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CONTENTS LAGOS DE TORCA: AN URBANIZING WETLAND................................................................................4 SAN JOSE DE COSTA RICA: REGENERATING URBAN LANDSCAPES............................................10 EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS..................................................................................................17 CITY PLANNING WORKSHOP: WILMINGTON, DELAWARE............................................................23


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Zhenya J. Nalywayko 4635 Sansom St. # 2 Philadelphia, PA, 19139 (203)-252-7993 Zhenyawayk@gmail.com

Skills Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Adobe Photoshop ArcGIS Hand Drawing Microsoft Suite Negotiation Public Speaking Rhino Writing

Selected Coursework San Jose de Costa Rica: Urban Design Studio

Bogota, Colombia: Urban Design Studio City Planning Workshop Contemporary Urbanism Environmental Planning Monument Lab Site Planning

University of Pennsylvania | School of Design

MA of City & Regional Planning | 2016 - 2018 Environmental Planning & Urban Design

Featured in Panorama, PennDesign’s student planning & design journal Featured in the March 2018 “Penn Teach-In” Monument Lab exhibition Volunteered at Norris Square Park as a liaison for Monument Lab

Temple University | College of Liberal Arts

BA in Geography and Urban Studies | 2012 - 2015 Minor in Visual Anthropology Graduated Cum Laude Member of the Temple University Honors Program Award for Outstanding Achievement in Geography & Urban Studies

Experience

University of Pennsylvania | Teaching Assistant Philadelphia, PA | 2017, 2018 Negotiation & Conflict Resolution | 2018 Reviewed and graded student journal entries and final papers Met with students upon request to review course material

City Planning Workshop | 2017 Coordinated with UPenn administration, city officials, and the instructor on site visits & community meetings Oversaw development, editing, and publication of the workshop’s final masterplan

Pennsylvania Environmental Council | Graduate Fellow

Philadelphia, PA | 2017 - 2018

Conducted outreach for regional hike/bike trail extensions Raised awareness about and helped organize PEC’s annual environmental awards dinner Prepared graphic materials for official reports and outreach events

Philadelphia Parks Alliance | Outreach Coordinator Philadelphia, PA | 2015 - 2016

Acted as liaison between community groups and the Philadelphia City Council as an advocate for the sugar sweetened-beverage tax Managed projects and workloads of 5 to 10 interns Coordinated and ran advocacy events across Philadelphia

Temple University | Writing Center Tutor Philadelphia, PA | 2014 - 2015

Tutored undergraduate and graduate students in specific areas of concern (grammar, organization, tips to english language learners)


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LAGOS DE TORCA: AN URBANIZING WETLAND Bogota’s growth since the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors in the 1600s has resulted in the loss of 97% of the area’s wetlands. The northernmost tip of Bogota is one of the few places left in this plateau with intact wetlands remaining. However, development pressures from a rapidly growing population and a mayor that many see as in-cahoots with wealthy developers are placing its precious environmental resources at risk. “Verdant Torca,” is a counter-proposal to Penalosa’s Lagos De Torca plan. Verdant Torca is an eco-driven framework plan that uses the protection of vital natural resources like wetlands to guide and blend future development into the landscape.


Final Framework Plan

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To ensure that future development in Northern Bogotå does not further imperil the region’s few remaining intact wetlands, Verdant Torca begins with a large-scale ecological framework to order development. Riparian buffers protect existing streams from pollution, wetlands are revitalized through improved water quality, and future residents are provided high quality open space.


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Verdant Torca ensures residents equitable access to green space and expands ecological services by threading elements of the large-scale ecological framework throughout the future development area. Green corridors, park spaces , and a network of trails turn the region’s natural resources into a system of public space for future residents to enjoy. Visualizations of the Parkside development area, highlighted below, can be seen on the following page.

