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issue two September 2015

‘'I GUESS THIS IS WHERE I'M SUPPOSED TO PLANT MY FOOT, TRY TO KEEP YOU FROM CLOSING THE DOOR ON ME'' Door to Door movie 2012

wallcoo.com


Editor’s Note At the risk of sta ng the obvious, doors are symbolic of entrance and exit. However, this twofold interpreta on is not so obvious in a cultural context. The issue of boundaries comes into play through the presence of a doorprimarily a closed one. Introduce colour to a door and the dynamic changes further. How do you determine whether or not you have crossed the line in nonfamiliar territory? In early American tradi on a red door was always a sign of welcome to the passing horse and buggy traveler. Whilst in Ireland, a red door is believed to ward off ghosts and evil spirits. In ancient Chinese culture, red was an auspicious color used for the entrances to shrines, and the colour was associated with prosperity. Choosing a red door as the cover of our second issue, we take from the American culture by focusing on the welcoming aspect of the colour red. The Grill encourages dialogue and engagement with different cultures-everyone is welcome-sta ng the obvious again? The theme of this issue is the influence of film on culture, how storylines offer a glimpse into diverse lifestyles and culture. The main spread includes 3 different pla orms showcasing film mainly interviews with fes val gurus Wanjiku wa Ngugi and Elton Mjanana as well as a conversa on with Mr Gustavo Vainstein the CEO of European television channel, Eurochannel. Till the next issue!! Tatenda Kanengoni tatendanavy@gmail.com

qualmdown.wordpress.com www.vappingo.com e-n-s.deviantart.com h p://debbie-debbiedoos.com/2013/05/what-does-having-a-red-door-mean.html www.sophia.org http://homeguides.sfgate.com/feng-shui-red-door-significance-104654.html

DIY.DESPAIR.COM


Introducing This Issue’s Grill Mates CINDY JÄNICKE studied Theatre Science and Educa onal Science in Berlin, Germany. She is living and working in Germany, Zimbabwe and Uganda as a dramaturge, director, producer, trainer and author. Worked for different major cultural ins tu ons in Germany, such as States Opera in Berlin, theatre and opera house in Wuppertal, Bavarian States Theatre in Munich, headed the Department for Theatre and Educa on at the Arts University of Switzerland in Zurich, produced the fes val „bright view“ in Stu gart. She ini ated and produced na onal and interna onal projects and collabora ons in Germany, Switzerland, Romania, East and South African Countries. Her projects and produc ons were awarded and invited to several fes vals. Cindy Jänicke is togehter with Plot Mhako from Zimbabwe and Antonio Bukhar from Uganda the co-founder of KUENDA produc on, a collabora ve pla orm between Germany, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

LILIAN MASHIRI: Lilian Mashiri is a Librarian by profession and is passionate about information, whether it's reading, writing or making resources available to others. She enjoys working with children and fostering a reading habit. Her favourite quote is “I read to live.” For her, reading is a form of meditation. It is one of the ways in which she thinks about life, adds to her own consciousness and projects her imagination into more of life than she can live on her own. “In reading I become a thousand different people and yet remain myself” (C S Lewis).

FATEMA SACHAK: Born in the United States, Fatema moved to Zimbabwe at the age of one, and lived in Zimbabwe un l a ending University in Pennsylvania a year ago. Went to Chisipite Senior School, and is now at Dickinson College studying Economics and Poli cal Science

DEXTER FUNDIRE: is an aspiring writer and poet. He first started writing professionally as a food critic for his university magazine in Thailand. For more on Dexter, check out his blog http://everthingwithnobody.blogspot.com or follow him on twitter @Dexmau5

ELI NYAKUDYA: Not 'so fresh' out of college student who is passionate about introducing Africa to the rest of the world and the world to Africa. My aim is to build a bridge through wri ng that can be used to cross different cultural and societal borders.

ERIKA KUENSTLER:Born and raised in Zimbabwe, Erika Kuenstler moved to South Africa in 2008 to persue tertiary studies. Following her achievement of several degrees in Cape Town, she then went on to study in Munich,Germany, where she is currently based and is completing her second Masters degree in Neurocognitive Psychology. In addition to this, she works part-time as a music reviewer and photo-journalist for a range of on-line music magazines and festivals, and also works as a research assistant studying the neural underpinnings of attention deficits in Alzheimers Disease.


5

INSIDE

INTERESTING

FACTS ABOUT

THE EDITOR

A celebration of African stories through Film: Wanjiku wa Ngugi Channelling the Heart of Europe: Eurochannel Exploring Zimbabwean Film with Elton Mjanana Word! Q & A with Linda Gabriel AfroRhythmn Prayersoul feature Kalternberg One on One with Arnold Rosslee Reading culture by Lilian Mashiri American and Western Culture Shock Changing the culture of tradition

1. She is a middle child (Is there a middle child in a family of 4 children...the average of 4? Yea you get the idea 2. She will be featured in an upcoming bestselling book (Details in the next issue of the Grill out in December!) 3. She has been wri ng from a young age, but professionally for the past 4 years 4. She is addicted to Reality shows and panel style talk shows (The fave being Keeping up with the Kardashians and The Spot respec vely...eeks! 5. She has always been obsessed with magazines, as a young girl she used to e s co r t h e r m o m to t h e b a n k , magazine in hand, always!


Wanjiku wa Ngugi: A celebration of African Stories through Film

www.haff.fi Wanjiku wa Ngugi is a Kenyan author as well as the former director of the Helsinki African Film fes val in Finland, a fes val that showcases African Films. She currently sits on the advisory board of the fes val. Her debut novel The Fall of the Saints was published in early 2014 to cri cal acclaim. Wanjiku takes us through the inspira on behind the fes val, changing the percep on of the African Film industry and offers ps to aspiring writers.

Living in different countries has certainly shaped how I look at the world. Basically I have come to understand how much more similar we are, than different. We all want, and are working towards the same things, regardless of where we are from. So I do consider it luck that I have lived in all these countries, parts of which I feel have stayed with me. As a novelist, its also afforded me the chance to transverse across con nents in storytelling. You are also an accomplished author, your debut novel The Fall of the Saints was released early last year. When wri ng a book, what comes first the tle or the storyline?

What inspired the idea to launch the Helsinki African film fes val? The idea was to celebrate the excellent but rarely seen films that are made on the con nent and to challenge the o en one-sided and dehumanized way Africa and Africans are depicted in the media. Images are powerful as you know. This is to say that an entertaining, thought-provoking film is a powerful way to tell a story, whilst also deconstruc ng the stereotypical images used to represent Africa. Can you share with us what goes behind pu ng together a fes val of that magnitude? An excellent team, me, finances, a en on to detail and lots of pa ence top the list. You've had a mul -cultural influence on your upbringing including living in Kenya, Zimbabwe, Eritrea, Finland and the US. What did you take away from each culture and how has this shaped the woman you are today?

In most cases anyway, the tle is a nego a on between the author and publisher. The storyline certainly comes first. In my case, for instance, in wri ng The Fall of Saints, a novel about a woman finding her agency, I had been trying to come to terms with this idea of assembling babies in the wombs of poor and low-income women, o en for export, and the moral and ethical ques ons surrounding this industry.

In a nutshell, what would you say you are you passionate about? Wri ng. Films. Reading. Tennis. Has the African film industry evolved in your opinion? It most certainly has. Whilst before only a few individuals could access funding to produce films, a lot more filmmakers are able to tell their stories, due to the ever growing technology, support from governments, local industries etc.


