develop and deliver equitable and quality sport opportunities for ALL girls and women through relevant research, advocacy, leadership development, educational strategies, and programming in a manner that promotes social justice and change. Founded in 1981, the WBCA promotes women's basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit WBCA.org.

--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/WadeTrophyWinner2007.html

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Against the Odds Coaching Gender Bender By Zena O. Lewis

I

f you are a male coach who is thinking about coaching women’s basketball, there are a few things you need to know before stepping into the realm of women’s basketball. There are quite a few differences between coaching men and women that one might not realize until they are actually in the shoes of a women’s basketball coach. The difference in the women’s play is not necessarily good or bad, but it does require adjustment. Unfortunately, there is not a book entitled, “How To Coach Women For Dummies”, though Guy Hardaker at the University of Central Oklahoma may have wished there were when he rst ventured into the women’s world of basketball. There are a few differences in coaching men and women’s basketball and hopefully this article will proGuy Hardaker vide (University of Central Oklahoma) insight for those of you out there who may need a little introduction into how the women’s game works. For some male head coaches, coaching women’s basketball may be a different experience. Despite the gender bender, the goal is still the same: focus on winning.

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Don Zierden, head coach of the WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx, has coached male players for many years. He enters his rst season as head coach of a women’s team that nished with the second worst record in the league. His intent is to change the culture and tone of the entire team, but realizes that there may be some surprises along the way. “There may be some differences as I go along, but I’m really not expecting any. I know that they are very talented players and I expect to coach them the same way that we were coaching in the NBA,” Zierden said. “It’s obvious that it’s going to be a new experience coaching women, but there is no fear or nervousness. Part of the reason is, I feel very condent in the staff that I hired. Going into this, knowing that I hadn’t coached women before, I thought it was of the utmost importance to put a staff around me that had some experience.” The games variation due to gender may not weather among the athletes. In some cases coaches become different instructors when leading the opposite sex. “I may have toned it down a bit as far as being a coach, aggressively. Not much. The girls respond really well. The differences in guys and girls that I’ve noticed, more than anything, is when I was coaching boys, I would just tell them what to do. They would just do it. Girls, you tell them what to do, and they’ll do the same thing but they want to know why. They want to understand the game. They want to know why we run certain plays in various situations,” University of Central Oklahoma head coach Guy Hardaker said. Hardaker, in his rst year coaching women, mid-way through the season has the Bronchos at a 13 – 12 record in Division II play.

“As far as X’s and O’s, obviously the lobs aren’t dunks. We still catch passes over the top and lay it up. I was telling my male colleagues that we actually complete back door and lob situations better now than when I was coaching men,” Hardaker said. “They want to win just like anyone else. They are competitive. People try to warn me of the emotional standpoint of coaching women. These girls want to win and they want to be coached.” To help him prepare for his rst season at the helm of a women’s team, Hardaker contacted University of Oklahoma’s women’s head coach Sherri Coale. Preparation is essential when heading any athletic program for the Drew Olsen rst time. (Concordia University)

Concordia University (Nebraska) Head Coach Drew Olson, with the season winding down, has the Bulldogs with a record of 19 – 12 in his rst year coaching women. Coach Olson is the third member of his family to take the reigns of a women’s program. His father, Rich Olson, has over 20 years of coaching girls’ basketball and is currently coaching on the high school level. Drew’s brother, Jarrod, is head coach of the women’s basketball team at Florida Southern College. Even with creditable sources, Concordia’s Olson still found additional means to

Women’s Basketball Coaches Association


Against the Odds remaining teams in the regular season with a 20 – 11 record.

prepare himself for his rst year. “I actually talked to a lot of people that have gone from men to women, such as my dad and my brother. I also spoke with the previous head basketball coach and his predecessor who are both at Drake University, Micah Parker and Todd Voss. I asked them questions about the differences, and little things that helped them,” Olson said. “ The most helpful thing was reading a book by Kathleen Deboer called ‘Gender and Competition’. It was helpful when answering questions related to understanding, coaching and teaching women athletes.”

After 38 years of coaching boys, Pekin High School (Pekin, Illinois) girls’ varsity head coach Paul Swanson says he has had to simplify his plays in his rst year as a girls’ coach. “Running basic basketball plays and adapting to techniques. I’m teaching the same things, but the level of play is slightly different,” Swanson said. “We run a base number of set plays. Then we go more high-low motion. As opposed to boys, I constantly ran motion. Now, I run ex into motion with the girls.”

