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hungarian cultural days of cluj 4th edition

IM AG E S A N D F I GU R E S


hungarian cultural days of kolozsvรกr / cluj 4th edition

2013. I M A G E S A N D F I G U R E S

photography: transilvanart.ro

www.magyarnapok.ro


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 18th of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

a dynamic start

Exhibition openings: • Passing times – Carpathian Society of Transylvania • Ágota Antal: Barázka – Fashion exhibition • Béla Gy. Szabó: Paintings • Cluj/Kolozsvár school of graphics –The Kolozsvár Society • Photo-stories – Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania

‘Culture is not destructive, but creative. It builds, it lifts us up, brings us close to one another and fosters links!’ (Károly, comment on Facebook)


5 Cultural and national diversity

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he Heltai Gáspár Library Foundation and the Szarkaláb Folk-dance Ensemble organised between the 16th and the 21st of August the 15th edition of the meeting of folk-dance ensembles, commemorating Saint Stephen’s Day. Thirteen ensembles representing minority cultures in eight countries (Croatia, Hungary, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Transcarpathia/Ukraine, Transylvania/Romania and Vojvodina/Serbia) as well as 180 youngsters from 7 settlements located in Cluj (Kolozs) and Sălaj (Szilágy) counties participated in this festival, which became an integral part of the programme offered by the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.

Did you know that almost

200,000

people attended the entire series of programmes?

The participants of the Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles introduced themselves to the audience by performing a street dance in the main square of the city on Saturday, Sunday or Monday – according to schedule. In the Transylvanian capital, youngsters dressed in beautiful popular costumes promoted the cultural and national diversity of Central Eastern Europe. The best photographs taken by the students of Cinematography, Photography and Media Department of the Sapientia University were presented as part of an exhibition entitled Photo-stories and also celebrating the university’s tenth anniversary. The portraits, nature photographs as well as images of various textures, objects and buildings were presented in an unconventional manner by printing them on canvass and using no frames. Furthermore, thanks to the generous donation made by the Ladány family, these works were also published in an album. Béla Gy. Szabó rose to fame as woodcutter and graphic artist. However, the Bánffy Palace – that is, the city’s Museum of Fine Arts – hosted an exhibition of his paintings. ‘I know of only a few homes in Kolozsvár where you cannot see a single woodcut by Béla Gy. Szabó on the walls’ – said art historian Júlia Németh at the vernissage of the exhibit dedicated to ‘the uncrowned king of Transylvanian woodcutting’. The fact that this was the 95th posthumous exhibition of his works is the best proof of the artist’s greatness and the respect he earned. ‘He would probably be glad that so many people came to the opening’ – said somebody.

‘The Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj evolved already into a muster of the major creators and characters of Hungarian cultural life in the Carpathian Basin.’ Gergely Balázs, Senior Organiser


hungarian cultural days of cluj

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

the 19th of August

4th edition

on a high level

Exhibition openings: János Thorma, his contemporaries and followers TAG (Transylvanian Art Group) – Lutheran Bishopric New York, New York! Let’s get a room! – ‘Origo’ Association Hommage à Babits Mihály – Exhibition of works by László Miklosovits, graphic artist from Albertirsa Presentation of the renovated statue depicting Saint George Hungarian Film Days of Cluj – opening Opening ceremony of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj, 4th edition

‘We will continue to be Hungarians as long as we sing Hungarian songs and dance Hungarian folk dances.’ Zoltán Kallós, ethnographer

‘This is how Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. 697th edition? treasures should be The The 4th edition of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj commenced officially with the opening displayed to ceremony held on Monday, the 19th of August. Very many people attended the event, the large hall of the Hungarian Opera House of Cluj was overcrowded. Balázs Gergely, the Senior Organthe world!’ iser of the programme – and also the person who suggested, four years ago, that such a series of events should be organised – argued that Kolozsvár is a young city, although it became an important settlement in the Middle Ages, 697 years ago.


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A celebration of unity and culture (continuation from the previous page) The opening ceremony of the 4th edition of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj brought together, again, representatives belonging to the two political poles of the ethnic Hungarian community in Transylvania: on the one hand, The Hungarian National Council of Transylvania (HNCT) and The Hungarian People’s Party of Transylvania (HNPT) as well as the Democratic Alliance of Hungarians in Romania (DAHR), on the other hand. The leaders of these organisations delivered speeches to the audience, while folk music and folk dance ensembles from Cluj and its surroundings performed during the opening ceremony. László Tőkés, Member of the European Parliament and president of the HNCT praised the organisers for being able to overcome partisan loyalties in an exemplary manner and cooperate in order to further the common cause: ‘the religious, national, social and political unity, as part of the most progressive traditions of Transylvania and Cluj, which is called “the treasure city”.

Symbolic moments and the joy of unity during the Opening ceremony

‘We can show and prove to the world that in this city we have only built and created, without ever destroying anything.’ Béla Kató, bishop of the Transylvanian Calvinist Diocese TAG (Transylvanian Art Group) – exhibition hosted by the Reményik Sándor Gallery

Hunor Kelemen, the president of the DAHR said: ‘If results could be measured in what concerns the creation of cultural values and spiritual achievements, Cluj would occupy the first place in Transylvania’.

Did you know that, this year, the entire series of programmes required more than

60 different locations?


hungarian cultural days of cluj 4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

the 19th of August

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Free guided tour of the exhibition presenting Thorma’s work

‘I was able to experience the fact that Cluj is inhabited indeed by a Hungarian community which awakes a sense of belonging in its members, since this community is alive and well, moreover, it is not afraid of displaying its existence. (The same is true for Transylvania as well.)’ http://nemjarunkki.blogspot.ro

he headquarters of the Transilvania International Film Festival also served as headquarters of the organising committee. Various personalities met the public and talked to them here, while feature films were also on the premises during the evenings.

