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LIN ZHIXIN nicolelin.zx@gmail.com


Lin Zhixin Nicole Graduate from the University of Hong Kong (2016) BA(ArchStud) Email: nicolelin.zx@gmail.com Phone: +(852) 51342029 Linkedin: Zhixin Lin (Nicole)


02 Barrier Housing Typology: Two-way Corrugation

03 The Urbanistic Architecture: Secluded Reading l Underground

04 The Architectural Urbanism: Residue & Boundary Activator

05 The Generic Village: Void I House

06 The Organic Village: Tectonic House

Graphics and Digital Fabrication

FEATURED WORKS

01 Dam Housing : Double-wedging Walls


01 DAM HOUSING : DOUBLE-WEDGING WALLS AND DUAL WORKING-LIVING PROJECT TYPE: STUDENT WORK OF STUDIO 6 TIME: 2016. 01~ 2016.05 SITE: SLIVER PLOTS WITHIN THE EAST COAST PARKWAY FLYOVERS NEAR MARINA BAY, SINGAPORE PROGRAM: 70% LIVING, 30% WORKING The studio agenda is to propose a wall/slab housing project in a collective site consisted of 9 sliver plots bounded by flyovers in central Singapore. 70% of total area is for living. 30% is given to working spaces for the start-ups of the creative industry. Bounded by two inclined highways on the west and south, the site is further penetrated by another flyover, dividing the land into a small plot and a linear plot. Such unique site condition inspires a hybrid living typology transforming from a tower to a slab block. The axis of my site is at the perpendicular intersection of all the other studio projects that follow the contour of the main highway. Thus a grounded transformation approach is adopted to take the opportunities of active ground spaces at the intersection of traffic and people flow. Two wedging walls on the longitudinal axis act as the spatial organizing device as well as primary structure. The in-between spaces looking to the highway serve as working zone for the creative industry and living spaces are allocated on the two sides of the walls looking away from the highway to gain more privacy. The relationship between working and living is either mixed or separated, responding to typological difference from tower to slab block.

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN


1:500 STRUCTURAL MODEL

1:50 SECTIONAL MODEL

5


The primary wall structure peals open to create buffer zones between public circulation spaces and individual units. On those levels that do not have corridors, the triangular area serves as a planter pocket or service balconies depending on changing dimensions facilitated by the stepping of wall structure.

Units turn at the edge facing the highway into a U-shape arrangement for better lighting on selected levels based on the geometry of stepped catenary. When units do not turn, the spaces at the edge become gardens as buffer from the highway. The parapets of living units are higher and more protective than those of gardens. (see sectional model for details)

OFFICE-HOME UNIT (MEDIA AND DESIGN)

The east wing of slab living is more public as units are accessed from corridors with stairs linking different levels to sky gardens. Whereas on the west, units enjoy more privacy with bridges creating individual access.

6 +23M FLOOR PLAN

SE NAL MU COM

UNA M COM

RE CTU UFA MAN SHOP K R WO

L SE

RVIC

ES

RVIC

ES

+65M FLOOR PLAN


MODEL IN PROGRESS: PRIMARY WALL STRUCTURE

THICKENED WALLS AS SERVICE-HOLDER

7 SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1:400


As the wedging walls open up towards the landscape, the middle circulation space enjoys fresh air and natural lighting with sky gardens at interval of 6 floors. The circulation is further differentiated on east and west. The east wing of slab living is more public and active as units are accessed from corridors with stairs linking different levels to sky gardens. Whereas on the west, with bridges creating access to individual units, residents enjoy more privacy.

Living

Shops

Offices: Design and Media

Gallery

Manufacture Workshop

Restaurant and Services

Ground Open-air Art Market

Gardens

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

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public lift access CIRCULATION DIAGRAM


Office-home lofts

Responding to the highway: a grounded mass transformation tower to slab typology to facilitate different living style. The edges facing the highway are rotated away from each other to avoid direct visual contacts.

Pealing walls: The primary wall structures peal open steppingly from different direction to create ground connection as well as buffer zone from circulation spaces into units.

2 walls as primary structure and programming device: laminated in-between spaces looking to the highway as working zone for the creative industry and living spaces on the two sides looking away from the highway to gain more privacy.