Even with differences, there is a high degree of similarities when coaching women and men’s basketball. “I think the men and women are competing at the same intensity level. It’s a little bit different. The men’s side is more athletic with dunks, however it’s pretty steady. As far as training, we do similar exercises and drills. We prepare for games the same way,” Ohio Dominican University head coach Nathan Bellman said. “Practices are still similar. We now practice against guys. Dealing with guys, your dealing with egos on the oor. With girls there is not as much. Girls seem to be more receptive.”

During the last few years there has been a slight surge of hiring male coaches for women’s basketball teams. In the WNBA, nine of thirteen coaches are male. “I think what happens in any sport, not just basketball, but I think it becomes trends. I think what’s happening right now, you see the Mike Thibaults, the Paul Westheads, and the Bill Laimbeers,” Zierden said. “People that were involved in the NBA game, they brought some NBA avor into the WNBA. I think right now that’s the trend. How long does it last? When will it go another way; that is yet to be determined? You see it all the time in sports. Whether it’s baseball or football. They hire ex-players or former coaches.”

Coach Bellman may be in his rst year as head coach, but has acquired a bit of experience coaching women’s basketball. He served as the women’s assistant coach for Indiana Wesleyan University, Wright State University and the University of the Cumberlands. Bellman’s Panthers face the Employers

One thing is certain - coaches continue their same philosophy when coaching men and women. “As of right now, everyone in this business has a philosophy and we know

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Women’s Basketball Coaches Association

what we want to do. Until, I see it doesn’t work in the WNBA, I’m going to continue to do it,” Zierden Don Zierden (WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx) said. “Watching Mike Thibault, Paul Westhead, Bill Laimbeer, people that have been involved in the NBA, it doesn’t seem like they’ve had any problems carrying their philosophy over to the WNBA. So I’m going to continue the same with mine.” Should male coaches stick to coaching male players? Does being the opposite sex make you less qualied when coaching the other gender? In women’s basketball, those questions are seldom asked, or never. Since the early years, male coaches have impacted and pioneered the game. In contrary of historic, painful and horrid world events that were impacted through discrimination, one could say that women’s basketball is a pillar of equality. Man or woman? The real question is; can you coach basketball?

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11


WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:04 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

For Immediate Release March 12, 2007

Contact: Summer McKesson Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112 smckesson@wbca.org

The Oklahoma Eiffel Tower takes WBCA February National Player of the Month The University of Oklahoma’s Courtney Paris selected WBCA National Player of the Month for second time this season. ATLANTA, Ga. - The University of Oklahoma’s (OU) sophomore center and scoring sensation Courtney Paris, has been named the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) National Player of the Month for February. Paris receives the honor for the second time this season and fourth time in her career. Paris’ maniacal scoring and tenacious defense impacted the Sooners’ (23-4, 13-3) five game win streak for the month. Paris’ 29 points, 17 rebounds and three blocked shots per game average capped an OU 6 – 1 record in February. The monthly onslaught opened with a 41-point and 19-rebound performance against state rival Oklahoma State University. It concluded with her 55th straight double-double against Baylor while leading her team to a share of the Big 12 regular season team title. The Sooners are currently ranked #11 in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches' Poll. Paris continues to lead the Big 12 Conference and OU in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots. She is ranked in the top four in the nation in all three statistical categories, averaging 24 points, 16 rebounds and three blocks per game. Paris is among the 29 players selected as preseason candidates for the 2007 State Farm Wade Watch. Last season, the sophomore center was named to the 2006 Kodak/WBCA All-America Team. She became the first player in NCAA history to record 700 points, 500 rebounds and 100 blocks in one season. She now holds the Big 12 record for points in one season, passing Edwina Brown of Texas. Paris captured Big 12 honors being named to the All-Big 12 First Team, All-Big 12 Freshman Team and All-Big 12 Defensive Team. In addition, Paris was named Big 12 Freshman of the Year and Co-Defensive Player of the Year. Also nominated: Ashley Underwood, Maine (America East); Kamesha Hairston, Temple (Atlantic 10); Lindsey Harding, Duke (Atlantic Coast Conference); Alysha Clark, Belmont (Atlantic Sun); Angel McCoughtry, Louisville (Big East); Natalie Doma, Idaho State (Big Sky); Kelli Darden, Radford (Big South); Kemie Nkele, UC Riverside (Big West); Tyresa Smith, Delaware (Colonial Athletic); Carmen Guzman, UAB (Conference USA); Erica Davis, Yale (Ivy League); Shaunna Ambrose, Niagara University (Metro Atlantic); Carrie Moore,Western Michigan (Mid-American); Elisha Turek, Oral Roberts (MidContinent) Amber Bland, North Carolina A&T (Mid-Eastern Athletic); Carlai Moore, Southern Illinois (Missouri Valley); Dani Wright, Brigham Young (Mountain West); Chinata Nesbit, Robert Morris http://www.wbca.org/releases/FebruaryPOM2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

