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RESEARCH


ZGF Architects LLP is an award-winning architectural, planning, and interior design firm with offices in Portland, Seattle, Los Angeles, Washington, DC, New York, and Vancouver, BC. Our portfolio features a diverse mix of projects for both private and public institutions, including work for healthcare, research, academic, civic, corporate, and commercial clients. ZGF has been involved in the planning and design of public, private, and academic research laboratories for more than 25 years. We have created technology-enriched facilities that touch on all aspects of laboratory design, including facilities that support the evolving sciences of genomics, proteomics, bioengineering, stem cell research, and nanoscience, as well as translational research. In addition to an intimate understanding of the technical requirements for laboratory facilities, we understand how research is performed and how the needs of staff have evolved over time. With each project, we have leveraged this knowledge to promote multidisciplinary pollination to provide opportunities for creative and collaborative encounters, and to maximize flexibility for future program growth and change. Our design philosophy is centered on the premise that excellence should be reflected in each and every aspect of a building—its fit within the community and campus, its function and relationship to its users, its building systems, and its cost. This dedication to design excellence at every level has resulted in numerous national, regional, and local awards, including the prestigious Architecture Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects, which recognizes the firm’s “high standards, humanistic concerns, and unique ability to capture the spirit of a place and the aspirations of its inhabitants.”


BIOMEDICAL

ZGF has helped to enhance the culture of research at the University of California, Berkeley. Their guidance has resulted in two of the most successful and inspiring facilities, both of which have exceptionally flexible and sustainable environments that promote the collaborative exploration of new directions in scientific research. ROBERT TJIAN, PHD, PRESIDENT, HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE (FORMER CHAIR OF THE CHANCELLOR’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON BIOLOGY AND PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOPHYSICS, AND STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY)


DICKINSON COLLEGE Stuart Hall and James Hall

CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF DESIGNED A NEW 90,000 SF SCIENCE FACILITY, WHICH SERVES AS A UNIFIED HOME FOR FIVE PREVIOUSLY DISPERSED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, AND ENHANCES DICKINSON COLLEGE’S TRADITION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY AND COLLABORATION.

The building includes interactive learning and research spaces for biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, chemistry, neuroscience, and psychology. The facility extends in a two-wing configuration, with each wing connected by a shared spine. Each wing includes classrooms, teaching laboratories, faculty offices, and informal meeting spaces. The spine is the social heart of the building, home to a large, light-filled atrium, and smaller spaces for group study and project displays. The building design balances a contemporary look

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with elements that are responsive to existing campus construction. Sloped roofs and limestone reflect the existing character of the campus, while the use of iridescent stainless-steel shingles and the glass curtain wall treatment convey a fresh, modern design approach. Multiple courtyards have been integrated to facilitate indoor and outdoor teaching and interaction. Texture, color, and the playful use of materials at the exterior extend inside the building to humanize and add richness to the interiors. The project has achieved LEED Gold®.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Orville A. Vogel Plant Biosciences Building

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE 93,700 SF ORVILLE A. VOGEL PLANT BIOSCIENCES BUILDING, THE FIRST FACILITY TO BE COMPLETED FOR THE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION COMPLEX BEING DEVELOPED ON WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY’S MAIN CAMPUS IN PULLMAN.

As the cornerstone project and entry for the new development, the plant biosciences building houses state-of-the-art research and teaching laboratories for molecular and biological plant sciences research. The main goal for the building was to create a functional and aesthetically pleasing educational facility that establishes a distinct look and feel for the Research and Education Complex. The four-story facility provides research and laboratory space for approximately 40 principal investigators and more than 40 postdoctorate students, as well as general laboratory 8

support spaces, specialized growth chambers, and major instrument rooms. Level one houses teaching laboratories, a large study hall, and primary circulation. Levels two through four accommodate research laboratories and support spaces. A large archive for plant specimens is housed below-grade. The research laboratories are linked by a three-story atrium and connecting stair, with gathering and conference space located at the atrium’s base level. A greenhouse display area, for exhibits and multi-use interaction areas, is provided at the south end of each research floor. The new building connects to the existing Plant Sciences Building to facilitate a shared environment and to allow an integrated approach to research.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

AFTER COMPLETING A SERIES OF STUDIES TO REPLACE THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY’S WARREN HALL, ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW FIVESTORY, 204,365 SF REPLACEMENT RESEARCH BUILDING, WHICH PROMOTES COLLABORATION AND DISCOVERY IN A HIGHLY FLEXIBLE, EFFICIENT, AND WELCOMING FACILITY.

Located at a prominent entry to the campus, the Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences is the anchor for a quadrangle of research and teaching buildings dedicated to the biomedical and health sciences. The Center’s four pillars of research are cancer biology, infectious diseases, stem cell biology, and neurogenerative diseases. Designed to house 30 to 35 research laboratories, as well as lecture halls, teaching laboratories, and classrooms, the Center is home to The Henry H. Wheeler Jr. Brain Imaging Center, 10

The Berkeley Stem Cell Center, The Henry Wheeler Center for Emerging and Neglected Diseases, and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, with scientists tackling the complexities of such diseases as cancer, Alzheimer’s, tuberculosis, and HIV. The building is divided into two programmatic zones: laboratory research and office / interaction. Abundant natural light and views, high ceilings, adjustable casework, “plug-and-play” services, individual task lighting, and shared support rooms create a flexible and collaborative laboratory environment. Office suites are adjacent to laboratories with strong visual connections between the two. Informal gathering spaces are located throughout the facility. The project is LEED-Gold certified and also incorporates Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria.


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STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Institutes of Medicine 1, Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, A California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Facility PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW 204,640 SF RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. THE NEW FACILITY IS THE MOST ENERGY-EFFICIENT LABORATORY BUILDING ON THE CAMPUS, PRIMARILY DUE TO THE MECHANICAL SYSTEM DESIGN.

The facility houses the stem cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Institute, integrating researchers from multiple specialties and disciplines, including cancer, neuroscience, cardiovascular medicine, transplantation, immunology, bioengineering, and developmental biology. The Institute is focused on making discoveries in stem cell research and translating them into preclinical applications, innovative therapies, and treatments. The project is designed to be LEED SilverÂŽ equivalent and includes research and office 14

space for 33 principal investigators, as well as an underground connection to nearby research facilities. The site, formerly a surface parking lot, occupies a strategic location between the medical and engineering precincts. The building design features open laboratories and communal gathering spaces that encourage interaction and teamwork, and is a key component in an effort to encourage alliances between scientists and physicians. Flexibility and modular concepts are applied to the laboratory infrastructure, which can be easily reconfigured to accommodate new faculty needs or research programs, and furnishings.


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CARNEGIE INSTITUTION FOR SCIENCE Maxine F. Singer Building

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

ZGF DESIGNED THE NEW HOME OF CARNEGIE’S DEPARTMENT OF EMBRYOLOGY. THE BUILDING FURTHER BOLSTERS THE DEPARTMENT’S INTERACTIONS WITH THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY, AND WITH THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE.

The 81,563 SF Maxine F. Singer Building contains a mixture of biochemistry-type laboratories suitable for cell and developmental genetics research and state-of-the-art genomic research, core facilities, and public areas for meetings and seminars. Because the Carnegie Institution has a unique approach to research and collaboration, the project goals were to design open and flexible laboratory spaces to promote this highly interactive organization. The plan is a modified pinwheel with the lobby / hearth at its center, which connects on its main level to the auditorium, as well as 18

the investigator laboratories and their adjacent support spaces. Immediately below are the balance of the laboratories, the lunch room, and library with immediate access to the outdoors. The laboratories are inti­mately scaled, with skylights, large windows, and sloped ceilings that provide high volumes and an abundance of natural light. Small interaction areas at the ends of corridors that look into the trees and creek extend an atmosphere of collegiality and informality to every corner of the building.


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Keck School of Medicine of USC, Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A BUILDING THAT PHYSICALLY EMBODIES THE CLIENT’S NEED FOR AN ENVIRONMENT THAT FOSTERS COLLABORATION, DISCOVERIES AND EXPANSION.

The 91,485 SF Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC provides a permanent home for stem cell research in the University’s first LEED Gold® building on the Health Sciences Campus. The first floor is dedicated to public functions, with a lobby and large seminar room. The four floors above consist of open, flexible laboratories organized in a transparent neighborhood scheme, which sets this building apart from other laboratory facilities in that there are no obstructions across the width of the building. This unique arrangement provides visual connections between program elements and allows 20

flexibility for future modifications. Interaction areas on every floor further promote collaboration. An innovative, high-performance glass envelope brings natural light deep into the interior, while serving as an integral part of the building’s operating system. The west façade utilizes angled glass fins to reduce glare. The east façade features a ventilated double-glass wall, which acts as a buffer to moderate interior temperatures, reduces solar gain, and creates oblique views with its play of transparent and translucent glass. The building is an R&D magazine Laboratory of the Year High Honors Award recipient.