Thickened walls: The walls get thickened and service spaces are integrated into these walls, such as lift shafts, kitchens, toilets, closets, storage, book shelves, etc.

Splitting both vertically and horizontally corresponding to the wind direction to encourage natural ventilation and improve lighting. On the slab-living zone, one wing is more open to the landscape and encourage more public living, whereas the other wing enjoys more privacy.

Columns as secondary structures: the grid interval corresponds to the change of height of the structure and the angle of the carved-out catenary geometry, which in turn create different spatial span for varied functions.

Manufacture workshops

Work-live: on the tower side where light comes from both edges, the mid-space is used as offices(media & design) connected with living quarters. Whereas the laminated spaces on the slab side gets much deeper, it is programed as manufacture workshops. The ground art market acts as an active public space.

Split level units: with the help of columns, the wall housing is free up from banal horizontality. Apart from the upper tower consisted of office-home lofts, living zones are generally composed of 6 basic types of split-level units.

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

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WALL PEALING POSITION

B. DOUBLE SPLIT UP MID ACCESS

A. SINGLE SPLIT UP DOUBLE HEIGHT CORRIDOR 1: UNIT A & B

C. DOUBLE SPLIT UP HIGH TO LOW CORRIDOR 2: UNIT C & D D. CONTINUOUS DOUBLE SPLIT DOWN

F. SINGLE SPLIT DOWN

WORKSHOP LEVEL E. DOUBLE SPLIT LOW TO HIGH

5.8M

CORRIDOR 3: E & F

The diagram explains a module made up of 6 typical unit types, ranging from one-bedroom studio apartments to 4-bedroom units for bigger families. In consideration of efficiency, the module repeats every six residential levels with corridors only needed on three floors. It is in coordination with the workshop arrangement, which are also allocated every six floors. What it means is that factories have their own access and do not overlap with residential corridors for insulation purpose. The roof of these workshops then become integrated into sky garden that could be accessed for communities.

UNIT C

UNIT D

3 CORRIDORS EVERY 6 LEVELS

UNIT E

UNIT A

TYPICAL UNITS DIAGRAM

UNFOLDED SECTION THROUGH THE WEST WING 10

UNIT F

UNIT B


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02

Barrier Housing Typology: Two-way Corrugation project type: Group work of studio 5 (Credits to my group mate Cheng Yung Hsin) time: 2015. 09~ 2015.12 site: Generic Sloping site in Hong Kong, oriented north-south program: Housing Typology The studio aims to challenge the typical point-block tower housing in Hong Kong by revisiting the wall typology. Our group started by looking at the slab of Unite d’Habitation by Le Corbusier. Through the research, we learnt that the challenge for a wall house is in its longitudinal axis with long, narrow corridors. In our design, we intend to transform this corridor spaces into active transitional spaces from circulation to individual units. In Unite d’Habitation, the interlocking duplexes repeat every three levels. Whereas in our scheme, we invent a four level corrugation system that only requires one corridor on the second level. The quality of horizontal circulation is improved through the corrugation system in which the spaces are double-heighted at interval and connected to the gardens on different levels. The two-way corrugation system also gives a variety of unit types compared to the original repetitive diagram of Unite’ d’Habitation.

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SLAB STUDY DIAGRAMS

ADDING POROSITY ON THE WEST-EAST AXIS

Slabs as partition device without openings

LOWER ENTRANCE

UPPER INTERIOR STREET VIEW Interlock Units Interior Street with openings to each unit

Interlock Unit type 2

Interlock Unit type 1

UPPER ENTRANCE

-- HEIGHT PARAMETER -- HEIGHT PARAMETER -- HEIGHTPARAMETER PARAMETER -- HEIGHT SECTIONAL ALTERATION STUDY 1:500 1:500 1:500 1:500