Take the explosion of Nollywood for instance, and the subsequent video phenomena, e.g. Ugawood, Riverwood, they do not have to necessarily rely on “Western” funding. The way these films have been received in the con nent showcases the power of determining what stories are told, by whom and for whom. Whatever one wants to say about the low budget films, whatever the shortcomings, these films are filling a gap, a vital gap of telling stories that Africans can iden fy with. It goes without saying that the quality will improve with me, (if it hasn't already) especially if the economy of these countries picks up. Would you say the art of wri ng is learnt or it is an innate gi ? The key to wri ng is reading, reading and more reading. And then wri ng and more reading. I believe everyone can write if commi ed to the cra , as it is hard work and takes lots of hours. What are your top 5 African Films and why? This is a difficult ques on for me as I have many favourite African films and for so many different reasons. So I will just take

five recently produced films off my list of favourites:

Tey by Alain Gomis. Tey is a film that tells the story of Satché 's last day on earth, for it has been decided that his me has come to die. Satché himself has recently returned home to Dakar, Senegal a er spending the past several years living in the United States. This film is a gentle, joyous, impressionis c celebra on of life and death. There is a spirituality and soulfulness to the story that keeps it cap va ng. Certainly a film worth watching. La Pirogue by Moussa TouréThe Piroque tells the tale of 30 men, and one-woman Stowaway, who have set out on an extremely dangerous voyage from their

na ve Senegal to look for work and be er opportuni es in Spain. Having lived in Finland for a number of years, this was an all too familiar story. The power in this story is the way the director deals with the emo onally charged events that occur on the Piroque—head on, ma er of fact and not in a melodrama c fashion as o en happens with films that take on poli cal and conten ous issues.

Yema by Djamila Sahraoui Yema is a deeply moving film, about a woman and her sons, but as the story unfolds we begin to see that it weaves a far bigger story, one of a fratricidal civil war on a na onal scale, of a country ripped asunder, but told through the lives of a mother and her family torn apart. It was quite easy to get drawn to the characters and connect with them on an emo onal level, to be able to understand through their suffering that they speak for an en re genera on. A must watch. Pegasus by Mou akir Mohamed

Zineb is an emo onally exhausted psychiatrist assigned to Rihana, a trauma zed and pregnant young woman found in the street. The film is visually striking, and it gripped me from the beginning, as Zineb's own troubled mind, and reality merges. For those who love psychological thrillers, this one will keep you at the edge of your seat. Bamako by Abderrahmane Sissako Her marriage on the rocks, cabaret singer Mele returns home a er a degrading night of work and finds her apartment complex transformed into an elaborate tribunal in which the ins tu ons of interna onal capitalism are being put on trial. I have never seen a film quite like this, it is a fascina ng and thought-provoking exposé of the World Bank and the effects of its policies on Africa. What are you working on at the moment? I am working on edits of my second novel.

CHANNELLING THE HEART OF EUROPE! Mr Gustavo Vainstein


Eurochannel strives to showcase the best of European cinema, television series, documentaries, and music programs to a cap vated audience. Month a er month, we select top-quality programs that demonstrate the complexity and beauty of European culture, one that, while diverse, exemplifies a rich history and promising future. Eurochannel features programs by well-known directors, as well as produc ons by up-and-coming actors in areas from the United Kingdom all the way to Croa a. In which countries is the channel available and how can one subscribe to it? Eurochannel is currently available in 87 countries across North America, South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Prominent local and na onal cable and satellite operators include Eurochannel in their package op ons; viewers are encouraged to ask to include Eurochannel in their programming package. Since its incep on, what are some of the notable strides achieved by the channel? Eurochannel has a long history in La n America, thus our entry into other countries and con nents has proven to

be a great feat for European cinema culture in general. We are now distributed in over 80 countries, with growing audiences year a er year. A significant stride was made this year with the inclusion of African countries through DStv. Eurochannel is proud to have such an effec ve partnership with them so that African residents can enjoy quality European programming. In addi on, our partnerships with cultural and diploma c ins tutes has increased substan ally. Our work with the European Union, the House of Europe, museums of fine arts, and independent cinemas has allowed for Eurochannel's programming to reach new audiences. The Eurochannel Short Film Tours are an exci ng and crea ve way of promo ng cultural exchange, please tell us more about these. The Eurochannel Short Films Tour is our signature annual event. Every year and according to our chosen theme, our Programming department selects over 60 shorts, all from dis nct European regions and countries. In this manner, viewers hear a plethora of foreign languages while following along with localized version of sub tles. As such, Eurochannel offers an adventure across Europe through these short films, as viewers experience dis nct cultures, languages, and points of view. This year's new theme is My Dear Family, which will showcase the complexity and richness of diverse

European families. A few of your events target the youth, why is this important to the channel and its goals

CHANNELLING THE HEART OF EUROPE! Created in 1994, Eurochannel is a television channel dedicated to promo ng European culture and lifestyle through movies, series and programs. Showcasing of fashion events, arts and mythical des na ons also adds assortment to the channel's programming. The channel recently expanded its viewership to an African audience. Chairman and CEO of Eurochannel Mr Gustavo Vainstein elaborates on the vision behind this visual powerhouse. Please tell us about your professional journey as well as y o u r w o r k w i t h E u r o c h a n n e l For many years now, I have worked in the field of cultural television. I was a radio and TV producer, as well as a cable television specialist. I have been in charge of Eurochannel for more than ten years. What began as a

small channel released in some countries, we have successfully developed into a global channel offered in 12 different languages. Searching for produc ons created in dis nct European countries, then analysing whether our markets will respond posi vely to them and its actors and producers, serves as a thrilling journey for us at Eurochannel. I possess a strong belief in the media as a powerful force, one that promotes an increased understanding between people of dis nct cultures and upbringings. A vast selec on of cap va ng films and series, and their raw effect on viewers, allow people to discover similari es and differences amongst our neighbours thus helping bridge cultural gaps. A er much turmoil, Europe stands at the renaissance of cultural crea vity, and it is indeed this splendid talent that we showcase through Eurochannel. What is the main objec ve of Eurochannel?

While it aims to please all connoisseurs of European culture, Eurochannel understands the growing influence by the global youth. Now more than ever is the youth traveling to foreign countries, learning new languages, and assimila ng foreign customs into their own tradi ons. It is of utmost importance to provide a medium by which to enjoy such cultural adventure; with its wide selec on of European programming, the youth can virtually travel anywhere they desire in Europe. What can your audience look forward to from the channel in future? Our monthly programming always features a different country's cinema; in November, we plan to showcase outstanding produc ons by the country of Lithuania! Addi onal series will also come to life on the channel, as well as our signature, in-house produc ons. Not to be forgo en, our collabora ons with innova ve and established partners will con nue to grow. Viewers will thus be able to enjoy more free screenings closer to their homes as Eurochannel expands its partnership reach across borders. Do you have any announcements or anything you would like to share with regards to Eurochannel? We are thrilled to be part of DStv Now's programming op ons; we hope to expand our reach within Africa very soon. In the mean me, be on the lookout for more free screenings with cultural ins tutes in your countries!