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FRED HUTCHINSON CANCER RESEARCH CENTER SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

SINCE 1987, ZGF HAS PROVIDED MASTER PLANNING, SITE SELECTION, PROGRAMMING, AND DESIGN FOR THE BUILD-OUT OF MORE THAN 1,300,000 SF FOR THE FRED HUTCHINSON CANCER RESEARCH CENTER (FHCRC).

With steady growth since its inception in 1975, the FHCRC made the decision to consolidate its four major divisions, which had been dispersed throughout more than a dozen buildings near downtown Seattle. The goal was to create an interdisciplinary campus-like setting in an urban environment that would improve the Center’s functional organization, accommodate future expansion, and provide a comfortable environment for its researchers. Users expressed the importance of creating a spirit of community equal to the need for high-quality, flexible laboratories, offices, and spaces for meaningful interaction. The resulting master plan defines an urban 24

campus of interrelated yet separate buildings that can stand alone, but are connected aesthetically and functionally by covered walkways and bridges, and can be built in phases over time. The development of the campus to date includes the Weintraub Basic Sciences Building and Hutchinson Human Biology Building (a R&D Magazine Laboratory of the Year Award recipient), the E. Donnall Thomas Clinical Research Building, the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the Yale Building, and the LEED-Certified Robert M. Arnold Building, home to the Public Health Sciences Division. In support of the FHCRC’s commitment to the environment, the buildings are energy and water efficient, and offer ample daylight and views.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Gwen and Jules Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE NEW 330,760 SF KNAPP CENTER FOR BIOMEDICAL DISCOVERY FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO’S BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES DIVISION, WHERE RESEARCHERS WORK AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN BASIC SCIENCE AND MEDICINE.

The Knapp Center is an integral piece of a new medical sciences campus that spans the continuum from basic research to patient care. The building provides a greenhouse environment to nurture and support investigators who are creating a new era of individualized medicine, identifying treatments personalized to the genetic make-up of each patient. At 10 stories, it is one of the tallest buildings on The University of Chicago campus, and provides laboratories, laboratory support, and office space for the Departments of Pediatrics, Cancer Center, and 28

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Medicine. To promote a highly-interactive laboratory environment, the floors have been organized into two blocks of laboratory modules with associated support and offices. The light-filled interiors are planned to enhance the collaborative culture of the occupants while providing a nurturing environment that allows diverse research collaborators to work side-by-side. The building also features conference and lecture halls, and several multi-story public and common spaces— all designed to enhance the exchange of ideas. Two third-floor bridges connect the building to both research buildings and the primary teaching facility for students in the Pritzker School of Medicine.


THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Bunting Blaustein and David H. Koch Cancer Research Buildings

THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE COMMISSIONED ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH HDR, FOR SITE PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, AND DESIGN OF TWO COMPANION CANCER RESEARCH BUILDINGS TO SUPPORT THE INSTITUTION’S COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE IN PATIENT CARE AND RESEARCH.

The buildings are physically linked by a 250-seat conference center with associated pre-function space and a landscaped pedestrian mall. Both buildings are 10 stories with five laboratory floors, each two stories high to accommodate interstitial spaces above the laboratories. Towers of 10 single-story office floors anchor each corner of the buildings. These intermediate levels house additional faculty and graduate student offices, which are linked to the main laboratory floors by stairs located in interaction spaces on each floor. 30

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

An abundance of unassigned spaces are located strategically throughout the buildings to promote the free exchange of ideas. The 242,951 SF Bunting / Blaustein Building contains laboratories for cancer biology, hematologic malignancies, urologic oncology, GI cancer, solid tumor research, cell and gene therapy, and molecular virology. The 267,000 SF Donald H. Koch Building includes research programs for brain cancer, radiation oncology and molecular radiation sciences, pancreas cancer, and skin, lung, head and neck cancers. Both buildings share laboratory support services, BSL-3 laboratory space, as well as a cGMP laboratory. The structures serve as the new “front door” to the campus.


THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building / Medical Research Building

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED TWO RESEARCH BUILDINGS TO SUPPORT MULTIDISCIPLINARY FACULTY, STUDENTS, AND INDUSTRY PARTNERS TO FACILITATE THE TRANSLATION OF BASIC RESEARCH INTO REAL WORLD APPLICATIONS.

The 143,257 SF Medical Research Building was programmed for basic scientists and physician researchers to advance the understanding of the molecular basis of human health, aging, and disease. The 177,063 SF Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building is home of the BIO5 Institute, which brings together world-class scientists from five disciplines—agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, basic science, and engineering. Both buildings are designed as four levels of flexible laboratories, administrative and faculty offices, graduate student workstations, and conference facilities—all 32

TUCSON, ARIZONA

organized into research neighborhoods. One of the most important design decisions was to locate office and meeting areas in proximity to, but not inside, the laboratories. Conference rooms and informal gathering spaces are scattered throughout each floor and outdoors to stimulate interaction. The buildings are physically linked by enclosed walkways, a shared courtyard, and a 90-foot-tall metal Ramada structure to foster interaction and allow researchers to share core research facilities, equipment, and meeting rooms.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Bioscience Research Laboratories

TUCSON, ARIZONA

THE NEW 158,305 SF BIOSCIENCE RESEARCH LABORATORIES IS THE THIRD ZGF-DESIGNED FACILITY IN THE RESEARCH COMPLEX THAT INCLUDES THE MEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING AND THE THOMAS W. KEATING BIORESEARCH BUILDING.

It accommodates research informatics in the life sciences, translational imaging, and clinical translational research to help advance the understanding of the molecular basis of human health, aging, and disease, and provides creative spaces to foster individual creativity and facilitate collaboration amongst scientists from different disciplines, including the physical sciences. Comprised of wet and dry research laboratories, laboratory support areas, offices, conference rooms, specialized core facilities, and clinical research spaces, the building’s design and layout 36

maximizes flexibility to allow reconfiguration of the laboratories and office spaces in response to evolving changes in technology and research priorities. The early adoption of BIM on the project has expanded the usefulness of the model for design documentation and coordination, as well as for communicating the design intent to enhance the Construction Manager’s ability to secure complete, competitive bids from the subcontracting community.


CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL LOS ANGELES Saban Research Institute

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

ZGF DESIGNED THE SABAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE, WHICH DOUBLED RESEARCH SPACE FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, MAKING ROOM FOR PROGRAMS TO GROW, AND FOR NEW INITIATIVES IN NEUROSCIENCE AND MEDICAL GENETICS.

The 100,000 SF, six-level building employs a U-shaped configuration. A flexible laboratory wing is flanked by two office bays to the north and south, defining a protected courtyard that can be used by the facility’s researchers and administrators as an outdoor social interactive space. The full program includes research laboratories and support spaces, administrative and research offices, a 174-seat auditorium, and a conference room. The massing of the building introduces a more varied, stepping form than has been typical of the institutional buildings in 38

the neighborhood, both as a response to the recently completed neighborhood guidelines and to clearly express the functions of the building. Cladding systems are also richer and more varied to add more human scale and warmth to the character of the Children’s Hospital campus.


SCIENCE CENTER / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY 3711 Science Center

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF, SUPPORTED BY UJMN ARCHITECTS + DESIGNERS, WORKED WITH THE UNIVERSITY CITY SCIENCE CENTER AND WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY (A BIOMED REALTY COMPANY) IN A JOINT VENTURE TO PROGRAM AND DESIGN A NEW STATE-OF-THE-ART DEVELOPMENT IN PHILADELPHIA.

Founded in 1963 as the nation’s first urban universityaffiliated research park, the Science Center is located just west of Philadelphia’s Central Business District and covers both sides of Market Street between 34th and 39th Streets. The four-block campus covers approximately 17 acres and has been intensively developed with only several infill sites remaining available for development. A new master plan was adopted in 2005 that reflects the changing context of the park. ZGF designed the new development to 40

be built in two phases. The completed first phase, 3711 Science Center, is a 10-story, 401,032 SF research / medical office building with first floor retail and a parking structure. The top four floors house the research, support, and office spaces. The lower floors provide structured parking for 530 cars. Retail space fronts Market Street at street level. The building has achieved LEED Silver®. The second phase is a new 13-story building with flexible planning and services to support clinical and research laboratory activities, clinical treatment and retail space with approximately 357,251 SF. This project has achieved LEED Gold®.