Professional debate on sports – Insomnia Café

The most important event in terms of visual arts The exhibition entitled János Thorma, his contemporaries and followers presented almost 140 works of art by painters of the famous Nagybánya/Baia Mare school, belonging presently to various public and private collections. In this manner, the exhibits offered a comprehensive picture of the diversity characterising visual arts in Transylvania. Visitors could admire creations by Thorma’s famous contemporaries, who founded the Nagybánya/Baia Mare school of painters: Károly Ferenczy, István Réti, Simon Hollósy and Béla Iványi-Grünwald. The exhibition also hosted paintings by Margit Kiss, who was one of Thorma’s disciples and later became his wife and lifelong inspiration. Finally, an interesting exhibit was the composition entitled On your feet now, Hungary calls you dedicated to the Hungarian Revolution and War of Independence fought in 1848-1849. Thorma worked on it throughout his life, but never finished the painting. This exhibition, which can be considered the most important event of the year in terms of visual arts, presented more than 130 works of art. It was meant to commemorate 75 years from János Thorma’s demise and the main organising partner was the Hungarian Consulate-General in Cluj-Napoca.


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‘Human power is sufficient to defeat the dragon.’

The Kelemen Lajos Society for the Protection of Monuments, with financial support from the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, commissioned the renovation of the Saint George statue, in order to commemorate 110 years of its existence. ‘We hope that soon plaques will be placed on monuments in Cluj and people will also be able to read information in five languages about this statue and how it was erected here’ said György Gaal, the president of the mentioned society during the presentation ceremony. The Insomnia Café suggested that the neo-baroque building of the former New York Hotel be a special location hosting various programmes of this year’s festival. What could the organisers do with the New York Hotel, which received no tourists for several years and began to decay, although in old times it used to be a place of gathering for illustrious guests? The lively manifestations, which took place here, answered this question. An interesting visual arts exhibition, entitled New York, New York! Let’s get a room!, was opened on Monday afternoon. Eleven artists exhibited their work in eleven different rooms on the first floor of the building, which used to be a hotel.

Did you know that the entire series of programmes included

390 events and manifestations? ‘What I like about the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj is that we can be together and also feel that we belong together.’ Robi, 27 years old

A new programme was also offered by the organisers. After-parties were organised for people who did not go home in a hurry after the concerts performed on the big stage in the city centre. The series of after-parties were advertised using a variant of the programme’s slogan: ‘The city boilzzz at night, too’; and held during the night in the New York Arena, not far form the big stage. The right atmosphere for those who wanted to party on Monday night was created by dance hits from the 1930s.


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 20th of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

a festive atmosphere

City tour and visit to the Házsongárd cemetery King Mathias and the mayor of Cluj Recital – The memory of Jenő Dsida The 15th edition of Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles – Closing ceremony

Cavalcade of dances in the main square of the ‘treasure city’ The Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles plays an increasing role in identity preservation and stimulates smaller communities to organise themselves. Thus, its importance for the international cultural links established by the ethnic Hungarian community in Transylvania is beyond doubt. It is one of the most prestigious manifestations held around Saint Stephen’s Day in the entire Carpathian Basin and an encounter point for regional and minority cultures in Europe. Many people, ethnic Romanians and ethnic Hungarians alike, attended its closing ceremony.

‘Meeting old and new acquaintances is a pleasant feeling. I can recall the magic word: together... we, ethnic Hungarians from Cluj and Transylvania… in a peaceful, civilised and joyful manner. Together.’” http://koliver.wordpress.com


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The Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folkdance Ensembles The Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj and the festival were intertwined for the fourth time. The exuberant movements of dancers and their joy as well as the beautiful popular costumes, being a pleasure to behold, represented a dignifying start for the series of programmes. Hungarians in Cluj greeted with much enthusiasm the dancers, their performances being watched by large audiences. In the end, the crowd left satisfied since the ensembles representing eight countries delivered exquisite performances this year, too. On the 20th of August, the day when Hungary was founded as a Medieval Kingdom, the festive procession of dancers followed the traditional route and arrived at King Mathias’ statue in the main square where they performed a cavalcade of dances. Besides the foreign ensembles, two local groups participated as well.

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he number of groups participating in the Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles is increasing every year. Three new folk dance groups arrived in 2013: one from Latvia, one from Poland and one from Slovakia. The number of locations where the guests could exhibit their talent and skills was also higher. Representatives of participant ensembles were received by Emil Boc, the Mayor of Cluj in his office. He expressed his hopes that the guests had a good time in the city located on the banks of the Szamos/Someş river and that its inhabitants will have the opportunity to attend such high-level performances next year, too.

Did you know that, this year, just like previously, there were

no disturbances of public order?


hungarian cultural days of cluj

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

20 august

4th edition

Did you know that receiving

14,177 likes,

the festival’s Facebook page is the third most popular in Transylvania?

Roughly fifty programmes for children and families Of the almost four hundred programmes of the festival, fifty were expressly dedicated to children. The main organisers thereof were the ‘Tree of Life’ Association for Family Assistance, the local group of the Hungarian Scout Association of Romania, the Diakonia Christian Foundation, the DRIBLI Children’s Football Club of Transylvania and the Legends of Szeklerland. On Tuesday, the children could watch the play ‘King Mathias and the mayor of Kolozsvár’ performed by puppeteers Ferenc Demeter and László Vincze.