Exploring Zimbabwean Film with

Elton Mjanana


Elton Mjanana is a laudable Zimbabwean film prac oner. As the coordinator of the Zimbabwe Film Fes val Trust (ZIFFT) he consults for various film projects around the country. In our brief Q & A, Elton enlightens us on the state of the Zimbabwean Film industry and his career. How did you get into the film industry? At the age of 15 whilst at school, the cas ng director for the movie Flame came to audi on us for a role in the film. I gained interest in this because I had been involved with the drama club at my previous school and really believed I had some talent in ac ng. I landed the role and like they say, the rest is history. Please tell us about your work involvement with ZIFFT and the organiza on's mission In a nutshell, ZIFFT's mission is to build a society that loves, appreciates and consumes film. I like to be involved with that because as a prac oner of filmmaking I espouse such a society and working at ZIFFT fulfils my ambi on to see that happening. What's the theme for this year's ZIFF? The theme for this year's edi on is 'documa on' which is a play on the two words 'documentary' and 'anima on' We are keen to encourage that these genres are taken seriously by prac oners as well as audiences. You have a ended different film fes vals across the globe including Nigeria and most recently, Dokfest in Germany. How do the film industries of the countries you have visited differ? The biggest difference between the industries of the West and those in Africa generally is a lack of support from where it ma ers – the government. There are no structures to ensure the growth and sustainability of

filmmaking in African countries generally. There are basically no industries to talk of because all the things that relate to the industrial art of filmmaking are lacking. In the Zimbabwean context, what is your opinion on the influence of film on culture? There is a lot of film influence in our culture and our general way of living nowadays. For example, the way we run our households and even carry ourselves has some inspira on from the shows we watch on TV. It's sad that there is absolutely no local film contribu ng to the way we live, save for the few catch phrases that mushroom here and there. Otherwise even the way our youths behave and carry themselves has a lot of bearing on what they have seen in film.

Word ! Linda Gabriel

Who would you nominate as Zimbabwean filmmakers to look out for? I really like Joe Njagu and what he is trying to achieve for himself as a filmmaker and generally for the country. His passion drives him and he strives to empower himself by constantly yearning for educa on on his cra . I would recommend up and coming filmmakers to work with him for mutual benefit. What are the developments in the Zimbabwean Film industry and are there any areas you feel s ll need improvement? For starters there are unique stories we have to tell. A lot of them are told in a bad way and in the end do not make an impact. We need to start caring about quality when it comes to our work; there are basic quality control issues in terms of sound and picture and we really need to pay a en on to these. Wri ng and produc on also need to be upped a lot. We have the world famed Bollywood, Hollywood and

Nollywood, I've heard small whispers about the Zimbabwean version in Zollywood, any truth to this? Apart from the Zollywood online distributor based in England, there is very li le on the ground to suggest Zollywood in the sense of the world famous ones you men on. The dream may be there but there is nothing sugges ng it. We have a lot people concerned with their small produc ons and not caring enough to come together to form this formidable en ty, the so-calledZollywood. What is the best made Zimbabwean film in your opinion and why? I think Jit has to be one of the best ... there are a few good ones … I pick this one because it was social issue driven as the other very good ones of its era. It also explored a subject that we should try as Zimbabweans to play on, as it is something that is quite unique to us. I also think it respected the values of making films and also paid a en on to quality control. As long as Zimbabweans thrive on those issues and stories that are unique to us, then there is hope. This film really gave me hope, but then there was no follow up to that film. What 3 items can you NOT live without? That's a tough one … items … okay … my phone, my laptop and headphones, in that order

What is your defini on of spoken word? It's when wri en poems or stories are put on stage and performed. What tle best describes you and the work that you do? I am a Consultant in the Development of Arts in Africa, a Spoken Word Ar st and a Fashion Enthusiast.

Mmmmh let's see, I fell in love with Reggae when I was ten, by the me I was 12 I had a complete collec on of Eric Donaldson's casse es. And yes I am amongst those who used pencils or ballpoints to rewind a casse e. What is your favourite quote and why?

Which ar st(s) have influenced you?

'Be the change that you wish to see in the world' by Gandhi, I am an ini ator, I have learnt to just do it, than expec ng that someone will do it, what if they don't?

Virginia Phiri, Mutabaruka, Igna us Mabasa, Blessing Musariri, Batsirai Chigama, Ethel Kabwato, the list is long. Music also plays a role on this journey.

GET IN TOUCH WITH LINDA lingabz@gmail.com or +263 778 999 323 follow her on twi er @Gabzlin

How can the spoken word market in Zimbabwe become more sustainable for ar sts? This subject is tricky; I am also going through research and trying to find out how to earn a living from my poetry. You recently launched your clothing brand Linda Gabriel which includes Scarves, please tell us about your business goals. For now, I am only focusing on making scarves, I am working on perfec ng the cra . I want this project to grow. I am hoping to start with South Africa. I wish to see my scarves being worn by people in various countries. Louis Vui on and Daymond John inspire me. Can you share with us one thing people probably don't know about you.


AfroRhythm

Hot and Fresh: AfroRhythm–Zimbabwe' s answer to Cowboys, Country andHip Hop By Cindy Jänicke

Do you remember a moment were si ng next to your neighbour at a concert, you stopped talking and held your breath because you could not believe what you had just seen or heard? Such moments are best described, but difficult for another person to feel. In that moment, something magical happens. You hear the first scores of the guitar, and in comes this voice between a deep base, whiskey and smoke. You li up your eyes to the stage expec ng to see someone in their 40's singing and what you see is a 20something year old young man, in a fancy shirt, a bow e and braces that look fresh from a fashion magazine. Humbly, he sits on a stool, playing his acous c guitar and just singing, pure and simple. Divine Chitubura is that singer with a magical country voice. Growing up on a farm in Karoi, Divine's father wanted him to become a farmer and a carpenter. He started off singing in church and evolved from a choir boy to a solo performer. He felt that there must be more to explore with his unique voice. As a result, he par cipated in the Starbrite compe on in 2013, where he met young rapper, Josh 'Jay Karizma' Makanya. Makanaya had just come back from Botswana- his family moved there when he was a year old. However, he was already known in Zimbabwe having won the 2011 Best newcomer Award at the Zimbabwe Hip Hop Awards. Together with Divine, they founded the band Afro Rhythm in 2014. Country Music originates from the early 20th century, a combina on of tradi onal folk music with urban sounds and the Blues, this crea ng its unique tone. Liking to the original idea of country music, Divine and Makanya's texts are inspired by their daily lives; you hear very personal stories that connect with everyone from their music. You never find Divine without his guitar complemen ng his remarkable voice. The combina on of a Rapper and the self tled Cowboy from Zimbabwe is their special spice. Their music consists of deep African, country music roots and beats fused with reggae, Hip Hop and RnB.

Their second album-following their first acous c album- was more experimental, and featured ar sts like the South African Varaidzi, Zimbabwean DJ Bu erfly and Tricky J. They are convincing as a band for the clubs as well as radio. Collabora on and explora on of new paths are two key visions for their ar s c direc on. They always try to challenge their status quo and bring it to another level, surprising themselves musically and also their fans with their ever changing sounds. Their last exci ng live fusion happened with outstanding Zimbabwean beatboxer Probeatz. There are many more surprises to expect from this young band and it is definitely certain that more people will have breathless moments as they sit in a concert and stop talking, because they hear this cap va ng voice between bass and whiskey and smoke.