Parkside


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Parkside

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Parkside is one of Verdant Torca’s five planned development areas. Parkside is a midand low-rise community blending luxurious, high-quality housing with glorious natural resources and ample public space. Green armatures, public parks and plazas, and alamedas connect residents to public transportation, recreational areas, and buzzing commercial corridors. Parkside asks future residents to rethink what a “garden city� can be.

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Wetland Park Visualization

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SAN JOSE DE COSTA RICA: REGENERATING URBAN LANDSCAPES Costa Rica’s capital city, San Jose, is sprawls over 800 square miles and contains 50% of Costa Rica’s entire population. However, the San Jose metropolitan area suffers from social fragmentation, environmental degradation, and an acute risk of natural hazards. The Delta seeks to provide a prototype for future development and specifically in the filling of gaps between the San Jose GMA’s many urban voids. By creating a new centrality focused on the provision of efficient public transportation, quality public space and related environmental services, The Delta will transform the San Jose GMA.


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San Jose GMA Hydrology

“The Delta”


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1985

1995

2005

The maps on the left highlight the San Jose GMA’s growth between 1985 and 2016. Much of this growth has been highly fragmented, following existing and new highways and roads and avoiding the myriad ravines that define the region’s landscape. This pattern of leapfrog development has greatly degraded the area’s environmental quality and has resulted in a socially and spatially divided metropolitan region.

2016


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Site Existing Conditions

1960s & 1970s

1980s & 1990s

Present Day

Initial Site Plan Sketch


Ecological Framework

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Initial Framework Plan

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Sections 1

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EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington, located just to the north of Kensington along the Delaware River in Philadelphia, PA, is an otherwordly place. New construction is happening on almost every block in the neighborhood. Large tracts of vacant land are being snatched up and filled in as fast as developers can get their hands on them, and old warehouses are being converted into lofts almost as quickly. The neighborhood is full of odd juxtapositions. Sleek, modern apartments share lot lines with East Kensington’s characteristic workmanlike early- and mid-20th century two-story rowhomes. Expanses of dead grass and cracking asphalt break up the area’s re-densifying fabric. Is this what the first signs of gentrification look like?


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EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington Site Map 200 Ft


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Intensity of Development 1

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EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington Observational Map 200 Ft

Area of Investment (New Development, Construction, or Rennovation)

Area of Disinvestment (Untended lot, deteriorating housing, vacancy)


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30%

Tree Cover Analysis

6%

Recommended in Urban Areas

In East Kensington

EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington Tree Cover Analysis 200 Ft


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Existing Land Use

Low Density Residential High Density Residential Mixed Use Commercial Civic/Institutional Industrial Park Yard/Open Space

EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington Land Use 200 Ft

Active Recreation Parking/Transportation Vacant Land or Building


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Building Condition Analysis

New/Under Construction Excellent Stable In Need of Repair

EAST KENSINGTON SITE ANALYSIS East Kensington Building Condition Analysis 200 Ft

Deteriorating Vacant


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CITY PLANNING WORKSHOP: WILMINGTON, DELAWARE Wilmington, Delaware is a small city located in the heart of the Northeast corridor, 30 minutes south of Philadelphia and two hours north of Washington, D.C. Despite its proximity to major cultural and economic hubs, Wilmington fails to provide the jobs local residents need, and the city struggles with poverty and associated socioeconomic ills. Additionally, Wilmington faces intense environmental issues such as incoming sea-level rise and a lack of quality green space for its roughly 70,000 residents. Resilient Wilmington seeks to address these issues by turning Wilmington into a regional hub of sustainability, cyber security, and employment by 2050. Primary goals and objectives include turning Wilmington’s landfill into a waste-to-energy center, investing in data security, and reducing impervious surface coverage through a suite of green stormwater infrastructure interventions.


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East Wilmington Interventions

To demonstrate how Resilient Wilmington 2050 will combat issues of economic inequity, environmental justice, and flooding, the plan outlines a suite of interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in East Wilmington. This East Wilmington neighborhood plan expands the city’s existing riverfront trail, proposes new bus and bike routes to better connect East Wilmington residents with the city and region, and sites job training at local schools and community centers to better engage East Wilmingtonians in the workforce, among other things. Below is a visualization of what the expanded riverfront trail will look like after completion.