SCIENCE CENTER / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY 3400 Science Center

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF WORKED WITH THE UNIVERSITY CITY SCIENCE CENTER AND WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY (A BIOMED REALTY COMPANY) IN A JOINT VENTURE TO PROGRAM AND DESIGN A STATE-OF-THE-ART 434,000 SF LABORATORY AND OFFICE BUILDING FOR SMALL START-UPS AND INCUBATORS TO INSTITUTIONAL CLIENTS AND MAJOR CORPORATIONS.

This 18-story building at the intersection of 34th and Market Streets will further advance the Science Center’s mission to create a supportive environment for local entrepreneurs. The building has been designed for “laboratory ready” office space with robust mechanical systems that support flexible, state-of-the-art laboratory environments. Positioned at a primary pedestrian and public transit crossroads, 3400 Science Center will further activate the area with its ground-level retail. 42

A dramatic two-story lobby will provide transparency and connections to the urban fabric. To help shade the building and its occupants, while simultaneously reducing solar heat gain, a glass curtain wall system with syncopated fins and mullions will be applied on the north, east, and south façades. A dynamic combination of glass and spandrel glass on the west façade will reflect the neighborhood and changing sky throughout the day. The use of these curtain wall systems will allow a generous amount of light to infuse each floor, providing a healthy and inviting home for each tenant. The building has been designed to meet LEED Silver® performance standards.


SCIENCE CENTER / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY 3800 Science Center

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF WORKED WITH THE UNIVERSITY CITY SCIENCE CENTER AND WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY (A BIOMED REALTY COMPANY) IN A JOINT VENTURE TO CREATE A 440,000 SF OFFICE TOWER CONCEPT THAT WILL HOUSE CLINICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS.

Conceived in two phases to address the Science Center’s projected growth, Phase 1 features a 19-story, 345,000 SF office tower with ground level retail, two levels of below-grade parking, two levels of above-grade parking, and a penthouse. Phase 2 is comprised of a 12-story, 95,000 SF office tower. Each tower will have its own prominent entrance and lobby. The storefront façade of both buildings along Market Street is intended to enliven the urban street edge. A unique feature of this development’s concept is the podium-level Winter 44

Garden and Outdoor Terrace that will connect the two buildings. Intended as an amenity for the buildings’ tenants, the Winter Garden and Outdoor Terrace will provide an area for public functions, including potential “spill out space” from the café, meeting rooms, and conferencing program elements that might be located on the podium or levels two and three of the office buildings. The Winter Garden is envisioned as space that would be “tempered” rather than fully air conditioned, thus reducing the operating costs typically associated with these kinds of spaces, and would be a showcase for sustainability.


UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY Life Science & Technology Park, Master Plan and Research + Development Building 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA

ZGF WORKED WITH A JOINT VENTURE BETWEEN WEXFORD SCIENCE+TECHNOLOGY AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI TO DESIGN A NEW LIFE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PARK (UMLSTP)—AN AMBITIOUS, MULTI-BUILDING DEVELOPMENT THAT SUPPORTS THE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION OF KNOWLEDGE GENERATION, EDUCATION, PATIENT CARE, AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

The UMLSTP master plan is comprised of 2,000,000 SF of flexible laboratory, clinical, office, and retail space housed in five buildings. The plan allows for incremental development of increasingly larger buildings (from 252,800 SF to 435,000 SF) and a mix of uses as the market dictates. The first phase, Research+ Development Building 1 (R+D1), is a 252,800 SF, six-story laboratory / office building. Designed to 46

support and grow the “Knowledge Based Community” that emerges from a successful University-sponsored research park, R+D1 and the future phases are intended as a life science and technology accelerator to help early-stage and mature companies commercialize discovery from research. Ultimately including a mix of commercial, retail, hotel, and residential uses, the UMLSTP will bring together scientists, researchers, clinicians, and business leaders in a place for intellectual interaction and the sharing of knowledge and discovery. The project’s first phase has achieved LEED Gold® and incorporates innovative systems that are estimated to use about 30% less energy than a comparable building.


I-95 FREEWAY

R+D BUILDING 1

RAIN GARDEN

R+D BUILDING 2

NW 7TH AVENUE

R+D BUILDING 3

RAIN GARDEN

R+D BUILDING 4

R+D BUILDING 5

NW 17TH STREET

NW 20TH STREET

PARKING GARAGE


BIOMED REALTY TRUST Vue Research Center

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROVIDED PLANNING AND DESIGN SERVICES FOR A 122,000 SF PREMIER LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING IN SEATTLE’S SOUTH LAKE UNION NEIGHBORHOOD, HOME TO A BURGEONING BIOTECH COMMUNITY.

The new seven-story facility is an expansion of the adjacent 530 Fairview building. The Vue Research Center provides a new identity and front entrance for both buildings on the corner of two major arterials— Fairview and Republican—a highly visible and trafficked location that faces popular neighborhood amenities. The building provides highly flexible research and development laboratories, laboratory support, offices, conference rooms, and street level retail. The design of the building blends with the existing building, while increasing glazing by using floor to ceiling glass to achieve greater transparency, access to daylight, and a 48

lighter street presence. The visibility of the building—an opportunity for enhanced image and brand identity for the tenant—is increased by shifting the main entrance from the previously above-grade, mid-block location to an on-grade entrance at the south end of the development. By enclosing the external elevated colonnade, the building-street connection is improved and offers a highly transparent interior gallery along Fairview, which extends the lobby into a public gallery. This gallery features the research of the building’s tenants and enhances the feeling of community within the building. The project is pending LEED Silver®.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE LEICHTAG BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING, WHICH PROVIDES WET RESEARCH AND CORE LABORATORIES, SUPPORT SPACE, AND OFFICES.

The 146,392 SF facility was designed to stimulate growth and funding for biomedical science, and to provide a world-class environment that attracts leading scientists to the University. Located within the School of Medicine campus, the building is on a prominent site directly east of a major pedestrian artery. The facility is organized with laboratories in the center, and research offices at the east and west ends. The five-story atrium, referred to as the Scholarly Interaction Space, marks the west entrance and is ringed by offices and informal meeting areas. A multi-story suspended dichroic glass structure by artist Ed Carpenter enlivens the atrium. 50

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Researchers can enjoy views of the newly created School of Medicine quad from exterior walkways along each floor, while strategically located common activity spaces encourage interaction. Natural light is also brought into the interior workspaces through clerestory windows; the laboratories have floor-to-ceiling windows with sloping ceilings that increase light into the building and improve air circulation. The exterior walkways also serve as sunshades for the laboratories.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PLANNED AND DESIGNED A NEW BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH FACILITY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO’S SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TO ACCOMMODATE GROWTH AND TO HOUSE A NEW MULTI-DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM IN GENOMIC MEDICINE AND AN EXPANDED DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCES.

The five-story, 190,000 SF project incorporates wet bench laboratories, laboratory core facilities and support space, administrative offices, and conference space for Health Sciences interdisciplinary programs, including medical genomics. Offices are separated in the northern wing, with floor-to-ceiling glass for abundant, even daylight and operable windows to take advantage of the mild climate much of the year. The project has achieved LEED Platinum® with the incorporation of high-performance features, such as a dynamic, 54

climate-responsive exterior solar shading system on the east, west, and south façades that eliminates solar gain while optimizing daylight. The project also includes a water reclamation system that will collect approximately 890,000 gallons per year from air handler condensate, primarily during the dry summer season when coastal fog and humidity occur more frequently. This in turn will reduce potable water use for landscape irrigation by 100%, and for toilets by more than 50%. The water filtration system was expanded to collect condensate from a neighboring laboratory building on the campus as well.


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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center

BETHESDA, MARYLAND

ZGF WON AN INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION TO LEAD THE PROGRAMMING, PLANNING, AND DESIGN FOR A 1,200,000 SF ADDITION TO THE EXISTING 2,500,000 SF WARREN G. MAGNUSON CLINICAL CENTER ON NIH’S BETHESDA CAMPUS.

The expansion included a 240-bed replacement hospital for inpatient and outpatient care (620,000 SF), as well as related clinical research laboratories (250,000 SF) in proximity to patient treatment areas. It replaced outdated facilities at the National Institutes of Health and upgraded its research environment, increasing opportunities for physicians and patients to participate in the nation’s top tier of clinical research. The design presented a “campus plan” approach to the new Clinical Research Center by scaling the building

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elements to modest three- and four-story wings, which step down from the existing Clinical Center toward the neighboring community, bringing the entire complex back into harmony with the rest of the campus and the community. The seven-story science court, adjacent to two outdoor courtyards, is the physical heart of the expanded complex. It provides interaction space on each level. Interstitial spaces maximize flexibility of building systems, allowing laboratories to be converted to patient rooms, or vice versa.


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MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER The Mortimer B. Zuckerman Research Center

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH SOM, PROVIDED MASTER PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, AND DESIGN FOR THE NEW MORTIMER B. ZUCKERMAN RESEARCH CENTER IN MANHATTAN.