Chasing dreams – Zimbabwe's Neo-Soul star

Prayer Soul

By Cindy Jänicke

Prayersoul is a 32 year old Harare based and Bulawayo born musician. With his urban and soulful African neo-soul sound, the young ar st made his way to the concert stages in Harare and more recently, abroad. I met Prayersoul in a small café in Munich, Germany, where we talked about the music industry, touring and chasing dreams. CJ: What is your story? PS: I am a typical Zimbabwean boy, born in Bulawayo.Since I was a kid, I loved music, I just did not think I was a singer or a musician, I just thought I was a music lover. But then in High school, I wanted to impress that girl, so I sang a song to her and the next day I was famous in school. That is how I started singing, exploring and wri ng songs. I took guitar lessons and evolved my music from there. A er I finished my sociology studies at the University in Masvingo in 2007, I could not get a job like many others. I had a lot of me on my hands, so I started to perform and write my own music. What is the story behind your name? Prayersoul? I got it from a friend of mine in Masvingo. This was in the early days when I had just been introduced to Neo-Soul music, and I started listening to people like Jill Sco or Erykah Badu, Raphael Saadiq, and fell in love with the sound. To have a stage name I wanted to keep Prayer, but also wanted the Soul twist, something to sound fresh and unique, and that is how Prayersoul was born. Where has this name taken you, so far? I have grown as an ar st and as an individual. This name got me a wife. For the past 5 years, I have only been doing music and it's been a great journey. I am now in Germany for my first tour with a couple of solo shows and one really big one at the Theatron Summer Music Fes val in Munich. This name has brought me to Austria and Italy, to Venice, where I performed at the Zimbabwean Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. And since this year I am working with a management team in South Africa on growing my brand there as well. How would you describe your brand? I think my brand is very urban; it represents a young, urban individual and musician, who is not afraid to dream. I think it resonates with progress and excellence and has been able to be a really good representa on of where I come from and who I am. Prayersoul does not like to be associated with one place only but rather with ideals, with a person who dreams big and chases these dreams. What is your connec on to Germany?

www.prayersoul.com

It started with my first radio interview ever. I had recorded my first single called “again” and was s ll very experimental at that me. I did not carry CDs to the interview, so the DJ said t hat I have to sing live on air. And then director of the Zimbabwe German Society, Roberta Wagner, who is a real Soul music lover, had switched on to my interview. I was already involved in the Acous c-Night as the co-founder and our first project was to move the Acous c-Night for two years to the Zimbabwe German Society. But the real German connec on started when we met German musicians like the singer Nneka, Masaa, the Jazz Band from Dresden and a band called Jamaram in Harare. With Jamaram I had very special connec ons; we performed at the Harare Interna onal Fes val of the Arts (HIFA) together. With some other musicians from Harare we went on our first tour with them for the first me in Europe, first me in Germany - 22 ci es in a month, every day on the road, in a bus and on stage. It was an amazing experience.


followers that you have are actually followers, they do not just click and like your page, there is some form of integrity in that followership. So whenever I post something about my performances in Germany, the number of people that respond to me on my Facebook page and Twi er, are the actual people that are coming. Whereas in Zimbabwe you can post an event and you have 150 people saying they are coming, you get to the event and find 60 people. What happened to the other guys? An what is the state of the art in the music industry in Zimbabwe? I would say Zimbabwe is almost like at the embryonic stage of an industry in entertainment, a lot of ar sts, musicians in the industry need to do a lot of work. Probably more work than the next genera on of musicians that is going to follow. We are the ones who set the pace of what the next genera on is doing.How we do, will determine how far the industry is going to go. The challenges are to be able to do things, to come up with crea ve ways of how to connect with the audience, how to connect with people who don`t go out, because we don`t have a big culture of going out in Zimbabwe as compared to Germany. So being able to show up at one of your biggest fan`s houses and do lounge concerts which I do especially during winter, just perform for their friends and family creates that buzz, creates that brand loyalty, where they feel connected to me personally. They will take videos and pictures and they will want to tell someone who did not come or who would not have come anyway “this is the kind of experience we had and I really did not know that we have this kind of talent in Zimbabwe.” If it was a huge industry, the way it would work for Zimbabwean musicians would be to release an album, have it on radio, music channel and then do 20 shows around Zimbabwe to promote this album, and then do another circuit for the same album, because people are loving it. So what that means is that one album should reflect in your income to show that you managed to invest. But we do not have the industry structure. So Zimbabwe needs a music channel that creates that connec on to the audience? Yes, due to the fact that there is no structure in the industry were if you want to know about performing ar sts, all the performing ar sts in Zimbabwe, you could go to this specific channel and you get to have a feel what Zimbabwe is like. But it is not like that. Someone has to know where things are happening and take you there; you can never just go to one place. So I probably do not even know how many fans I could have in Zimbabwe. There are even radio sta ons now that broadcast almost everywhere, I think if the same thing happens with TV, then it is going to open up a lot of opportuni es and create an actual industry. The reason why an ar st is big is because of the number of people that know him. And in Germany, if you pick an ar st like Gentleman, everyone knows him, because they see him on MTV, on TV, on radio, they go to YouTube and see him, they go to his website, they see him and he has 50 shows booked in advance and you can buy the ckets online. Once those structures are put in place, that would definitely help a lot of ar sts in Zimbabwe. Can you make a living off your music in Zimbabwe?

What was your picture about Germany before you came? I did not really know much about Germany. The only interac on that I had was stuff from TV, the internet and the people that I knew from the Zimbabwe German Society. I knew some stereotypes, about Germans being on me, on being upfront and being very straight forward. And it comes with a lot of pride, excellence and progress. I was curious to get in touch with that experience, the “wennschon, dennschon”, the respect for work, the respect on doing something properly even if it is the smallest thing. I wanted to see how musicians operate in this environment, in this country. Are your audiences in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Germany different? Actually my audience is very mixed. I used to think it was very sophis cated young professionals, but I realized that my music connects with a wider spectrum of people. I performed for young kids, for an elderly crowd, and all of them enjoyed my music. I feel like it seems to resonate with more than just one part of any demographic source all around.In Germany I think people are more open to music and entertainment. If someone is not a big fan of Soul music, they will s ll go to a fes val where the headline act is a soul ar st and they will give them a chance. I feel like in Zimbabwean people are not so open to just go and watch anyone. They seem to s ck more to their ar sts or their type of sound or their type of venue. Does audience building work differently in Germany and Zimbabwe? If we talk about big brands they are really working on bringing out the best of the product and taking it to the people. You need to do the same thing with music. Jamaram is the band of the year and they started by performing a lot in Munich.They collected contact details, Emails and phone numbers of their audience members, and whenever they had shows, those people would know and bring more people. And it was easy for them to begin to publish work and have a booking agency that would try to get them gigs which opened up to new fan bases. Social media made it easier to follow them. I no ced that about Germany, the social media

En rely? I think from just performing and doing gigs not yet. It is slowly ge ng to that place where it can be like that one day. It is a possibility and if the growth con nues then it will definitely be possible.