UPPER ENTRANCE LOBBY VIEW

INTEGRATED DESIGN

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AXONOMETRIC DRAWING UNITE’ D’HABITATION: SLAB ANALYSIS

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RESEARCH UNITE’ D’HABITATION: SLAB ANALYSIS

ROOF SECTION -- PUSH AND PULL

Floorboard

Soundproofing Film

RO

OF

Metal Frames

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F

Concrete Beams

Wood

RESEARCH: SLAB AS INFILL

DESIGN PROCESS: SLAB AS FOLDED PLATE (MODEL CAST IN CONCRETE, 1:200) 8F

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Simplex A Accessible from Upper Interior Streets 40 m2

A

Simplex B Accessible from Upper Interior Streets 47 m2

A A B B B

Duplex A Accessible from Interior Streets 83 m2

Duplex A Accessible from Interior Streets 164 m2

TYPICAL UNIT TYPES 1:300

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Duplex B - accessible from interior street 164m2

TYPICAL FLOOR 1 :100

UPPER ENTRANCE

Lobby Simplex A Simplex B Duplex A Duplex B Retail Gardens

LOWER ENTRANCE

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM 1:500

VERTICAL CIRCULATION DIAGRAM 1:360 Section AA’ - Program Distribution SECTION

Lower Ground Entry

SECTION AA’ 1:360 Section BB’ - Program Distribution

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Sectio


03

The Urbanistic Architecture: Secluded Reading Underground project type: student work of studio 4 time: 2015. 01~ 2015.05 site: Shanghai program: Community Library The observation of Shikumen of Changle Lane adjacent to the site is part of the key drivers of the library design. It is found that due to the severe subdivision, people are somehow forced to adapt an over-communal life and there is a lack of private space. The inhabitation of Li Long (the lanes between Shikumen houses) also reflects this problem. For Li Long, due to the crammed life within the houses, there is a tendency that residents extend their personal space outside of the house and the relationship between public and private becomes vague. In light of the crammed communal life found in the research, the underground library will help to create more private reading space for the neighborhood. Continuing the architectural language of the moment models, the library extensively takes advantage of the site context, such as the waterfront view and an existing historical building. The scale and hierarchy of circulation and reading related program spaces are inspired by the Li Long which has a sense of intimacy. In all, the underground library has two level of understanding, the interior spaces which are intended to be secluded and the ground level which has more reaction the surrounding and is transformed into a public garden.

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B

N 2

1

15 14

3 -3.2m -5.7m

-6.3m

+4.3m

+5.7m

-6.3m

+0.0m

1/F PLAN 1:400

-5.7m

A

4

A’ 1/F Lecture Hall -6.3m

6 -5.7m

Trees planted to zigzag the circulation as a spiritual W before entering different zones

-5.7m

-3.2m

5

-6.3m

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9 10 8 11

-5.9m

12

-4.9m

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B’

Glass Cover of Underground Circulation Route

-4.9m

-5.5m

-5.5m

-5.7m

1 Cafe’ 2 Quiet Reading Area 3 Courtyard 4 Circulation Route 5 Children Library 6 Kiosk 7 Newspaper Reading Room 8 Storage 9 Binding Room 10 Cataloging Room 11 Purchase Office 12 Duplicating Room 13 Adult Library 14 Lecture Hall 15 Mechanical Room

LG2 PLAN 1:400

LG1 Elevated Reading Space

G/F Administrative Office Mechanical Room Glass Railing

-2.5m

LG2 Book Stacks(Adult, Children, Quiet Reading area) Cafe’, Back of the House

LG1 PLAN 1:400 Reading Area

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SITE RESEARCH STREET REAPPROPRIATION SHIKUMEN SUBDIVISION FACILITATORS ANALYSIS

INFORMAL OCCUPATION OF LANE SPACES

Addtion/ Extension of Floor Slabs (usually filling up courtyards)

Road Along the Waterfront

Addition of Partitions

Width: 11.9 m Program: Residential and Shops On One Side

Subdivided Shikumen 3~5 m2

Main Lane of Shikumen

1931 Shikumen 20~45m2

Width: 4.5 m Program: Residential On Both Sides

Nearby Xin Ya Department 25~50 m2

Private Space / Person

Partitions and Shared Building Services Analysis 4~5 Family

Typical Subdivision Wooden Structure Adaptation

Sub-Lane of Shikumen Width: 3 m Program: Residential On Both Sides

Addition of Wooden Frame

Original Shikumen Prototype Based on Chang Le Lane, 1931 1~2 Family

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The View-blocking “Wow“ Walls The Directional Walls The Directional Wow Route: Most Mobility The Explorer Route: Less Visibility

