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HIGHPERFORMANCE


ZGF Architects LLP is an award-winning architectural, planning, and interior design firm with offices in Portland, Seattle, Los Angeles, Washington, DC, New York, and Vancouver, BC. Our portfolio features a diverse mix of projects for both private and public institutions, including work for healthcare, research, academic, civic, corporate, and commercial clients. ZGF has been an industry leader and pioneer in sustainable design. Over 25 years ago, we completed a headquarters building for the Bonneville Power Administration, which was designed to use 50% less energy than its counterparts. The building was selected by the GSA to serve as a national prototype for high-performance office building design. ZGF also designed the first double LEED Platinum® laboratory building at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Since then, with over 150 LEED Accredited Professionals on staff, the firm has designed over 100 projects nationally that have been, or are registered to be, LEED Platinum®, Gold®, or Silver®. Additionally, a number of our projects are pursuing performance standards that exceed the thresholds of LEED Platinum®, and seek to meet various imperatives of the International Living Future Institute’s “Living Building Challenge” program, which require projects to be net-zero energy and water, and minimize the impact of materials and site design. ZGF is committed to the 2030 Challenge, an initiative that targets substantial reductions in carbon emissions associated with building operations and design and advocates for carbon neutrality by the year 2030. Additionally, the firm is working with a number of universities who are signatories of the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment to develop long-range sustainable design strategies for their campuses. Our design excellence has been recognized by numerous sustainable and high-performance design award programs through the AIA, IIDA, EPA, DOE, GSA, American Public Transit Association, Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, State and Local government agencies, and utilities across the country.


ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE Rocky Mountain Institute Innovation Center

BASALT, COLORADO

ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE’S NEW 15,600 SF OFFICE BUILDING IN BASALT IS A PHYSICAL MANIFESTATION OF THE ORGANIZATION’S WORK AND VALUES. IT MAXIMIZES ENERGY AND RESOURCE EFFICIENCY, WHILE CREATING A STRUCTURE THAT COMPLEMENTS AND STRENGTHENS THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND SERVES AS A DEMONSTRATION FACILITY FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE INTEGRATED DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGIES.

Designed to be a 100-year building, the ZGF team utilized a variety of tools to create a LEED Platinum® certified, net-zero energy building that meets the Passivhaus infiltration standards. Intended to demonstrate deep green results, the project includes a super-insulated building envelope with structural insulated panels; a cross-laminated timber structure;

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integrated operable external shading optimized for passive heating and cooling and daylighting; natural ventilation; photovoltaics; and multiple connections to the outdoors. The project seeks to minimize impacts on the environment and dependency on fossil fuels by reducing energy loads and prioritizing passive design principles. Located in a harsh climate with an Energy Use Intensity goal of 17.2 kBtu/SF/yr, the project team used an Integrated Project Delivery approach to promote a collaborative, incentive-based design and construction process.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY An 83 kW roofmounted photovoltaic system generates more energy annually than it uses (-2.8 kBtu/SF/yr or “net-positive” over a 100% reduction) to help the building achieve net-zero energy.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY The Innovation Center is the most energy-efficient building in one of the coldest climates, with a predicted energy use intensity of 17.2 kBtu/SF/yr. Its 83 kW solar-electric system is expected to exceed the power demands of the building by using 74% less energy than the average office building in this climate, as determined by Energy Star. The LEED Platinum® building earned all 19 LEED energy points and meets the Architecture 2030 energy reduction goals, even without considering the photovoltaic array.

SUSTAINABLE SITE The east-west elongated axis of the building follows the gentle curve of the Roaring Fork River to the south and provides generous views and maximum exposure to daylight, while preserving the floodplain and wetlands in the area.

Exterior shades, directed by sensors and the building management system, respond to weather conditions and interior needs for passive solar gain or control. Space lighting power density is reduced by an average of 50% from the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 baseline.

SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE The landscape plan furthers the restoration work to the native riparian habitat, re-establishing an extensive overstory vegetation and a diverse woody understory.

The walls and light shelves include state-of-the-art, phase-change material that provides mass to capture heat. This material melts and solidifies at a specific temperature to store and release energy to help maintain thermal comfort.

HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE The building is sealed and wrapped in a highly insulated “warm coat” envelope—including R-50 walls and an R-67 roof—crafted from Structurally Insulated Panels (SIPs).

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING Native and adapted species reduce irrigation demand by 58%. The municipal non-potable retention pond supplies the remaining 42%.

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ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Ventilation (2.6%)

Domestic Hot Water

300

(2.9%)

Lighting (12.3%)

Exterior Usage

200

(2%)

Miscellaneous Equipment

KEY

Any items not covered by other end use categories

Heating

(48%)

(30.7%)

2030c Baseline

100 66.2

Energy model Energy offset by onsite renewables (PV) Actual energy LEED / Code baseline

19.8

Pumps And Auxilary

0

2030c Target based on occupancy date

-2.82

(1.5%)

STORMWATER DESIGN The building directs stormwater to a rain chain and site swales that provide cleaning and filtration as the water moves to a municipal retention pond to be used as a source of non-potable water. WASTEWATER TREATMENT Separate non-potable plumbing lines were installed to enable the Innovation Center to be one of the first commercial buildings in Colorado to use greywater when state regulatory requirements are approved. SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS Material selections support the native ecosystem. For example, Western Juniper wood, a rot-resistant tree that does not require treatment, was harvested from areas of invasive overgrowth. Materials were specified to be sourced locally to reduce carbon and environmental impacts. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS The southern face has large windows and wood slat ceilings that slope to capture light and mountain views across the river.

ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable windows combine automated controls with manual overrides and a night flushing system during the cool season. An exhaust fan assists natural ventilation in the convening space, while a dedicated outside air system with a Tempeff Dual Core energy recovery system on the exhaust air has a 90% heat recovery effectiveness in winter and 80% in summer. CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS Rather than light and condition the entire space, the design targets occupant comfort and control. Lighting controls include occupancy sensors in all regularly occupied spaces and daylight dimming controls in selected office spaces. To ensure thermal comfort, the Hyperchair from Personal Comfort Systems provides radiant heat and a convective fan, powered by a laptop battery, that is adjustable to personal preference.


PEARL IZUMI USA, INC. Pearl Izumi North American Corporate Headquarters

LOUISVILLE, COLORADO

ZGF DESIGNED THE NEW PEARL IZUMI NORTH AMERICAN HEADQUARTERS BUILDING, LOCATED ON AN EIGHT-ACRE SITE AT THE FOOT OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.

Expressing the dynamic simplicity of a modern design barn, the 55,000 SF building incorporates a dynamic, open workspace that is visually connected to a mezzanine loft, collaborative spaces, conference rooms, and the Shimano Experience Center. The palette of materials—concrete, glass, wood, naturally weathering steel, and accents of vibrant color—combines with high ceilings, abundant natural lighting, ideal solar orientation, and natural ventilation to link the interior space to the vast Colorado outdoors. The ensemble creates a comfortable and creative work environment for staff dedicated to product design and development. The high-energy workspace is balanced with amenities 6

that include a fitness room with showers and locker rooms, a living room, break areas, and a bike room. A protected courtyard, porches, and an outdoor amphitheater extend the social and work space to the outdoors. Future expansion is anticipated and planned for on the site, as well as additional adjacent property depending on growth.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

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MER

SUM

WIN

TER

SUM MER

WIN

TER

SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE A palette of native, low-water-use landscaping minimizes irrigation and maintenance. The planted interior courtyard provides a biophilic entry and reinforces the blurring of outside and inside. STORMWATER DESIGN Stormwater is a serious concern in Colorado. The design team exceeded local requirements by incorporating a series of linked retention ponds that treat all stormwater on-site. The system was tested in its first year with a 1,000-year storm, which hit Boulder especially hard. Torrential rain of 4–6” fell in fewer than 12 hours and was successfully treated, retained and then released. 100% of precipitation is managed on-site. HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE The building achieves dramatic energy savings by using 10-inch-thick Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) in the walls and roofs for an airtight building envelope. The super-insulation of the double concrete walls and SIPs keeps the facility comfortable year-round and lowers the heating and cooling loads.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY The building was designed to achieve a 65% reduction from a typical similar building. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS The solar orientation maximizes natural light while controlling heat gain in the summer and absorbing it in the winter. ENHANCED VENTILATION Angled clerestories bring daylight deep into the work spaces and are fitted with motorized vents to assist the chimney effect for natural ventilation. Operable wood windows are located throughout the workspace. MATERIALS REUSE Reclaimed Wyoming snow fence wood and exposed concrete are used on the façade.


STANFORD UNIVERSITY Central Energy Facility

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

AS A PART OF THE STANFORD ENERGY SYSTEM INNOVATION (SESI) INITIATIVE, STANFORD UNIVERSITY RECENTLY COMPLETED A TRANSFORMATIONAL CAMPUSWIDE ENERGY SYSTEM, AT THE HEART OF WHICH IS A NEW CENTRAL ENERGY FACILITY—DESIGNED BY ZGF, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH AFFILIATED ENGINEERS—THAT EMBODIES THE LATEST TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES AND ECODISTRICT PLANNING SOLUTIONS.

The comprehensive energy system replaces a 100% fossil-fuel based combined heat and power plant with grid-sourced electricity and a first-of-its-kind heat recovery system, yielding compelling results for the entire campus: greenhouse gas emissions slashed by 68%, fossil fuel use reduced by 65%, and water use reduced by 15%. The 125,614 SF Central Energy Facility is comprised of five distinct components: an administrative / teaching building, a heat recovery 10

chiller plant, an OSHPD-compliant cooling and heating plant, a service yard, and a new campus-wide, main electrical substation. The new complex was designed to sensitively integrate into the surrounding campus. More than a power plant, the Central Energy Facility is a learning center where students have the opportunity to see first-hand the systems and technologies at work. The high-performance, climate-responsive design of the administration building, which houses workstations for plant staff and flexible support space, including collaboration rooms, training / conference rooms, classrooms, a staff lounge, and testing laboratories, will result in net-positive energy performance. The photovoltaic arrays shade the structure while generating more electricity than needed to power the building. Other sustainable features include natural ventilation, radiant flooring heating, chilled beam systems for cooling, and LED lighting.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

7

5 4

6 2

2

3

1

LEGEND 1 Heat Recovery Chillers 2 Chilled Water Storage Tanks 3 Hot Water Tank 4 Fuel Tanks 5 Cooling Towers 6 OSHPD-Compliant Boiler 7 OSHPD-Compliant Chillers

PROCESS WATER SAVINGS The Central Energy Facility reduces total campus water usage by 15% annually, by reclaiming waste heat from the cooling process (rather than sending to cooling towers), as well as by switching from steam to hot water distribution. This saves 125 million gallons annually. NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE The project is designed to connect to a future municipal piping system that will provide non-potable water for process cooling and irrigation. SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING Native low-water landscaping is watered by drip, as opposed to spray, irrigation. Porous gravel assists in discharging stormwater runoff and recharging the groundwater table.

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ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

75

50

49

KEY 2030c Baseline

25

Energy model

19.6

Energy offset by onsite renewables (PV) Actual energy LEED / Code baseline 2030c Target based on occupancy date

0

NOT TO SCALE

-75.2

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY A 175 kW rooftop photovoltaic system supplies four times the energy used by the administration building. ENERGY EFFICIENCY The plant is projected to be 70% more efficient than the previous cogeneration plant, and to reduce carbon emissions by 50%. GREEN MATERIALS Locally sourced structural steel exceeds 80% recycled content on average. Boardformed concrete uses local aggregate and doubles as structure and enclosure. Exterior Corten steel panels contain 85% recycled content. Aluminum hardware throughout the facility is highly recycled and recyclable. MATERIALS REUSE The entry court stairway utilizes FSC-certified reclaimed wood for the bench seating. Reclaimed wood is used for soffits.

ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable windows allow natural ventilation and night flush cooling. Large, lowspeed, high-volume ceiling fans help air circulation. The PV-ready trellis structure was designed to provide shading to permit natural ventilation while allowing extensive glazing to maximize daylight and views. CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS LED lighting is used throughout and controlled through occupancy sensors and daylight dimming controls. HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Low-VOC, low-odor paints and carpeting were used to minimize indoor air contaminants. Radiant slabs provide both heating and cooling, and chilled sails provide ambient cooling. Bio-based phase-change materials are installed within ceilings to help maintain comfortable interior temperatures passively.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management

ZGF PLANNED AND DESIGNED THE 84,672 SF DONALD BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT, WHICH WAS ONE OF THE FIRST BUILDINGS IN THE UNITED STATES TO BECOME LEED PLATINUM® AND WAS THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA’S FIRST GREEN BUILDING.