So what should happen in Zimbabwe within the next 3 to 5 years to push the music industry? We need one, two or three more TV sta ons, that really focus on pushing the local music and arts scene. The moment that happens, our local musicians become stars to everyone in Zimbabwe. So if the whole country gets into one portal of informa on then they know ok, so this guy has this art, he has got a new album, he is hot, he is doing this and he is doing that. We need to get visibility to the rest of the country, then it would be easier for a show in Bulawayo for example, I do not have to reintroduce myself and start over again from scratch and begin to win audiences, but they already know me because they had a strong media representa on of what I do. And I feel like the moment the media opens up, it will push ar sts to bring out their best. And because they bring out their best, it creates new standards in what an ar st should be like. The moment someone says follow me on Twi er @Prayersoul on a na onal broadcast TV program, I should at least be able to have 10000 people watching and let's say for argument's sake just 10%, so that would mean 1000 more likes on Twi er. What else could be done? More specific to musicians and the performing arts scene would be having companies and young promoters, that would be professionally able to facilitate a na onal tour with a fixed structure taking note of the fact that someone has done an album, they have been on radio and on TV, and are ready to go on the road, gets on a bus, gets into the country, all of Zimbabwe, all the provinces, goes and does shows. There would be a standard format of what a show should be like. It should have a stage; there should be some form of ligh ng, some form of brand placement and some form of control in terms of the standards of output and what quality of a performance and quality of the music should be like.


Standards and standard procedures should be controlled by the na onal bodies, lets say by the Na onal Arts Council. I think it is also me for new players to get in, new players come with fresh ideas and a fresh approach. So I feel like once it opens up to young promoters, there is definitely more compe on, compe on always breeds new levels of excellency. In Germany you have socie es for trades, so there is a society for graphic designers, a society for carpenters. The stronger the society, the more protected the art is and the more protected the work is. And it is hard to actually get in to such a society and be a cer fied cra sman. It guarantees quality and professionalism, we need more of that. What are your biggest challenges as a young musician? A lot of people only look at the glamorous aspect of when you get on stage and you are looking fresh and you perform and the crowd goes wild and they follow you on Instagram, several thousand followers and you have crowds waving their hands and screaming “Prayersoul”, so I feel like wow, I like that. But I realized how much work it actually is to get to that place. Personally my challenge is that I cannot reach out to as many people as I wish. Radio is great and I benefi ed a lot from that, people start following me because they heard me sing or talk on air. The broader reach out is missing, I have good music that I could submit, I have nice video clips, I can perform and entertain a crowd, the material is there, but the distribu on channels are missing. I really want to have access to those pla orms. How good is your German? My German “ist sehr gut”, it`s “hervorragend”. No, it is actually not. It is very basic, I can say a few things, now I am beginning to work on my sentence construc on. So I can listen to a conversa on and know exactly what it is about, but I s ll need to work on the differences of placing words in a sentence. But I can order food, buy clothes and ask for direc ons and say that this was an amazing concert.

reach out is missing, I have good music that I could submit, I have nice video clips, I can perform and entertain a crowd, the material is there, but the distribu on channels are missing. I really want to have access to those pla orms. How good is your German? My German “ist sehr gut”, it`s “hervorragend”. No, it is actually not. It is very basic, I can say a few things, now I am beginning to work on my sentence construc on. So I can listen to a conversa on and know exactly what it is about, but I s ll need to work on the differences of placing words in a sentence. But I can order food, buy clothes and ask for direc ons and say that this was an amazing concert. What are the most important expressions that you have learnt so far? It is unfortunate but this is the first expression that I learnt “Ah, Scheiße” (oh shit), that seems to be on everyones lips, like it is not even an issue. In Zimbabwe it is an issue when small kids swear, but I have seen 8year old kids in Germany saying it without their parents complaining. The second one would be “Ihrseidrich ggeil” (you are really hot), because I say that a lot when I go on stage. People are not expec ng me to say anything in German. So when I get on stage and I say “Hallo Wolfratshausen, wiegeht`s, Ihrseidrich ggeil”, then they start freaking out and screaming. Germans are…

What are the most important expressions that you have learnt so far?

I think Germans are very warm, but you only discover it, when they have let you in. That is the best descrip on I have of Germans. Because there is a stereotype where people feel like they are not the friendliest people on earth. And I feel like yeah, they are definitely not the friendliest people from the onset, but once you get to know them, then they open up and are one of the warmest people, very friendly, very caring.

It is unfortunate but this is the first expression that I learnt “Ah, Scheiße” (oh shit), that seems to be on everyones lips, like it is not even an issue. In Zimbabwe it is an issue when small kids swear, but I have seen 8year old kids in Germany saying it without their parents complaining. The second one would be “Ihrseidrich ggeil” (you are really hot), because I say that a lot when I go on stage. People are not expec ng me to say anything in German. So when I get on stage and I say “Hallo Wolfratshausen, wiegeht`s, Ihrseidrich ggeil”, then they start freaking out and screaming.

Zimbabweans are… Zimbabweans are full of life. It is like each Zimbabwean has two lives. We are just happy people, we love life, we are not very conten ous people, we love to celebrate Friday and go for a Braai and have fun with friends and family and just really soak in and enjoy life and enjoy the people that are around us, the friends and the family. Zimbabweans are big on that. And that is the one thing that I feel is very constant. And we love to look good, we love to feel like princes and look expensive. Zimbabweans love the good life.

Germans are…

And what is the clash between Zimbabwe and Germany from your experience? The first one would definitely be me keeping. Germans really respect me and respect other people's space as well. It is also like a two way thing, because I remember a German friend of mine saying, Germans need to learn to relax more and be less up ght about things, so if I come two minutes late, they should not be that upset. It should be a forgivable thing. I am on the German side when it comes to that, because people already expect the African to be late, so it is be er for you to be early.

I think Germans are very warm, but you only discover it, when they have let you in. That is the best descrip on I have of Germans. Because there is a stereotype where people feel like they are not the friendliest people on earth. And I feel like yeah, they are definitely not the friendliest people from the onset, but once you get to know them, then they open up and are one of the warmest people, very friendly, very caring. Zimbabweans are… Zimbabweans are full of life. It is like each Zimbabwean has two lives. We are just happy people, we love life, we are not very conten ous people, we love to celebrate Friday and go for a Braai and have fun with friends and family and just really soak in and enjoy life and enjoy the people that are around us, the friends and the family. Zimbabweans are big on that. And that is the one thing that I feel is very constant. And we love to look good, we love to feel like princes and look expensive. Zimbabweans love the good life. And what is the clash between Zimbabwe and Germany from your experience? The first one would definitely be me keeping. Germans really respect me and respect other people's space as well. It is also like a two way thing, because I remember a German friend of mine saying, Germans need to learn to relax more and be less up ght about things, so if I come two minutes late, they should not be that upset. It should be a forgivable thing. I am on the German side when it comes to that, because people already expect the African to be late, so it is be er for you to be early. I think the second clash would be communica on. I think in Zimbabwe there are too many cultures because of the two tribes, the Ndebele and the Shona, the Ndebele are very upfront people, so they definitely get along with the Germans. Which is where I was born, so it is not very difficult for me to sit and have a conversa on with someone who says, Prayer, I am not happy with the way you spoke to me last week, I think you should not speak to me like that. I am okay with that, also because it is the way I was raised. My mom was very upfront and a er she straightened things out, we could have cake and doughnuts and it was over. I feel like a lot of Zimbabweans need to learn to be more upfront. So celebrate the things that have to be celebrated and if there is something wrong, say it like it is, let us not wait for a person to go and express it to someone else. Standards and standard procedures should be controlled by the na onal bodies, lets say by the Na onal Arts Council. I think it is also me for new players to get in, new players come with fresh ideas and a fresh approach. So I feel like once it opens up to young promoters, there is definitely more compe on, compe on always breeds new levels of excellency. In Germany you have socie es for trades, so there is a society for graphic designers, a society for carpenters. The stronger the society, the more protected the art is and the more protected the work is. And it is hard to actually get in to such a society and be a cer fied cra sman. It guarantees quality and professionalism, we need more of that. What are your biggest challenges as a young musician? A lot of people only look at the glamorous aspect of when you get on stage and you are looking fresh and you perform and the crowd goes wild and they follow you on Instagram, several thousand followers and you have crowds waving their hands and screaming “Prayersoul”, so I feel like wow, I like that. But I realized how much work it actually is to get to that place. Personally my challenge is that I cannot reach out to as many people as I wish. Radio is great and I benefi ed a lot from that, people start following me because they heard me sing or talk on air. The broader