Riverbank Viewing Platform

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Inner Garden

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Main Entrance

15 Mechanical Room 16 Meeting Room 17 Chief Library Office 18 Supporting Staff Office 19 Office Storage 20 Reception

Public Plaza

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:800

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Extending Walls as Spatial Guider and Regulator


Adults’ Library: Visual Interaction Allowed

Quiet Reading Area: Visual Interaction Not Allow

SECTION BB’ 1:400

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wed

SECTION AA’ 1:400

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04 THE ARCHITECTURAL URBANISM: RESIDUE Top floor residents: Building stout structure for living

PROJECT TYPE: STUDENT WORK OF STUDIO 3. RESEARCH PHASE ARE GROUP WORK OF LIN Top floor residents: Erecting simple WORK. structure for storage ZHIXIN, CHENG YUNG HSIN AND JIANG NAIXIN. DESIGN PHASE IS INDIVIDUAL TIME: 2014. 09~ 2014.12 SITE: TO KWA WAN (NEAR DEMOLISHED KAI TAK AIRPORT), HONG KONG PROGRAM: LEISURE AND ART Studio 3 focuses on investigating architecture from the perspective of the city. The aim is to learn tools for analyzing the city, develop focused research and to create an urban strategy for residual spaces in To Kwa Wan area in Hong Kong. The methodology is broken down into two phases: an analytical phase “Contextualizing the City”, and a propositional phase “Future Urban Scenarios”.

Council: Demolishing the informal structures and fencing off the space to prevent it from being used by others

Tenant of the informal structure/Top floor resident: Sub-dividing the interior and installing services, making the space more habitable

Top floor residents: Building stout structure for living 1200

For the research phase, our group found that resistance — our theme defined as an opportunistic response to the original frameSTAGE2: Top floor residents started to build informal structures on work, is primarily caused by the incompetency of urban space, the roof top for self-use-as the extension of their living space or for either the lacking of welcoming green open space orstorage. the affordable They made use of the original framework of the roof top and transformed housing. Such informal or even illegal use of space might cause it. unexpected deteriorations and conflicts with other stakeholders. Original Framework: Roof top (Stair case exits, parapets, water tanks) Top floor Residents Nevertheless, it exploits the positive potential of theActors: leftover urResistance: Building informal structures ban spaces. Inspired by the action of opportunistically breaking the imposed framework, my design concept centers around activating the boundary conditions — either the physical barriers or the programmatic segregation. The architectural intervention focuses on the interfaces around the cattle depot which is a unlively artist village mainly due to its detachment to the community. The critiques towards such boundary conditions are twofold — it restricts movement and prevents events from happening. As a response, the project proposes a meandering route as a activator 24

Top floor residents: Erecting simple structure for storage

IRON SHEET

IRON PLATE

IRON SHEET

STAGE3: Some of the informal structures were rent or sold to the outsiders and then altered by the newcomers. Some were tear down as the result of the council’s effort. 2500

1500

7167

Original Framework: Roof top (Stair case exits, parapets, water tanks), existing informal structures Actors: Top floor Residents, outsiders, councils Resistance: Building, transforming, demolishing informal structures 1200

ORIGINAL ROOFTOP

INFORMAL STRUCTURE FOR LIVING

RESEARCH — RESISTANCE OF ROOFTOP INFORMAL STRUCTURE STAGE2: Top floor residents started to build informal structures on the roof top for self-use-as the extension of their living space or for storage. They made use of the original framework of the roof top and transformed it. Original Framework: Roof top (Stair case exits, parapets, water tanks) Actors: Top floor Residents Resistance: Building informal structures

STAGE3: Some of the informal outsiders and then altered by t as the result of the council’s eff

Original Framework: Roof top tanks), existing informal struct Actors: Top floor Residents, ou Resistance: Building, transform


RESEARCH — RESISTANCE ON FENCED-OFF GREEN SPACE Open Space Beside Refuse Station Original Framework Half-enclosed fences and the entrance from refuse station discourage outsiders to enter. Action of Resistance Rubbish collectors working for the refuse station store personal items and take a rest there during lunch time.