The Bren School was also the nation’s first building to earn LEED Platinum® twice—for both New Construction and Existing Buildings. The building surpasses code requirements for energy efficiency standards by more than 31%. To reduce heat-island effect, a special roofing material was installed to help keep the building cool. In addition, the Bren School was sited to harvest natural light. The office wing relies on natural ventilation with operable windows and transoms, instead of air conditioning. Daylight harvesting is coupled with a 14

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA

lighting plan that incorporates energy efficient fixtures and bulbs and controls for motion and ambient light. A roof-integrated photovoltaic system was installed, which allows 7 to 10% of the power to be generated cleanly on-site during the warmest months. The project also pursued alternative power sources, such as fuel cells that were generously donated. The focus of the design was to create a building that would facilitate interaction through state-of-the-art research and teaching laboratories, faculty and administrative offices, conference and seminar rooms, and outdoor seating.


J. CRAIG VENTER INSTITUTE J. Craig Venter Institute La Jolla

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THIS 44,607 SF BUILDING, WHICH IS COMPRISED OF LABORATORY AND OFFICE / DRY RESEARCH SPACE ABOVE A PARTIALLY BELOW-GRADE PARKING STRUCTURE, IN RESPONSE TO THE CLIENT’S CHALLENGE TO HAVE A BUILDING THAT GENERATES MORE ENERGY THAN IT CONSUMES.

The J. Craig Venter Institute is a leader in genomic research, with a commitment to environmental stewardship. The LEED Platinum® facility has been designed with a net-zero energy footprint, and is one of the greenest buildings in the country. The team’s holistic approach to design revolved around energy performance and water conservation. To reduce energy loads and optimize the mechanical system, the computational laboratories and administrative spaces are located in one wing, and wet laboratories 16

occupy the other. The dry wing provides open and private offices, formal meeting areas, temporary visitor stations, and informal open modular seating to support administrative and research activities and to foster collaboration. Two arrays comprising 26,124 SF of photovoltaic surface are projected to exceed the building demand, pushing excess power generated back into the grid. The systems have been refined to be completely integrated and work together to achieve the energy performance goals. Virtually all site and building water is UV-filtered and recycled for non-potable water functions, which is expected to reduce the building’s domestic water demand by 75%. The two wings form an atrium courtyard, creating a collaborative hub and allowing natural light to penetrate both wings.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

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ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Lighting (13%)

Cooling

300

(5%)

Heating

229.6

(7%)

Miscellaneous Equipment

200 KEY

Any items not covered by other end use categories

Refrigeration

(42%)

(13%)

2030c Baseline Energy model

100 91.8

Exterior Usage (6%)

Domestic Hot Water (1%)

(2%)

(11%)

GREEN ROOFS Roof gardens moderate the building temperature, increase the lifespan of the roof, create new wildlife habitat, and mitigate stormwater runoff volume. STORMWATER DESIGN Rainwater is captured and reused with mechanical filtering and UV disinfection. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES High-efficiency plumbing fixtures and waterless urinals conserve water. NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE Stormwater is reused for non-potable applications. WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING A palette of local plant species minimizes the need for maintenance, irrigation, or mowing, and creates a natural habitat for local wildlife. ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY The entire electrical load is generated on-site from roof-mounted photovoltaic panels.

Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2007)

Pumps and Auxiliary Ventilation

Energy offset by onsite renewables (PV)

0

2030c Target based on occupancy date

-16.9

ENERGY EFFICIENCY Chilled beams cool and heat office spaces efficiently without unnecessary fan power. GREEN MATERIALS The materials used in the building’s interior spaces are produced from recycled content. Fly ash is used in the concrete. The stone used is from local quarries, and the concrete contains local aggregates. SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS All concrete formwork and interior wood finishes use wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. This ensures the sustainable logging of trees and the use of plantation grown wood. ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable windows improve the occupant comfort.


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON MolES and NanoES Buildings

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 160,000 SF, TWO-PHASED MOLES AND NANOES BUILDINGS, WHICH PROVIDE CRITICAL RESEARCH SPACE FOR THE DESIGN, DISCOVERY, AND ENGINEERING OF COMPLEX MOLECULAR SYSTEMS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS.

The project accommodates growth in molecular engineering, responds to the evolving interdisciplinary nature of teaching and research, and fits within a historic, high-density area of the campus. Research will lead to new discoveries with beneficial implications for major societal challenges ranging from energy, sustainability, and information technology to affordable and effective healthcare. The 90,000 SF Phase 1 building provides space to support a wide range of wet laboratory uses, including fume hoodintensive chemistry. The design takes advantage 20

of the topography of the site to provide ground and basement level instrumentation laboratories (the largest on the West Coast) with ultra-low vibration and electromagnetic interference requirements, allowing the research laboratories to be above-grade to take advantage of daylight and views. The LEED GoldÂŽ building is the first laboratory building on campus with a naturally ventilated office component. It also features optimized laboratory ventilation, energy-efficient chilled beams, and a green roof. ZGF completed design of Phase 2, which will provide an additional 70,000 SF of research and collaboration space and includes a significant classroom component.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION The university campus is served by numerous bus routes that connect throughout the city of Seattle. Racks and showers are available for bicycle commuters. HEAT ISLAND REDUCTION Ambient summer temperatures are reduced through highly reflective concrete pavers and membrane roof, and a vegetated roof system that comprises nearly 25% of the roof surface. GREEN ROOFS Extensive green roofs feature drought tolerant sedums, and support on-site stormwater management. STORMWATER DESIGN Rainwater is detained in rain gardens, cleaning and reducing stormwater runoff. LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION Full cut-off site lighting fixtures and automatically controlled interior fixtures reduce the impact on night sky pollution. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES A 47% reduction in water use is predicted based on low-flow fixture selections.

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ENERGY MONITORING Phase change material (PCM) will be monitored in order to illustrate its role in expanding the applicable hours of natural ventilation and improving thermal comfort. Portable, small scale data loggers were installed in four locations within the offices (two placed in a wall and two in ceiling assemblies). For each assembly type monitored, one assembly has PCM installed, and one does not. Assemblies without PCM will be used as controls. Collected data will be scrutinized to vet the effectiveness of including PCM in typical interior assemblies. ENERGY EFFICIENCY During the project, the University reexamined its requirement for air changers per hour, from a campus standard of 10 to 6, providing up to a 40% reduction in energy associated with ventilating, heating, and cooling the laboratory spaces. Energy savings are significantly augmented by modular heat recovery chillers that simultaneously provide cooling to laboratory equipment and chilled beams, then transfer otherwise wasted heat to building heating and hot water systems. Additionally, PCM and radiant floor heating provide consistent and comfortable temperatures in the naturally ventilated portion of the building.


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

800

Cooling (9.6%)

Pumps and Auxiliary (5.2%)

600 Miscellaneous Equipment

Ventilation

518.3

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(14.4%)

(37.8%)

400

Lighting (4.8%)

KEY Domestic Hot Water (0.5%)

207.3

200

LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2004)

(27.7%)

0

GREEN MATERIALS Recycled content and local materials were used throughout the building. The naturally ventilated office utilizes BioPCM, a plant-based wax PCM, to maintain thermal comfort. SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS Wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council was used throughout the building. CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS Building Automation System (BAS) optimizes thermal performance in utilizing the radiant floor and the actuated upper windows. Occupants control the lower windows manually, and a red / green light indicator indicates when conditions are conducive for opening the windows. Users can also override the BAS to control ceiling fans in the office spaces.

Energy model Actual energy

Heating

CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT Over 95% of construction waste was diverted from a landfill to be recycled and reused.

2030c Baseline

2030c Target based on occupancy date

DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS A series of daylight studies (using both physical models in artificial sky and digital models through Ecotect and Radiance) were used to optimize light in the space and reduce the electric lighting load by a predicted 31.5% annually, and 78.5% during peak load conditions. Daylight-optimized internal blinds block direct sunlight, redirect daylight to the ceiling, and permit cross-ventilation during peak load conditions. External shading is utilized. ENHANCED VENTILATION This is the first laboratory building on campus with a naturally ventilated office component and optimized laboratory ventilation. Natural ventilation (enhanced with solar chimneys) in the office portion of the building is modeled to reduce the energy required for cooling that portion of the building by 98% (70,000 kWh annually).


CIVIC SAN DIEGO / CITY OF SAN DIEGO San Diego Civic Center Complex / City Hall

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

CIVIC SAN DIEGO, IN COOPERATION WITH THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO, HELD A DESIGN COMPETITION FOR A NEW THREE PHASE, 3,000,000 SF MIXED-USE AND CIVIC CENTER COMPLEX IN THE HEART OF SAN DIEGO’S CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT. ZGF, TEAMED WITH GERDING EDLEN, SOUGHT TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS OF THIS PUBLIC / PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP BY PROVIDING NEW ADMINISTRATION FACILITIES FOR THE CITY, AND DEVELOPING AN EXCITING HIGH-DENSITY, URBAN MIXED-USE COMPLEX ON FOUR PRIME CITY BLOCKS IN DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO.

The team’s plan was selected based on a design that includes opening up the site, and allowing the now blocked vistas to be reclaimed and reconnected to the urban fabric. The plan proposes reopening B Street and Second Avenue between A and B Streets 24

to vehicular traffic, reconnecting the Civic Center with the neighborhood, and also making the Complex more accessible and welcoming for retail uses. Plazas, fountains, landscaped pedestrian promenades, and pocket courtyards are the backdrop to this active center for civic and everyday life. From its solar photovoltaic panels and garden rooftops to wind turbines and a central cooling and heating plant, the proposed new City Hall complex, along with mixed-use buildings and shared below-grade parking, will reflect the community’s vision. The team expects the project to exceed LEED Platinum®.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

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CLIF BAR & COMPANY Clif Bar Headquarters

EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA

THE 75,000 SF CLIF BAR HEADQUARTERS, DESIGNED BY ZGF, TRANSFORMS AN ORIGINAL WORLD WAR II VALVE MANUFACTURING FACILITY INTO A WORKPLACE HAVEN FOR THE OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS AT CLIF BAR & COMPANY, A LEADING MAKER OF ORGANIC SPORTS NUTRITION FOODS AND HEALTHY SNACKS.

The space celebrates the inherent natural light and volumetric space of a repurposed warehouse, while capturing the company culture and connecting employees to the outdoors through “biophilic” interior design. From custom door pulls made from repurposed bike frames to the largest “smart” solar array in North America—which provides most of the office’s electricity needs—the adaptive reuse focuses on Clif Bar’s core values to sustain its brands, its business, its people, its community, and the planet. The project 28

is LEED Platinum® certified for Commercial Interiors. The headquarters features an open office working environment, a research and development kitchen, an employee wellness area, on-site childcare, theater space, and a café. ZGF recently completed an expansion of the headquarters and developed an additional 32,000 SF that includes 180 new workstations, as well as collaborative workspaces with connections to the existing Clif Bar space. Recycled climbing rope art and recycled wood are used throughout the addition to reflect the company lifestyle and culture.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

STORMWATER DESIGN Planters capture and filter stormwater from the exterior play area preventing it from entering the sewer system. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Low-flow fixtures help reduce water use by more than 30%. ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY Solar thermal panels heat 70% of hot water used by Clif Bar, offsetting natural gas use and saving 27,000 pounds of CO2 emissions per year. High-efficiency boilers provide back-up for nights and low sun days. Photovoltaic panels on the roof will generate over 700,000 kwh/yr and provide up to 75% of power for the tenant space.

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daylight sensors switch off electric lights when there is ample daylight, reducing lighting energy use. Exposed concrete floors moderate indoor air temperatures; its mass absorbs excess heat throughout the day. MATERIALS REUSE Over 60% of the furniture, kitchen equipment, and theater equipment was reused, including workstations from a former tenant and kitchen equipment from a defunct restaurant. Reclaimed wood was used throughout the project for stair treads, ceilings, floors, wall finishes, benches, table tops, and wall caps. Recycled sporting equipment that would have otherwise been tossed in a landfill was used to make door pulls and art installations.


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Lighting (1.7%)

Domestic Hot Water

Miscellaneous Equipment Any items not covered by other end use categories

(9.7%)

(8.5%)

Cooling

300

Refrigeration

(1.3%)

(3.9%)

Ventilation (4.6%)

200

Heating (26.1%)

139.9

Cooking (44.1%)

100 56

Vertical Transport (0.1%)

CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS Individual occupancy sensors at each workstation turn off unused powered devices, helping to conserve energy and reduce building heat loads. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Daylight from existing clerestory windows was harnessed by designing large, open office areas to achieve interior light during most of the day. Glare-control window coverings were installed to provide a comfortable working environment. Over 85% of occupied areas are naturally daylit. ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable windows were refurbished to provide occupants fresh air, cooling, and connection to the outdoors.

0

KEY 2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2007) 2030c Target based on occupancy date


CONRAD N. HILTON FOUNDATION Headquarters, Phase 1

AGOURA HILLS, CALIFORNIA

ZGF MASTER PLANNED AND DESIGNED THE NEW HEADQUARTERS FOR THIS CHARITABLE FOUNDATION. THE 44-ACRE CAMPUS, LOCATED IN THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS, HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO RESPECT ITS NATURAL SETTING AND TO ADAPT TO THE REGION’S ENVIRONMENT.

