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R E P O R T O N E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T O F R O H I N G YA I N F L U X

APPENDIX C. Stakeholders Consultations Meetings in Dhaka Meeting

Date

Participants

Discussion Agenda

Key issues identified/ discoursed

Meeting with MoDMR

25th October, 2017

Mr. Mohsin, Joint Secretary, MoDMR

Briefing about the Rohingya situation and expectation from the study

The Rohingya influx after 25th August 2017 has been continuous and on a large scale. The Government, with the help of UN agencies and bilateral support of other supporting countries, is addressing the problem. Forestry and the environment have been victims of the circumstances. Expectation from the study team is to get an understanding about the reversible and irreversible damages and the means to contain/offset them.

Meeting with MoEF

26th October, 2017

Additional Secretary Joint Secretary (Environment)

Concerns about forestry damage. Concerns about contamination of ground water and surface water.

Concerns about forestry damage both natural forest and plantation, concerns about ECAs and Protected Areas. Expectation from the study team is to get an understanding about the loss and damage in the forestry sector and means for restoration. Concerns also include contamination of ground water and surface water and about their likely cleaning operation.

Expert Consultation

28th October 2017

BFD, DoE, MoEF, FAO, UN WOMEN, NGOs

Informing and updating all relevant ministries and line agencies, experts and key stakeholders about the REA, identifying info and knowledge gaps and gathering views and advice to design a robust environment impact assessment and mitigation plan.

Hill-cutting, tree-felling for fuelwood, withdrawals of huge amounts of ground water, and pollution from fecal sludge. Key factors for health and environmental concerns include the polythene wastes from relief operations and increased dust particles in the air from increased traffic. Some Rohingya have settled in areas that are likely to face landslides in next year’s rainy season. It is critical to learn the resource-use behavior of the Rohingya to determine the types and extent of the future environmental impact. Gender aspects of the crisis are very important to consider as the majority of the Rohingya are women and children. Determining the role of Rohingya women in impacting the communities and environment is very important. Rohingya women stay in their houses most of the time, so the REIA teams should visit the households to collect data and build relationships.

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Profile for Zilla Haider

Report on ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF ROHINGYA INFLUX  

This study was initiated by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF), the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), and UNDP and UN Women, with...

Report on ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF ROHINGYA INFLUX  

This study was initiated by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF), the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), and UNDP and UN Women, with...

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