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Mexico’s independence from Spain, in 1821, gave the Apaches concerns about the growing mining presence, so they put a halt to the ore train conductas and the mines were inoperative from 1838 until the 1850s. During this time, the Army of the West, led by General Stephen Watts Kearney marched through the area unopposed and Lt. William Emory named the Santa Rita bluff the “Ben Moore Mountain.” The U.S.-Mexican International Boundary Commission officials arrived at Santa Rita

26 – SILVER CITYLIFE

in 1851 and a new era in the land protected by the redoubtable Apache chiefs Mangas Coloradas, Victorio and others began. From then until 1910 some 124 million pounds of copper were produced. The mining area was a gathering place for many adventurers who sought to make quick fortunes in mining, trapping, trading or other endeavors and their presence caused much friction among the Apaches. Among these explorer-intruders were Kit Carson,

previous page: Steam shovel loading steam locomotive train below Romero Mine, 1910. left: Terry Humble, central mining district historian, has volumes of material and photos on the district’s history. Courtesy of Luis Pérez. opposite: Churn drills at Santa Rita, circa 1911. Photos except left courtesy of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold

Silver City Life Summer/Fall 2011  

Silver City Life is a fabulous publication featuring the best of what Silver City New Mexico has to offer in the way of unique people, busin...

Silver City Life Summer/Fall 2011  

Silver City Life is a fabulous publication featuring the best of what Silver City New Mexico has to offer in the way of unique people, busin...

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