The development of this contemporary office campus provides the Foundation with a central headquarters to operate, maintain, and coordinate its long-term charitable projects. The full build-out of 90,300 SF of office space and support facilities will be implemented over four phases, along with site improvements. Phase 1 is a 22,240 SF office building featuring a reception area, meeting rooms, and a convenience kitchen. Positioned to respect the site’s natural slope and hillside setting, the building is designed as a 32

net-zero energy, LEED Platinum® facility. To achieve this, the building relies completely on natural ventilation to control the indoor environment. The building is almost entirely conditioned using a passive downdraft HVAC system. Energy for the heating load and hot water comes from the sun, with the back-up water heating system using a solar thermal system. A roof-mounted solar thermal array, consisting of 1,000 SF of evacuated tubes, along with a 3,000-gallon storage tank, provides almost 70% of the hot water heating and all of the domestic hot water for the project. These systems, combined with automated operable shading devices with high-performance glazing, potentially will allow the building to have 61% HVAC energy savings, and 45% overall building energy savings, when compared to a code compliant HVAC system.


BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BuoyancyͲ DoubleSkin& BaselineBuilding (reducedloads) BuoyancyͲ Fixed (reducedloads) Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+ (reducedloads) (reducedloads) DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& BuoyancyͲ Fixed BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ Fixed Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ Fixed Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ BaselineBuildingBaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BaselineBuildingBaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+Solar BuoyancyͲ (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Cooling&Heating Microturbine (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) ChilledBeams Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Auto.Shds. Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage ChilledBeams Microturbine Horiz.Fins Microturbine DoubleSkin& (reducedloads) BaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding (reducedloads) BaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ Fixed (reducedloads) Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ (reducedloads) DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& BuoyancyͲ Fixed BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ FixedCooling&Heating Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ Cooling&Heating Buoyancy+Solar BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ Fixed ThermalStorage Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+ Cooling&Heating Buoyancy+Solar Microturbine Buoyancy+ (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Cooling&Heating Microturbine (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) ChilledBeams Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Auto.Shds. Horiz.Fins Cooling&Heating ThermalStorage ChilledBeams Cooling&Heating Microturbine Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Microturbine Cooling&Heating Microturbin

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES BaselineBuilding

BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding

BuoyancyͲ

BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ

8.3 7.4 8.3 7.4

8.3 7.5 8.3 7.5 6.7

BuoyancyͲ

INTEGRATED SYSTEMS OVERVIEW DoubleSkin& (reducedloads) BuoyancyͲ Fixed (reducedloads) Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ (reducedloads) DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& BuoyancyͲ Fixed BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ Fixed Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ Fixed Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ h/ft² BaselineBuilding (reducedloads) 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding Heating Heating Heating BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BaselineBuilding BuoyancyͲ BuoyancyͲ (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Cooling&Heating Microturbine (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) ChilledBeams Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Auto.Shds. Horiz.Fins Cooling&Heating ThermalStorage ChilledBeams Cooling&Heating Microturbine Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Microturbine Cooling&Heating Microturbin DoubleSkin& (reducedloads) BuoyancyͲ Fixed (reducedloads) Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ (reducedloads) DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& DoubleSkin& BuoyancyͲ Fixed BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+ Fixed Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ BuoyancyͲ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy+ Fixed (kWh/ft²) Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+ Buoyancy+Solar Buoyancy Wh/ft² BaselineBuilding (reducedloads) 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding 14.0kWh/ft² BaselineBuilding (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Heating Heating Heating 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.4 (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Cooling&Heating Microturbine (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) ChilledBeams Auto.Shds. (kWh/ft²) TraditionalFaçade ChilledBeams Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Auto.Shds. Horiz.Fins Cooling&Heating ThermalStorage ChilledBeams Cooling&Heating Microturbine Horiz.Fins ThermalStorage Microturbine Cooling&Heating Microturbi (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) 12.0 12.0 12.0 12.0 Cooling Cooling Cooling h/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.4 h/ft² Waste Heat 14.0kWh/ft² 14.0kWh/ft² 14.0kWh/ft² Waste Heat Waste Heat Heating Heating Heating 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.0 (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) 12.0 12.0 12.0 Cooling Cooling Cooling Wh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Wh/ft² Waste Heat 14.0kWh/ft² 14.0kWh/ft² Waste Heat Waste Heat *10.7 12.0 14.0kWh/ft² *10.7 *10.7 *10.7 Heating Heating Heating Heating Heating Heating 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.0 (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Cooling Cooling Cooling h/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 10.0 10.0 *10.7 10.0 12.0kWh/ft² *10.7 *10.7 10.0 *10.7 h/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² Heating Heating Heating (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Cooling Cooling Cooling Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Cooling Cooling Cooling Wh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 12.0kWh/ft² 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 Waste Waste Waste Waste Wh/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² 10.0kWh/ft² 8.3

10.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 10.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 8.0kWh/ft² 6.0 6.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²

10.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 10.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 8.0kWh/ft² 6.0 6.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²

Wh/ft² h/ft² 6.0

6.0kWh/ft²6.0 6.0kWh/ft²

6.0kWh/ft²6.0 6.0kWh/ft²

6.0kWh/ft²6.0 6.0kWh/ft²

Wh/ft² h/ft²4.0

6.0kWh/ft² 4.0 4.0kWh/ft²

6.0kWh/ft² 4.0 4.0kWh/ft²

6.0kWh/ft² 4.0 4.0kWh/ft²

h/ft² 4.0 Wh/ft²

4.0kWh/ft² 4.0kWh/ft²4.0

4.0kWh/ft² 4.0kWh/ft²4.0

4.0kWh/ft² 4.0kWh/ft²4.0

ystem l

alystem ANT al tal t 0.0 % st 0.0 % st 10.0 %

13% 14% 13%

10.0 % 20.0 %

10.0 %

13%% 13% 14%20.0

20.0 % 30.0 %

30.0 % 40.0 %

40.0 % 50.0 %

50.0 % 60.0 %

60.0 % 70.0 %

20.0 % 30.0 % 30.0 % 40.0 % 40.0 % 50.0 % 50.0 % 60.0 % 60.0 %

2 kWh/ft 2 kWh/ft

2 kWh/ft 2 kWh/ft

13% 15% 10.0 % 11% 20.0 13%% 15%

20.0 % 30.0 % 30.0 % 40.0 % 40.0 % 50.0 % 50.0 % 60.0 % 60.0 %

13% 14% 13%

13% 14% 13%

33% 33%37%

35%

37%

35%

Percentage Reduction Percentage Reduction From Code Compliant From Code Compliant

NS ions STEM ions stem stem NS ANT

Percentage Reduction Percentage Reduction From Code Compliant From Code Compliant

h/ft²0.0 ons TEM 0.0 Wh/ft² ons

10.0kWh/ft² 7.5 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 10.0kWh/ft² 7.5 8.0kWh/ft²8.0 8.0kWh/ft² 6.0 6.0kWh/ft² 8.0kWh/ft²

8.3

13% 14% 13% 15% 10.0 11%

%

13% 14%20.0 13%% 15%

39%

20.0 % 30.0 % 30.0 % 40.0 % 41%

42% 40.0 % 39% 41% 42%50.0 %

8.3 Heat Waste 7.4 8.3 Waste Heat 7.4 Heat 6.7 Waste Heat 6.7

7.4 7.5 7.4 7.5 6.0

6.7

6.0

5.0

13% 15% 11% 13% 15%

33%

35%

33%37% 40% 35% 42% 44% 40% 37% 42% 44%

50.0 % 60.0 %

13% 14% 13%

13% 14% 13%

33%

33%37% 39% 35% 42% 41% 45% 39% 37%47% 42% 41% 48% 45% 47% 48%

60.0 %

42% 41% 42% 44% 39% 40% 42% 41% 42% 52% 44% 54% 56% 52% 54% 56%

6.7 Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps

Lifts(kWh/ft²) 6.0 6.7 Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps Lifts Lifts(kWh/ft²) Lifts(kWh/ft²) 6.0

6.0 5.0 5.0

(kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting

Option Option Option1 1 2 1 Buoyancy Buoyancy Option Option 2 11

Auto Shades Options Auto Shades 2, 3,1 Option Option Option 1 2 14 Buoyancy Buoyancy Option Option 2 11 Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Thermal Auto Shades Options Auto Shades 2, 3, 4 Microturbine Conventional Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Storage Code Concept Buoyancy Concept 1 Buoyancy Thermal Code 3 Microturbine Compliant Conventional Storage Code3 Concept Concept 11 Concept Concept Compliant Code 3 Compliant

Concept Concept 31 Compliant

high performance reduction Option Option 11 with Buoyancy Option Option12 21 Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Option Option 11 Option Option 11 facade high performance Auto Shades Options Auto Shades 2, 3,12 Option Option 11 Option Option 214 Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Option Option 11 Option Option 11 facade Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Solar Cooling Thermal Solar Cooling Thermal Auto Shades+ Options Auto Shades 2, 3,+4 Microturbine Storage Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Heating Heating Storage Concept Concept 1A 1 2+ Concept Concept 3 12 + Chilled Buoyancy Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Solar Cooling Thermal Solar Cooling Thermal Microturbine Storage1A Heating Heating Storage31 Concept Concept 1 2 12 Concept Concept 212 Concept Concept1A Concept Concept 3

Included Heat Not Included 35% 37%

32% 33%37% 40% 35% 42% 44% 37% 45% 40% 37%47% 48% 42% 45% 44% 47% 48%

Concept Concept 312

32%

Energy Cost Carbon

70.0 % 70.0 % 70.0 % 71% EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) 71% RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption)

70.0 %

Heat 6.7 Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps Pumps Waste Lifts(kWh/ft²) Lifts(kWh/ft²) Heat 6.0 6.7 Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps Pumps

Lifts Lifts(kWh/ft²) Lifts(kWh/ft²) 5.0

Lifts Lifts(kWh/ft²) Lifts(kWh/ft²) 6.0

70.0 % 70.0 % 70.0 % 71% EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) 71% RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption)

34

5.0 5.0

(kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Reduced Loads -*Lighting Reduced Loads Lighting *(kWh/ft²) additional 3-5% (kWh/ft²) additional 3-5% (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Lighting Reduced Loads Reduced Loads Lighting reduction with -*Lighting reduction with *Lighting additional 3-5% additional 3-5% (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²)

high performance high performance reduction reduction Option Option Option Option11 Buoyancy Buoyancy Option Option 1111 with Buoyancy Option 11 with Buoyancy Option facade facade high performance high performance Auto Auto Shades Shades Auto Shades11 Auto Shades Option Option Option Option Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Option Option 1111 Option Option 1 facade facade Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Thermal Solar Cooling Auto Auto Shades Shades Auto Shades+ Auto Shade Microturbine Microturbin Storage Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyanc Heating Concept Concept 1 Concept Concept Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyanc Thermal 3 Solar Cooling2 + Microturbine Microturbin Storage31 Heating 2 Concept Concept Concept Concept 3 Concept Concept 3 1 Concept 2 Concept

Concept Concept 31

Included Heat Not Included

Concept 2

Concept

Note: Waste Heat Not Note: Waste Note: Waste Included Heat Not Heat Not Note: Waste Included

Included Heat Not Included

32% 37% 32% 32% Raw Energy Raw Energy (waste heat not included) (waste heat not included) 37% 45%Raw Energy Raw Energy 47% (waste heat not included) (waste heat not included) Raw Energy Raw Energy 48% 52% 45% 47% 54% Raw Energy Raw 56% Energy 48% 52% Energy Cost Energy Cost 54% 56%

32%

Energy Cost Carbon Carbon

37%

37%

Energy Cost Carbon

71% Carbon(%reductionbyoption)

Carbon

71% Carbon(%reductionbyoption)

RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) RawEnergy(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) EnergyCost(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption) Carbon(%reductionbyoption)

GREEN ROOFS Intensive and extensive roof gardens mitigate the building temperature, create new wildlife habitat, and integrate the building mass into the landscape.

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING A palette of local plant species minimizes the need for maintenance, irrigation, mowing, and contributes to protected plant life preservation creating a natural habitat for local wildlife.

LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION Efficient design of site lighting reduces night sky light pollution and limits light spill over to adjacent sites.

NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE Integrates an enhanced strategy that combines various water sources, including reclaimed storm, roof, and potable water into a storage tank for varied future use.

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Low-flow plumbing fixtures conserve water.