14800 37500

on tati

eS

us Ref 2600

Traffic Island Under The Footbridge Original Framework Fences and the gate on the footbridge saying no trespassing. Action of Resistance Passersby enter the space when the gate is occasionally unlocked.

97314

50025

CONSTRUCTION SITE STAFF ONLY

800

800

Traffic Island Near Construction Site Original Framework Fences on perimeter Action of Resistance Construction site workers step over the barriers to take a rest during lunch hour.

Lunch Hour Phenomenon Manual Workers without a fixed place to stay tend to find a green space during lunch time to take a nap. The lack of proximal public green space pushes them to resist the existing boundaries of fenced-off greenland such as traffic island.

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ARCHITECTURAL INTERVENTION

BOUNDARY ACTIVATOR — MOVEMENT + EVENTS 26


Formal Strategy with Different Interfaces & Events Boundary is the interface between streetscape and buildings as well as different programs. The final design proposes a sensitive approach to each of the different interface according to specific needs.

Cattle Depot & Gas Station

To Infill

Gallery & Gardens A buffer is needed between the industrial area and the artist village. Hence an Infill strategy is applied to maximize the available floor area.

Cattle Depot & Residential Blocks

To Penetrate

Interactive Artist Workshop The segregation between the residents and the artist village is reported to be mainly due to the lack of active public events. Therefore, a violent penetration strategy is applied to force the artists to interact with the community.

Cattle Depot & Traffic Island

Cattle Depot & Sports field

To Extend

To Connect

Adventure Park

Jogging Path

By extension, the barriers of the traffic island is broken and therefore the piece of urban residue is absorbed into the larger civic space.

By connecting the runway of an existing sports field to the cattle depot to form a continuous jogging path to, the segregation of the two civic spaces caused by the Kai Tak is broken and the utilization of space is strengthened.

Cattle Depot & Streetscape

To Setback & Elevate

Leisure & Retail Elevating and setting-back strategy is applied to open up the ground and engage the pedestrians into the public green space instead of conventional practice of fencing around.

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PROCESS MODELS

B A

A’ C

B’ C’

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Added Supporting Structure

Interactive Artist Workshop

Section AA’

Enhanced connection

Tertiary Movement

Primary Movement

Original Movement

Secondary Movement

Nodes

New Space

Section BB’

Directly Activated Space Indirectly Activated Space

Botanical Garden Outdoor Cafe’

Storage Outdoor Exhibition

Jogging Path

Section CC’ 29


05 VOID I HOUSE

THE HOUSE AS A VOID THE VOID AS A HOUSE

project type: student work of studio 2 time: 2014. 02 ~ 2014.05 site: a generic village in Guangzhou , China site boundary: 6m * 9m * 9m program: 2 adult couples, 2 children, 1 elderly couple In a generic village, each site and programs are the same. Students are required to design a house without exceeding a boxy boundary of 6m*9m*9m. The aim of this project is beyond a formal language. It is to develop a strategy which experiments with multiple possibilities of a single concept. The design should have deeper implications rather than just a fancy form. The scale also blows up to 1:15 in the final deliverable compared to the smaller scale of 1:50 in the traditional village house studio. The void|house project does not intend to produce a single fixed design but rather to open up the dialogue between different readings. It started from designing inside-out with the concept of three intersected voids — horizontal, vertical and diagonal to gain better lighting and ventilation, and more open space. The project can be interpreted in two ways , “the house as a void” and “the void as a house“. In the former, the void is defined by the surrounding solid. In this stage, the exploration focuses on massing and partitions. Then the experiment in structure leads to the second stage, in which the void becomes an autonomous object that in turn defines the solid. Partitions are no longer in the form of fitting into the leftover space in the boxy volume but grow from and constantly flow in and out of the void which is the structural core. The transformation from a subtractive to a addictive form, from an opaque to a more transparent language gives a brand new dimension to the single concept of void. N