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Cultural effervescence in Cluj The students of the Brassai Sámuel High School presented a show directed by professor Éva Rónai. The recital entitled Ode to the Hungarian Language was a compilation of poems by three great poets Mihály Vörösmarty, Sándor Reményik and Sándor Petőfi. Pieces of classical music also contributed to creating an intimate atmosphere. At the end, the audience rewarded this performance celebrating Hungarian language with standing ovation. A literary roundtable discussion – moderated by László Lövétei Lázár, editor-in-chief of the magazine Székelyföld (Szeklerland) – was also organised in order to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Zoltán Jékely’s birth. Why was the Transylvanian writer and poet left out from the canon of Hungarian literature? Sarolt Péterfy, PhD, a researcher of Jékely’s life and work as well as the curator of his legacy; Júlia Vallasek, PhD, assistant professor at the Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj and László Boka, PhD, the scientific director of the National Széchényi Library in Budapest tried to answer this question and related ones. The programme of the Hungarian Film Days of Cluj included on Tuesday night the screening of the play ‘Street of Limping Angels’ directed by József Szabó, an adaptation of the novel ‘The Sobbing Monkey’ by Tibor Bálint. The event was hosted by the ‘Tranzit’ House. The 130 minutes play was performed by the Hungarian Theatre of Cluj and recorded in 1972 during the 4th edition of the Cluj Retrospective of Films. After the screening, members of the audience talked to the writer’s widow and to actors. The closing ceremony of the Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles could already have been an appropriate final act of the third day. Nevertheless, the organisers prepared further surprises for that night: a jazz concert to warm up the atmosphere, further film screenings and two after-parties held in different locations.

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hat is for most people unusable, rusting junk, represents for Zoltán Elekes – graphic artist and bicycle restorer – an opportunity to create a bike, which by virtue of its uniqueness and beauty can offer (apart from other advantages) a rare visual experience to people interested in bikes and cycling. The ‘creations’ presented in an unconventional manner on the terrace of the club called The Soviet might have convinced visitors that, for some people, bikes have souls.


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 21st of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

music and community of values

City tour and visit to the Házsongárd cemetery Tour of organs in Cluj One hundred years of film-making in Cluj – festive screening Wine-tasting The Csík Band and its friends: András Lovasi and Hobo


15 The beverage of the soul and truth: wine

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ite-making, felt-making, making various objects of clay, glass blowing, nature education, painting using bare hands and feet, folk dance classes, embossing, beadwork, colouring and similar other programmes entertained children during the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. However, these programmes were open not only to the little ones, since their parents could take part as well and create various items together with their children. The Alma Band taught children how to make ice cream and in order to increase the efficiency of the process sang the popular song: ‘take the stuff, put it in the freezer, and wait, since patience brings ice-cream’. But who is patient anyway?

‘Life is too short to drink bad wine.’

Compared to the previous year, twice as many wine-makers participated in the 4th edition of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. Since their programmes and products attracted a very large number of people, we expect that more of them will be present in 2014 as well. Wine-tasting took place in the club of YMCA Transylvania. A large section of the street traditionally called Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) became Borutca (Wine street). This part of the street was indeed exciting and popular because visitors could taste and buy the products of fifteen wine-makers. Moreover, eight wine-makers delivered presentations, too. The first day belonged to two wine-makers from Nagyenyed/ Aiud: Jenő Györfy and Péter Papp. On Tuesday, wine lovers could taste the wines made by the Hetei family from Krasznabéltek/Beltiug. These were not only very delicious, but very nicely packed, too. However, the climax of the series was the presence of the Bott Vinery, from Tokaj (Hungary), which produces magnificent wines. On Thursday, wines made by Lajos Gál were presented by his son, Péter Gál. The next day, visitors tasted wines from Gábor Karner’s cellars located in the Mátra Mountains. On Saturday, the Konyári Vineyard from Balatonlelle introduced itself. The last day, Géza Balla presented his wines produced in the Ménes/ Miniş region in Arad county, Romania.

Between sacredness and prohibition The guest of the Sapientia University, Norbert Varga, PhD (University of West Hungary, Sopron) cited stories from the Bible and the Koran in order to explain the meaning of wine, grapes and grapevines as symbols. Following his presentation, members of the audience could taste a full-bodied wine, the famous Blaufränkisch from Sopron, which won bronze medal at a competition in Portugal, in 2004. Finally, participants could also bid for and buy this wine since an auction was also organised.


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 21st of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

‘In the end, only the two of them remain: God and wine.’

Tour of organs in the churches of Cluj The organ is arguably the most complex, expensive and hence durable musical instrument. But how do flue pipes and reed pipes produce sound? What does flauto dolce mean in case of an organ and where is the principal? All these questions were answered during the tour of organs presented by Dávid Sipos, PhD student of Church history. In Saint Michael’s Church, István Bodó talked about the church organ built by Johannes Hahn, a master organ-builder from Szeben/Sibiu, which is unique because after its extension in 1899 four hand pieces can be interpreted on it as well. The gallery of the so-called Reformed Church ‘with two towers’ is equipped with a relatively new instrument built by Angster in 1941.


17 Celebrating 100 years from the production of the first silent film in Cluj, the Art Movie Theatre evoked the work of Jenő Janovics, one of the pioneers of Hungarian film-making. The 1917 movie entitled ‘The last night’, an adaptation of a play written by Ede Sas, was discovered a few years ago in The Federal Film Archive in Berlin. The other movie played there was a documentary by Bálint Zágoni, ‘The Hungarian Pathé’.

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he visits to the Házsongárd cemetery, organised by the Kelemen Lajos Society for the Protection of Monuments and the Házsongárd Foundation were as popular as one year ago. Hundreds of people listened to the tour guides who told them sometimes sad and shocking stories, while on other occasions moving love stories. Being buried in the Házsongárd cemetery is a ‘status symbol’, since many well-known personalities were laid to rest here, among many others: the writer János Apáczai Csere, the bible translator Albert Szenczi Molnár as well as poets like Jenő Dsida and Domokos Szilágyi.