Heat Waste Waste Heat Heat Waste Heat

Lifts Lifts Computers Computers Lifts(kWh/ft²) Lifts(kWh/ft²) Computers Computers 5.0 (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Computers Computers Computers Computers Computers Computers (kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting (kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) Computers Computers ExteriorLighting ExteriorLighting

Note: Waste Heat Not Note: Waste Note: Waste Included Heat Not Heat Not Note: Waste Included

37% 32% Raw Energy 39% 40% 41% 42%heat (waste not included) 44% 42% 37% 45% Raw Energy 39% 40% 47% 41% 42% (waste heat not included) 44% 42% Raw Energy 48% 52% 52% 45% 47% 54% 54% Raw Energy 56% 56% 48% 52% 52% Energy Cost 54% 54% 56% 56%

Carbon

(kWh/ft²)

(kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting (kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting

(kWh/ft²) Reduced Loads Lighting *(kWh/ft²) additional 3-5% (kWh/ft²) Reduced Loads Lighting reduction with *Lighting additional 3-5% (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²)

Concept Concept1A 1 2

(kWh/ft²)

Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps(kWh/ft²) Waste Fans Fans Fans(kWh/ft²) Fans(kWh/ft²) Waste Heat Pumps(kWh/ft²) Pumps(kWh/ft²) Fans Fans

ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) Lighting Lighting ExteriorLighting ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) (kWh/ft²) ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting

Note: Waste Heat Not Note: Waste Note: Waste Included Heat Not Heat Not Note: Waste Included

32% 33% 39% 40%

Heat

Waste 7.4 Waste Heat 7.4 Heat Waste Heat 6.0

ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) Lighting ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) ExteriorLighting (kWh/ft²) Lighting Lighting

13% 15% 11% 13% 15%

35%

(kWh/ft²)

Fans(kWh/ft²) Cooling Pumps(kWh/ft²) 7.5 Fans Fans(kWh/ft²) Pumps(kWh/ft²) 7.5 Fans

Lifts Computers Lifts(kWh/ft²) Computers (kWh/ft²) Computers Computers Computers (kWh/ft²) Exterior Lighting (kWh/ft²) Computers ExteriorLighting

5.0

4.0kWh/ft² 4.0kWh/ft² 4.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft²2.0 2.0kWh/ft²2.0 2.0kWh/ft²2.0 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0 2.0 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft²2.0 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft² 2.0kWh/ft² 0.0 0.0 0.0kWh/ft² 0.0kWh/ft² 0.0kWh/ft²0.0 Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code 0.0 Option Option Option Option Option Façade Options Façade Options Options Option 12 Option Option Option 1 21 VAVMECHANICAL VAV XXX Buoyancy Chilled Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy VAV VAV VAVMECHANICAL VAV XXX Buoyancy VAV XXX 1 Chilled Buoyancy VAVBeam Chilled Buoyancy XXX Beam SYSTEM MECHANICAL SYSTEM 0.0 Compliant SYSTEM 0.0kWh/ft² 0.0kWh/ft² 0.0kWh/ft² Option 11 Façade Option 11 0.0 Compliant Option 2 Option 11 Option Façade Options Façade Options Façade Options Option Option 11 Option 1 21 Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Compliant Code Compliant XXX Auto Shades Auto Shades Options 2, 3,1 Auto Shades Code Compliant Compliant Code Compliant XXX Code Auto Compliant XXX Shades Code Auto Compliant Shades Options Auto XXX Shades 2, 3,1 FACADE OPTIONS FACADE OPTIONS FACADE OPTIONS Option 1 Façade Option 1 Option Option 1 Option Façade Options Façade Options Options Option 124 Option 1 Option Option 1 214 VAVMECHANICAL VAV XXX Buoyancy Chilled Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy VAV VAV VAV VAV XXX Buoyancy VAV XXX Chilled Buoyancy VAV Beam Chilled Buoyancy XXX Beam SYSTEM MECHANICAL SYSTEM Code MECHANICAL SYSTEM Option 1 Option 1 Option 2 Option 1 Option Façade Options Façade Options Façade Options Option Option 1 Option 21 Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant VAV Mechanical VAV Buoyancy Buoyancy Chilled Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy System Mechanical VAV System VAV Mechanical Buoyancy VAV System Buoyancy VAV Chilled Buoyancy VAVBeam Chilled Buoyancy Buoyancy Beam Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant VAV VAV Buoyancy Buoyancy Chilled Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Mechanical System Mechanical VAV System VAV Mechanical Buoyancy VAV System Buoyancy VAV Chilled Buoyancy VAV Beam Chilled Buoyancy Buoyancy Beam Thermal Thermal Thermal Solar Cooling Thermal Code Compliant Code Compliant XXX Auto Shades Auto Shades Options 2, 3, 4 Auto Shades Code Compliant Code Compliant Code Compliant XXX Code Auto Compliant XXX Shades Code Auto Compliant Shades Options Auto XXX Shades 2, 3,+4 FACADE OPTIONS FACADE OPTIONS FACADE OPTIONS Conventional Conventional XXX Conventional Conventional XXX Conventional XXX Conventional XXX PLANT MECHANICAL PLANT PLANT Storage VAVMECHANICAL VAV Buoyancy Buoyancy Chilled Beam Conventional Buoyancy Buoyancy Buoyancy Mechanical System Mechanical VAV System VAVMECHANICAL Mechanical Buoyancy VAV System Buoyancy VAV Chilled Buoyancy VAVBeam Chilled Buoyancy Buoyancy Storage Storage Heating Storage Code Code Code Code Mechanical Mechanical Code Code Mechanical Code Code Code Code Code Code CodeBeam Concept 1A Concept Concept 1 Concept VAV Mechanical VAV Buoyancy Buoyancy Chilled Beam Buoyancy Buoyancy Concept 1A Concept Concept 1A 12 + System Mechanical VAV System VAV Mechanical Buoyancy VAV System Buoyancy VAV 1 Chilled Buoyancy VAVBeam Chilled Buoyancy Buoyancy Beam Thermal Thermal Thermal Solar Cooling Thermal Code Code Code Code Mechanical Mechanical Code Code Mechanical Code Code Code Code Code Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Plant Plant Compliant Compliant Plant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Conventional Conventional XXX Conventional Conventional XXX Conventional Conventional XXX Conventional XXX PLANT MECHANICAL PLANT MECHANICAL PLANT Storage COST COST COST Storage Storage Heating Storage CodeMECHANICAL Code Code Code Mechanical Mechanical Code Code Mechanical Code Code Code Code 1 Code Code1A Code1A Concept 1A Concept Concept 11 Concept Concept Concept 1212 Concept Concept Concept Concept Concept Concept Concept Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Plant Plant Compliant Compliant Plant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Initial Cost Initial Cost Initial Cost Code Code Code Code Mechanical Mechanical Code Code Mechanical Code 1A Code Code 1 Code 1A Code 1A Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Plant Plant Compliant Compliant Plant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant COST COST COST Concept 1A Concept 1 Concept 1 Concept 1A Concept Concept 1A 12 0% 0% 0% 0% Initial Cost Cost Initial Cost Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Plant Plant Compliant Compliant Plant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Compliant Initial Cost0.0 % Initial Initial Cost0.0 % Initial Cost0.0 % 0.0 % Initial Cost 0.0 % 0% 0% 0% 0.0 % 0% Initial Cost Initial Cost 10.0 % 10.0 % 10.0 % 11% 11% 11% 11%

Percentage Reduction Reduction Percentage From Code Compliant From Code Compliant

Wh/ft² h/ft²2.0 h/ft² Wh/ft²2.0 Wh/ft²

2 kWh/ft 2 kWh/ft

h/ft² h/ft²8.0 Wh/ft² Wh/ft²8.0 h/ft² h/ft²6.0 Wh/ft²

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY Innovative roof mounted thermal solar system, in combination with photovoltaic canopies, provide shade in the parking lot, and reduce reliance on the electrical grid.

71% 71%


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Domestic Hot Water (1.5%)

Miscellaneous Equipment Cooling

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(29.2%)

(25.4%)

300

Ventilation (3.9%)

Heat Reject

200

(5.6%)

KEY Lighting

2030c Baseline

(17.8%)

Heating (11.2%)

Pumps and Auxiliary (5.4%)

Energy model

100

0

ENERGY EFFICIENCY / ENHANCED VENTILATION An innovative chimney system provides 100% outside air, contributing to reduced energy loads and indoor air quality. The ventilation system is coordinated with the envelope system to balance heat gain. HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE The building orientation, ventilation, and envelope design work together to balance heat gain.

Actual energy

79 31.6

ENERGY MONITORING Building performance data on the various uses of the building is displayed on flat screen monitors.

Energy offset by onsite renewables (PV)

37.3

LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2007)

9

2030c Target based on occupancy date

CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT Noise, dust, and runoff pollution was minimized during construction, while implementing an extensive plan for construction waste management. GREEN MATERIALS Local, renewable, and recycled building materials were utilized. Recycled content was used in all parts of the structural system and construction of the interior partitions. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS The building orientation, with the long axis running east to west and maintaining a thin floor plate, allows daylight to penetrate regularly occupied spaces.


ACTIVE SHADING SYSTEM SHADES OPEN A key factor in the passive downdraft HVAC system is the need to control direct sun from the conditioned space whenever the outside air temperatures are above 80°F.

SHADES CLOSED The automated external shading system limits direct sun on the southwest façade of the building during hot afternoons, yet enables occupants to enjoy outdoor views and abundant natural light.

36


ENERGY EFFICIENCY WATER COOLED CHILLER The HVAC system provides chilled water using a water-cooled chiller combined with a cooling tower a nd pumps. The highly efficient chiller, combined with the elevated supply temperatures used by the natural ventilation system, a nd the automated operable shading devices with high-performance glazing, will allow the building to have 61% predicted HVAC energy savings when compared to ASHRAE. SOLAR THERMAL HEATING Energy for the heating load and hot water comes from the sun, with the back-up water heating system using a solar thermal system. A solar thermal array consisting of 1,000 SF of evacuated tubes, along with a 3,000 gallon storage tank, provides almost 70% of the hot water heating and all of the domestic hot water.

PRECOOLING COIL & COOLING COIL SOLAR HOT WATER

STORAGE TANK

BACKUP WATER HEATER WATERSIDE ECONOMIZER LOOP

COOLING TOWER ON SITE

WATER COOLED CHILLERS


DICKINSON COLLEGE Stuart Hall and James Hall

CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF DESIGNED A NEW 90,000 SF SCIENCE FACILITY, WHICH SERVES AS A UNIFIED HOME FOR FIVE PREVIOUSLY DISPERSED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, AND ENHANCES DICKINSON COLLEGE’S TRADITION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY AND COLLABORATION.

The building includes interactive learning and research spaces for biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, chemistry, neuroscience, and psychology. The design balances a contemporary look with elements that are responsive to existing campus construction. Sloped roofs and limestone reflect the existing character of the campus, while the use of iridescent stainless-steel shingles and the glass curtain wall treatment convey a fresh, modern design approach. Multiple courtyards have been integrated to facilitate indoor and outdoor teaching and interaction. Texture, color, and the playful 38

use of materials at the exterior extend inside the building to humanize and add richness to the interiors. The facility is Dickinson’s first laboratory-intensive teaching building designed with LEED in mind, and has achieved a LEED Gold® rating. Historically, the College has been one of the lowest energy users per square foot in the country and purchases 50% of its campus electricity needs from wind-generated power. Enthalpy heat wheel recovery mechanical systems and extensive commissioning guarantees the building systems and energy use performs as intended. A 30% reduction in water use is achieved through efficient fixtures and significant energy savings (23% better than code) are generated from the high-efficiency windows, exterior sun shading, interior light harvesting, occupancy sensors, and interior sunshades.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

40


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Miscellaneous Equipment

400

Any items not covered by other end use categories

390.6

(3.6%)

Ventilation (15.3%)

Heating (34.4%)

300

Pumps and Auxiliary (3.7%)

200

195.3

Lighting (7.3%)

Domestic Hot Water

KEY

100

(0.2%)

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy

Cooling

LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2004)

(35.5%)

0

STORMWATER DESIGN A retention pond / bioswale reduces the load on the municipal system and provides cleaner stormwater. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES A 30% reduction in water use is achieved through high-efficiency fixtures. WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING The previously developed site has been restored with native, natural plantings that require no mechanical irrigation. ENERGY MONITORING An energy monitor is displayed in the building’s lobby to encourage conservation by demonstrating the building’s energy load. ENERGY EFFICIENCY Significant energy savings are generated from high-efficiency windows, exterior sun shading, interior light harvesting, occupancy sensors, and interior sunshades.

2030c Target based on occupancy date

CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT An extensive construction waste management plan was implemented to minimize noise, dust, and runoff pollution. This resulted in 75% of all construction debris being diverted from landfills through recycling. GREEN MATERIALS The materials used in the building’s interior spaces are produced from recycled content. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS In addition to the building massing and orientation, glazing and sunscreen strategies allow for comfortable and daylit indoor teaching environments. Nearly all of the spaces in the new halls offer direct outdoor views, and more than half of the open space is punctuated by natural light.


GERDING EDLEN DEVELOPMENT COMPANY Twelve |  West Mixed-Use Building

PORTLAND, OREGON

ZGF DESIGNED A NEW 22-STORY, 550,000 SF MIXED-USE BUILDING IN PORTLAND’S EMERGING WEST END DISTRICT TO MEET LEED PLATINUM® TWO TIMES AND SERVE AS A LABORATORY FOR SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND WORKPLACE STRATEGIES.