I think the second clash would be communica on. I think in Zimbabwe there are too many cultures because of the two tribes, the Ndebele and the Shona, the Ndebele are very upfront people, so they definitely get along with the Germans. Which is where I was born, so it is not very difficult for me to sit and have a conversa on with someone who says, Prayer, I am not happy with the way you spoke to me last week, I think you should not speak to me like


Have you ever wondered what it must have been like to live in the Middle Ages? In a simpler me when kings ruled the lands and when knights proved their valour in combat, to win pres ge and perhaps even a hand in marriage of a fair princess? Amongst other forms of combat, jous ng was one such way in which a knight could prove his worth: with a lance in hand, two knights would charge their steeds at each other at breakneck speed, each trying to knock the other off his horse. Once having successfully unhorsed his opponent, the remaining knight would be victorious, and could thus claim his prize. This compe on was not without its risks, as the wooden jous ng poles would o en sha er against the opposing knight's armour, and several knights were killed by the splinters that pierced through their armour and into their necks or their hearts. Running over three consecu ve weekends, the KaltenbergRi erturnier (the Kaltenberg Jous ng Tournament) brings back to life these bygone ways. Taking place in the grounds of an old castle, this is the world's largest jous ng tournament, featuring a slew of other a rac ons. People meandering around in medieval garb lend the whole event an authen c atmosphere, whilst realis c se lements are sca ered about the grounds, giving you an idea of how people used to live in the Dark Ages. This event contains everything you could possibly imagine. Stalls upon stalls sell a vast plethora of items from the Middle Ages, ranging from quills to suits of armour, from mead (a tradi onal type of honey wine) to all sorts of dishes that were commonly eaten centuries ago. There are also many displays of what every-day life would have looked like: here there is an old woman spinning wool with her spinning wheel and spindle, whilst there is a blacksmith tending to his furnace and pounding a glowing hot sword into form on his anvil. And if this isn't enough, close to 1000 entertainers take part in this event, with a host of local and interna onal acts. Early in the a ernoon, a procession takes place, with each of the entertainers demonstra ng his or her par cular art as they parade around the palace.On six different stages set-up in different corners of the castle grounds are all sorts of acts guaranteed to regale and to amaze: from knife-jugglers to fire-breathers, from acrobats to sword fighters, from comedians to magicians, andfrom s lt-walkers tomusicians, Kaltenberg has something to delight every audience. However, the undeniable highlight of the event is the jous ng tournament that takes place in the arena each evening. Here, the spectators are treated to a real display of horsemanship that is unparalleled in today's society. In what is part a jous ng tournament and part an elaborate stage play, dozens of skilled horsemen take part in the tourney, slowly unravelling the story of a peaceful kingdom besieged by a dark knight. Each knight challenges this usurper, yet all are unseated from their horses, thereby losing the match to this evil knight. Finally, the king himself confronts the dark knight, but is also defeated and killed. In the ensuing chaos, the young prince flees with a band of trusted warriors by his side. Escaping to a neighbouring kingdom, the prince seeks out the best sword-master in the en re realm so that he can learn how to fight in the hopes of one day reclaiming his throne. Meanwhile, the dark knight rules the kingdom with an iron fist, plunging all into pure anarchy. Finally, the awaited day comes where the prince returns to his kingdom to seek vengeance for the death of his father. Bravely he fights the dark knight in a drawn-out sword ba le that sends sparks flying everywhere. In the end he is triumphant, and under his just rule, the kingdom returns to its previous peaceful state. All in all this annual event provides a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the tradi ons and day-to-day life of angolden age!

Kaltenberg By Erika Kuenstler


N A C I R E M A

AND WESTERN

K C O H S E R U T CUL

achak S a m e t By Fa

Coming from Zimbabwe, studying abroad-especially in Western countries can impose quite a big culture shock. As a student studying in the United States (US), the culture difference hit me quite hard. I found that viewing the culture and values presented on the news and television is extremely different from experiencing it in person. What I first no ced when I went to the US was the extreme friendliness of strangers. On trains, buses, and even taxis, strangers would start engaging in small talk, constantly to a point where I felt uncomfortable. This of course is the case with most Americans; they are very polite and friendly in informal circumstances, of which many other cultures are not accustomed. Secondly I observed the difference in style and look of the popula on, mostly with respect to teenagers. Being a liberal country, style is very open, and many teenagers were expressing themselves through piercings and ta oos all over their bodies, a body art that is extremely rare in Zimbabwe. In addi on, boys wear baggy sports a re on a daily basis, with shoe laces that are undone most of the me and girls enjoy wearing short revealing clothing, contrary to the more conserva ve Zimbabwean culture where it is uncommon to see these styles of a re. Style and a tude, especially for youngsters is determined by the concepts of celebri es. Hollywood is quite a large part of American culture and has even started to change other more conserva ve cultures today. A large percentage of the popula on look up to these celebri es, and therefore, the famous stars influence their fans in values, style and even daily life, thus affec ng their culture. Another huge aspect of American culture is the role of the military. The military is a major feature in government, poli cs and security interests of the country, and their role reflects posi vely in the eyes of the US ci zens. Military cadets and veterans are greatly respected and valued by the popula on and grand amounts of money are given to military programmes. Most Americans will be completely suppor ve and proud of all military troops and look up to them as role models of what their country stands for. This being the culture that I have witnessed is not of course the whole culture of the United States. USA being a country essen ally of immigrants, there are hundreds of other cultures intertwined from the former countries of the ci zens which are s ll being prac ced today, and which also create the mul cultural diversity of the country. Although ini ally I was quite astounded by the differences in culture, over me even though I may not agree with all aspects of the culture, I learnt to respect it and understand the history and reasons behind the culture, which in turn made me comprehend and resonate with the American people a lot be er. Through understanding and respec ng different cultures, it was my gateway to making interna onal rela onships.


Opinion: Changing the culture of Tradition by Eli Nyakudya

The tradi ons men oned above are a few out of many around the world that have been prac sed for centuries by their people. Tradi ons have been essen al in crea ng individual iden

es that define us as communi es.

In my Shona family the older members get to choose

Did You Know? Halloween does not exist in Germany, but instead they celebrate All Saints Day on November 1. On this day, families visit their

their preferred piece of meat first. My family also

rela ves' graves. A erward godparents come with gi s of braided sweet bread called “Strietzel” to their godchildren's homes.

received a lot of cows in exchange for my sister's hand

The passing down of informa on appears to be the main tool in the sustainability of tradi on. However, as a global ci zen of the contemporary

in marriage (Lobola). In South Africa they like to

genera on I have o en been compelled to the ideology of crea ng new tradi ons for ourselves.

celebrate their Heritage Day by cooking their food on

While considering this idea of new tradi ons and cultures the following ques ons were raised: Is tradi on dynamic? Is it flexible enough to

an open fire. (Braaing)

accommodate changes in societal structures in the post millennium era? And can we create a collec ve culture without eroding our own cultures?

