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and the area is now filled with shelters. Other hills will likely face a similar fate. There are over a million Rohingya who have so far been sheltered within a few square kilometers of the influx area combining old and new makeshift camps. A set of historical satellite photos presented in Figure 4-6 demonstrates forest degradation and changes in land-use caused by makeshift camps. The most alarming impacts of the influx are: forest degradation and habitat loss; the fragmentation of territory for wildlife; human-wildlife conflicts, hill cutting, soil erosion and stream congestion; ground water source depletion; watershed degradation and water scarcity. Soil pollution and compaction, lighting,

noise and air pollution are other areas of concern.

Forest Degradation and Habitat Loss The Rohingya gather whatever materials they are able to in order to build their shelters. This has resulted in indiscriminate cleaning of the vegetation cover from hills and forests. Fuelwood for daily cooking is also being collected from forests, and this is causing serious forest degradation and habitat destruction (see Section 5.2.1). A new access road to the Rohingya camps on the Cox’s Bazar – Teknaf highway is under construction and this will facilitate access not only to the camps, but also to the forests and their resources.

Figure 4-6 Forest Degradation and changes in Land-use near Kutupalong- Balukhali makeshift camp (white oval)

September 07, 2002

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November 12, 2009

October 26, 2017, Credite Pléiades ©CNES 2017, Distribution Airbus DS47

https://data.humdata.org/dataset/bangladesh-satellite-image-of-kutupalong-makeshift-settlements-and-expansion-sites-zones-kml

Profile for Zilla Haider

Report on ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF ROHINGYA INFLUX  

This study was initiated by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF), the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), and UNDP and UN Women, with...

Report on ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF ROHINGYA INFLUX  

This study was initiated by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF), the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), and UNDP and UN Women, with...

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