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Ashlee Zibert Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2020


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Table of Contents Student Work District 96

Columbus Arena District

5 - 19

Trespass Park

21 - 35

Mapping Landscapes

37 - 43

Scarlet Jungles

45 - 47

Cleveland Ohio Industrial Valley

Geospatial Analysis & Representation

Waterman Farm, Ohio State University

Personal Information Ashlee Zibert

Knowlton School of Architecture The Ohio State University Zibert.7@osu.edu 144 W. Norwich Ave. Columbus, OH 43201

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District 96

Columbus Arena District Collaboration with Juliana Pollock & Nate Becks August 2019 - December 2019 Columbus Crew Stadium Adobe Suite, ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Lumion, Rhino In 2017, the owner of the Columbus Crew MLS team, announced its plans to move the team to Austin, Texas. What followed was a full-throated movement to keep the team in Columbus known as “Save the Crew.” Over the ensuing years, the team has been purchased by new owners, in order to keep it in Columbus. As part of that deal, The Crew and the City of Columbus have agreed to move the Crew from its current home at Mapfre Stadium to a new stadium, and mixed use development site in Columbus’ Arena District. The commitment of public funding to the stadium raises a debate about the wisdom of committing public money

to private sports teams, and whether stadia are a positive benefit to urban life. This project focused on reinterperetating a stadium not as a massive single-purpose sports palace, but as a flexible, multi-use public space that functions both as a stadium and as a vibrant public space. This provocation was tackled through the medium of earth. Not only does this project push the limits of an urban stadium, it tests the potentials of earth form for stadium/park formation.

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Stadium Critique Concept This project began with a critique of current stadiums in Columbus. Many stadiums take the form of an oval or dome structure with a field in the middle. The field is completely enclosed and all directionality is towards the field. The Shoe and Mapfre Stadium are completely closed and only offer circulation within the stadium. When in Nationwide Arena’s plaza the structure becomes overwhelming and the plaza is under programmed. Huntington Park features a fence along Nationwide Boulevard that provides public viewing of the baseball field, providing a unique experience to their events. The goal of this project was to challenge

these overwhelming built structures that are only occupied during events. In order to challenge current stadiums, the enclosed shape needed to be broke. The oval became a hexagon to create an angular form. The hexagon was then manipulated and broke in order to create open spaces. This ultimately created four distinct structures that increase in size and complexity. The unique shape of the proposed Columbus Crew stadium allows for unique circulation and program outside of events.

Columbus Stadiums

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Ohio Stadium

Mapfre Stadium

Nationwide Arena

Huntington Park


Parti

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Design Organization District 96 began with the design of the Crew stadium. The rejection of enclosed stadiums and the adjustment of angles ultimately led to the stadium footprint. Built structures emphasize the form while earthworks provide a unique experience. The stadium itself has three main entrances, each with a large plaza and gate. Gates allow the public to view the field, much like Huntington Park. 746

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Stadium buildings begin on the ground and ramp up, expanding the plaza space while reducing the inundation of stadium buildings. To further emphasize the structures and their angular forms ramped pathways create public parks on top of stadium buildings. Ultimately providing the public and surrounding communities an opportunity to use the stadium outside of events. The ADA accessible ramps through the North and West stadium buildings provide a unique perspective of the field, stadium, and city.

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FIELD NORTH STADIUM BUILDING EAST STADIUM BUILDING SOUTH STADIUM BUILDING WEST STADIUM BUILDING RIVER FRONT PARK NORTH STADIUM PARK MAIN ENTRY PLAZA WEST ENTRY PLAZA


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Building Districts

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

OFFICE

STADIUM BUILDING

FIELD

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Site Relationships Located north of Nationwide Boulevard, the Crew Stadium follows the pattern of stadiums throughout the rest of the Arena District. The Crew Stadium is positioned along the Olentangy River in order to acquaint the Arena District with the river. Series of ramps bring park goers from the river’s levy to the top of the stadium, the highest point of the site. Green space throughout the ramps creates a public park that provides unparalleled public vantage points of the stadium and field.

Northern Site Sections

Across the site buildings are organized in groupings with a central green space. The built elements of the stadium sit around the field, while the buildings surrounding the stadium sit around a green space. The residential and commercial districts are located near the stadium, providing businesses local and event revenue. Office buildings are located on the south end of the site, distancing them from the clamor of the stadium but remaining near commercial amenities.

STADIUM PARK

COURTYARD

RESIDENTIAL

RAMPED PATHWAYS BUILDING FACADE

OLENTANGY RIVER

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING

COURTYARD

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Site Circulation

I-6

70

NATION

NATIONWIDE ARENA LVD. WIDE B

T. HIGH S

CREW STADIUM

HUNTINGTON PARK

SPRING ST..