The Györkös Mányi Albert Memorial House hosted a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Ilona Jakab, the late wife of painter Albert Györkös Mányi. Unfortunately, the large public knows very little about Ilona Jakab although she was an excellent artist. In his tribute to her, writer and critic Lajos Kántor argued that Ilona Jakab was a ‘hiding artist’ and, in consequence, not much is known about her. People fond of literature had an opportunity to meet poet Zsófia Balla in the building operated by the Minerva Cultural Association. She reflected everything she received from the ‘treasure city’ during the years she spent in the Hungarian capital. Because she could write and talk about her life experiences in her native land – in a credible manner – only abroad. Although she is a music academy graduate, she always starts with an image, a picture. Her poems are results of extensive polishing and work because she believes that ‘great poetry is hidden in texts chiselled to the level of syllables’.

‘I am looking forward to see András Lovasi during the Hungarian Cultural Days. I like his music, and once I asked for 600 lifts to arrive to the place where he gave a concert. I would not miss him, no matter what happens. Look, I grew a moustache to honour him and the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.’ T. Sz., humourist


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 22nd of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

‘The Moon is made of cheese’ (Title of a song performed by Ferenc Demjén)

Opening of Festival Street Transylvania’s historical opportunity – infographics Introduction to the world of Argentine tango Concerts: Intim Torna Illegál Ferenc Demjén and his guest: Szörényi Levente

Almost twenty-thousand people sang in the main square of Cluj Many people were looking forward to a special musical event scheduled for Thursday, the concert given by Ferenc Demjén and Levente Szörényi. They interpreted extremely popular songs like ‘Sorrounded by flowers’, ‘You must let me go’, ‘I am made of ice’ and ‘You broke my heart into pieces’. The audience sang together with them, while some people started dancing already at the beginning. The concert culminated with the song ‘The Love Train’ when many people in the audience formed a conga line and began dancing to the rhythm of music. People listening to this concert had a very good time irrespective of age. As one person commented on Facebook: ‘there are no age limits for enjoying good music’. After the encore, almost twenty-thousand people sang in the main square of Cluj: ‘The trees will reach the sky and the shine will touch the earth, / You will know where to go to find your land of birth.’

Did you know that the team of organisers consisted of

76 persons?


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The Hungarian Economists’ Society of Romania and the Carpathian Region Business Network organised a roundtable discussion entitled ‘Hungarian enterprises in Cluj as factors shaping the economy’. The main idea of the debate was the manner of doing business to be adopted by Hungarian enterprises in order to obtain advantages in comparison to other firms. Participants agreed that the crucial factor is the courage to openly admit their (ethnic) Hungarian background, since in this way they might obtain both financial and other kind of support. Sports enthusiasts and photography fans were invited to a friendly discussion organised at Insomnia Café. Sports photographers Zsolt Halmágyi, Sándor Manases and Loránd Vakarcs spoke about the advantages of photography and their experience. They gave some advice on what to take into consideration, what should the good photographer’s backpack hold and what are the features of good sports photographs. For instance, during a football match one should strive not only to capture the moments of goals. It is equally important to be attentive throughout the game and observe reactions as well as motions. The most interesting moments of play might occur in other places than the ones in which footballers are fighting for ball possession – and all these moments are worthy of being immortalised in photographs. Thursday afternoon, an image taken from a fairy tale greeted the public in front of the Casino located in the city’s Central Park. The environment was itself beautiful. The public came to attend a dance class and red carpet led to the dance floor. Dozens of enthusiastic pairs tried to learn tango steps from the two instructors of the Cluj Tango Company Association, Horia Pop and Ioana Lascu. The Tango Cazino Festival lasted during the whole week adding more colour to the programme of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.

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he Szalmakalap Traditional Folk-Dance Ensemble from Szék/Sic presented the performance entitled ‘The street corner dances in black-red-black’. As many ethnic Hungarians know, the poem ‘Red-black’ was inspired by young women from Szék/Sic dancing in the park facing the headquarters of the telephone company. Thus, the performance evoked in many of us the poem itself. The location was the same, traditional one. A few decades ago, young women from Szék/Sic who were employed as domestic help in Cluj, came here to dance not to the rhythm of music, but of their own singing. By the end of the show, the enthusiastic audience started to dance and teach each other in a spontaneous manner.

The 4th edition of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj also gave impetus to local media life. The Hungarian section of the Cluj Radio broadcasted live, each and every day, from the headquarters of the Transilvania International Film Festival. They also moderated the meetings of various artists and creators with the public. Furthermore, Radio Agnus broadcasted from the Óváry Room of the Sapientia University, while Radio Paprika, the Hungarian section of the Cluj Television Studio and Erdély Tv, a channel in Hungarian language, broadcasted from Farkas utca (Wolves’ street).


hungarian cultural days of cluj

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

the 22nd of August

4th edition

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he organisers staged a fair in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street), which began on Thursday morning. The slogan was: ‘no plastic!’ What else then? Famous hand-painted porcelain from Kalocsa (Hungary), wooden spoons made in Korond (Corund) and home made jam from Gyergyócsomafalva (Ciumani). Lute-like popular instruments called koboz for musicians; trinkets made of felt for beautiful girls to wear; linen shirts and hats made of straw for young boys; chocolate chips, chocolate cubes, chocolate balls as well as sweet chocolate, sour chocolate and milk chocolate with or without peanuts for people having a sweet tooth and soap made with goat milk for those who want to live forever. All these were offered by the Guild of Transylvanian Craftsmen.

‘We were very moved and proud. We went home with two full bags on our shoulders. The products of the fair in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) are worth buying, because they are artistic, original, environmentally friendly, interesting, fine, beautiful and very goood!’ Éva, message posted on Facebook


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Did you know that there were

196 stands in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street)?