Twelve | West features street-level retail space, four floors of office space, 17 floors of apartments, and five levels of below-grade parking. The building has an eco-roof, rooftop garden and terrace space, complete fitness studio, and a theatre. Four wind turbines sit prominently atop the building representing the first U.S. installation of a wind turbine array on an urban high-rise. The building serves as not only an anchor in a rapidly transforming urban neighborhood, but also as a demonstration project to inform future sustainable building design. Twelve | West was honored as a 42

2010 AIA COTE Top Ten Green Project. Home to the Portland office of ZGF, the building serves as both a reflection of our culture and as a living laboratory where we can evaluate first-hand how the workplace environment functions and feels. The office floors have an open-floor concept with some interior offices that have transparent walls to ensure that natural light penetrates into the building. Each office floor features alternating interior communicating stairs, with lounge areas and seating to help foster employee interaction.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

Simple tools—a fishing rod, a toy glider propeller, and a wooden ruler—when coupled with world-class expertise, yielded key information in the overall exercise of successfully implementing building-integrated wind turbines.

ENERGY END USE

Miscellaneous Equipment

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Any items not covered by other end use categories

Cooling

(7.8%)

(15.9%)

300

Exterior Usage

Heating (15.8%)

(1.1%)

200

Lighting

Ventilation

(17.6%)

(8.7%)

100

Pumps and Auxiliary

95.8 47.9

(0.6%)

Domestic Hot Water (32.5%)

44

KEY

0

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2004) 2030c Target based on occupancy date


ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY Solar thermal panels heat 24% of hot water used in the building, offsetting natural gas use. Four wind turbines produce 10–12,000 kWh of electricity per year. Monitoring of wind conditions and turbine performance will improve knowledge for future projects.

HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Low-e glass admits 55% of visible sunlight but reflects 70% of the associated heat, reducing energy use for lighting and space cooling. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Waterefficient plumbing fixtures help reduce water use by more than 44%.

ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable windows provide occupants fresh air, cooling, and a connection to the outdoors.

CONTROLLABILILTY OF SYSTEMS Daylight sensors switch off electric lights when there is ample daylight, reducing lighting energy use by 60%.

GREEN ROOFS Roof gardens clean, detain, and filter rainwater and significantly reduce roof temperatures in warmer months.

NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE A 22,000 gallon tank collects 286,000 gallons of rainwater and condensate annually, reducing potable water use and making it available for reuse to flush office toilets and to irrigate the green roof.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY Exposed concrete moderates indoor air temperatures. Mass is cooled with cool night air in the summer months and absorbs excess heat throughout the day.

Passive / chilled beams provide energy-efficient cooling on the hottest days. Underfloor air distribution efficiently delivers moderate-temperature air directly to occupants. Personal adjustable floor vents provide control over ventilation.


CITY OF SEATTLE King Street Station Renovation

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROVIDED DESIGN SERVICES FOR THE HISTORIC RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF THE 60,000 SF KING STREET STATION, LOCATED IN THE HISTORIC PIONEER SQUARE DISTRICT OF SEATTLE, WHICH WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT AND OPENED TO THE PUBLIC IN MAY 1906.

Elements of the project include rehabilitation of the iconic 12-story clock tower, original 45-foot-high ornamental plaster ceilings and halls, terrazzo and mosaic tile floors, and operable windows. True to the building’s original fashion, the white marble wainscoting, decorative sconces, and glass globe chandeliers that were removed during modernization of the station in the 1950’s were replicated and replaced. The rehabilitation also included significant seismic and structural updates to improve the building’s safety and durability—all of which complied with the City’s sustainable building 46

standards and the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for Historic Preservation. A number of sustainable strategies and systems were incorporated to increase building performance, including natural ventilation, replacement of all mechanical systems with a new ground-source heat pump, and energy and water efficient lights and fixtures. The project has achieved LEED Platinum®.


Lavender, Historical Glass Tiles Salvaged for Reuse on Clocktower

TRANSPORTATION / COMMUTING CONNECTIONS Amtrak (Heavy Rail) Commuter Rail Light Rail Streetcar

Bus Bike Pedestrian Ferry

Glass Canopy to Improve Daylighting

Original Windows Preserved and Repaired New Public Open Space

Operable Windows Restored Throughout

Original Structure and Materials Restored / Maintained Performance-based Seismic Upgrade for 500-and 2500-year Events Original Clay Ceramic Roof Tiles Restored Providing Extended Roof Life of 75 Years Roof Insulation with R-30 Value

Future Canopy with Photovoltaics

Wall Insulation with R-25.6 Value Photovoltaics on Restored Canopy

Water Harvesting for Toilet Flushing

Electrical Transformers for Streetcar

Ground-source Heat Pumps for Heating and Cooling Geothermal Well Field

High-efficiency Unit Ventilators

Natural Ventilation in Main Waiting Area


PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY, LIVING CITY DESIGN COMPETITION Symbiotic Districts: Towards a Balanced City

PORTLAND, OREGON

AS THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF CITIES, DISTRICTS ARE THE RIGHT SCALE TO ACCELERATE SUSTAINABILITY— SMALL ENOUGH TO INNOVATE QUICKLY AND BIG ENOUGH TO HAVE A MEANINGFUL IMPACT. YET IN A CITY, THE WHOLE IS GREATER THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS, AND NEIGHBORHOODS BALANCE ASSETS LIKE WATER AND ENERGY BETWEEN EACH OTHER TO MEET CITY-WIDE NEEDS.

Recognizing this, the Living City Design Competition asked project teams to envision a future for an existing district that meets the requirements of the rigorous Living Building Challenge rating system. ZGF led a competition team in partnership with the Portland Sustainability Institute and national leaders in EcoDistrict assessment and governance. The team’s approach to the competition explores the symbiosis 48

between five EcoDistricts in Portland and how strategies in a single East Portland district, Gateway, contribute to the city’s overall performance. The team’s entry, “Symbiotic Districts: Towards a Balanced City,” a combination of eye-catching images and innovative system strategies, garnered the People’s Choice Award.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

RENEWABLE energy production (solar and wind) integrates into the urban fabric.

RESIDENTIAL buildings use excess heat captured from supermarket refrigeration systems.

GEOTHERMAL conditioning loops extend across the neighborhood below-ground connecting to heat pumps in buildings.

LIVING INFRASTRUCTURE Bold infrastructure interventions build towards a city living in balance. The redevelopment of a main street at the site of a regional transit station provides a rich street life based on pedestrians, bicycles, and public transport. Urban greenways created from abandoned freeways and green streets provide a new green city infrastructure for habitat, food, water, and waste. In a net-zero energy and water community, local fuels power nodes of district energy that couple efficient mixed-use structures and neighborhood water utilities capture, clean, and reuse water arriving from the sky. The urban greenways, roof gardens, living walls, and use of the in-between green spaces allow agriculture to be embedded into the community.

50

ORGANIC wastes are anaerobically digested to produce energy.

PEOPLE, bikes, trains, and buses coexist in a multi-modal system on streets where cars are prohibited.

Existing Conditions


ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION Automobiles lose their dominance by shifting rights-of-way to pedestrians and bikes, allowing residents and visitors to move easily between homes, services, and the regional transit center. This fuels a rich street life for pedestrians and businesses, and provides efficient transport while creating spaces ripe for communication and connection.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE A new green city infrastructure emerges for habitat, food, water, and waste. Green streets and a new greenway over the I-205 freeway provide a native habitat and a place to grow food while treating and conveying water. Organic wastes are captured in the neighborhood, cleanly converted to fuels while creating industry for residents.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY Net-zero energy and water become easy targets with infrastructure that is scaled to the neighborhood. Thermal pipes bring geothermal heat to buildings, looping between them to capture efficiencies across the district. Sewer mining and organic waste provide additional firepower. Living machines throughout the district clean water, with distribution to every building through accessible networks laid under streets.

SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE People grow food on every surface—organic fruits and vegetables are cultivated on the greenway, green spaces, rooftops, terraces, and green walls. Small livestock inhabit the city alongside residents, further helping to generate one of the most needed fuels—food—right where it is needed.


PORT OF PORTLAND Headquarters & Long-Term Parking Garage

PORTLAND, OREGON

THE PORT OF PORTLAND’S HEADQUARTERS BUILDING, DESIGNED BY ZGF, AT THE PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT SHOWCASES THE CLIENT’S COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES, WHILE REFLECTING A 21ST CENTURY CULTURE—ONE PORT—IN AN EFFORT TO INCREASE COLLABORATION AND FOSTER A TEAM ENVIRONMENT.

The 205,603 SF building consists of three floors of office space atop seven floors of public airport parking. The facility is located to the east of Portland International Airport’s main terminal building and is connected to the existing parking structure, serving as a new gateway to the airport. The design reflects a reorganization of the Port along functional lines, rather than departmental, and brings together staff in the Marine and Aviation Divisions previously dispersed in several Portland 52

locations. ZGF worked closely with the Port to develop new standards for office space to accommodate a shift from a closed office environment to primarily open plan—98% is open office, while 2% is private offices for those whose job functions demand privacy. With LEED Platinum®, the building incorporates radiant heating and cooling, daylighting, a “living machine”—an organic wastewater treatment system—and a green roof, among many other features. The project was also named one of the world’s most high-tech green buildings by Forbes magazine, as well as honored with a Smart Environments Award by the International Interior Design Association and Metropolis magazine.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

A

E

C G B

F

D

WATER EFFICIENCY

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

A 8th floor landscape deck with adaptive plants and micromist irrigation

E Reflective membrane roof

B Low-flow fixtures C Eco-roof with adaptive plants and micromist irrigation D Living MachineÂŽ system

F High-performance glazing G Radiant heating and cooling ceiling H 200 ground source loops for heating and cooling with auxiliary cooling tower for peak periods

H

54


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Heating (10.7%)

300

Pumps and Auxiliary (6.1%)

200

Miscellaneous Equipment

Lighting

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(15.8%)

KEY

(43.2%)

100.5

100

Cooling

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy

(5.8%) 40.2

Ventilation

Domestic Hot Water

(17.6%)

(0.8%)

0

LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2004) 2030c Target based on occupancy date

1 THE LIVING MACHINE® SYSTEM 1 Office building: toilet, sink, and shower 2 Primary and equalization tanks 3 Tidal flow wetland 4 Polishing vertical flow wetland

7

2

5 UV sterilization disinfection 6 Clean effluent tank

6 3 4

5

7 HVAC office cooling tower


CITY OF PORTLAND Simon and Helen Director Park

PORTLAND, OREGON

DOWNTOWN PORTLAND’S DIRECTOR PARK IS THE RESULT OF A LONG-HELD CITY GOAL TO CONNECT THE HISTORIC SOUTH AND NORTH PARK BLOCKS. ZGF SERVED AS MANAGING ARCHITECT AND URBAN DESIGNER, TEAMED WITH OLIN AS LEAD PARK DESIGNER AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, TO CREATE AN URBAN PARK OVER A SIX-LEVEL UNDERGROUND GARAGE.

The concept of an urban hardscape stretching from building face to building face—presenting one of the first implementations of curbless street design in the City of Portland—allows the park to engage the active street fronts of the adjoining properties. This piazza provides the canvas for a composition of structures and spaces that accommodate a variety of programmed and unprogrammed functions. A major canopy, water feature, and café provide park visitors with a range of 56

social settings in which to enjoy urban life. From children playing in the fountain and business professionals enjoying lunch under the canopy, to yoga classes, chess games, and sporting event viewing parties that draw thousands, Director Park provides a public space unlike any other park in Portland. Sustainable design elements include granite-edged bioswales, a café green roof, and low-energy lighting. The project is innovative in its approach to stormwater management as all stormwater is filtered on-site using natural vegetation. The project received the American Architecture Award from The Chicago Athenaeum and The European Center for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, and has been featured on the cover of Landscape Architecture Magazine and in Metropolis.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

58


ENERGY EFFICIENCY The café uses passive cooling by using make-up air for the kitchen supplemented by fans. Heating is captured from the exhaust from the parking garage below the park. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Low-E glass coating allows more daylight to penetrate to maximize daylighting and minimize energy consumption. GREEN MATERIALS Ipe wood, a highly durable and weather- and rot-resistant material, is used in the built-in seating within the park. SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE The landscape design includes drought-tolerant plants that filter stormwater. Light-colored paving reflects light on overcast days and reduces the heat island effect on sunny days.

STORMWATER DESIGN The landscape and hardscape work together to control stormwater runoff. The glass canopy uses rain chains to direct water to detention areas. Pervious surfaces collect runoff. 100% of stormwater is controlled on site and filtered through plantings. GREEN ROOF The café green roof captures rainwater and reduces the heat island effect. LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION The project was the first to utilize a street light other than the city’s standard, resulting in a more efficient fixture that reduces light pollution. ENHANCED VENTILATION Operable clerestories bring daylight into the café along with natural ventilation.


NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION / U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION SW Ecodistrict Plan

WASHINGTON, DC

ZGF DEVELOPED URBAN DESIGN AND SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES FOR THE SW ECODISTRICT, AN EFFORT LED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION AND U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION IN COORDINATION WITH 15 OTHER LOCAL AND FEDERAL AGENCIES.