I-670

NATIONWIDE BLVD.

SPRING ST.

OLENTANGY TRAIL

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Pedestrian Stadium Circulation

ACCESSIBLE ROOF GARDEN

PEDESTRIAN PATHWAYS

DIRECTED OPEN

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SOIL DRAINAGE GEOTEXTILE FABRIC INSULATION WATERPROOF LAYER ROOF

TALL GRASSES

Stadium Main Entrance Roof

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Stadium Main Entrance

PRESS BOX BOX SEATING VENDORS

STADIUM SEATING

PUBLIC VIEWING

PLAZA

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LIGHT TREE MASING

PUBLIC ACCESS

Stadium Accessible Roof

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Stadium West Entrance

ROOF ACCESS

RAMPWAYS PUBLIC VIEWING

PLAZA

PATH ONLY ACCESS

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Process Conclusion The design process was launched through physical three dimensional models. Plastalina was used as a tool to create space and program through landform. Hand modeling from the introduction of this project permitted landform to serve as the foreground of the design. This process led to the focus of vantage points and unique perspectives for the public. District 96 functions as the site of the new crew stadium and challenges the idea of what a stadium is. As we wanted to get away from the standard oval shape, the new crew stadium becomes multifaceted

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and relies on distinct edges to define space. Opening the stadium and incorporating a series of vegetated roofs allowed us to create fluidity between spaces and break away from the rigidity of the program. Through the juxtaposition of the stadium to the residential courtyards we wanted to create spaces of different sizes that allow for a variety of uses. District 96 is an extension of the arena district, but breaks some of the traditional ideas that it holds to create a unique experience for those who live here and for those who visit.


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Trespass Park

Cleveland Ohio Industrial Valley Collaboration with Juliana Pollock September 2018 - December 2018 Studio Award Adobe Suite, ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Rhino The Cuyahoga River in Ohio has a rich history. The largest transformation of the Cuyahoga River came when they connected it to the Ohio River and Lake Erie, creating the Ohio and Erie Canal. This new transportation route made Cleveland a hub for industry. The Cuyahoga river became an industrial waterway, diminishing its ecology. Not only was the ecology in the immediate area affected, but the entire

water system into Lake Erie. Today the Cuyahoga river still faces problems with water quality and habitat. This project focused on finding a solution to restore fish habitat on a particular section of the Cuyahoga River. Not only should the site address ecological issues in Cleveland’s industrial valley, it should respond to the needs of the surrounding community.

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Regional Neighborhoods & Parks

LAKE ERIE

CENTRAL

DOWNTOWN

Wendy Park

INDUSTRIAL VALLEY Rivergate Park

Oxbow Bend Scranton Flats

TREMONT OHIO CITY

DETROIT-SHOREWAY

Monroe Street Cemetery Foundation

Lincoln Park

Tremont Park

Michael Zone Recreational Park

Site Analysis The site, Oxbow Bend is located in Cleveland’s industrial valley. Oxbow Bend has a close relation to Downtown Cleveland and surrounding metropolitan areas. The site has been a lumber yard, steel mill, foundry, but has been vacant since it was bought in 1988. The site features a steel bulkhead and a concrete bulkhead along the Cuyahoga River. The Flats Industrial Railroad borders the north edge of the site, on the south end of the site the Centennial Lake Link Trail. A twenty-two foot retaining wall, that has been graffitied borders the east edge of the site. The south

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end of the site is heavily vegetated, but disperses to the north. Most of the site features crushed concrete with rudimentary vegetation. Oxbow Bend has great views of downtown Cleveland, and industrial bridges. Real-estate firm CBRE recently purchased the site and surrounding areas with the intentions of making it a mix-use neighborhood, Thunderbird. Currently Thunderbird lacks funding and is in conceptual stages. The Industrial Valley is quickly gentrifying, losing its rich history.


Site Context

CU

H YA

A OG

RIV

ER

THUNDERBIRD DEVELOPMENT

FOR SALE/LEASE

GREAT LAKES BREWING CO.

Cleveland Land Use Map RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL GREEN INSTITUTIONAL UTILITY

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Site Photos

Flats Industrial Rail Bridge

Views of Downtown Cleveland Bulkhead

Concrete

Rudimentary Vegetation

22’ Graffiti Wall

Rudimentary Vegetation

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Existing Site Vegetation

Dry Woods

Grass

Gravel

Animal Activity

Geese

Section A Section A

Goldenrod Evening Primrose Lamb’s Ear

Geo Bags Section B Section B

Goldenrod Evening Primrose Lamb’s Ear

Juniper Eastern Cottonwood

Deer

Section C

Eastern Cottonwood Smooth Sumac Japanese Knotweed Sycamore Goldenrod Witchgrass Common Reed Slippery Elm

Section C

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Fish Module The primary goal of our designed park, Trespass Park, was to provide a protected fish habitat. This section of the Cuyahoga River is extremely engineered and does not meet the needs of native fish. When designing this fish habitat, we focused on the needs of the Longnose Gar, Walleye, and Lake Sturgeon. Each fish is currently struggling to travel downstream to reach their spawning grounds. These fish also lack habitats suitable for the adult phase of their lives. Trespass Park will provide accessible spawning grounds and a habitable space for adult fish.