The two-phased project replaces outdated laboratories with new facilities that enhance Memorial Sloan Kettering’s campus and creates a distinct image for research. The completed first phase is a 558,000 SF, 23-story laboratory tower that includes wet laboratories and core research and teaching programs, as well as a new rectory for an adjacent church. Programmatic functions are organized into three clear architectural components: a laboratory bar with linear equipment room and support, a public circulation spine, and an office / interaction cluster. A glass-enclosed communicating stair, with adjacent conference and 62

lounge spaces at each level, creates a focal point for interaction for the entire building. The first phase has achieved LEED Silver®. Phase two is a 187,436 SF, connecting seven-story addition that will incorporate computational biology and graduate school programs, as well as a 350-seat conference center.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE REBECCA AND JOHN MOORES UCSD CANCER CENTER, A MULTIDISCIPLINARY FACILITY DEDICATED TO PROVIDING BASIC SCIENCE, TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE, AND CLINICAL SERVICE.

The 270,000 SF award-winning facility includes space for clinical care, basic research, cancer prevention and control, and administration departments. The clinical care component includes exam and procedure rooms, radiation oncology, chemotherapy / infusion, imaging, physician offices, and support spaces. The basic research program includes wet-bench research laboratories, laboratory support, and associated office space. The cancer prevention and control program includes administrative space for clinical trials, community outreach, and cancer prevention education 66

programs. Administration is located in the heart of the facility. Patients receive all their outpatient care within one facility, helping to ease the stress and strain on themselves and their families. It is a place for education about the disease and its prevention in a patientoriented, healing environment. A Cancer Commons, along with outdoor gardens, creates spaces of varying size and character to support interaction among faculty and students, while providing space for patients prior to and during treatments.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF HAS DESIGNED THE NEW 358,346 SF ALTMAN CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CTRI) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO (UCSD). THE BUILDING WILL HELP RESEARCHERS OBTAIN THE EDUCATION, RESOURCES, AND COLLABORATIONS NECESSARY TO TRANSLATE DISCOVERIES INTO PRACTICE.

At the University of California, San Diego, the Institute is a partnership among the University and other local institutions dedicated to improving human health. The mission of the Institute is to create an environment that advances healthcare through interactions between basic scientists, clinical investigators, community physicians, and patients. Named for donors Steve and Lisa Altman, the new building creates a unique, multidisciplinary environment that brings together laboratory scientists and clinical investigators to understand disease, develop 70

new methods of treatment, and translate clinical research results into clinical practice. The dry bench research space includes computing spaces, exam and interview rooms for human subjects participating in clinical trials, staff and faculty offices, and other specialty spaces. The building also includes wet bench laboratory space, as well as equipment space, tissue culture, other specialized rooms, and core facilities. The project is registered to achieve LEED Gold®.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Dell Medical School, Health Transformation Building and Health Discovery Building

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH PAGE, DESIGNED PHASE I OF THE DELL MEDICAL SCHOOL TO SUPPORT THE UNIVERSITY’S GOAL OF CREATING AN INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MEDICAL SCHOOL.

The project comprises two buildings that will bring together interdisciplinary groups of scientists, clinicians, healthcare professionals, and engineers from multiple fields in the research and clinical environment in an effort to promote dynamic interactions, continuous learning, and ingenious discovery, and to provide the highest level of medical awareness and treatment. The seven-story, 264,430 SF Health Discovery Building will provide space for 90 Principal Investigators in both wet and dry research groups focused on cancer, neuroscience, cardiopulmonary, metabolism, and genetics / genomics research. It will also house three 74

AUSTIN, TEXAS

major imaging modalities for research and clinical use. The 10-story, 239,370 SF Health Transformation Building has been designed as a flexible core + shell structure, with a parking garage for 1,100 cars to serve the needs of the patients and staff. Connections between the upper levels of the two buildings will serve to enhance synergies between research and clinical care at the Medical School. Both buildings have been designed to be certified LEED Silver®.


NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER Alexandria Center for Life Science – NYC East Tower / Laboratory Fit-Out

ZGF PERFORMED A FEASIBILITY STUDY, PROGRAMMED, AND DESIGNED 65,000 SF OF FLEXIBLE LABORATORIES IN THE ALEXANDRIA CENTER FOR LIFE SCIENCE – NYC EAST TOWER TO ACCOMMODATE NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER’S CURRENT AND FUTURE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH NEEDS IN PSYCHIATRY, NEUROLOGY, OTOLARYNGOLOGY, MEDICINE (RHEUMATOLOGY), ANESTHESIOLOGY, NEUROSURGERY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND BIOCHEMISTRY.

The project was comprised of the laboratory fit-out of floors 3, 8, and 9. Each floor included space for office / administration, open laboratory, and laboratory support, in addition to providing core facilities, conference rooms, and spaces for interaction. Among the project’s goals was the need for optimal efficiency and flexibility to accommodate long-term research 76

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

needs. The laboratory module developed for this project has become the planning standard for NYU Langone Medical Center. The design maximizes the building’s spectacular East River and City views by locating the laboratories on the east and west sides, while placing office and shared spaces to the north and south ends of the building. Circulation spaces are enhanced by wall-mounted, illuminated light-boxes with gels of natural patterns, back-painted glass write-up panels, and tack-boards for the display of current research. The material, color, texture, and furniture palettes are designed to enliven the space, and to introduce daylight into the work environment.


NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER Research Facilities for the Departments of Psychiatry and Child + Adolescent Psychiatry NEW YORK, NEW YORK

ZGF DESIGNED 67,800 SF OF NEW CLINICAL, RESEARCH, AND ADMINISTRATIVE SPACE ON TWO FLOORS IN THE ONE PARK AVENUE BUILDING TO ACCOMMODATE MAJOR PORTIONS OF NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER’S MAJOR PROGRAMS IN PSYCHIATRY.

The Department of Psychiatry’s lobby is located on the eighth floor and the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department’s lobby is on the seventh floor. Each has a unique identity, while maintaining the desired separation between clients of differing ages. The overall facility includes open workstations, shared and private offices, workrooms, conference rooms, and collaboration spaces for over 400 employees—providing both visual and acoustic privacy, as well as security within and between the departments. The density of the program and the building’s large footprint influenced the concept of 78

“The City” as an organizing theme. This was reflected in the layout by the creation of smaller neighborhoods, a clear circulation plan, and community work spaces—in the same way that the City employs plazas, streets, and parks to define unique character. Conference facilities and the Child Studies “Hub” were strategically located to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration between the child, adolescent, and adult programs. Color and materials were carefully selected to serve the working needs of professionals and staff, while providing interest and variety for the broad range of ages of visitors and patients.


MAX PLANCK FLORIDA CORPORATION Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience

JUPITER, FLORIDA

ZGF’S DESIGN OF THE 101,000 SF MAX PLANCK FLORIDA INSTITUTE FOR NEUROSCIENCE BUILDING EXPRESSES THE MAX PLANCK SOCIETY’S POSITION AS GERMANY’S LEADING SCIENTIFIC ORGANIZATION.

The building provides flexible, adaptable, stateof-the art research space for advanced, groundbreaking scientific work, and its interior spaces nurture a collaborative, interactive research culture for distinguished scientists recruited from around the world. The facility houses wet and dry bench research, instrumentation labs, computational research, core imaging and microscopy facilities, information technology services, vivarium, researcher offices and support shops. Laboratory spaces for bench research are open, with limited partitioning provided as required for security or demarcation of research zones. These spaces 80

are designed with fixed benches and open, flexible work areas that can be quickly reconfigured as research evolves and new scientists are hired. The building is organized around an open central space for circulation, scientific collaboration and interaction. Lab and office spaces look out on a communal zone containing an auditorium, lunch room, lounges, meeting rooms, and a dramatic entry lobby. The project has achieved LEED Gold®, supplemented by laboratory-specific energy use reduction recommendations from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Labs21 environmental performance criteria. ZGF designed this project in association with PGAL.


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EMORY UNIVERSITY Health Sciences Research Building

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

EMORY UNIVERSITY HAS PARTNERED WITH CHILDREN'S HEALTHCARE OF ATLANTA TO BUILD THE HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH BUILDING. DESIGNED BY ZGF, THE BUILDING ENHANCES TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AND PROVIDES CONNECTIONS TO EMORY'S EXISTING CLINICAL AND RESEARCH PROGRAMS.