Wait there is more! In Germany they hold an

So why not evolve? Why not start our own tradi ons? What about construc ng a new, broader and more integrated tradi on?

exhibi on in honour of beer every October (Oktoberfest). In America they blind the sky with

This discussion is not plainly arguing about tradi ons but is rather focusing on building new tradi ons that stretch beyond our borders because

fireworks every 4th of July (Independence Day). In

even if we see it or not, the world is becoming one! Furthermore, the concept of recycling ideologies and pa erns of behaviour does not stand

India they enjoy throwing paint at each other (Holi

much ground in the 21st century in which society is defined by progress.

fes val) and in Thailand they go to war by firing water

In 1966, an anthropologist by the name of Claude Levi-Strauss believed that every genera on has two types of socie es. The first are the ones

guns at each other (Songkran). In the Sudanese

that believe that the past is recreated by every genera on and that me is a series of cycles, which he referred to as the “cold” socie es.

Latuka tribe, when a man wants to marry a woman,

Secondly, there are those that are aware of change and of the irreversible nature of history, which he called “hot” socie es.

he kidnaps her. Elderly members of his family go and ask the girl's father for her hand in marriage, and if

In my opinion, I believe that our genera on will benefit from inves ng ourselves in the la er society of “hot” socie es. Our genera on has been

dad agrees, he beats the suitor as a sign of his

endowed with the tool of globalisa on which has allowed us to be conscious of change around us. Through globalisa on the world is moving

acceptance of the union!

towards a more integrated global society and this has raised the need to preserve local tradi ons. However, it has also created a pla orm that allows the sharing of these tradi ons as to adapt to the changing mes in which local and na onal cultures are allowed to extend beyond

As out of the ordinary as these prac ces may seem,

geographic and poli cal boundaries.

the common term for them is 'Tradi on'. In her

A cri cal approach will argue that globalisa on poses the risk of eroding local tradi ons. However, the focus here is not merely on deple ng the

opening essay to Memory and imagina on: The

tradi ons but rather crea ng new tradi ons that can be shared universally, therefore integra ng the world on a cultural pla orm.

Legacy of Maidu Indian Ar st Frank Day, Rebecca

How can this be achieved, one may ask? Simply by sharing our cultures on a global scale! Here are a few ideas that are already happening around

Dobkins asks a fairly difficult ques on “What are the

us:

meanings of 'tradi on'?”

Arts: Zimbabwe plays host to the Harare Interna onal Fes val of Arts which showcases the very best of local, regional and interna onal arts and culture in a comprehensive fes val programme of theatre, dance, music, circus, street performance, fashion, spoken word and visual arts.

A er years of recurring behaviour, tradi on was the

Did you know! Zimbabwe has a very rich ar s c tradi on, including music, dance, fine arts and cra s, and literature. Tradi onally, Africans

name given to those cultural characteris cs which, in

passed on knowledge through music and dance. Music and dance were part of ceremonies and rites of passage; in many places, they s ll are.

situa ons of change were to be con nued, handed

Culture is s ll passed on through praise songs (equivalent to poems), stories, and proverbs.

on, thought about, preserved and not lost. Our great

Music: The universal voice of music has become a culture uni ng force. Fes vals such as Tomorrowland in Belgium have already created a

grandfathers, poli cal leaders and church ins tu ons

tradi on that is shared by people from all over the world. Currently, my music playlist houses a variety of songs ranging from Milky Chance to

from earlier genera ons were responsible for

Robin Schultz both German ar sts.

crea ng pa erns of behaviour that have been influen al in how modern socie es behave today.

Similar to that: The Oktoberfest is unmistakably a German tradi on. However, this 16-day fes val in Munich a racts over six million visitors per year. I have even

Simply put, tradi on has been defined as a way of

shared in some German tradi on by having an Erdinger Weiss beer! The world shares a number of global tradi ons for example, 'the Easter

thinking, behaving or doing something that has been

Bunny & the Tale of the Eggs' from the name to the bunny, it's all German! So, the idea of sharing a global tradi on may appeal to some as

used by the people in a par cular group, family,

somehow Utopian but if we look around us we have already started prac sing it.

society etc for a long me. Other defini ons offered include an inherited, established or customary

Cultures and tradi ons are complex and evolving, they change over me. This discussion sought to highlight and encourage a change in the

pa ern of thought, ac on or behaviour.

culture of our tradi on by expressing it over a wider and more incorporated scale. The Zimbabwe German society hosts a number of local and interna onal cultural events. By par cipa ng one is actually breaking the borders of tradi on by allowing themselves to be part of the integrated culture!


By Dexter Fundire

In June 2015, Arnold Rosslee opened the doors to his café located at the Zimbabwe German Society (ZGS) grippingly called The Shebeen. When Arnold speaks of food, it's from an ar s c point of view. It's as If he is pain ng a masterpiece or discussing plans for the repain ng of the Sis ne Chapel. Discussing the launch of The Shebeen's new cocktails introduced at Thursday night's Alexio and the Shades of Black shows at ZGS, he describes each cocktail as “a delicate fusion of energy, serenity and joy in one glass.” It is clear that Arnold has a passion for food and that there is a lot of careful thought, prepara on and precise execu on that is injected into every dish. Having previously run a café at The Na onal Art Gallery- and run it well they did, Arnold and his team of master chefs are no strangers to the intense, fickle and cut throat world of the culinary arts. It is a world where the average man is your biggest cri c. Where one undercooked chicken dish can spell the end of your business. However, it is also an industry in which one gets to witness the joy of a customer as he or she takes their first bite of a well prepared dish. I for one am instantly turned into The Shebeen's number one fan as I take my first bite of their signature cherry and lemon muffins. It is simple yet incredibly delicious. It takes a minute or two before I can come down from cloud nine and get back to the interview. Whilst we wait for the main course, I bombard him with a series of ques ons in order to gain a be er understanding of what The Shebeen is all about. Dexter – What is The Shebeen? Arnold – In general, The Shebeen is a food hub where we seek to create different fusions of food whilst catering to the Zimbabwean Market. For too long we have gone places and we've eaten food and been disappointed by it because it is either too generic, bland or lacking in flavour. We decided that we wanted to provide people with food that is exci ng and has a bit of sparkle to it. The name Shebeen was decided because Shebeens or similar establishments are deeply rooted in Southern African culture. Anyway, throughout history where there was an illegal gathering of sorts amongst the people, we would witness revolu on and change. People would come together and offer different ways of thinking and alternate streams of thought. If you ask people who organized these revolu ons they would tell you that all these ideas were brought forth whilst gathering at shebeens with food and drink provided. So our aim was to reflect and immortalize these once illegal ins tu ons. It's our way of honouring those who opened up their doors to the people and thus were in themselves architects of change. Dexter- I have no ced that you and your team have something very unique that is taking place here. What influences this establishment's style? What gives it its je ne sais quoi? Arnold- First and foremost, we are young and youthful and that's the vibe we want to impose on our customers. Nobody, no ma er what age they are wants to feel old and grey. Yes we are required to live in a formal and bureaucra c society where everything is to go by the book and one is required to follow the rules and in a sense conform. However, we feel that your taste buds shouldn't conform to anything other than your personal tastes. What influences our style is good food. Food is very important to us. In a business like ours we have to make sure that no ma er what, our food is at its utmost best. There are no rules to ea ng here other than making sure each person enjoys their food.

mission to provide affordable and healthy food that is visually pleasing and tastes out of this world. We sell that lifestyle to people. In future, we want to set up a small monthly 5 minute cooking show on a YouTube channel that features prominent Zimbabwean somebodies as guests. These guests will make their favourite dish which we will then add to that menu for that month. We also cater for large events and business func ons. Dexter- Where do you get your ingredients?