The module was designed and used to solve the habitat issues along the Cuyahoga River. The simple module form allows for multiple uses in and out of the water. In the spawning grounds the Module is used as a rocky surfaces that is ideal for collecting sediment. In the adult habitat the module is used as walls at 90 degree angles to protect fish from the Longnose Gar. Out of the water the module is used as a hammock to provide seating.

Spawning Diagram Current Spawning Locations Lake Erie Proposed Spawning Location Cuyahoga River

Longnose Gar

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Lake Sturgeon

Walleye


Basic Module Form

Spawning Module concrete

module connection

rock & sediment collects

eggs

Adult Wall Module

Hammock Module

mesh

90 degrees

MODULE FRAME WITH A FLEXIBLE ROPE MESH FOR SEATING

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wetland mounds cracked maze garden lawn screening piles Thunderbird development spawning streams bulkhead walls adult fish maze Great Lakes Brewing Co. brewery connection park overlook shade garden Centennial Lake Link Trail existing dense vegetation


Design Organization Trespass Park is currently situated near Cleveland’s industrial valley. As the industrial valley continues to develop into a metropolitan area, we want to preserve its industrial history. Part of the current experience of being in the industrial valley or in oxbow bend is feeling like you are trespassing. We want to preserve this feeling during the initial access. The design of Trespass Park is organized along a grid. Creating the grid allows us to make connections through the site. The fish wall maze and the boardwalk interact on the same grid, allowing the wall to become part of the boardwalk handrail. The grid in the cracked maze garden provides an organizational way to disrupt

the concrete and define pathways. The garden mimics the existing rudimentary vegetation growing on site. Different screening techniques are utilized along the site boundary to create a sense of enclosure and to invoke a sense of uncertainty. To preserve the essence of the site we reused as much of the existing material as possible. Excess materials from the site are used to make stone piles that screen views from Carter road. Reused rail ties are used for defining path. Stairs into the site are lined with existing graffiti retaining walls on site. After descending the north stairs there are reused bulkhead walls. These provide another layer of uncertainty before the stream and boardwalks.

Organization

Cracked Maze Garden

5’ x 5’

Boardwalks

Fish Maze

8’ x 8’

5’ x 5’

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South Plan Detail

rail ties

boardwalk

adult fish maze

grafitti wall

stairs

shade garden

exsiting vegetation

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North Plan Detail

spawning stream

bench hammock crack vegetation stone piles

boardwalk

wetland vegetation

bench

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Fish Maze & Boardwalk

Bulkhead

Module Wall

River to Road Connection

Spawning Streams & Wetland Mounds

Cuyahoga River

Concrete

Hammock

Cracked Maze Garden

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Water Wall Maze Boardwalk

Spawning Stream


Path to Boardwalk

Graffiti Wall

Crushed Stone

Pedestrian Connection

Vehicle Road Bench

Wetland Mound

Spawning Stream

Walkway

Stone Pile

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Model The modeling process began with the study of Oxbow Bend. Using ArcGis we created a base file of the site. To focus on analyzing the topography of the site, we decided to make a pancake model with 2 foot contours. We used our base information to laser cut a chipboard model at 1:64.

Oxbow Bend Site Model

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The next part of the modeling process was the module. We began with study models that were later created in Rhino. After the single module was in Rhino, we 3D printed multiples to see how they could fit together. Once we deiced the form of the wall, we modeled it in Rhino, then 3D printed it. We took the 3D printed wall and used it to cast a rubber mold. The rubber mold was then used to create a rockite cast.


Single Module

3D Print

Wall Module

3D Print

Wall Module

Rockite Cast

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Mapping Landscapes Geospatial Analysis & Representation January 2020 - March 2020 ArcGIS, Adobe Suite Mapping and geospatial data visualization has had a strong importance to the design profession for much of history. Maps have served as analytical tools to inform design and as devices that present what appears to be impartial information. Through time the visualization of maps has evolved through its representation and means of creation.

This course was an introduction to ArcGIS as a means of mapping complex landscapes at multiple scales. Data was gathered from multiple sources and curated through ArcGIS. Visualization and communication was developed through composition in Adobe Suite.