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University (Northeast) Joi Scott, Murray State (Ohio Valley); Devanei Hampton, University of California (Pacific-10); Carly Meyer, Navy (Patriot League); Candace Parker, Tennessee (SEC); Shelita Burns, Jackson State University (Southwestern Athletic); Crystal Kelly, Western Kentucky (Sun Belt); Stephanie Hawk, Gonzaga (West Coast); Shan Moore, Louisiana Tech (Western Athletic). *WBCA National Player of the Month is based on achievements during the respective month for nomination. All nominations must come from the conference office and the player’s head coach must be a member of the WBCA. Founded in 1981, the WBCA promotes women's basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit WBCA.org.

--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/FebruaryPOM2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:03 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

Contact: Summer McKesson Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112 smckesson@wbca.org

For Immediate Release March 22, 2007

Goestenkors Garners Coach of the Year Honor ATLANTA, Ga. - The Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) has selected Gail Goestenkors of Duke University as the 2007 Russell Athletic/WBCA National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Coach of the Year. This year marks the 25th year that this accolade has been presented, which has been selected by the WBCA since 1983. “Gail Goestenkors has earned her keep amongst such a wonderful group of coaches at the NCAA Division I level,” said WBCA CEO Beth Bass. “I would like to congratulate Gail for being named the 2007 Russell Athletic/WBCA National NCAA Division I Coach of the Year.” In 15 years at Duke University, Gail Goestenkors has escorted the Blue Devils from relative obscurity to national prominence. Goestenkors has accomplished feats that no other women’s basketball coach in school history has been able to achieve. She tallied a 396-98 record and is on pace to become the quickest ACC coach to register 400 wins. Goestenkors has guided the Blue Devils to four NCAA Women’s Final Four appearances over the last eight years and five ACC Tournament crowns. Goestenkors has done one of her best coaching jobs of her career in 2006-2007 as the Blue Devils are ranked Number 1 nationally in the USA TODAY ESPN Top 25 Coaches’ Poll with a spotless regular season record. Duke became the first ACC team and only the 14th in NCAA history to finish the regular season undefeated. She also led Duke to its seventh straight 30-win season, an unprecedented mark and NCAA record. Gail has also received WBCA Coach of the Year accolades in 2003 and last year was named the recipient of the Carol Eckman Award. "Russell Athletic is proud to support the winners of the WBCA Coach of the Year Awards. Just like these individuals, for those who have what it takes on the inside, Russell has what it takes on the outside,” said Chris Passarell, Senior Director of Marketing, Russell Athletic. Goestenkors is one of six Russell Athletic/WBCA National Coaches of the Year selected, which also names winners for each of the other four WBCA collegiate divisions (NCAA Divisions II and III, NAIA and JC/CC) as well as High School. The winner is selected through a two-level process. The first level is by region, in which coaches from each WBCA geographical region vote for their respective top coach. Goestenkors, having received the most votes in WBCA Region 2, advanced as a finalist to the national level of the selection process along with the other seven Regional Coaches of the Year in NCAA Division I. The WBCA would also like to recognize the following regional Division I Coaches of the Year:

http://www.wbca.org/releases/DICOY2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

Region 1 3 4 5 6 7 8

Coach Geno Auriemma Pat Summitt Curt Miller Rick Insell Sharon Versyp Gordy Presnell Tara VanDerveer

7/18/10 1:03 PM

Institution University of Connecticut University of Tennessee, Knoxville Bowling Green State University Middle Tennessee State University Purdue University Boise State University Stanford University