Riverfront Trail Section

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Final Boards Group Work

RESILIENT WILMINGTON City of Wilmington 2050 Resiliency Plan IN 2050, WILMINGTON IS... ...a resilient city, prepared to withstand climate change and major shocks to the city. Wilmington utilizes innovative methods to power the city with a Waste to Energy plant and employs smart technology to transform its physical infrastructure and aid vulnerable residents. By engaging corporations, the city has revived its economy to become a regional cyber security leader. Improved vocational programs ensure Wilmingtonians are prepared for this growing industry, increasing local employment.

RESILIENT WILMINGTON City of Wilmington 2050 Resiliency Plan

The Plan: Vision, Goals, and Objectives RESILIENCY ELEMENTS Local Production & Waste Minimization

GOALS

Responsible Land Use & Resource Conservation

Accessibility & Local/Regional Connectivity

Diversity of People & Other Urban Species

WILMINGTON FAST FACTS Finance and Insurance sector hires 24% of employees

Wilmington must become adaptive, connected and prosperous, and healthy and equitable to make the vision a reality.

Goal 1:

Goal 2:

Reduce Contribution to Climate Change

Reduce Vulnerability to Climate Change Neighborhoods for 3 Retrofit Flooding Remediate 4 LandscapesContaminated

1 Build a Waste-to-Energy Plant

ADAPTIVE

Renewable Energy and 2 Incentivize Minimize Resource Use

Goal 3:

VISION IN ACTION CONNECTED AND PROSPEROUS

51% of population stop education after high school

Goal 4:

Transform City Systems

Create a Resilient Economy

City Efficiency Through 5 Increase Smart Technology

7 Development

6 Update Zoning

Wilmington a Regional 8 Make Cyber Security Hub

Goal 5:

Existing Conditions & SDOC

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Wilmington for work

Incentivize Downtown

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73% of residents leave

70% of residents drive to work

Goal 6:

Create Opportunity for Residents Foster Healthy Neighborhoods

HEALTHY AND EQUITABLE

Sustainability Educational 9 Create Programs for Residents

Complete Streets and 11 Establish 15-Minute Neighborhoods

Job Training Programs to 10 Create Prepare Residents for Industries

City and Neighborhood 12 Strengthen Communication

IMPLEMENTATION OBJECTIVES

PHASE

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2017 - 2025 PHASE

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2026 - 2035 PHASE

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2036 - 2050

KEY STRATEGIES

Nine objectives - organized in the three main goal categories - work towards decreasing emissions and minimizing waste, connecting residents with the city to provide opportunity, and ensuring equitable distribution of protected resources.

Strategy 1: Waste-to-Energy Plant

Waste-to-Energy Plant, Copenhagen DK

The plan proposes altering the course of waste traveling through the energy cycle. This initiative will construct a 22-acre Wasteto-Energy plant on the Cherry Island Landfill site to recover energy and materials from the waste stream.

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Compact Residential Development

Amtrak Station

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Thriving Riverfront & Downtown Corporations

OPPORTUNITIES FOR LAND REMEDIATION

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Cherry Island Landfill

FLOODING THREATS TO LOW-INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS

58% of land in Wilmington is impervious.

Strategy 2: Construct Data Centers

Corporations in Downtown Wilmington

To capitalize on its regional location and the presence of powerful corporations, Wilmington will become a cyber security leader for the region.

Strategy 3: Job Training Programs

P.S. DuPont High School, Wilmington DE

Wilmington has an existing network of vocational schools throughout the city. The plan will utilize this asset to establish training programs to prepare residents for the growing technology industries that are proposed for the city.

Parking lots comprise a large proportion of impervious surfaces, especially in Downtown. Over 80% of the non-sanitary flow through Wilmington’s combined sewers is caused by stormwater runoff from these impervious surfaces.