They drilled a hole in the bathtub in Cluj It is Thursday evening, half past six. Silence dominates the main square; a few people are passing by the statue of King Mathias, while others are beholding it peacefully. It is Thursday evening, half past seven. A mass of noisy people is singing ‘Drill a hole in the bathtub’. What happened in between? The alternative rock band Intim Torna Illegál came to the city again and agitation replaced tranquillity. ‘Of all the places where we played, Cluj is the biggest surprise. It happened here for the first time that some people in the audience were frantically holding up a bathtub during the performance of this piece. I almost dropped the guitar from my hands. Since then, we have come here to see the bathtub’ – declared Peti Dorogi, the lead singer of the band.

‘I am always looking forward to go to the concerts, first of all because of their atmosphere. The best thing is to assemble in the main square of the city, see so many familiar faces, have a good time and party, no matter what kind of music is being played.’ Milán, 26 years old


hungarian cultural days of cluj

the 23rd of August

4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

‘Take This Waltz’

‘Zorán’s concert will be gorgeous, I think. It is my generation’s music and I love it. He performs live very rarely, but if he does, I am always there.’ Zoltán, 35 years old

Preservation of military traditions and care of military burial sites in Transylvania Hungarian Days of Health Anecdotes in the New York Coffeehouse Concerts: Loose Neckties Society – Main square Zorán – Main square Bagossy Brothers Company – The Soviet

The audience were moved to tears by Zorán’s songs carrying eternally valid messages With his inimitable style and moderate renditions, Zorán captured and mesmerised the audience. Only a few musicians can have such an impact on a large crowd without using anything else than a guitar. His art speaks to all generations and makes young and old enjoy life together. Still, there have been deeply emotional moments, too, like when he was singing the rather simple, nonetheless, eternally valid lyrics of the song Tell me there’s a heaven: ‘Tell me there’s a heaven / That might be waiting for us / Tell me there’s a heaven / Though nobody found it thus / Tell me there’s a heaven / That would embrace all of us / Tell me there’s a heaven / That cannot be spoilt by us /’. This was one of the most memorable concerts of all series of such events organised during the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.


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Did you know that

215 volunteers helped organising the festival?

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he concert given by the Bagossy Brothers Company from Gyergyó­ szent­miklós/Gheorgheni was enjoyable, although the public had to use earphones. In the beginning this ‘silent mode’ was too novel for the audience, but at the end they wanted a third encore of the piece ‘Give me back my toy’. The seats were swiftly filled in The Soviet and, soon, there were no earphones left. Those who did not get one regretted it. Those who obtained earphones know why they listened to the adaptation of ‘One day’ with closed eyes.

‘I am looking forward to the concert given by the Loose Neckties Society because I also play in this band. It is impossible for me to describe what I feel when I see the joy brought to the faces of people in the audience by our own music.’ Sanyi, 23 éves

On Friday morning, youth organisations erected their tents and, thus, expanded the place required by Hungarian culture in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street). In the morning hours, people interested in these programmes could attend interesting lectures in the space reserved for these organisations, across the entrance of the Medieval Ruin Garden. Separate events were organised and hosted by MINTA, the youth organisation of The Hungarian People’s Party of Transylvania; The Hungarian Youth Council of Romania and KIFOR (Cluj county Youth Forum), the Kolozs/Cluj county branch of The Hungarian Youth Conference from Romania.

Thalia’s ‘high priests’ (the band called Loose Neckties Society) showed a different face: they wore black ties and played the part of musicians. It was not a difficult role for them, since they had to be ‘just’ themselves. They performed a diverse repertoire composed of Hungarian and English pop songs, jazz hits and several adaptations of poems. The musicians made the enthusiastic public including several actors as well as Gábor Tompa, the manager and director of the Hungarian Theatre of Cluj, sing.


hungarian cultural days of cluj

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

the 23rd of August

4th edition

‘For me, Cluj is a treasure city because it pulsates and is in motion irrespective of the season. During the academic year, students bring liveliness to the city, while during the summer the city boilzzz because of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. One does not need much time to feel at home here.’ Kata, 26 years old

The youth working for the success of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj Organising such a complex series of programmes as the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj requires a tremendous amount of work. Volunteers had to carry out various tasks: assemble the stalls, transport the stuff in and out, answer questions by the information stand, distribute leaflets and stick out posters – just to mention a few. Although these tasks were arduous, youngsters were compensated by the fact that in the meantime they could get acquainted with a lot of people. Hence, the organisers are looking forward, also in 2014, to be contacted by young volunteers who want to prove themselves during the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.


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On Friday morning, in the Medieval Ruin Garden, historian József Benkő delivered an unconventional lecture on preservation of military traditions connected to World War II and care of military burial sites in Transylvania. He pointed out that, in Transylvania, there are a large number of graves where Hungarian soldiers were laid to rest during World War II. Taking care of these is a matter of national importance. We must employ all means to make sure that these heroes are properly honoured. A presentation of military uniforms and items followed his talk. The opening of the exhibition entitled ‘Diplomas of the Calvinist Congregation in Kolozsvár’ took place on Friday in the Kolozsvár Gallery. This was an excellent opportunity to see a letter by prince Gábor Báthory stemming from 1609 and another by prince György Rákóczi I. dated 1632. The organisers shared their grandiose plans: they wish to discover and recover as many documents and objects connected to the congregation’s history as possible in order to put them on display as part of a permanent exhibition and ‘preserve’ them in a proper manner for posterity. In the interwar period, the former New York Coffeehouse was the haunt of local writers and publicists. In the afternoon, Gyula H. Szabó and Levente Benkő read anecdotes born in this café. The seven stories heard by the public were written in the style of the period and well-known people featured in them. The crowded coffeehouse was an ideal place to evoke funny stories.

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he stairs leading up, to the tower offer an interesting experience; the atmosphere inside is peculiar. Light filters through various openings and offers visitors a sense of direction, while they can smell the soft dust settled inside of the old edifice. We pass by coarse statues and heavy rose windows, pigeons glance at us as we pass through their peaceful dwelling. As we reach the balcony, high up in the tower, a completely new world opens up in front of us: ‘a map-like landscape’ and ant-people below. The streets branch out, yet the onlooker is able to discern pattern and order. We look into the distance with awe and admire the view. The perspective is gorgeous! It is a metaphor capturing the essence of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj.