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Forested Lands Midwest

PROTECTED LANDS

Federal

Subject to Extraction

State

Subject to Extraction

District

Tree Canopy

Local

Carbon Projects

NGO

Experimental Forests

Private Unknown

NF Headquarters USFS Research & Development Sites

Thirty-one percent of Ohio land area is forested and about 80 percent of forests are family owned. Historically Ohio was compromised almost completely of forest. The loss of forested land is mostly due to human activity. Only 7 percent of Ohio’s land mass is protected through easements, designations, and fees, leaving much of the tree coverage unmanaged. Eighty percent of Ohio woodland is privately owned. The Ohio Woodland Stewards Program, at The Ohio State University, provides private woodland owners with the resources to make informed decisions on the management of their land. Ohio forest habitats will shift northward as the climate continues to change. Because agricultural land has supplanted natural forest cover, many species will be unable to shift accordingly.

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Forested Lands Ohio Thirty-one percent of Ohio land area is forested and about 80 percent of forests are family owned. Historically Ohio was compromised almost completely of forest. The loss of forested land is mostly due to human activity. Only 7 percent of Ohio’s land mass is protected through easements, designations, and fees, leaving much of the tree coverage unmanaged. Eighty percent of Ohio woodland is privately owned. The Ohio Woodland Stewards Program, at The Ohio State University, provides private woodland owners with the resources to make informed decisions on the management of their land. Ohio forest habitats will shift northward as the climate continues to change. Because agricultural land has supplanted natural forest cover, many species will be unable to shift accordingly.

Federal

Mixed Oak

State

HISTORIC FORESTS

Oak-Sugar Maple

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Elm-Ash Swamp Mixed Mesophytic

PROTECTED LANDS

Beech

District Local NGO

Oak Savanna

Private

Bottom-land Hardwood

OHDNR Forests

Hemlock-Beech-Chestnut-Red Oak

Subject to Extraction

White Pine- Red Maple Swamp

Subject to Extraction

Tree Canopy

Reforestation Areas


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BRAND Y

W

IN

E

K CR EE

BR ANDYWINE CR

Brandywine Falls Hydrology This map is an analysis of the hydrology of the Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga National Park. Using ArcGIS and the spatial analyst tools a DEM was used to produce a hydrology analysis.

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K EE

BRANDYWINE FALLS

FLOW DIRECTION STREAMS WATERSHED BOUNDARY


Agriculture Riparian Buffers Suitability An analysis and suitability determination on agriculture riparian buffers in Ohio was completed using tabular data in ArcGIS. Tabular data was joined to Huc-12 watershed data in order to complete an analysis based on watersheds.

AREAS THAT WOULD BEST BENEFIT FROM RIPARIAN BUFFERS STREAM LENGTH WITH IMPAIRMENT (KM)

% NON-BUFFERED CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE STREAMS RESERVE LAND (ACRES)

0 - 45

0 - 20

0 - 100

45 - 88

20 - 40

100 - 500

88 - 134

40 - 60

500 - 1000

134 - 178

60 - 80

>1000

178 - 222

80 - 100

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Scarlet Jungles

Waterman Farm, Ohio State University Class Collaboration with Paula Meijerink August 2019 - March 2020 Adobe Suite, AutoCAD, CNC Router, Rhino This seminar explored the introduction of trees into human altered and sometimes hostile environments through hands on implementation. The development of Scarlet Jungles provided an outlet to explore the verge of imagination and reality of introducing trees into the environment. Ultimately developing knowledge of landscape technologies and understanding of the interaction between soils, root structure, young tree behavior and environment.

Scarlet Jungles began in the fall of 2018 with an initial planting in March of 2019. Serving as a riparian buffer along the farm’s South Creek, this project is a multi year initiative with several implementation and construction phases. This portion of the seminar was the second planting blitz serving Phase 1 while also facilitating the design of Phase 2. Furthermore the seminar explored the current condition of Phase 1’s plantings and local seedlings through analog representation.

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Speculative Planting Design

Columbus Seedling Imprint

Site Observation Drawing

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30”

CNC NUMBER

0 1

0 1

1-1/4”

1”

48”

SCREW

4”

2”

0 1

Site Identification Rows Row Identification for Scarlet Jungles was a collaboration with fellow student Andrew Souders. The row identification stakes aid in the identifying of planting rows on Waterman Farm. Cedar lumber is cut into three foot long stakes and drilled onto a piece of plywood in order to secure the stake in the CNC router. Rhino files were created for each stake number. Once routed the inside of the number is painted scarlet in order to better be identified on site. This project is on an on going collaboration with Paula Meijerink to complete all required stakes and install.

3’

1’ UNDERGROUND

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