The Plan aims to improve connections from the National Mall to the Southwest Waterfront, transforming the 10th Street SW and Maryland Avenue SW corridors south of the National Mall into a showcase of sustainability. The Ecodistrict will be an active, multimodal, mixed-use neighborhood of significant cultural attractions and public spaces, offices, residences, and amenities. Three main goals were established for the project: advancing recommendations in the Monumental Core Framework Plan; assisting the 60

federal government to meet the goals and objectives of Executive Order 13514—Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from government facilities; and transforming an existing federal employment center south of the National Mall into a model 21st century sustainable community, while enhancing the quality of life for pedestrians through the implementation of high-performance landscapes, infrastructure, and streetscapes.


WASHINGTON MONUMENT

NATIONAL MALL

CENTRAL UTILITY PLANT

OPTIMIZED BUILDING EFFICIENCIES

DISTRICT OPEN SPACE IMPROVEMENTS

U.S. CAPITOL


BOLSA CHICA CONSERVANCY Center for Coastal Ecology

HUNTINGTON BEACH, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROVIDED CONCEPTUAL DESIGN SERVICES FOR A NEW 10,000 SF CENTER FOR COASTAL ECOLOGY TO INCREASE VISITOR UNDERSTANDING OF THE IMPORTANCE OF WATERSHEDS, WETLANDS, AND THE OCEANS TO THE HEALTH OF OUR PLANET.

Recognizing the vital role that science literacy plays in protecting coastal habitats, more than 4,000 SF of exhibition and laboratory space will be dedicated to fostering environmental stewardship through hands-on learning and participation in restoration activities. The program includes a wet laboratory, conference room / library, office space, informational lobby, and a gift shop. A 5,000 SF amphitheater / outdoor classroom will accommodate groups as large as 100 for educational programs, live animal shows, and theatrical presentations. Much in part to the organization’s 62

mission to restore, educate, and advocate, sustainability is a driver of the project’s design. ZGF is exploring going beyond LEED Platinum® to create a net-zero energy and net-zero water project. Net-zero energy strategies will include the use of natural light to meet lighting levels for the majority of daytime hours, passive ventilation, and a building monitoring system. Photovoltaics will be utilized to generate more energy than is used onsite. Net-zero water strategies include high-efficiency fixtures and dry-composting toilets, as well as siteintegrated water management systems.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

GREEN ROOFS

ENERGY MONITORING

STORMWATER DESIGN

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES

HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING

GREEN MATERIALS

NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE

CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS

WASTEWATER TREATMENT

DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY

64


VENTILATION WITH WIND BLOWING Cross-Ventilation

Stack effect / stratification still results in warmer air at high level. A transom / air path will allow air flow across the floor plate.

High ventilation rates achieved w  ith natural ventilation minimize temperature differences across t he building.

VENTILATION UNDER LOW WIND CONDITIONS Buoyancy Ventilation With Highand Low-Level Openings

Tall ceilings help keep the lower area comfortable. Air warmed up by people, sun, and lights rises up in the space and exhausts from high level. The sloped roof allows air warmed by the sun to accelerate out of the high-level openings.

Cool air enters at low level

BASELINE APPROACH

PROPOSED APPROACH

• Standard efficiency fixtures

• High-efficiency fixtures

• Potable water consumption: 670 gallons / week

• Dry composting toilets • Potable water consumption: 180 gallons / week

Sinks (41%) Drinking Water (15%)

Sinks (20%)

Toilets (38%)

Drinking Water (5%)

Urinals (15%)

Savings (75%)

POTABLE WATER CONSUMPTION FOR INTERNAL BUILDING USES BY DAY (GALLONS) Water Consumption by:

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

WEEKLY TOTAL

Students / Visitors

10.9

21.8

32.6

10.9

32.6

10.9

10.9

131

Office Staff / Volunteers

5.4

5.4

5.4

5.4

5.4

2.7

2.7

32

Water for Exhibits

1.8

3.0

4.2

1.8

4.2

1.5

1.5

18

TOTAL

18

30

42

18

42

15

15

181


U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Region 8 Headquarters

DENVER, COLORADO

IN RESPONSE TO THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY’S (EPA) MISSION TO “PROTECT THE PUBLIC’S HEALTH AND SAFEGUARD THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH WE LIVE, LEARN, AND WORK,” THE REGION 8 HEADQUARTERS WAS DESIGNED BY ZGF, WITH OPUS ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS, INC., TO BE ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIVE IN BOTH CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION.

Consisting of nine stories of office space, two levels of below-grade parking, and ground-level retail, the new 292,000 SF building is a study in sustainable and mission-driven design. It is located on a remediated brownfield site, is LEED Gold®, features Denver’s first eco-roof designed specifically to treat stormwater, and serves as an example of, and a laboratory for, ongoing research into high-performance, integrated 66

design. Already teams have measured the building’s energy performance, surveyed its occupants with respect to comfort and performance, and observed the performance of its water management systems. The results of these undertakings have been shared with EPA officials, architects, developers and the general public via publication, conferences and building tours. The long-term hope for the facility is that it not only reflects and enlivens the urban neighborhood in which it is set, but that it will continue to inspire building teams to continue to push the boundaries of aesthetically intriguing sustainable design and urban renewal.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

The fundamental organization of the building encloses a central atrium with two L-shaped wings—an eight-story wing that takes the incident solar radiation and provides a roof garden terrace, and a ninestory wing that takes the brunt of the prevailing winds and shelters the roof terrace. Glare analysis of upper occupied floors (with and without the sails).

Local sky and daylight conditions were studied carefully to determine the best solutions for harvesting natural light. A carefully conceived series of sails suspended from the atrium roof was designed not only to drive light down into the space, but also to protect occupants of the upper floors from glare. Ultimately, the system was fabricated by a local sailmaker in Portland and installed by a theatrical rigging company in Denver at 80% of the budgeted cost.

68

The green roof not only provides an amenity for occupants, but also performs the legally mandated stormwater quality functions for the project. The City and County of Denver agreed to allow this as a pilot project—possibly to become an accepted regional practice for pollutant removal and runoff control—following an effort in which the design team collaborated with international experts to prove its effectiveness and the EPA agreed to monitor and report its performance for five years of operation.


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Ventilation

300

(10.7%)

Cooling (7.8%)

Miscellaneous Equipment

200

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(31.3%)

KEY

Heating

118.3

(20.7%)

100

Pumps and Auxiliary

59.2

(3.1%)

Domestic Hot Water (3.1%)

0

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-1999) 2030c Target based on occupancy date

Lighting (23.3%)

WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENT SATISFACTION

KEY Benchmark EPA, Region 8 Headquarters Pacific Lutheran University, Morken Center UCSB, Donald Bren School Portland State University, Northwest Center


U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Federal Center South Building 1202

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

THE 209,247 SF REGIONAL HEADQUARTERS DESIGNED BY ZGF FOR THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS PROVIDES A HIGH-PERFORMANCE, 21ST CENTURY WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENT THAT IS BATHED IN NATURAL DAYLIGHT.

The concept for the building—the Oxbow—features a narrow office bar wrapped around a central atrium of shared conference rooms and amenities, known as the Commons, to encourage interaction and foster collaboration. The open plan office layout provides the greatest amount of flexibility for teams to grow and shrink and the Commons compels users to come together. The design integrates active and passive systems, materials, and strategies to achieve aggressive water and energy saving requirements without sacrificing comfort or amenity. After one year of operation, the building is operating at 25 kBtu/SF/yr 70

and is in the top 1% of energy-efficient buildings in the country, performing 40% better than ASHRAE 2007. Optimized mechanical systems feature chilled beams, heat recovery, and phase-change thermal energy storage. An estimated 430,000 gallons of rainwater is collected on the roof for use in toilets, irrigation, and a rooftop cooling tower. The reclamation of 200,000 board feet of salvaged timber from a warehouse previously located on the site provides a dramatic interior environment. Measurement and verification has shown that the building’s operation meets the aggressive goals of the 2030 Challenge. Additionally, the building has achieved LEED Platinum®.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Maximum efficiency Water Sense fixtures are utilized throughout the building. NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE Rainwater reuse system captures water from the roof and stores it in a 25,000 gallon cistern for toilet flushing, irrigation, rooftop cooling tower, and water features in the atrium.

72

ENERGY MONITORING Energy management and verification devices monitor energy use. An extensive first year measurement and verification showed that the building is meeting its aggressive energy goal, achieving the mandates of the 2030 Challenge, and ranking in the top 1% of office buildings in the U.S. for energy performance.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY Thermal storage tanks with phase change materials (PCM) take advantage of free cooling to store energy for future use. Geothermal heating and cooling loops were integrated into structural piles (one of the first projects in the region to combine both systems). Shading devices reduce heat gain and lower the required cooling. Ventilation air is provided by four rooftop air handling units with heat recovery and distributed via an underfloor air delivery system. Supplemental heating is provided at the perimeter zones using hydronic radiant system. Cooling is primarily provided using overhead passive chilled sails with a portion of the cooling provided from the ventilation air through the raised floor plenum.


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Cooling

300

(8.9%)

Pumps and Auxiliary (5.2%)

200

Miscellaneous Equipment

Ventilation (13.9%)

Any items not covered by other end use categories

KEY 106

(42.1%)

Domestic Hot Water

2030c Baseline

100

(2.1%)

Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1 - 2007)

42.4

Lighting (25.7%)

2030c Target based on occupancy date

0 Heating (2.1%)

ANNUAL WATER USE IN GAL/YR

HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Low-emitting materials were used throughout the building. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Occupancy sensors and continuous dimming ambient controls are used for daylight harvesting, as well as for maximizing connection to nature and reducing electric lighting loads during daylight hours. Sunshades used on every elevation are tailored to respond to specific solar conditions. ENHANCED VENTILATION 100% outside air is continuously delivered to the occupied space to provide improved indoor air quality.

69%

1,400,000 1,200,000 Annual Water Use (gal)

MATERIALS REUSE Approximately 200,000 board feet of structural timber and 100,000 board feet of decking from an existing warehouse on the site was reclaimed for reuse in the new building. Over 20% use of recycled content materials and 50% of the new wood was certified. Additionally, the team recycled or salvaged more than 98% of construction waste.

1,000,000 800,000 600,000 KEY

400,000

Urinal Water Cabinet

200,000

Lavatory Faucet Showers

0

Kitchenette

Baseline Use

EPA WaterSense Fixtures + Rain Water Capture


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 204,365 SF LI KA SHING CENTER FOR BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES, WHICH HOUSES INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS IN THE FIELDS OF RESEARCH ON THE MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DISEASE.

The five-story building is divided into two distinct programmatic zones: the laboratory research zone, and the office and interaction zone. Because sustainability was a significant design goal of this facility, this separation of program elements allows the building to be organized in a way that optimizes the building’s systems and spaces. The intense mechanical, electrical, and structural demands of the research laboratories are separated from the less intense offices, conference, and interaction spaces. This allows the non-laboratory spaces to take advantage of natural ventilation. 74

Laboratory air integrity is maintained by small vestibules between the laboratory and office spaces. The project is LEED Gold® certified, incorporates Labs21 environmental performance criteria, and has been honored with a Go Beyond Award by the International Institute for Sustainable Laboratories and R&D Magazine. Sustainable building systems and features include expansive glazing and filtered daylight in 90% of spaces, low-e glass with integrated sunscreens, and a terracotta rainscreen, among others. In addition, integrated color displays of red and green continuously signal to occupants when to open or close operable windows, based on outside temperatures.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES LABORATORY / SUPPORT / PUBLIC ZONE SECTION

76


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Exterior Usage

800

(0.2%)

726.1

Miscellaneous Equipment Any items not covered by other end use categories

600

(29.4%)

Heating (45.4%)

Pumps and Auxiliary

400

(1.3%) 290.4

Ventilation (12.6%)

Lighting

200

Heat Reject

(3.5%)

Domestic Hot Water

Cooling

(1.8%)

(4.5%)

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING Palette of local plant species minimizes the need for maintenance and irrigation. ENERGY MONITORING A real-time display in public area of building monitors energy and water usage. An integrated color display wall continuously signals the most favorable time to open or close windows, based on outside temperature conditions. ENERGY EFFICIENCY The separation of laboratory and office / social zones allowed for differentiation of mechanical and structural design. 100% of nonlaboratory space air is returned and available for use in the laboratory air system, maximizing energy recovery and minimizing the energy required for conditioning make-up air.

Energy model LEED / Code baseline (CA Title 24-2005)

0

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES A 43% reduction in indoor potable water use was achieved through the selection of low-flow fixtures.

2030c Baseline Actual energy

(1.3%)

GREEN ROOFS Adaptive native plantings provide habitat for bees, insects, and birds and mitigate stormwater mitigation. Green roofs insulate heat island and cooling effect.