‘I am anxious to visit the tower of Saint Michael’s Church, because the view is spectacular. Seen from above, the city is even more lovable.’ Ildikó, 23 years old


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IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

we cooked up this plan fairly well!

Cooking competition Yurts and their surroundings – Exhibition opening The Restaurant – pantomime show Concerts: Indie Folker Whisperblast Koszika Katapult Antal Timi Knock Out Stormbridge Tankcsapda

Dancing wooden spoons Altogether, 21 teams representing foundations, institutions, groups of friends, enterprises and political parties enrolled in the competition called ‘Everything boilzzz’. Competitors had nothing else to do then purchase the necessary ingredients (including the mandatory good mood) and the contest of flavours could already start. From all delicacies prepared by contestants, the giant lecsó (ratatouille) cooked by chef Tibor Kiss-Budai was the ‘hotttest’.


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Abundance of programmes on Saturday Did you know that our web page had

40,938 vizitors in August?

The lecsó (ratatouille) is a classical and mandatory course offered after our cooking competition. It is a guaranteed success every year.

The editors, Emese Egyed and Károly Veress presented the thematic issues of the Transylvanian Museum scientific journal. The issues comprised writings form various scientific domains like ethnology, philosophy and even literature. The participants in the debate stressed that the journal strives to publish papers written by young researchers. At the end, the audience had the privilege to browse through a 101 year-old issue of the journal – namely, the issue of July 1912 – and another one from 1943, too. During the meeting with the audience, organised before her concert, Timi (Tímea) Antal, runner-up in the third series of the Hungarian X-Factor acknowledged that she is more nervous in front of a Transylvanian than a Hungarian audience. Notwithstanding this confession of hers, the singer born in Bánffyhunyad/Huedin – roughly 50 kilometres from Cluj – gave a stormy concert on the small stage installed in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street). Péter M. Sebők, PhD, specialist in agriculture, passed away ten years ago. Former colleagues, friends and pupils evoked his memory. Mária Farkas Imreh and András Bódis moderated the discussion organised by The Kolozsvár Society.

T

he Emese Park (Szigethalom, Hungary) is an institution aiming to familiarise people with Middle Age life in the times of the Árpád Dynasty. Thus, they installed a yurt in the Medieval Ruin Garden as well as other items characteristic to the lifestyle of people in the Árpád Era. Attila Magyar, the director of the institution opened the exhibition. A presentation of combat techniques from the era followed afterwards allowing the audience to develop an idea of the equipment and techniques used by warriors one thousand years ago. After the presentation, the members of the audience could visit the exhibition, too.

It was a bright, sunny afternoon when dance enthusiasts started gathering in front of the stage in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) to be introduced to the world of Argentine tango by two dance instructors from Budapest, Katalin Csontos and Endre Szeghalmi. The organiser of the event was again the Cluj Tango Company Association. The lesson was held in both Hungarian and Romanian, hence, members of the audience could learn about ‘the dance of repressed desire and passion’ irrespective of their ethnic background. Shht, can you hear that? Why do people scream and clap every five minutes in The Soviet? They were cheering Krisztina Koszorús and her band, the Hotshots. The band gave a concert in ‘silent mode’ and people were listening using wireless earphones and smiling incessantly.


hungarian cultural days of cluj 4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

the 24th of August

‘We are a Hungarian rock band in the most noble sense of the word, since we do not share extreme political views.’ Lukács Zoltán, the lead singer of Tankcsapda

T

he large space in front of the sports arena was a place to test one’s tympanic membranes and vocal cords. Various bands played here ‘hard’ rock. The guests of the day called, naturally, RockKolozsvár were Stormbridge; Whisperblast, formed again six months ago; Katapult; and the most peculiar Transylvanian rock band, the Knock Out celebrating twenty years of existence. The final moment of the evening was the concert given by the most popular rock band in Hungary, Tankcsapda, which is well known to ethnic Hungarians in Transylvania as well. At such parties, this band makes us liberate our wild side by singing about thoughts we hardly ever express in words… One does not need to be their fan, or wear steel-toe boots and a black T-shirt. It is enough to identify with the lyrics of their songs, to be in the proper good mood and listen to the guitar, the drums and the familiar hoarse voice and you will begin singing together with the band since ‘everybody has a switch for rock and roll’.

God, give us rock music!

Did you know that this year the festival enjoyed the support of

80 organisations?

The Hungarian section of the Cluj Radio broadcasted live the meeting of the band with their fans. The moderator and the public asked several questions about the present and also their future plans. Members of Tankcsapda answered in a sincere, direct manner, sometimes even jokingly without giving the impression that they are stars, celebrities. Soon, it became clear that the band is always full of plans, its members being very determined. At the end of the meeting, the boys of Tankcsapda gave autographs.


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‘I am very glad that the city boils! I also congratulate warmly all people who contributed to all this.’ Ilona, comment on Facebook

A pure sound, a face painted white and a black hat This is Róbert Cseke from Cluj or Indie Folker, who gave a concert on the stage installed in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) by the organisers of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. He appears traditionally with his face painted white and wearing a black hat. Róbert Cseke is one of the first musicians in the area to play a special genre, indie folk. He already gave concerts in Hungary and Britain, while becoming increasingly popular at home. His musical universe is alternative folk: an alloy of ‘roots’, alt-country or folk-rock. Chiefly, traditional American folk music – for instance in Bob Dylan’s or Tom Waits’ style – inspire his original songs that captured again the local audience in Cluj.


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Stephen is our Lord!