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THE HOUSE AS A VOID

COLLAGE UNFOLDED ELEVVATION OF THE CONCEPTUAL VOID HOUSE 1:30

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THE VOID AS A HOUSE

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The Village House

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project type: student work of studio 1 time: 2013. 09 ~ 2013.12 site: Shi Chuang Village in Conghua, Guangzhou , China site boundary: 14m * 5.3m program: 2 adults In a traditional village, houses cluster together organically. Each student was given a unique site and program to design a house that fit into the village context. As the first design exercise of the studio, this is a rather abstract project which mainly aims to develop a formal architectural language through the exploration of mass, partition and basic structure. The tectonic development of my project can be summarized using three verbs -- "to elevate", "to split" and "to thrust", which are more parallel than linear.

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section AA

MASS section BB

plan

STRUCTURE

37

PARTITION


TO ELEVATE — massing exploration

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TO SPLIT

TO THRUST —tectonic strategy

motif 39


CHINESE ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH

KAILI RESEARCH

Coursework of History of Chinese Architecture Site: Yu Hua Tang in Yu Yuan Garden, Shanghai On-site surveying, 3D modeling and graphic illustration Collaborating with Cheng Yung Hsin

Research Collection Booklet Layout Design, Photography and Texts 148*210 GUIZHOU RESEARCH

GUIZHOU RESEARCH

M odification and Expansion The research focuses on the on-going transformation in the village houses of Dong and Miao Minority in Guizhou Province. This section specifically looked at the modification and expansion of the existing Dong Minority’s houses through on-site survey and interviews with the locals. The houses of the Minority which are typically elevated from the ground by a few wood columns called "Diao Jiao Lou" in Chinese are quite unique and are closely related to its context which has a wavy topography and a humid climate. Based on our research, there is an increasing tension between the preservation of the traditional wood construction methods and the need for a modern living. In General, the old generation prefers the conventional wood construction which takes longer and more complicated construction yet has better natural ventilation and sense of touching the earth. Whereas the younger generation prefers to use bricks as it's easier and faster. The change in materials and construction methods also change the culture and many aspects of the villagers' life. These research findings will help us to design a new prototype of rural houses using new technology that adapts to the needs of the occupants and at the same time preserve the culture landscape of the village.

Team Members: Chen Xi Dai Shuyao Li Ping Lin Zhixin Mariane Quadros de Souza Xie Zhile Yang Zeyu

MODIFICATION & EXPANSION 改建及扩建

GUIZHOU RESEARCH INTERVIEW

GUIZHOU RESEARCH

“I PREFER WOODEN HOUSES”

“I PREFER BRICK HOUSES”

GRANDFATHER - DIMEN VILLAGE

GRANDSON- DIMEN VILLAGE

GUIZHOU RESEARCH

GUIZHOU RESEARCH

The Top Floor Space, Zhaoxing Villagen 顶层空间 肇兴

TOP FLOOR AND ROOFTOP

GRAPHICS & FABRICATION 40

In the most cases that we have investigated, the top floor of Dong Minority’s residential houses are not effectively used. While some are adapted to children’s bedrooms, many of them are not in use or used for storing sundries. Some villagers didn’t even allow us to enter the top floor for privacy reasons. The first reason why the space is not used actively is that thermal

顶层及屋顶 insulation is not good enough on the top floor--it’s hot in summer and cold in winter. In rainy days, rain drops might splash in. Moreover, two sides of the triangle space created by pitched roofs are not convenient to use. Besides the problem of utilization, an interesting phenomenon is that residents tend to cover external louvres with different materials, which vary from timbre, metal to

fabric. According to the villagers that we interviewed, they are mostly for the purpose of preventing rain drops from entering.