KEY

2030c Target based on occupancy date

GREEN MATERIALS Regional materials, such as local aggregates in terrazzo and locally produced ceramic tiles with all California clay, were utilized on the project. Bamboo, a rapidly renewable material, was used for the laboratory casework. HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Incorporates low-emitting rubber floors in laboratories and lowemitting carpet in offices. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Expansive glazing and filtered daylight are provided in 90% of spaces. A prominent sun shading parasol protects the south interactive areas, while allowing for maximum natural light. Individual user-controlled exterior sunscreen shutters protect the offices from intense western solar gain and glare while preserving views to the San Francisco Bay. ENHANCED VENTILATION Office and social areas are equipped with operable windows to reduce the requirement for mechanical space conditioning and associated energy use.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PLANNED AND DESIGNED A NEW BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH FACILITY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO’S SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TO ACCOMMODATE GROWTH AND TO HOUSE A NEW MULTI-DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM IN GENOMIC MEDICINE AND AN EXPANDED DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCES.

The five-story, 190,000 SF project incorporates wet bench laboratories, laboratory core facilities and support space, administrative offices, and conference space for Health Sciences interdisciplinary programs, including medical genomics. Offices are separated in the northern wing, with floor-to-ceiling glass for abundant, even daylight and operable windows to take advantage of the mild climate much of the year. The project has achieved LEED Platinum® with the incorporation of high-performance features, such as a dynamic, 78

climate-responsive exterior solar shading system on the east, west, and south façades that eliminates solar gain while optimizing daylight. The project also includes a water reclamation system that will collect approximately 890,000 gallons per year from air handler condensate, primarily during the dry summer season when coastal fog and humidity occur more frequently. This in turn will reduce potable water use for landscape irrigation by 100%, and for toilets by more than 50%. The water filtration system was expanded to collect condensate from a neighboring laboratory building on the campus as well.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

LABORATORIES

DAYLIGHT ZONE

VISION ZONE

FIXED SUNSHADE

AUTOMATED (COMPUTER-CONTROLLED) RETRACTABLE EXTERIOR BLINDS

SOLAR SHADING Dynamic exterior shading reduces cooling load and energy use by keeping laboratory spaces at an optimal ventilation rate for safety, while enabling daylighting through the redirection of sunlight, a “tuned” ceiling shape, and photo-sensor controlled dimming of indirect interior lighting fixtures.

80


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Heating

Ventilation

(4.7%)

(5.5%)

300

Cooling (8.1%)

Pumps and Auxiliary (3.7%)

Miscellaneous Equipment

Domestic Hot Water

(55.9%)

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(8.8%)

200 161.9

KEY

100

Heat Reject (1%)

64.8

Lighting (11.3%)

Exterior Usage

0

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1 - 2004) 2030c Target based on occupancy date

(1%)

STORMWATER DESIGN Bioswales capture and filter stormwater runoff. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Plumbing fixtures are low-flow and toilets are dual-plumbed, cutting potable water use by more than 50%. NON-POTABLE WATER CAPTURE Non-potable water is collected from numerous sources within the building and from the adjacent laboratory, then filtered, and stored on-site, providing 100% of landscape irrigation ENERGY MONITORING Specialized systems have been included for energy submetering, monitoring, and optimizing ongoing operations and building design research. ENERGY EFFICIENCY To save energy, laboratory exhaust fans have been designed to reduce speed in calm wind conditions.

GREEN MATERIALS Building materials have been selected for low-VOC emissions, recycled content, and local sourcing. SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS Over 95% of the project’s wood is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Curved ceiling in laboratories optimizes daylight distribution; electric lights respond automatically to daylight levels. A combination of fixed and operable external shades eliminate direct solar heat gain and glare. ENHANCED VENTILATION All private and shared office spaces incorporate operable windows. All concentrated occupancy spaces have CO2 sensors, and displacement ventilation in offices supplies higher quality, cleaner air with less energy.


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A BUILDING THAT PHYSICALLY EMBODIES THE CLIENT’S NEED FOR AN ENVIRONMENT THAT FOSTERS COLLABORATION, DISCOVERIES AND EXPANSION.

The 91,485 SF Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research provides a permanent home for stem cell research in the University’s first LEED Gold® building on the Health Sciences Campus. The first floor is dedicated to public functions, with a lobby and large seminar room. The four floors above consist of open, flexible laboratories organized in a transparent neighborhood scheme, which sets this building apart from other laboratory facilities in that there are no obstructions across the width of the building. This unique arrangement provides visual connections between program elements and allows 82

flexibility for future modifications. Interaction areas on every floor further promote collaboration. An innovative, high-performance glass envelope brings natural light deep into the interior, while serving as an integral part of the building’s operating system. The west façade utilizes angled glass fins to reduce glare. The east façade features a ventilated double-glass wall, which acts as a buffer to moderate interior temperatures, reduces solar gain, and creates oblique views with its play of transparent and translucent glass. The building is an R&D magazine Laboratory of the Year High Honors Award recipient.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

84


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

Miscellaneous Equipment Any items not covered by other end use categories

(15.8%)

400

Pumps and Auxiliary (0.6%)

Lighting

354.3

(1.7%)

Heat Reject

Ventilation

(0.2%)

(13.5%)

300

Domestic Hot Water

Heating

(5.4%)

(27.1%)

200 141.7

Exterior Usage (0.1%)

100

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy

Cooling

LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1 - 2004)

(35.6%)

0

ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION Reduction of transportation impacts include the USC bus service, bike storage with readily available showers, and preferred parking for fuel efficient cars.

KEY

2030c Target based on occupancy date

ENERGY EFFICIENCY Chilled beams are used to remove heat from the laboratories using water instead of the traditional air systems.

HEAT ISLAND REDUCTION High albedo materials are used on the roof surfaces to mitigate the building heat island effect on the local environment.

HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE A double skin façade on the east elevation reduces energy consumption, while solar fins on the west elevation help reduce glare to the building interior.

LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION Interior and exterior light fixtures are “Dark Sky Friendly” to minimize light pollution.

GREEN MATERIALS Rapidly renewable wood products, such as bamboo veneer doors and architectural casework, are used throughout the building.

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Plumbing fixtures have flush valves and flow restrictors to reduce the consumption of water by over 30% for the building.

HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT The use of lowemitting adhesives for carpets / fabrics improves the indoor air quality.

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING The site was planted with native species that require less irrigation and maintenance.

DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Indirect and controlled lighting in all normally occupied spaces and light harvesting controls in the laboratories reduce or eliminate the need for electric lighting during the daylight hours.

COMMISSIONING Enhanced commissioning will significantly improve researcher comfort, reduce energy costs, and reduce ongoing maintenance costs by ensuring that the systems are operating as intended.


SOKA UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA Performing Arts Center and Wangari Maathai Hall

ALISO VIEJO, CALIFORNIA

THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AND WANGARI MAATHAI HALL, DESIGNED BY ZGF, ON SOKA UNIVERSITY’S ALISO VIEJO CAMPUS WAS ENVISIONED AS A PREMIER FACILITY TO OFFER EXCEPTIONAL ACOUSTICS FOR A VARIETY OF PERFORMANCES FOR THE CAMPUS AND BROADER COMMUNITY.

The project consists of two adjoining buildings. The three-level, 47,836 SF Performing Arts Center offers several seating-in-the-round configurations—from 723 seats to 1,200 seats—to accommodate an array of events, from concerts to convocations. The four-level, 48,974 SF Wangari Maathai Hall offers 11 classrooms, 29 faculty offices, and a 180-seat Black Box Theatre (5,600 SF). Both of the performance spaces are served by common support spaces, including a loading dock, a green room, dressing rooms, musician warm-up 86

rooms, a dance rehearsal studio, laundry facilities, and storage spaces. The design of the new facilities seamlessly integrates with the existing campus and adjacent buildings to create a warm and inviting feel. Sustainability was also a central component of the project. Featuring green roofs, photovoltaic panels, and other energy saving elements, the project has achieved LEED Gold®.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

88


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Exterior Usage (0.4%)

Miscellaneous Equipment Any items not covered by other end use categories

300

(20.1%)

Cooling

Pumps and Auxiliary

(34.5%)

(0.7%)

200

Domestic Hot Water (14.4%) 120

100 Lighting

Heating (10.4%)

Ventilation

(8.7%)

(10.8%)

STORMWATER DESIGN In order to meet the City of Aliso Viejo’s mandates that there be no net increase in runoff for new development projects, ZGF implemented a stormwater management plan that incorporates a manmade bioswale and vegetated roofs to capture and treat 99% of the stormwater runoff. GREEN ROOFS A total of 14,800 SF of custom-designed green roofs help to mitigate heat gain in the building, increase the lifespan of the roof, and help to manage and treat stormwater runoff. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Low-flow water fixtures and high-efficiency instantaneous gas water heaters conserve water, resulting in 45% less water usage than a conventionally designed building. ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY Photovoltaic panels located along the top row of windows of the Performing Arts Center lobby and on the roof generate an estimated 7.5% of the energy the facility uses.

48

0

KEY 2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1 - 2004) 2030c Target based on occupancy date

GREEN MATERIALS At least 20% of building materials—metal doors and frames, aluminum, metal extrusions, glass, gypsum wall board, insulation, ceiling tile, carpet tile, acoustic wall panels, and toilet partitions—include recycled content. DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS The building’s orientation, and the use of indirect and controlled daylighting in all normally occupied spaces, other than the main performance hall and Black Box Theater, reduce or eliminate the need for electric lighting during daylight hours. Fixed sunshades on the Center’s exterior are designed to reduce heat gain in the main lobby, yet permit visibility. HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Low VOC adhesives, sealants, paints, carpet and composite wood products were used. CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT 75% of the project’s construction waste was recycled.


DANA-FARBER CANCER INSTITUTE Yawkey Center for Cancer Care BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH MILLER DYER SPEARS, DESIGNED DANA-FARBER’S NEWEST CLINICAL FACILITY AND NEW SIGNATURE IMAGE.

The 285,000 SF building provides space on over 14 floors for 100 examination rooms, 150 infusion chairs, an expanded clinical research center, and public services for dining, retail, and quiet reflection. The facility also includes seven levels of underground parking with connections to other Dana-Farber Cancer Institute buildings that link to affiliated hospitals, bringing research and clinical staff into close proximity. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s primary goal for the Yawkey Center was to create a state-of-the-art clinical building that promotes personalized, multidisciplinary, safe, respectful, and compassionate cancer care for patients and families in a healing environment. Other 90

goals were to stimulate translation of research into the care of patients, optimize flexibility and utility of space, streamline the flow of patients and materials, minimize wait and treatment times, foster productivity and collaboration among staff, and create a new front entrance and presence. The project is LEED Gold®, and served as a pilot in the Green Guide for Healthcare v2.2 initiative.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

92


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR Miscellaneous Equipment Any items not covered by other end use categories

500 489.9

(2%)

Ventilation (17.1%)

400

Cooling (31.4%)

Exterior Usage (3.6%)

Lighting (4.8%)

300

Pumps and Auxiliary (0.1%)

200 195.9

Heating KEY

(41%)

100

2030c Baseline Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1 - 2004)

0

2030c Target based on occupancy date

GREEN ROOFS Green roofs located on the 4th, 11th, 12th, 14th, and 15th floors include native and non-invasive adaptive plantings to mitigate stormwater runoff and to provide habitat for local fauna.

SUSTAINABLE SOURCED MATERIALS The eucalyptus used throughout the building conforms to requirements of the Forest Stewardship Council to ensure the sustainable logging of trees and the use of plantation grown wood.

HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES All toilets use low-flow plumbing fixtures. Where applicable, sink faucets are equipped with motion sensors, leading to a 55% reduction in water use.

HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT VOCs, persistent biotoxins, and other health hazards are minimized in the interior finishes.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY A heat recovery system transfers the heat from either intake or exhaust air, depending on the season, in order to reduce the amount of energy needed to bring the incoming air to a comfortable temperature. CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT An extensive construction management plan was implemented to minimize noise, dust, and runoff pollution and to handle construction waste, resulting in 50% of all construction debris being diverted from landfills through recycling.

DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS The Center utilizes lighting operated by sensors that automatically reduce artificial lighting in public areas when daylight is available. All light fixtures are energy-efficient and use low-mercury, long-life bulbs. ENHANCED VENTILATION 100% outside air is used for all clinical spaces.


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS Bioengineering and Sciences Building

RICHARDSON, TEXAS

THE 223,000 SF, LEED GOLD® BIOENGINEERING AND SCIENCES BUILDING, DESIGNED BY ZGF IN ASSOCIATION WITH PAGE, IS PHYSICALLY CONNECTED TO THE ADJACENT 190,195 SF NATURAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY (ALSO DESIGNED AND COMPLETED BY ZGF/PAGE) TO ALLOW SHARING OF CORE FACILITIES.

The highly flexible research and teaching laboratories bring together interdisciplinary groups of scientists and engineers from multiple fields, including biology, neuroscience, and bioengineering. Offices for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and teaching assistants are mixed together with teaching and research facilities to ensure dynamic interactions, continuous learning, and ingenious discovery. The building supports learning and research 94

of the functions of the brain, the nervous system, the cell, the gene, and the disciplines of science and engineering as they relate to improvement of human functions and electronic sensing devices. An integral approach to building mass, orientation, exterior façade development, and systems design optimizes building performance and reduces energy costs.