Music from the Tower Concert given by Longstep Closing ceremony Stephen, the King – rock opera Fireworks


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It is high time for István (Stephen) and Koppány to become friends In 2013, the highlight of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj was without a shred of doubt the rock opera ‘Stephen, the King’. The show directed by Zoltán Zsuráfszky, the artistic director of the Honvéd Ensemble, used a new set and different, new costumes. Apart from dancers form Hungary, the director also selected 50 people form Transylvania. Pál Feke played István’s part. During the press conference organised before the show, Balázs Gergely – president of the ‘Kolozsvár, the Treasure City’ Association – argued that ‘it is high time for the followers of István (Stephen) and Koppány to become friends’.

‘Stephen is our Lord!’ – in the main square of Cluj ‘Still, the performance of the rock opera Stephen, the King in Cluj was a huge success – and there is no need to point out why I do say so. We witnessed a historical moment indeed, since the desire to see and listen this iconic rock opera in the main square of Cluj animated people for many years. Even though this opera is controversial, it touches our souls and liberates repressed emotions. All in all, everybody was able to experience her or his ethnic Hungarian identity freely and in a community. The show – with its traditional nature, usual choreography, the more than 70 dancers including members of the Honvéd Ensemble and Transylvanian folk dancers, the popular winners of the casting show Társulat (The Company), the red-white-green flag and the Hungarian national anthem, at the end – was perfect for this purpose. But, first and foremost, the appropriateness originates from the musical universe of the opera, since almost all people know all the songs by heart. In Kolozsvár, these songs resonate in a different manner and make hearts beat in a different manner, too.’ (Revizor online – web portal for theatre and opera criticism)

O

n the last day of the festival, the ‘treasure city’ joined Királydomb, Sevilla, Csíksomlyó and Esztergom on a special map. The scale of this map is impressive as well. The ‘law of large numbers’ dictated that nearly 50 thousand people gathered in the main square and in the neighbouring streets to see the rock opera Stephen, the King performed by the Társulat (The Company).


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‘I would like to say thanks for transforming together, in the last ten years, this city in a multicultural settlement, where everybody respects culture, traditions and popular customs.’ Emil Boc, mayor

Treasures form the treasure chest of the ‘treasure city’ In the main square of Cluj/Kolozsvár, the Romanian and Hungarian national anthems were played at the beginning of the closing ceremony of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj. The crowd of 50 thousand people – gathered in the main square and the ‘Deák Ferenc street’ – was greeted by Zoltán Balog, Minister of Human Resources (Hungary); Emil Boc, the mayor of the city, deputy-mayor Anna Horváth and Balázs Gergely the festival’s Senior Organiser. In her speech, Anna Horváth emphasised that, this year, the main square resounded for the fourth time as a result of Hungarian cultural values. ‘The city boils, but there is no unrest. There are no reasons for concern’ – said the deputy-mayor.

Balázs Gergely, Senior Organiser of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj, argued that the community experiences of the week may have transformed people who came from far away, to a certain extent, into inhabitants of the city; and everybody will be able to go home with some beautiful memories taken from the treasure chest of the ‘treasure city’. ‘We, people from Cluj are very proud of all this’ – stressed Gergely, and added ‘during the dark 1980s, when we crossed the main square we often had the impression that the king is sad. Now, everybody can see that he is smiling and justifiably proud that his people assembled again and celebrated here, in his native city.’

‘One cannot subtract Hungarian culture from the history of Cluj, Transylvania and Romania.’ Balog Zoltán, minister

Did you know that almost

50,000 people attended the first performance of ‘Stephen, the King’?


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Thanks to TransylvaniaCam everybody could follow the course of events online, even though the service offered a bird’s eye view. The web page had 17 thousand visitors from 42 countries. Six thousand viewers saw the rock opera ‘Stephen, the King’ online.

‘Congratulations, ethnic Hungarians from Kolozsvár! For me, this was the biggest hit of the year! I congratulate the organisers for being able to follow the course of events even at home, in Hungary!’ Károly, message on Facebook

T

his is a special occasion when thousands of ethnic Hungarians from Transylvania go on a pilgrimage to Kolozsvár. They are driven not only by the atmosphere of the festival and the need to replace everyday gloom by colour; they go to face King Mathias full of hope that, by chance, a familiar face will great them or even a new one and will shake hands with them. Of course, they are animated also by the desire to become again members of the family, which gathers on this occasion. (Júlia Toczauer – Erdőkertes, Hungary)

‘The ethnic Hungarian community in Cluj restored its battered dignity.’ The total attendance of the programmes offered by the 4th edition of the Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj was nearly 200,000. No significant problems or technical difficulties were encountered during the festival. The audience wrote a new page of history: no cultural event in Cluj was ever attended by as many people as those who went to see the rock opera ‘Stephen, the King’. Thus, the Hungarian community of the ‘treasure city’ restored its dignity, which received considerable battering during the last decades. We all can be proud of this! The team of organisers consisted of 76 people receiving help from two hundred volunteers. Many thanks to the Hungarian Students’ Union from Kolozsvár (Kolozsvári Magyar Diákszövetség) and the Hungarian High School Students’ Council from Kolozsvár (Kolozsvári Magyar Diáktanács) for their help in coordinating volunteers. The number of participants rose by 30% as compared to last year, meaning a total attendance of approximately 200,000 people. Apart from the record audience of 50 thousand persons set by the rock opera ‘Stephen, the King’, the most popular event was the concert given by Zorán and attended by 22 thousand people. The proportion of ethnic Romanian participants was roughly 20 percent. In comparison to last year, the number of visitors consulting the festival’s web page increased three times. This represents seven thousand visitors per day, which means more visitors than the readership of any Hungarian language news portal in Transylvania. The number of followers on Facebook doubled during the first 10 days, while 90 thousand people read the most popular entry.


hungarian cultural days of cluj 4th edition

IMAGES AND FIGURES 2013.