The new 212,000 SF facility is the initial phase of a large complex with 60% of the program dedicated to pediatric research and the remainder focused on other cancer, immunology, and drug discovery research. The design concept consists of three functional components: a wet laboratory building, a tower containing public functions and dry research space, and an enclosed dry research bridge that connects the new research facility to clinical and research operations on Emory’s core campus. The laboratory building provides four research 84

levels, while the tower consists of an auditorium, break-out spaces, and a café on the first floor, and three floors of dry research above. The dry research bridge consists of two floors of computational office space and circulation, and provides a much-needed physical connection between Emory’s disparate research precincts. Laboratory spaces are organized into discrete research neighborhoods to promote scientific interaction and the formation of group identity within different research sectors. The project is LEED Silver®.


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UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Cancer and Cardiovascular Research Building

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ALLIANCE, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 285,000 SF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH LABORATORY, A SIGNATURE BUILDING MARKING THE GATEWAY TO A NEW MEDICAL RESEARCH PRECINCT KNOWN AS THE BIOMEDICAL DISCOVERY DISTRICT.

Providing an iconic front door, the building forms the heart of the district’s research functions, provides public amenities and establishes a central point for future district expansion. The facility collocates faculty and staff associated with expanding cancer and cardiovascular research programs with a shared research commons, laboratories, offices, café and conference space. The facility supports partnerships between the University and surrounding research institutions like the Lillehei Heart Institute and The 88

Masonic Cancer Center. Laboratories are open, transparent and daylit with modular bench layouts that encourage visual and physical connectivity between researchers. Offices have views of the exterior courtyard and internal atrium, providing connectivity and sense of community throughout the building. The building is LEED Silver® and meets the 2030 Challenge, using 60% less energy than typical laboratories.


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LOS ANGELES BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT HARBOR-UCLA MEDICAL CENTER Campus Master Plan

TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA

ZGF WORKED AS MASTER PLAN ARCHITECTS, IN ASSOCIATION WITH JENSEN + PARTNERS AS EXECUTIVE CAMPUS PLANNERS, TO DEVELOP A FUNCTIONAL SPACE PROGRAM AND MASTER PLAN VISION FOR THE REORGANIZATION AND REDEVELOPMENT OF THE 10.25-ACRE LOS ANGELES BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (LA BIOMED) CAMPUS.

The LA BioMed campus is located on the southern portion of the 72-acre Harbor-UCLA Medical Center’s site, establishing “a campus within a campus” dedicated to the advancement of medical science. The plan includes significant restructuring of the existing campus and defines areas for essential medical research functions in an effort to create a cohesive research park organized around facilities that support translational research and collaboration. The master 92

plan identified a series of projects to be implemented in phases, including three research laboratory buildings, a new campus center, a parking structure, new campus quadrangles and gardens, and a new campus entrance, as well as a connecting research spine that would link three of the Institute’s existing buildings with the proposed new research facilities. ZGF worked with Harbor-UCLA Medical Center’s planning team to organize the plan in a way that parking facilities could be shared with the hospital, and an extension of the spine would create a physical link between LA BioMed and the hospital. The master plan, together with the siting and massing of the new facilities, will establish a new identity for LA BioMed in the future. ZGF was subsequently commissioned to design the Phase 1 implementation.


THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII Cancer Center

HONOLULU, HAWAII

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH SHIMOKAWA + NAKAMURA, DESIGNED A 150,000 SF CANCER RESEARCH FACILITY FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII ON THE KAKA’AKO WATERFRONT IN HONOLULU.

The LEED-Gold certified building provides state-of-theart wet and dry research laboratories, and associated office spaces. The laboratories are linked by a series of public and shared spaces, supporting the collaboration and interaction of the various research initiatives, which include Natural Products / Carcinogenesis, Epidemiology, Clinical Science, Prevention and Control, and Hawaii Tumor Registry. The building has been designed as a role model for highly sustainable laboratory facilities by preserving natural resources, reducing operating costs, and improving the work environment. Elements, such as low-e glazing, were 94

implemented to relate the building to the adjacent campus and its natural surroundings. Referencing the tone of the warmth and softness of the façade, a multistory breezeway of Parklex wood panels features an elevator tower clad in coral stone to connect the two wings of the building and to create a powerful visual link with the ocean.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES Center for Health Sciences, South Tower Seismic Renovation

ZGF HAS BEEN WORKING WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES ON CONVERTING A FORMER HOSPITAL BUILDING TO ACCOMMODATE STATE-OF-THEART RESEARCH WET LABORATORIES AND ASSOCIATED OFFICE FUNCTIONS TO SUPPORT THE DAVID GEFFEN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE’S RESEARCH AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS

As the largest single building located in the 2,400,000 SF Center for the Health Sciences Complex, the 443,387 SF South Tower is physically connected to buildings on all sides, yet is structurally independent. After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, damage assessment and engineering studies determined that the 12-story Tower required structural improvements to meet current building codes and standards. The ZGF team was also asked to address the building’s energy efficiency and life 98

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

safety infrastructure with the ultimate goal of providing a flexible laboratory environment in a cost-effective, functionally efficient building that is seismically safe and sustainable. The double LEED Platinum® renovation project was phased to maintain existing operations of lower level medical laboratories. Phase 1 (Interior Demolition and Hazardous Materials Abatement of Levels 2-10), Phase 2 (Interior Demolition and Abatement of Levels B, A, and 1; seismic renovation; and core + shell improvements), and Phase 3 (Basic Tenant Improvements) are completed. The new space provides a “warm shell” for flexible wet laboratory space with interior finishes, but without specific casework and equipment. Phase 4 is in progress and will include Enhanced Tenant Improvements and customization of the “warm shell” to meet specific research needs of the user groups.


ENGINEERING / BIOENGINEERING / NANOSCIENCE

ZGF was instrumental in providing a convincing argument for a design where open laboratories and open plan seating would foster an environment of enhanced collaboration across disciplines. This concept worked—and, I now believe that it will quickly become the norm rather than the exception. BRUCE GNADE, PHD, VICE PRESIDENT OF RESEARCH, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory

RICHARDSON, TEXAS

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH PAGE, DESIGNED A NEW 190,195 SF NATURAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY THAT PROVIDES HIGHLY FLEXIBLE INTERDISCIPLINARY LABORATORY SPACE TO SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGE THE INTERACTION OF THE RESEARCHERS HOUSED WITHIN.

Equally important was providing the most highly serviced and safest laboratory space on the campus to accommodate cleanroom and laboratory functions previously housed in other buildings. The solution was a floor plan with two laboratory wings, with office space adjacent to the laboratories. The primary activities housed in the facility are physics, biology, chemistry, electrical engineering, and neuroscience, with much of the research being conducted at a nano-level scale. The research facility also includes a 10,000 SF cleanroom, 102

space for the University’s technology acceleration program, and facilities for imaging. The communal parts of the program are located at the building ends, including conference rooms on the east, and a twostory café and seminar room at the south overlooking a courtyard. Interconnecting stairs are located at the intersection of the two building wings. Whether in a laboratory or administrative office area, one can see all the way through the building.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS Bioengineering and Sciences Building

RICHARDSON, TEXAS

THE 223,000 SF, LEED GOLD® BIOENGINEERING AND SCIENCES BUILDING, DESIGNED BY ZGF IN ASSOCIATION WITH PAGE, IS PHYSICALLY CONNECTED TO THE ADJACENT 190,195 SF NATURAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY (ALSO DESIGNED AND COMPLETED BY ZGF/PAGE) TO ALLOW SHARING OF CORE FACILITIES.

The highly flexible research and teaching laboratories bring together interdisciplinary groups of scientists and engineers from multiple fields, including biology, neuroscience, and bioengineering. Offices for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and teaching assistants are mixed together with teaching and research facilities to ensure dynamic interactions, continuous learning, and ingenious discovery. The building supports learning and research 106

of the functions of the brain, the nervous system, the cell, the gene, and the disciplines of science and engineering as they relate to improvement of human functions and electronic sensing devices. An integral approach to building mass, orientation, exterior façade development, and systems design optimizes building performance and reduces energy costs.


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CORNELL UNIVERSITY Duffield Hall Nanotechnology Research Facility

ITHACA, NEW YORK

ZGF DESIGNED A 150,930 SF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL CENTER WITHIN THE ENGINEERING QUADRANGLE TO SUPPORT SCIENCE IN THE FIELDS OF ELECTRONICS, OPTOELECTRONICS, MATERIAL SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING, MICROELECTRONICS, AND NANOTECHNOLOGY.

Approximately one-third of the facility is comprised of cleanrooms. The building also has low vibration and low electromagnetic field standards, and extensive central laboratory service requirements. The modular design can be adapted to changing functional needs. As changes in use are called for by new researchers, research direction, or organization, partitions can be relocated, doors moved, and rooms expanded into larger rooms or contracted into several smaller rooms without requiring reconstruction of structural or building 110

services. An important requirement of the design was to create an environment that would foster interaction among all disciplines of the College. Spaces for casual interaction or “intellectual collisions” are provided through the strategic location of common facilities, such as stairs, alcoves, and conference rooms, as well as a library and a café. The atrium also provides visibility between floors, enabling researchers to see colleagues moving from one space to another.