Arnold- With the aid of the Zimbabwe German Society we have managed to set up a small garden where we get all of our herbs from. Our vegetables and fruit are purchased from organic farmers around Harare, mainly from Belvedere which is rela vely close to our premises. Other ingredients are bought Dexter- This place is always vibrant and full. What is your from wholesalers and our meat is purchased from indigenous secret to a rac ng customers in today's struggling economy? farmers. We want to contribute to the Zimbabwean economy which is why we try and purchase from local farmers. Arnold – Well, there are many different ways of doing that. What we've found is that every customer regardless of their socioeconomic status wants to maintain a certain lifestyle. People are more conscious of their health these days and so we made it our

Arnold Rosslee


Dexter- Give us a brief insight into a day in the Shebeen. Arrnold- First thing we do when we get here is clean up. We consciously make sure that our kitchen is always spotless. As they say, “cleanliness is next to godliness”. Then we start to prep our food. A er that it's all about baking and ge ng ready for breakfast. Our breakfast lasts ll midday. As we get closer to the end of the breakfast we start preparing our lunch dishes. Lunch is usually when it is the busiest. That's when it really picks up around here. Lunch usually goes on for 2 to 3 hours. A er that it dumbs down a bit and we mostly serve snacks and drinks un l we close at 5. If there is an event happening at that night here at ZGS we then return at 7 where we also open up the bar. In-between all of this we are always experimen ng with food to try and discover new and exci ng dishes for our loyal customers.

The importance of a reading culture

spectrum.mit.edu

By Lilian Mashiri

Dexter- Introduce us to your team Arnold- Firstly, I will start with myself. I am no simple joke but I am a simple cat (chuckles). Some mes I feel like I should be a food cri c. I love going on food adventures, tas ng different dishes and seeking to discover what makes each dish so. I am very open minded and eager to taste. I am the one who brings together each member of my team. I like to see myself as the glue that makes The Shebeen s ck. I am the ideas guy, an entrepreneur of sorts. A er me there is a lady named Cathlin. She is our manager. She makes sure that we are on our toes and deliver the best possible service that we can. Then there is Chef Anesu who is a wizard in the kitchen. He just got back from South Africa where he worked at a 4 star hotel in Sandton. He has been cooking since the age of 5. His passion is cooking and has done a couple of crazy and interes ng food projects for the book café. We worked together at the gallery café and for a number of private func ons.His experience and passion brings more to our establishment than just recipes. Recipes are awesome but without love, desire all they are is just recipes. Chef Anesu brings all that and more. We also have Chef Kundai who is an excellent pastry Chef so if you like pastries you know where to find him. Dexter- You are scheduled for the electric chair, what do you pick as your last meal? Arnold- Wow, um well it definitely has to be a three course meal. I would start off with a fish fingered dish with my lemon on the side and some caramelized onions. For my main course I would… well Harare and try one of the Shebeen's signature gourmet dishes I recently had the most amazing beef goulash with red wine, and drinks. This is an establishment that I strongly believe will potatoes, carrots and coconut oil. Oh my gosh (at this moment stand the test of me. he does a li le shake). It was heavenly. For my main course I would have beef goulash with a special coastal salad. The dressing should be mixed with mayonnaise, sweet chilli and some honey. For desert, I would want to have carrot cake and custard. That dish makes me nostalgic. It remind me of home. Of a me when, as a child I would get home from school and mom would be baking carrot cake. That aroma would sweeten up the room and everyone would be Dexter- Tell us about your bar. Arnold- What we seek to establish in our bar is that fusion. As with our restaurant everything is about fusion. We will be selling dra beers and signature Shebeen cocktails. At this moment my meal arrives. It couldn't have come at a be er me. All this talk of good food and fusion has le my mouth watering. As I take my first bite it is obvious that these guys know what they are talking about. I strongly suggest that you all take the me to come to 51 Lawson Avenue, Milton Park;

The passion for reading is not merely a hobby, it is a cultural habit. It can best be described as a prac ce of seeking knowledge, informa on or entertainment through the wri en word - by reading books, journals, magazines, or newspapers to men on a few.

informa on-scarce society to one that is driven by an informa on overload and there is a decline in reading books due to the presence of Internet and electronic book sources such as e-books, e-journals and e-news. People are spending more me on electronic media which they can A reading culture is usually cul vated in the early stages of a child's life easily access on personal computers. and is further developed as an educa onal tool as reading books is Libraries are generally perceived as containing just shelves compulsory in school and university or college and beyond. Educa on of books and may seem an quated or outdated. By is not a process that finishes the day and eventually, we leave school or providing relevant e-resources such as e-journals, e-books, university. Reading s mulates imagina on, encourages quick learning, CD ROM databases, online databases and web-based and expands horizons. It encourages imagina on and curiosity. resources in the right quan ty, libraries can help in Reading enhances acquisi on of skills for handling complex ideas or improving reading culture. issues. Libraries can also provide the opportunity to share the love Lack of access to reading material is one of the contribu ng factors to a of books and reading and thus create a strong reading poor reading culture. The main role of libraries therefore is to promote culture. This could be introduced by facilita ng literacy an increase in the produc on of reading materials and to iden fy the ac vi es such as book clubs that would bring readers major obstacles that inhibit reading and to find ways of elimina ng together and provide them with a place to feel safe, valued them. The library also has the responsibility of making informa on and knowledgeable. available in different formats to encourage reading, because not only Libraries s ll have a role to play in facilita ng what is being does it supply reading materials in all areas; it also supplies materials at read, be it by e-book readers, tablet, phone newspaper, all levels. It stores books, pictures, pamphlets, maps, films filmstrips, magazine or books. What ma ers is ensuring that library recordings and all other printed media. members have access to reading materials that will engage, At a me when the use of computers and access to internet is the norm educate, entertain and challenge them at all levels. access to informa on is just a click away, we've moved from an Sources Jarkata Post October 15 2011. Reading culture: The long journey to becoming a developed nation. Usmeet Kaur, Hindustan Times, Amritsar April 23, 2015 World Books Day: Libraries help inculcate reading culture Austin Onwubiko. Nigeria: Improving Reading Culture among Students - Role of School Heads and Teachers Stephen Adekunle Ajayi. The influence of electronic resources use on students’ reading culture in Nigerian universities: a case study of Adeleke University. Readforpleasure.co.uk


Zimbabwe German Society 51 Lawson Avenue Milton Park Harare for inquiries or to be featured in the grill magazine please email info@goetheharare.org

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Profile for zimbabwegermansociety

The Grill Issue 2  

The second issue of The Grill Magazine, a digital platform celebrating world culture.

The Grill Issue 2  

The second issue of The Grill Magazine, a digital platform celebrating world culture.

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