STRENGTHS

Zoe Axelrod Thomas Orgren Sydney Goldstein Chloe Qu Zhenya Nalywayko Yixiao Sun Instructor: Laura Ahramjian

Infrastructure is in place to make Wilmington a sustainable city.

DEFICIENCIES

Wilmington faces many socioeconomic and environmental challenges.

Most of the brownfields are located in the riverfront floodplain, raising the public health impacts of flood events. The neighborhoods facing most severe flooding threats are also encountering economic challenges.

OPPORTUNITIES

There are existing opportunities for community involvement in rejuvenating neighborhoods.

CONSTRAINTS

Geographic position produces environmental hazards and increased regional competition.


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RESILIENT WILMINGTON City of Wilmington 2050 Resiliency Plan IMPROVED EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

RESILIENT WILMINGTON City of Wilmington 2050 Resiliency Plan

Focal Plan: East Side Access to Opportunity and Resources

Benefits to Communities 3

DATA CENTERS AND CYBER TECHNOLOGY

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Howard School of Tech at Clifford Brown Walk & E 12th Street

EDUCATION FAST FACTS Educational programs will target adults and children Prepare residents for and connect residents with emerging industries Involve residents in citywide resiliency initiatives

Server Farm at Walnut Street & E 8th Street Corporations in Wilmington are disconnected from many aspects of the city including the enviornment and the local economy. To engage companies in Wilmington, small data centers will be established near fiber optic lines in large vacant buildings. The data centers will utilize district heating connections to recapture heat and use the energy in other buildings and to use heat from other sites to cool the servers.

COGENERATION OF DISTRICT HEATING

1 EDUCATION & JOB TRAINING

Help residents adapt for climate change

2 EFFICIENT CITYWIDE ENERGY

3 GREEN RETROFITS

• District-wide sustainability curriculum will educate all students about climate change • Targeted job training will prepare teenagers and adults for growing industries

• More efficient energy use will result in lowered utility bills • Low-income residents will benefit first, since the program is piloted in public housing developments

• Stormwater improvements will protect low-income residents against flooding • Home retrofitting incentives will reduce energy bills

4 ACCESS TO GREEN SPACE

5 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

6 LOCAL & REGIONAL ACCESS

TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

One challenge Wilmington faces is connecting the existing Amtrak and SEPTA Regional Rail station to Downtown. Today, visitors exit onto a busy street with half-empty parking garages and surface parking lots. Transit Oriented Development will connect people with new businesses near the station, creating an improved sense of place. The integration of the station with the city will also facilitate regional travel as part of emerging industries. TOD at E Front Street & E 2nd Street

• Support for neighborhood-level planning will build on existing momentum • Free workshops will help residents make proactive contributions to citywide sustainability goals

• Access to recreational green space will improve physical and mental health • Cherry Island Park will provide increased natural defense against flooding as sea levels rise

• Proximity to public transit will improve access to jobs and appointments within and outside of Wilmington for residents without vehicles • Development of housing downtown will increase access to amenities

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MONUMENT LAB: CIVIC STUDIO ON PUBLIC SPACE Monument Lab was a civic studio on public space and the monuments that often define it held across Philadelphia from mid-September to mid-November. Monument Lab’s guiding question was: what is an appropriate monument for the City of Philadelphia? As a volunteer lab guide at Norris Square Park in a heavily Puerto-Rican neighborhood in North Philadelphia, I was tasked with engaging the public in conversations about what public art is, and what it can be. The project below, which I produced with my partner Stephanie Garcia, came out of my time in Norris Square. Stephanie and I produced a book chronicling some of those we met in Norris Square. The book came out of Norris Square, and was given to Norris Square when Monument Lab ended. Below are some photographs from an exhibition our work was included in during the University of Pennsylvania’s 2018 March “Teach-In.”


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WETS PHILADELPHAI, Jane Dhruvi


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Boat & Bike, Heryk Tomassini


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Zhenya J. Nalywayko zhenyawayk@gmail.com

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