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DUKE UNIVERSITY Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Sciences DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 330,000 SF, LEED SILVERÂŽ FACILITY FOR THE PRATT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND THE DUKE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.

The Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Sciences supports teaching and research efforts in bioengineering, photonics and communications systems, integrated sensors and simulators, materials sciences, and materials engineering. It also expands Pratt’s partnership with the medical school, providing laboratories for collaborative research in healthcare, genomics, and biotechnology. Program elements include research and teaching laboratories, a 22,500 SF cleanroom, a characterization and testing facility (Class 1000 to Class 100), a 206-seat conference center, lecture halls, classrooms, and administrative spaces. The Fitzpatrick Center 114

consists of two buildings linked by a publicly accessible atrium and conference center, which provides the engineering school with indoor gathering spaces and identity within the larger campus environs. Serving as a catalyst for the formation of a new engineering quadrangle, the Fitzpatrick Center is constructed in front of the existing engineering building and forms a new pedestrian axis and open space to integrate the new facility with the historic core of the west academic campus. Native materials help mold the pedestrian and landscape experience of the new facilities and connecting forest pathways. The project site was chosen to encourage use of public transportation, including a planned intermodal transit station.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Stanley Hall

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOENGINEERING TEACHING AND RESEARCH BUILDING TO FIT WITHIN A SENSITIVE CAMPUS CONTEXT AND TO PROMOTE A UNIQUE SYNERGY AMONG SCIENTISTS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, AND ENGINEERING DISCIPLINES.

Key project issues for the 290,000 SF, eight-story Stanley Hall included creating a flexible layout for the laboratories that would respond to new and changing multidisciplinary research, integrating adaptable building systems and infrastructure, and designing open, inviting spaces to stimulate interaction among faculty and students from the various departments and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Organized around research themes relating to health, energy, 118

and the environment, major program elements include research and teaching laboratories, a bionanotechnology center with cleanrooms, support functions, lecture halls, an NMR suite, specialized low-vibration optical suites, a multimedia / distance learning center, and administrative space. The building responds to its sloping site and the rich architectural context of the site, bridging between the classical Beaux Arts and Arts and Crafts traditions of the campus.


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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Ann and Robert H. Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building

ZGF DESIGNED THE ANN AND ROBERT H. LURIE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING AS AN EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN’S BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TO ACCOMMODATE NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN VARIOUS EMERGING FIELDS.

The design focuses on interdisciplinary research with an open laboratory concept that challenges traditional models of laboratory planning. The completed project consists of 31,670 SF of new construction in the form of an addition, with 23,370 SF of renovated space in an existing building. Programs in the facility emphasize cellular and molecular biotechnologies, and include research laboratories and support spaces, a lobby atrium, wet and dry teaching laboratories, classrooms, conference rooms, and faculty offices. The large atrium 122

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interaction space is a key component of the new facility, fostering interaction among faculty, administrators, and students. This space is connected to an entry plaza with additional opportunities for student and faculty gatherings. The project site is located at one of the main entries to the North Campus and is very visible from the surrounding community. The addition was located on the south side of the existing structure, providing a new face to the community and becoming a gateway to the north campus that not only improves the campus appearance, but is a symbol for the North Campus and the College of Engineering.


PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science

PORTLAND, OREGON

THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE FOR THE NORTHWEST CENTER FOR ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, DESIGNED BY ZGF, WAS TO COMBINE ALL OF THE ENGINEERING DISCIPLINES INTO A STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITY IN AN EFFORT TO ENHANCE INTERACTION AND LEARNING WITHIN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE.

The project involved a new 138,000 SF building and renovation of an existing facility. By bringing together programs previously dispersed in multiple buildings throughout the campus, the project creates a regional center for the growing number of collaborative programs with Oregon Health & Science University, the Oregon Graduate Institute of Technology, and other institutions. It is also a key element in the University’s goal to increase its emphasis on engineering, science, 124

and technology by accommodating a growth of engineering graduates, being doubled from 250 per year to 500. The Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science provides interdisciplinary research and teaching facilities in five above-grade stories that incorporate classrooms, 48 laboratories, a 120-seat lecture auditorium, faculty offices, student service offices, and offices for the college’s dean. The building incorporates many high-performance design features, including a geothermal heat exchange system, and has achieved LEED Gold®.


THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Chemical Sciences Building

TUCSON, ARIZONA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW 85,661 SF LABORATORY BUILDING TO HOUSE THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA.

Located in the historic campus core and directly adjacent to the campus’s original chemistry building, the Chemical Sciences Building consolidates and frames usable open space, while enhancing the environment, and strengthening the campus precinct south of the main mall. Program areas include organic, inorganic, analytical. and physical chemistry research laboratories and support spaces; a Class 1000 cleanroom; instrument laboratories; faculty and student offices; and administrative support spaces. The building is organized by its two distinct types of space: laboratories and offices. Office support spaces are grouped together 126

to promote interaction among users. The laboratories were designed using a modular approach, and are served by a linear equipment room to maintain a separate service access and to accommodate future changes in research programs and staffing. The eastern end of the building is clad in corrugated copper and acts as a backdrop to a newly landscaped piazza. A glass curtain wall takes advantage of the north orientation, where all offices are located, to take advantage of views. The glass curtain wall, comprised of clear and fritted glass, metal panels, and a sunscreen, is flanked at each end by entry lobbies at the building’s corners. To the south, brick was used with a rich three-dimensional patterning that gives the façade its own identity and at the same time ties it back to the traditional vocabulary of the campus.


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UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Physics and Nanotechnology Building

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ALLIIANCE, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 144,000 SF LABORATORY WHICH COLLOCATES DISPARATE PROGRAMS WITHIN A FLEXIBLE, INTERDISCIPLINARY ENVIRONMENT LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CAMPUS’ SCIENCE PRECINCT.

The building includes physics experimental and theoretical research groups and faculty and graduate student office space and the Center for Nanostructure Applications (CNA), a federally-funded, campus-wide initiative to promote interdisciplinary collaboration and discovery of nanotechnology research. The design leverages shared space and equipment needs while providing distinct identities for each group within the building. A 5,000 SF glass-enclosed Class 10 cleanroom is sited prominently on the first floor at the main entry,

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puts science on display, supporting institutional goals of education and recruitment. The project is LEED Silver®.


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UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON MolES and NanoES Buildings

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE TWO-PHASED MOLES AND NANOES BUILDINGS, WHICH TOGETHER PROVIDE 160,000 SF OF CRITICAL RESEARCH SPACE IN THE FIELD OF INTERDISCIPLINARY MOLECULAR ENGINEERING CONSIDERED CRITICAL FOR ENSURING FUTURE ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND MEDICAL HEALTH WORLDWIDE.

Sited within the campus core, the buildings were designed to fit within the historic context while also reflecting the cutting-edge nature of the research housed within them. The 90,000 SF Phase 1 building provides space to support a wide range of wet and dry laboratory uses, including fume hood-intensive chemistry, open plan offices for researchers, faculty offices, common and support space. The design takes advantage of the topography of the site to provide 134

ground and basement level instrumentation laboratories (the largest on the West Coast) with ultra-low vibration and electromagnetic interference requirements, allowing the research laboratories to be above-grade to take advantage of daylight and views. The LEED Gold® building is the first laboratory building on campus with a naturally ventilated office component. It also features optimized laboratory ventilation, energy-efficient chilled beams, and two green roofs. Phase 2 will provide an additional 70,000 SF of research and collaboration space and includes a significant classroom component.


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UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Engineering Research Center

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE 5,500 SF ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER TO BRING TOGETHER LEADERS IN ROBOTIC, NEUROSCIENCE, COMPUTER SCIENCE, AND OTHER DISCIPLINES TO ADVANCE THE INTEGRATION OF TECHNOLOGIES WITH HUMAN NEURAL SYSTEMS.

Located within the George Russell Jr. Building at the University of Washington, the new facility is used to pursue interdisciplinary research and education to address questions important to both human health and robotics, and to provide the foundation for new industries through innovation. The Center was made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation. More specifically, researchers at the Center use robotic devices that assist in the understanding of the nervous system, combining advances in robotics, neuroscience, electromechanical devices, and computer 138

science to restore or augment the body’s ability for sensation and movement. Research will lead to new technologies developed for amputees, people with spinal cord injuries, and people with cerebral palsy, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and age-related neurological disorders. Based on the client’s desire for an inviting space that would foster a spirit of collaboration, the design provides a highly flexible arrangement featuring open spaces that take advantage of natural light and a lively color palette.


VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY Goodwin Hall

BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RECENTLY COMPLETED AN UPDATED STRATEGIC FACILITIES PLAN TO TRANSFORM THE COLLEGE’S EXISTING, AND INCREASINGLY OBSOLETE SPACE, INTO MODERN FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT CUTTING-EDGE AND EXPANDING PROGRAMS.

The 159,500 SF Goodwin Hall / Signature Engineering Building focuses on undergraduates with highly specialized laboratories to support hands-on problem solving and active-learning. The new facility consists of classrooms, instructional and research laboratories, offices, and support space for the Departments of Mechanical, Chemical, and Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, as well as administrative space for engineering education and student services. Additional 140

building components include meeting rooms, casual study space, and a café. Public corridors and student gathering spaces wrap around highly transparent teaching and research laboratories and a central atrium, which includes a Rolls-Royce jet engine and a study / meeting “capsule.” The building also has more than 240 sensors embedded into the structure to study real-time the building vibration for a variety of research projects. Energy efficient strategies, such as heat recovery, recycled air in public spaces, and stormwater management systems helped the building achieve LEED Gold®.


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U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS Army Institute of Public Health

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MARYLAND

THE CURRENT PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND LABORATORY FACILITIES ARE HOUSED IN 11 BUILDINGS, MOST OF WHICH ARE OLD, DETERIORATING, AND CANNOT SUPPORT MODERN EQUIPMENT. ZGF HAS DESIGNED A REPLACEMENT FACILITY THAT WILL CO-LOCATE ALL FIELD LABORATORIES, A CENTRAL UTILITY PLANT, A WAREHOUSE, AND RELATED SUPPORT FACILITIES INTO A FULLY INTEGRATED OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH FACILITY.

The 275,042 SF building is designed as a three-story laboratory bar with field laboratories and toxicology offices / laboratories on the lowest level, a mix of field and wet laboratories on the second level, and wet laboratories on the top level. Research offices are located along the northern exterior wall, affording views over the landscape and maximizing the opportunity to 144

admit glare-free north light into the workplace. Offices and conference rooms have a recirculating air supply, with laboratories providing once-through air with chilled beams, to achieve greater energy efficiency. Surface parking will be organized in terraces around the sides of the gentle hill, establishing a terraced base for the building and providing a gravity-driven stormwater management system that integrates bio-infiltration and detention swales. These are designed to flow appropriately into the lower wetlands, thereby enhancing their health and that of the surrounding area. A future phase includes a three-story office building and additional parking. The facility is designed in accordance with all USACE facilities criteria, and is expected to earn LEED Silver®.


UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE ConocoPhillips Integrated Science Building

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ECI/HYER, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 129,000 SF RESEARCH AND TEACHING LABORATORY, WHICH PLACES SCIENCE EDUCATION ON DISPLAY AND PROMOTES CROSS-DISCIPLINARY FERTILIZATION AND SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY.

Laboratories are highly adaptable and include dramatic views. A daylit atrium provides gathering space linking the three building wings—research, teaching, and office. Emphasizing vertical and horizontal connectivity, a central stair and bridges link the 3-story building at every level. Additional open interaction spaces dispersed throughout the building feature white boards to encourage impromptu discussion among students, faculty, and staff. Extensive use of glass provides a high level of transparency throughout the facility, while the 146

use of a variety of wood finish materials adds warmth during long winter months.


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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Programming Studies for Multiple Science Facilities

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY

ZGF IS ENGAGED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DETAILED PROGRAMMING STUDY FOR PRINCETON’S SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES (SEAS) AS PART OF A COMPREHENSIVE CAMPUS MASTER PLANNING EFFORT.

The division has seen a tremendous rise in applicants in recent years, as well as a significant increase in the number of students seeking to enroll in engineering coursework. Although the University has added a substantial number of new research and teaching laboratories, the bulk of the existing programs still reside in antiquated buildings that are close to the end of their useful lives. The pressing need to revitalize, replace, or otherwise improve the quality of SEAS facilities presents numerous opportunities to reinvent and reinterpret the relevance of engineering practice within the campus today. Uniquely positioned to offer a high-caliber 150

engineering education within a liberal arts environment, the school is looking inward and to its peers to help re-define the practice of engineering both within and beyond the context of the University. Through a series of workshops with the SEAS strategic planning task force and the SEAS programming committee, ZGF assessed the existing physical infrastructure and identified the quantities and types of new facilities to be brought online to support the articulated pedagogical and research goals. Working with the campus planning team and the University, ZGF collaborated on strategies for site evaluation and selection, and planning strategies for the overall SEAS campus.


ENVIRONMENTAL

ZGF’s design Embodies the values of our University—a history in agriculture, an ethic of environmental effectiveness, and a spirit of collaboration across the arts and sciences. We are thrilled with the outcome for our scientists, for our campus and its place in the region, and for the international community that will benefit from the work of the institute. ROBERT SEGAR, ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR, CAMPUS PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS


GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY / LINCOLN PROPERTY COMPANY Potomac Science Center

WOODBRIDGE, VIRGINIA

LIVING AN ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS LIFESTYLE IS AT THE HEART OF THIS PROJECT AND THE MESSAGE TO WHICH THE UNIVERSITY IS DEDICATED, NOT ONLY BY THE PROGRAMS WITHIN THE BUILDING, BUT THROUGH THE ARCHITECTURE ITSELF.

The 52,000 SF building, which will sit on the banks of the Occoquan River, provides space for George Mason University’s Potomac Environmental Research & Education Center; the Geoinformatics Training and Research Center; as well as K-12 and community outreach. Program elements are grouped by air change requirements and fed by separate high-efficiency mechanical systems best suited to their use, while daylight modeling helped sculpt the façades of the narrow floor plates to maximize deep daylight penetration with minimal glare. The university has also 152

partnered with the neighborhood and regional utility companies to install solar panels across the upper deck of the adjacent new parking garage. The architecture and the extensive, landscaped gardens containing native plantings and bio-filtration systems will play an active role in the research and teaching being performed within the Center. ZGF is serving as the design architect in association with HKS. In accordance with the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Public-Private Education Facilities and Infrastructure Act, the team of Lincoln Property Company, Belmont Bay LLC, HKA, and ZGF collaborated to offer George Mason University the land and to lead the development of the project. The project was designed to achieve LEED Silver®.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA Marine Sciences Building

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PLANNED AND DESIGNED THE FOUR-STORY, 62,006 SF MARINE SCIENCES BUILDING (MSB), WHICH SHARES THE SITE WITH THE DONALD BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT, ALSO DESIGNED BY ZGF, ON THE LAST OPEN SITE FACING THE OCEAN ON THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS.

The LEED-Certified building accommodates a unique combination of research and education programs, including: the Marine Science Institute, with its major research centers in ocean and coastal conservation, biotechnology, and marine policy; and the Natural Reserve System, which manages field sites for research and education on California’s diverse natural resources. The MSB includes teaching and research laboratories— specialized seawater work rooms with running sea 154

water, as well as temperature / humidity controlled environment rooms—faculty and departmental offices, conference facilities, an auditorium, and support areas to accommodate highly interdisciplinary research projects involving faculty from the departments of biology, geology, ecology, geography, chemistry, materials engineering, oceanography, environmental science, and public policy. The open-air courtyard in the center of the wedge-shaped building provides a convenient gathering space, while open walkways and bridges between the floors increase visibility of the faculty and students, and encourage chance meetings and informal interaction.


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U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION FDA at Irvine, Regional Laboratory and District Office

IRVINE, CALIFORNIA

ZGF, IN JOINT VENTURE WITH HDR, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW 133,470 SF BUILDING FOR THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION TO REPLACE AND CONSOLIDATE THE AGENCY’S AGING LABORATORIES AND FORMER DISTRICT OFFICE.

Completion of this building facilitated a changing institutional culture and new work methods to address advances in technology and science. The facility is comprised of testing laboratories, laboratory services, and offices, along with a conference center, a dining area, a library, and a training area. Each laboratory is used for a specific purpose: medical device engineering, entomology / sanitation, organoleptic, pesticide chemistry, microbiology, drug chemistry, and food chemistry. Eliminating visual barriers between the office and laboratory modules was key to the design, as was 158

harmonizing the building with its 10-acre site adjacent to a freshwater marsh reserve. The building is oriented so that both floors of offices have a view of the wetlands to the northeast; laboratories on the south side face a landscaped parking lot. Although the project was awarded and designed prior to the establishment of the LEED system, many sustainable design features were incorporated as a matter of best practice. Located partially on a former landfill, the site was remediated prior to construction and landscaped with native and drought-tolerant species. In consideration of the adjacent wetland, bioswales were designed to capture rainwater for use in site irrigation. FDA at Irvine has been recognized with numerous awards, including the R&D Magazine Laboratory of the Year High Honors award.