Organisers – Hungarian Cultural Days of Cluj, 2013 Senior organiser – Balázs Gergely Festival director – Levente Sánta Programme director – Lilla Szabó Marketing & fundraising; Coordination of stalls in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) – Péter Szász Economic director – Levente Csigi Financial director – Botond Fábián Image director – Elemér Könczey Communication coordinator – Mihály Katona Contact person (for local authorities) – Zoltán Kinizsi Volunteers, emergency team – Konrád Gergely Rés Volunteers – Imola Dobra Information stalls, volunteers – Edina Fugel Technical coordinator – András Péter Kovács Press officer – Tímea Mészáros Volunteers for communication tasks – Réka K. Veres, Zsuzsa Erika Ozsváth, Péter Rusz, Emese Kolozsi, Adél Szabó, Andrea Biró, Ágota Portik, Ibolya Line, Márton Varga, Éva Bartha, Claudiu Groza, Ion Indolean Opening ceremony: organisers and supernumeraries – Lóránd Boros

Organiser – László Csergő, Zsuzsa Király Advertising materials, layout of printed matter – Botond Fazakas Photographers – Tamás Bethlendi, Gábor Kiss, László Árpád Mohácsi Logistics – Huba Vadász-Szatmári Secretariat – Kata Péter Storage facilities – Orsolya Márton Coordination of stage use in Farkas utca (Wolves’ street) – Melánia Szabó Board and accommodation – Katalin Kopányi, Orsolya Sorbán Security – Zoltán Szabó Protocol – Melinda Mihálka Programmes for children – Boglárka Sándor, Enikő Osváth, Zsolt Herédi, Kinga Szabó Exhibitions – János Szántai, Tünde Márkos Youth programmes – Botond Talpas, Eszter Sándor Saint Stephen’s Day Festival of Folk-dance Ensembles – Balázs Pillich Sports – Miklós Boros, András Killyéni

Stalls operated by museums – László Benkő, Henrietta Fekete Stalls operated by bookstores and publishing houses – Gyula H. Szabó Craftsmen’s fair – Attila Molnár Wine-makers’ programmes – Zoltán Kormos, Imre András, László Vincze, Szilárd Ilyés Gastronomy – Tibor Kiss-Budai, Imola Dobra, Emőke Bereczki Lectures – Dezső Szenkovics, Jenő Mátis Hungarian Film Days of Cluj – Csilla Könczei, Orsolya Tóth, Tibor Schneider, Ibolya Bálint, Róbert Lakatos, Cecília Felméri Literary programmes – Noémi László, Zoltán Király, János Dénes Orbán New York Arena – Ferenc Bóné, Tibor Toró Jr. Web page – Beáta Albert, Tímea Mészáros, Zsuzsa Erika Ozsváth, Eszter Sándor, Réka K. Veres Translations – Tímea Berki, Krisztina Timár

Partner organisations Amateur Speleology Club, Cluj Apáczai Csere János High School Art Movie Theatre Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Institute of Bucharest The Barabás Miklós Guild Báthory István High School BBS Consulting System Brassai Sámuel High School Brassai Sámuel High School – Students’ Council Bulgakov Art Café (Bulgakov Irodalmi Kávéház) Calvinist Congregation of Downtown Kolozsvár (Kolozsvár-Belvárosi Református Egyházközség) The Calvinist High School of Kolozsvár Carpathian Society of Transylvania Cluj-Dăbâca Roman Catholic Deanery Createch Plus and ‘Vizualitas’ Workshop Dávid Ferenc Youth Association Democratic Alliance of Hungarians in Romania (DAHR) Department of Biology and Ecology – Hungarian section of the Babeș-Bolyai University Department of History – Hungarian section of the Babeș-Bolyai University Department of Physics – Hungarian section of the Babeș-Bolyai University Diakonia Christian Foundation DRIBLI Children’s Football Club of Transylvania EmpirX Association

The Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Romania Friends of Bálint Tibor Association Györkös Mányi Albert Memorial House Házsongárd Foundation Heltai Gáspár Library Foundation Hungarian Consulate-General in Cluj-Napoca Hungarian Cultural Society of Transylvania Hungarian Economists’ Society of Romania Hungarian High School Students’ Council from Kolozsvár Hungarian National Council of Transylvania (HNCT) Hungarian National Council of Transylvania (HNCT) – Economic Department Hungarian People’s Party of Transylvania (HNPT) The Hungarian Royal House, Marosvásárhely – 23rd Frontier Force Rifles Battalion – Group Dedicated to the Preservation of Military Traditions Hungarian Scout Association of Romania (HSAR) Hungarian Students’ Union from Kolozsvár Hungarian Theatre of Cluj Hungarian Youth Council of Romania Insomnia Café Ion Andreescu University of Art and Design, Cluj-Napoca János Zsigmond Unitarian High School Kaja Tanya Restaurant Kelemen Lajos Society for the Protection of Monuments Kolozs/Cluj county Youth Forum The Kolozsvár Society

Kozmutza Flóra Special School for Children with Hearing Impairment League of Hungarian Writers from Transylvania ‘Lucian Blaga’ Central University Library The Mayor’s Office, Cluj-Napoca Minerva Cultural Association The MINTA Youth Organisation Museum of Fine Arts Cluj ‘Origo’ Association Pro Minoritate Foundation Quadro Gallery The Rákóczi Association ‘Reconstructio’ Association RotaMundi Association Saint Michael’s Parish Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania Szarkaláb Folk-Dance Ensemble Szentimrei Foundation The Tailors’ Bastion – Cultural Centre The Talents Calvinist School Transilvania International Film Festival Transylvanian Museum Society Tranzit Foundation ‘Tree of Life’ Association for Family Assistance Visit Cluj YMCA Transylvania


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HUNGARIAN CULTURAL DAYS OF CLUJ 2013 – IMAGES AND FIGURES  
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