在大多数案例中,侗族民居屋顶 的利用率并不高,大多数属于闲 置或堆砌杂物状态,少数隔出了 房间以作儿童卧室等。而部分居 民不允许外人进入顶层因其私密 性强。 分析利用率低的原因首先是屋顶 保温性能差,夏天热冬天冷。虽 有屋檐遮挡,但雨天还是有漏雨 的可能性。再者便是坡形屋顶造 成的三角空间两侧利用不便。

除利用率不高外,还有一个较 为有趣的现象是居民们喜欢在 房屋顶层两侧天窗外侧添加遮 盖物,材料从木板、金属到布 料都有。经询问,村民们多说 为挡雨之用。


BYPRODUCTS

PROSPECTUS

Course Book: Student-work Collection Layout Design 200*270

Yearbook of Department of Architecture, HKU Layout Design 180*260

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BA(AS) Program

Arch4001 Architecture and Urban Design I Juan Du

Urban Ecologies: Safari Hong Kong & Shenzhen The Urban Ecologies Studio aims to confront conventional architectural design and city planning practices with alternative sustainable design strategies for the contemporary city. The Safari Hong Kong & Shenzhen studio is a collaborative project with the Columbia University Urban Landscape Lab to conduct research and design projects that explore the urban ecosystems along public transit lines connecting Hong Kong and Shenzhen. Understanding the systematic and ecological impact of such large scale infrastructure is crucial to comprehend the operations and performance of the two cities.

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Arch2057 Architectural Design I Coordinator John Lin D. Chad McKee Debra T. M. Cheung Jason Dembski Jae Hyun Lim Miho Hirabayashi

House in a Village The project for this year is situated in a modern Chinese village in Guangdong Province. Conghua Village is in the process of redevelopment in the face of economic and social changes of the past 30 years. As economic reforms have established major new cities in the Pearl River Delta, most village families have begun to supplement their incomes as migrant workers in cities. This has brought about major changes to the village. What was once a relatively homogeneous rural community has given way to an increasingly heterogeneous one, with families of very different incomes and livelihoods. This is reflected in the physical transformation of the village from traditional dwellings to newer generic housing. A change from communal living to individual houses.

Close to Window of the World station are Shenzhen’s biggest golf course, largest urban village (Baishizhou), and luxury residential districts (Portofino). These places may seem different, but they share the same ecosystem. They are connected by water, above and below ground. Look up close and you will see millions of micro-organisms that are beneficial to the environment and to human health. How can we live with these tiny creatures? For detailed information please visit http://www.safariszhk.org/

Based on the ecological mapping and field research, 6 stations each in Hong Kong and Shenzhen are selected for detailed mapping and drawings across the urban fabric surrounding the station. The drawings should reveal visible and hidden relationships amongst districts that host plant life and wild life as well as densely (human) populated public spaces, buildings, and infrastructure. The design projects negotiate conflicts of the environment, the social communities, and the economic costs and impacts of the proposals, with the agenda to create architectural projects that contributes to the urban environment in surprising and innovative ways.

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pp3 Semester 1: the Tradition Village Collective Studio Model pp4-5 Sem2: the Generic Village Collective Studio Model pp6 Student Works Cheng Tak Hei Ivan Lin Zhixin Nicole

pp22-23 The Sweep Led by Olivier Ottervaere and John Lin THE SWEEP is a viewing platform and play area built in a Bai minority village in Yunnan Province. Conducted as an experiential learning project in the Department of Architecture at The University of Hong Kong, the project was built in 6 days with 65 students. The timber structure is designed as a series of 12 trusses arranged tangentially into a self-reinforced ring. Each truss cantilevers up to 4 meters to support a decked surface. As the trusses descend and ascend, the ruled surface evolves from the ground upward, culminating in a spectacular view across a valley of rice terraces.

The first semester of looks at the evolution of the traditional Chinese village. The second semester will consider the generic house. A number of differences will become apparent. In the traditional village, each site is unique. In the generic village, every site is the same. In the generic village, each program will be the same. However the house is a process of gradual development. Over time, the rooms will be occupied and the house may also be constructed in phases. Eventually, the house will contain two couples, their children, and an elderly couple. The house must consider the issue of communal living. Which programs are shared and which are separate? How does the house ‘grow’?

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All works in the studio are explored and produced based on the concept of sustainability as a crossover between the Natural, Social, Economic, and the Constructed. This design research methodology expands upon existing analysis and design techniques utilized within the field of architecture by introducing important understanding of urbanism from the knowledge fields such as landscape, geography, sociology, economics, and political science.

pp29 “Micro Urbanism”

The project is located at the entrance to the local primary school. Students live in the school on weekdays and are picked up by parents for the weekend. The platform is a natural waiting area for parents and students, offering a shaded space below. Though the plan arrangement of trusses is simple, the overall structure delivers a diversity of views and spaces, constructing a 360 degree panorama of village houses, mountains, valley, and farmland.