160


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science

DAVIS, CALIFORNIA

ZGF DESIGNED THE NEW 139,000 SF ROBERT MONDAVI INSTITUTE FOR WINE AND FOOD SCIENCE, ESTABLISHING A HOME FOR ONE OF THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS WINE AND FOOD SCIENCE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS IN THE WORLD.

Consolidating the University’s departments of Viticulture and Enology, and Food Science and Technology, the Robert Mondavi Institute offers students more courses in food and beverage science than any other university in the nation. The Institute serves as a gateway between UC Davis and a broad community of scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, and industry professionals engaged in all dimensions of wine and food science-related activities. To support interdisciplinary teaching and research, the laboratories themselves were designed to facilitate flexibility and reconfiguration. Just as the concept of 162

terroir is used to denote the special characteristics that geography bestows upon wine, the term can also be applied to describe the impact of place on architecture. Housing the Sensory Research Theater, sensory teaching / research laboratories, conference spaces, multi-level interaction areas, and offices, the Institute is articulated in an ensemble of buildings, reflective of nearby farms and wineries, and organized around a central garden. The concept is intended to express the synthesis of science and culture, and present a dramatic and inviting new regional face to the UC Davis campus. The design of the facility reflects the agricultural roots of the campus coupled with the today’s collaborative approach to research.


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IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Biorenewables Complex

AMES, IOWA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH OPN ARCHITECTS, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE TWO-PHASED 244,300 SF BIORENEWABLES COMPLEX SHOWCASING THE STATE OF IOWA'S AND IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY’S SHARED COMMITMENT TO CUTTING-EDGE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND MATERIALS RESEARCH.

The complex integrates research and teaching laboratories, classrooms, offices, meeting and support space connected by a central atrium to optimize collaboration and cross-fertilization of ideas in a single transparent, daylit facility. Phase 1 houses the 74,300 SF Biorenewables Research Laboratory (BRL) which includes research laboratories and a high bay. Phase 2 includes Elings Hall, a 70,000 SF office and classroom wing, and Sukup Hall, a 100,000 SF research and teaching wing for ISU’s top-ranked Department of 166

Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering (ABE). Located on the last open site on the west edge of central campus, the complex creates a hub for student, faculty, and visitor activity, while establishing front door for the campus’ high profile program. The complex is LEED Gold®.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Paul G. Allen Center for Global Animal Health

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE PAUL G. ALLEN CENTER FOR GLOBAL ANIMAL HEALTH, WHICH IS DEDICATED TO PROVIDING RESEARCH SOLUTIONS TO WORLDWIDE HEALTH CHALLENGES.

The 62,000 SF Phase 1 building is designed to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration and offers the flexibility necessary for grant funded research. The ground floor features an entry lobby and reception area open to the floors above. The entry opens on to a terrace with sliding glass doors which support larger gatherings and fundraising events. The highly contained, ground floor BSL-3 laboratory provides safe access for research specimens. Upper floors include BSL-2 laboratories and open offices organized into neighborhoods to facilitate exchange and discovery. Laboratories and offices are visually connected by a glass wall to allow continuous 170

visual connection and maximize daylight and views. The Phase 1 building is LEED Silver®.


J. CRAIG VENTER INSTITUTE J. Craig Venter Institute La Jolla

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THIS 44,607 SF BUILDING, WHICH IS COMPRISED OF LABORATORY AND OFFICE / DRY RESEARCH SPACE ABOVE A PARTIALLY BELOW-GRADE PARKING STRUCTURE, IN RESPONSE TO THE CLIENT’S CHALLENGE TO HAVE A BUILDING THAT GENERATES MORE ENERGY THAN IT CONSUMES.

The J. Craig Venter Institute is a leader in genomic research, with a commitment to environmental stewardship. The LEED Platinum® facility has been designed with a net-zero energy footprint, and is one of the greenest buildings in the country. The team’s holistic approach to design revolved around energy performance and water conservation. To reduce energy loads and optimize the mechanical system, the computational laboratories and administrative spaces are located in one wing, and wet laboratories occupy the other. Ground 172

level wet laboratories utilize an easily reconfigurable “plug and play” casework system that encourages transparency and creates an environment that can be rearranged overnight. The dry wing provides open and private offices, formal meeting areas, temporary visitor stations, and informal open modular seating to support administrative and research activities and to foster collaboration. Two arrays comprising 26,124 SF of photovoltaic surface are predicted to exceed the building demand, pushing excess power generated back into the grid. The systems have been refined to be completely integrated and work together to achieve the energy performance goals.


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ADDITIONAL RESEARCH PROJECTS ALLEN INSTITUTE FOR BRAIN SCIENCE SEATTLE, WASHINGTON AMGEN

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIFORNIA

Building 29 Biotechnology Research Center

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PHOENIX, ARIZONA

Biodesign Institute C

BAPTIST HEALTH SOUTH FLORIDA SOUTH MIAMI, FLORIDA Comprehensive Cancer Center

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO FRESNO, CALIFORNIA Jordan Agriculture Research Building

GEORGIA REGENTS UNIVERSITY

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA

Cancer Research Building

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS

Richard and Barbara Silverman Hall for Molecular Therapeutics and Diagnostics Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Hall, Center for Nanofabrication and Molecular Self-Assembly The Arthur & Gladys Pancoe NorthShore University HealthSystem Life Sciences Pavilion

OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY

PORTLAND, OREGON

Mark O. Hatfield Research Center Vollum Institute

PFIZER

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Research and Development Campus

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

Foundations in Medicine 1, Master Site Plan and Buildings

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

COLUMBUS, OHIO

Physics Research Building

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, M.D. ANDERSON CANCER CENTER George and Cynthia Mitchell Basic Sciences Research Building

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA, FAIRBANKS

FAIRBANKS, ALASKA

Energy Technology Facility

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Life Sciences Building Sciences Laboratory Building

176

DAVIS, CALIFORNIA

HOUSTON, TEXAS


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE IRVINE, CALIFORNIA Natural Sciences Unit 2 Engineering Unit 2

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

Biological Sciences Building Entomology Building

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Mission Bay Campus, Genentech Hall

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH MEDICAL CENTER

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Center for Innovative Science

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Ray R. Irani Hall, Molecular and Computational Biology Building Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

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INDEX B

M

BioMed Realty Trust Vue Research Center 48

Max Planck Florida Corporation Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience 80

C Carnegie Institution for Science Maxine F. Singer Building 18 Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Saban Research Institute 38 Cornell University Duffield Hall Nanotechnology Research Facility 110

D Dickinson College Stuart Hall and James Hall 4 Duke University Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Sciences 114

E

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center The Mortimer B. Zuckerman Research Center 62

N National Institutes of Health Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center 58 NYU Langone Medical Center Alexandria Center for Life Science – NYC East Tower / Laboratory Fit-Out 76

P Portland State University Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science 124

Emory University Health Sciences Research Building 84

Princeton University Programming Studies for Multiple Science Facilities 150

F

S

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 24

G George Mason University / Lincoln Property Company Potomac Science Center 152

I Iowa State University Biorenewables Complex 166

J

Science Center / Wexford Science + Technology 3400 Science Center 42 3711 Science Center 40 3800 Science Center 44 Stanford University Stanford Institutes of Medicine 1, Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, A California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Facility 14

T

J. Craig Venter Institute J. Craig Venter Institute La Jolla 172

The Johns Hopkins University Bunting Blaustein and David H. Koch Cancer Research Buildings 30

L

The University of Arizona Bioscience Research Laboratories 36

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Campus Master Plan 92

Chemical Sciences Building 126 Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building / Medical Research Building 32

The University of Chicago Gwen and Jules Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery 28

University of Minnesota Cancer and Cardiovascular Research Building 88

The University of Hawaii Cancer Center 94

Physics and Nanotechnology Building 130

The University of Texas at Dallas Bioengineering and Sciences Building 106

University of Washington Engineering Research Center 138

Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory 102

U University of Alaska Anchorage ConocoPhillips Integrated Science Building 146 University of California, Berkeley Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences 10 Stanley Hall 118 University of California, Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science 162 University of California, Los Angeles Center for Health Sciences, South Tower Seismic Renovation 98 University of California, San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute 70 Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility 54 Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building 50 Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center 66 University of California, Santa Barbara Marine Sciences Building 154 University of Miami / Wexford Science + Technology Life Science & Technology Park, Master Plan and Research + Development Building 1 46 University of Michigan Ann and Robert H. Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building 122

MolES and NanoES Buildings 134 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Army Institute of Public Health 144 U.S. Food and Drug Administration FDA at Irvine, Regional Laboratory and District Office 158

V Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Goodwin Hall 140

W Washington State University Orville A. Vogel Plant Biosciences Building 8 Paul G. Allen Center for Global Animal Health 170


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