Goestenkors and the national winners from the other five divisions will be honored at the Russell Athletic/WBCA National Coach of the Year Luncheon presented by AstraZeneca on Monday, April 2, 2007, at 12:00 p.m. (ET) in the Crowne Plaza’s Grand Ballroom. The luncheon is part of the 2007 WBCA National Convention, held in conjunction with the NCAA® Women's Final Four® in Cleveland, Ohio. About Russell Athletic For more than 100 years, Russell Athletic has been designing and producing the most innovative, most comfortable apparel to help athletes at all levels perform their best. From the youth practice fields, to premier collegiate teams, to the most respected professional arenas, whenever you see athletes and teams who demand the highest quality, exceptional durability, and extreme comfort, you’ll find Russell Athletic. Founded in 1981, the WBCA promotes women's basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit WBCA.org.

--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/DICOY2007.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:05 PM

Press Release :: Women's Basketball Coaches Association

For Immediate Release January 23, 2007

Contact: Summer McKesson WBCA Manager of Communications 770.279.8027 ext. 112

Four New Players to Join the 2006-2007 "Wade Watch" Each of these student-athletes contends for The State Farm Wade Trophy NCAA Division I Player of the Year ATLANTA, Ga. - The State Farm Wade Trophy Committee decided unanimously to add Baylor University’s Bernice Mosby, Duke University’s Abby Waner, Middle Tennessee State University’s Chrissy Givens, and the University of California – Berkley’s Ashley Walker to the State Farm 20062007 Wade Watch List. The four will be added to the list of twenty-five players who were selected during the preseason. “I concur with the committee’s decision and believe that all four players are on track to be considered for the 2007 State Farm Wade Trophy,” said WBCA CEO Beth Bass. “It will be exciting to see who steps up over the next few weeks among these 29 standout players to become this year’s State Farm Wade Trophy recipient.” The four players have been added due to their consistent play through midseason. Baylor senior, Bernice Mosby, leads the Bears, averaging 18.7 points and 9.3 rebounds per game. Along with nine double-doubles on the year, Mosby’s .496 field goal and .773 free throw percentage has placed her among the Big 12 Conference’s top four in scoring. Mosby’s play has helped the Bears to a 16-3 overall record and an idle ranking in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches' Poll. Abby Waner, Duke University, averages 14.3 points per game at midseason, leading the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches' Poll number one ranked Blue Devils (20-0, 5-0). Waner is strong at the free throw line, averaging over 80 percent this season. The sophomore joins senior teammates, Allison Bales and Lindsey Harding, on the State Farm Wade Watch List. Senior Chrissy Givens of MTSU joins the list averaging 22.0 points per game. Her scoring ranks first on the team and second in the Sun-Belt Conference. As a result of her 50 percent shooting and sixtytwo steals, the Blue Raiders (17-3, 9-0) remain steady in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches' Poll. Cal’s Ashley Walker is having a sensational sophomore season hitting over 55 percent of her shots, giving her a 17.8 points per game average. Walker has tallied six double-doubles, while helping the Golden Bears (15-4, 6-3) retain their ranking in the USA TODAY ESPN Division I Top 25 Coaches' Poll. Her collective 8.6 rebounds per game, shot accuracy and double-digit scoring ranks her in the top three in three different statistical categories in the Pac-10.

http://www.wbca.org/releases/2006-2007WadeWatchAdditionsPressRelease-Jan.07.html

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WBCA :: Press Release

7/18/10 1:05 PM

The renowned “Wade Watch” list for the State Farm Wade Trophy is comprised of student-athletes who are members of an NCAA Division I institution and are selected based on the following criteria: game and season statistics, leadership, character, effect on their team and overall playing ability. The national awards committee who selects these candidates is comprised of leading basketball coaches, journalists and basketball administrators. With the four additions, the list now totals 29 players with the Atlantic Coast Conference leading the way with nine (9). The Pacific-10 following behind with five (5) and the Southeastern Conference in close with four (4). The Big East and Big 12 follow with three (3). The Big Ten and the Sun Belt Conference each have two (2) with Conference USA having one (1) player represented. Founded in 1981, the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association promotes women’s basketball by unifying coaches at all levels to develop a reputable identity for the sport and to foster and promote the development of the game in all of its aspects as a sport for women and girls. For more information about the WBCA, please visit www.WBCA.org.

--WBCA--

http://www.wbca.org/releases/2006-2007WadeWatchAdditionsPressRelease-Jan.07.html

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