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Arch4001 Architecture and Urban Design I Tom Verebes Teaching Assistant Mohamad Ghamlouch

Mass-Customised Megablock The studio will engage with two of the pre-eminent organising devices of modern China’s urbanism. Firstly, we will engage with the primacy of the GRID, as the ubiquitous organising device for deploying infrastructure and subdividing land in China’s new urbanism. The second trope we will confront is the MEGABLOCK, as the apparent default modular unit of urbanism in China. The megablock is the offspring of Modernist superblock housing schemes of the mid-twentieth century, and in part, can also be seen as a legacy of the Danwei, or work unit, in post-1949 China. Selfsufficient working and living communities have since evolved either into the prevalence of privileged gated communities, or as internalized urban environments. Both of these urban types relegate the street, and its vibrant culture, all but extinct. We will challenge the vast scale of the megablock to be conceived in its entirety and constructed all at one time.

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pp33 Cheng Chi Yu Stanley Zhang Yacen Sharon So Mingming Joanna Tong Zhen Jenny Lei Meng Chong Jeff Song Yang Nigel

The grid, however, remains a more timeless, ubiquitous, yet insidious device, with which to dimension and to control the organisation of space and its flows. This studio aims to confront this disciplinary, professional, cultural and technological context - without nostalgia for what has been lost in China’s ferocious urbanisation, nor with much naiveté of our studio’s capability to change the politcal and economic system driving urbanisation in China. This Studio will operate as a Joint Studio with Professor Xu Weiguo’s Masters Studio at Tsinghua University in Beijing. The collaboration comprises joint briefing workshops and reviews; a trip to the Digital Architectural Design Association (DADA)conference in Beijing; and a site visit to Tianjin to be briefed by the Urban Planning Bureau of Tianjin in September. This collaboration will, in the coming months, also lead to exhibitions and publications of student work from this studio.

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THE PARASITE WALKER Student-work of Visual Communication Design and Rendering

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THE CAGED Student-work of Visual Communication Geometry Generation (grasshopper) and Rendering

THE CAGED


DIGITAL FABRICATION

DIGITAL FABRICATION

LIVERPOOL ALTABRISA PARTIAL FACADE

3D PRINT - FACADE UNIT FACADE UNIT Designed by Lin Zhixin Nicole

1:100

100MM * 100 MM * 50MM

al Facade

Side V

FACADE UNIT Designed by Lin Zhixin Nicole

s

Side View

Top View in

Overall View

ACADE UNIT esigned by Lin Zhixin Nicole

evation View 44

Section View

Elevation View

Section View

Plan View

Stage 1 Primary Structure

Method: Laser Cut Materials: 2mm White Cardboard Slots are createdTop on the laminated floor slabs to fit colView in the Frame umns and partitions precisely. T-shape slots on the partition walls help to locate the position of the gradient structural strips. The strips penetrate through the slots and are fixed on the internal beams as well as walls to give a strong connection.

Stage 2 Secondary Structure

Method: Laser Cut Materials: 1mm White Cardboard The secondary structure is a series of zig-zagging Booom View beams. The sticking-out parts in the center will control the 90 degree twisting point of the skins in later stage. Tiles are attached onto the H-shape structure as preparation for fixing the skins as well.

Plan View Method: Laser Cut Materials: 2mm White Cardboard Slots are created on the laminated floor slabs to fit columns and partitions precisely. T-shape slots on the partition walls help to locate the position of the gradient

Side View

Booom


DIGITAL FABRICATION

3D PRINT - FACADE CORNER 1:200

3D PRINT + VACUUMED PLASTIC BUBBLES + AIR-BRUSH PAINTING GROUP WORK: DESIGNED AND MADE BY LIN ZHIXIN, LAU KA LONG, CHAN SUET YING


Lin Zhixin Full Portfolio 2016 Summer