Neighborhood Diagram

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STRATEGIES

Heat Driven Lab @ 1.5 Hoods / Module HEAT DRIVEN LABORATORY @ 1.5 HOODS / MODULE

Ventilation DrivenENERGY Lab @EFFICIENCY 9 Hoods /The Module overall mechanical design

BIOENGINEERING / PHYSICS / NEUROSCIENCES Bioengineering / Physics / Neurosciences

CHEMISTRY

of the laboratories focuses on reduced air change rates, while optimizing energy efficiency for the project. Through a combination of chilled beams, Aircuity system, Phoenix Valves, fume hood occupancy sensors / sashes, and heat recovery pumps, the project is estimated to have an energy reduction of 41.2%. SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS Over 95% of the project’s wood is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). ENERGY MONITORING Energy management and verification devices monitor energy use throughout the building. LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION Efficient design of site lighting reduces night sky pollution and limits spillover to adjacent sites. CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT 76% of construction waste was diverted from the landfill. GREEN MATERIALS Recycled and local materials were specified throughout the project.

4AC

4AC 2AC

± 2AC

2AC + 4AC = 6AC

2AC

6AC

6AC = 2AC + 4AC

± 2AC

± 2AC

HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING ENVELOPE High-performance glazing, fixed exterior shades, 2AC + REQUIRED AS REQUIRED + REQUIRED ± 2AC continuous insulation, and 2AC aluminum metal panel rainscreen system all work together to reduce heat gain, while optimizing daylighting and occupant comfort. HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENT Low-emitting materials were used throughout the building. ENHANCED VENTILATION 100% outside air is continuously delivered to the occupied spaces to provide improved indoor air quality. ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION The university campus is served by numerous public bus routes and private university shuttles that connect students and faculty throughout the Richardson / Dallas area.

96


ENERGY END USE

ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) IN KBTU/SF/YR

400

Ventilation Domestic Hot water

(6%)

390

Area Lights (5%)

(3%)

300 Cooling (9%)

Miscellaneous Equipment

Pumps and Auxiliary

200

Any items not covered by other end use categories

(3%)

(56%)

KEY

Heating

117

(16%)

2030c Baseline

100

Energy model Actual energy LEED / Code baseline (ASHRAE 90.1-2007)

Task Lights (2%)

2030c Target based on occupancy date

0

ANNUAL WATER USE IN GAL/YR

7,000,000

COOLING COIL CONDENSATE REUSE Condensate from the cooling coils is captured in a 6,500-gallon RO Feed Tank located in the basement of the building. The captured condensate is approximately 1,200,000 gallons per year. HIGH-EFFICIENCY FIXTURES Low-flow fixtures, in combination with other water-saving strategies, reduced the building’s water consumption by 52%.

Annual Water Use (gal)

WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING 55% of site irrigation is offset by captured rainwater, and captured reverse osmosis reject water from the Bioengineering and Science Building and the adjacent Natural Science and Engineering Building. This water is stored in a 25,000-gallon cistern. The captured reject water from both buildings is approximately 6,400 gallons per day.

52%

6,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000

KEY Irrigation

1,000,000

RO System Sinks

0

Flushing

Baseline Use

Proposed Design


ZGF LEED ®-CERTIFIED OR REGISTERED PROJECTS CI = LEED for Commercial Interiors NC = LEED for New Construction

CS = LEED for Core and Shell ND = LEED for Neighborhood Development

EB = LEED for Existing Buildings

PLATINUM LEVEL AKRIDGE REAL ESTATE SERVICES, AKRIDGE AND MITSUI FUDOSAN AMERICA, 1200 SEVENTEENTH

WASHINGTON, DC

Certified Platinum LEED-CS v2009

CATERPILLAR INTERNATIONAL VISITOR CENTER

PEORIA, ILLINOIS

Registered LEED-NC 2.1

CITY OF SEATTLE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, KING STREET STATION RENOVATION

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Certified Platinum LEED-NC 2.2

CLIF BAR & COMPANY, CLIF BAR HEADQUARTERS

EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA

Certified Platinum LEED-CI v2009

CONRAD N. HILTON FOUNDATION, CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

AGOURA HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Registered LEED-NC 2.2

CONRAD N. HILTON FOUNDATION, HEADQUARTERS, PHASE 1

AGOURA HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Certified Platinum LEED-NC v2009

GERDING EDLEN DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, TWELVE | WEST MIXED-USE BUILDING

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Platinum LEED-NC 2.1 Certified Platinum LEED-CI 2.0

J. CRAIG VENTER INSTITUTE LA JOLLA LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Registered LEED-NC 2.2

OREGON CONVENTION CENTER, CONVENTION CENTER AND EXPANSION

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Platinum LEED-EB 2.0

PORT OF PORTLAND, HEADQUARTERS & LONG-TERM PARKING GARAGE

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Platinum LEED-NC 2.2

ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE, OFFICE BUILDING

BASALT, COLORADO

Certified Platinum LEED-NC 2009

U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, FEDERAL CENTER SOUTH BUILDING 1202

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Certified Platinum LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, SOUTH TOWER SEISMIC RENOVATION LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA Registered LEED-NC v2009

98


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO, HEALTH SCIENCES BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH FACILITY

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Certified Platinum LEED-NC 2.2

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA, DONALD BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA Certified Platinum LEED-NC 1.0 (Pilot Program) Certified Platinum LEED-EB 2.0

GOLD LEVEL 99 WEST SOUTH TEMPLE AT CITY CREEK SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

ANN & ROBERT H. LURIE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF CHICAGO

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

BUILDING 4 AT CITY CREEK SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Certified Gold LEED-CS 2.0

CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN LUIS OBISPO, WARREN J. BAKER CENTER FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

CITY CREEK REDEVELOPMENT, BLOCKS 75 AND 76 (BUILDINGS 1, 2, 4-7)

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

Certified Gold LEED-ND 1.0 (Pilot Program)

CITY OF SACRAMENTO, SACRAMENTO VALLEY STATION RENOVATION, INTERMODAL PHASE 2

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA

Registered LEED-CS v2009

CONFIDENTIAL SEMICONDUCTOR COMPANY, SIGNATURE OFFICE BUILDING

HILLSBORO, OREGON

Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

DANA-FARBER CANCER INSTITUTE, YAWKEY CENTER FOR CANCER CARE

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

DANIELS REAL ESTATE, THE MARK

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Registered LEED-CS 2.0

DICKINSON COLLEGE, STUART HALL AND JAMES HALL

CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

FOURTH & MADISON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON Certified Gold LEED-EB O&M 2009

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, BIORENEWABLES COMPLEX

AMES, IOWA

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

99


JONATHAN ROSE COMPANIES, VANCE BUILDING RENOVATION

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Certified Gold LEED-EB 2.0

KAUFMAN JACOBS, BLOCK 300 INTERIORS RENOVATION

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Gold LEED-EB O&M v2009

KING COUNTY CHINOOK OFFICE BUILDING

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Registered LEED-CI 2.0 / Registered LEED-CS 2.0

MAX PLANCK FLORIDA CORPORATION, MAX PLANCK FLORIDA INSTITUTE FOR NEUROSCIENCE

JUPITER, FLORIDA

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

MICROSOFT, BUILDING 88

REDMOND, WASHINGTON

Certified Gold LEED-CI 2.0

NINTENDO OF AMERICA HEADQUARTERS

REDMOND, WASHINGTON

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, RICHARD AND BARBARA SILVERMAN HALL FOR MOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS EVANSTON, ILLINOIS Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, MORKEN CENTER FOR LEARNING AND TECHNOLOGY

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.0

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY, MASEEH COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

PROJECT ECOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT, COURTSIDE MIXED-USE STUDENT HOUSING AND SKYBOX APARTMENTS EUGENE, OREGON Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

RICHARDS COURT AT CITY CREEK SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

SCIENCE CENTER / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY, 3737 SCIENCE CENTER

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

Certified Gold LEED-CS v2009

SEATTLE CHILDREN’S, MAJOR INSTITUTION MASTER PLAN AND BUILDING HOPE: CANCER AND CRITICAL CARE EXPANSION SEATTLE, WASHINGTON Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

SOKA UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AND WANGARI MAATHAI HALL Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

STATE OF WASHINGTON, EDNA LUCILLE GOODRICH BUILDING Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.0

THE JBG COMPANIES, 500 L’ENFANT PLAZA Registered LEED-CS v2009

100

WASHINGTON, DC

TUMWATER, WASHINGTON

ALISO VIEJO, CALIFORNIA


THE REGENT AT CITY CREEK SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

THE STANDARD, TANASBOURNE HOME OFFICE BUILDING 2 HILLSBORO, OREGON Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON, ENGINEERING RESEARCH BUILDING ARLINGTON, TEXAS Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS, BIOENGINEERING AND SCIENCES BUILDING

RICHARDSON, TEXAS

Registered LEED-NC v2009

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, COMMUNITY RESOURCE AND REFERRAL CENTER WASHINGTON, DC Certified Gold LEED-CI v2009

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, VA AMERICAN LAKE, MASTER PLAN AND AMBULATORY MEDICAL BUILDING TACOMA, WASHINGTON Registered LEED-NC v2009

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION 8 HEADQUARTERS

DENVER, COLORADO

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, ST. ELIZABETH’S EAST AND WEST CAMPUSES WASHINGTON, DC Registered LEED-NC v2009

UNICO, THE OVERTON

PORTLAND, OREGON

Registered LEED Version 3

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, LI KA SHING CENTER FOR BIOMEDICAL & HEALTH SCIENCES BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, THE WASSERMAN FOOTBALL CENTER

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Registered LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII CANCER CENTER

HONOLULU, HAWAII

Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY, LIFE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PARK, MASTER PLAN AND RESEARCH + DEVELOPMENT BUILDING 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA Certified Gold LEED-CS 2.0

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, GLOBAL SCHOLARS HALL

EUGENE, OREGON

Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, ELI AND EDYTHE BROAD CIRM CENTER FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE AND STEM CELL RESEARCH LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.2

101


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & SCIENCES BUILDING

SEATTLE WASHINGTON

Registered LEED-NC 2.2

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, GOODWIN HALL

BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA

Certified Gold LEED-NC v2009

WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY, KANEKO COMMONS SALEM, OREGON Certified Gold LEED-NC 2.1

ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP, 1800 K STREET TENANT IMPROVEMENTS

WASHINGTON, DC

Certified Gold LEED-CI v2009

SILVER LEVEL BUCCINI / POLLIN GROUP, INC., CANOPY BY HILTON - PORTLAND

PORTLAND, OREGON

Registered LEED-NC v2009

CARROLL INVESTMENTS LLC, THE ELIOT TOWER

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Silver LEED-ND 1.0 (Pilot Program)

COMMUNITY OF HOPE, CONWAY HEALTH AND RESOURCE CENTER

WASHINGTON, DC

Certified Silver LEED-NC v2009

DANIELS REAL ESTATE, STADIUM PLACE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Registered LEED-NC v2009

DUKE UNIVERSITY, FITZPATRICK CENTER FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING, MEDICINE, AND APPLIED SCIENCES DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA Certified Silver LEED-NC 2.1

EMORY UNIVERSITY, HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH BUILDING

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Certified Silver LEED-NC v2009

GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY / LINCOLN PROPERTY COMPANY, POTOMAC SCIENCE CENTER

WOODBRIDGE, VIRGINIA

Registered LEED-BD+C NC 4

HACKENSACK UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER, JOHN THEURER CANCER CENTER

HACKENSACK, NEW JERSEY

Registered LEED-NC 2.2

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTHCARE, THE COTTONWOOD CLINIC PROJECT AT THE TOSH CAMPUS

MURRAY, UTAH

Registered LEED-NC v2009

JUDICIAL COUNCIL OF CALIFORNIA, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA CLARA, FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER COURTHOUSE SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Registered LEED-NC v2009

MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER, THE MORTIMER B. ZUCKERMAN RESEARCH CENTER NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Certified Silver LEED-NC 2.0

102


OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY, HILDEGARD LAMFROM BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Silver LEED-NC 2.1

REED COLLEGE, THE GROVE: BIDWELL, ASPEN, SEQUOIA & SITKA HOUSES

PORTLAND, OREGON

Certified Silver LEED-NC 2.2

REGIONAL LEARNING ALLIANCE

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Certified Silver LEED-NC 2.0

STATE UNIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION FUND, STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT CORTLAND, BOWERS HALL UPGRADE TO SCIENCE HALL PHASE 1 CORTLAND, NEW YORK Registered LEED-NC v2009

SCIENCE CENTER / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY, 3711 SCIENCE CENTER

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

Certified Silver LEED-CS 2.0

THE CASCADE AT CITY CREEK

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

Registered LEED-NC 2.2

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA, THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA CANCER CENTER AT DIGNITY HEALTH ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER PHOENIX, ARIZONA Registered LEED-NC 2.2

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, ARMY INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MARYLAND Registered LEED-NC v2009

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BLANCHFIELD ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL ADDITION / ALTERATION FORT CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY

Registered LEED-NC v2009

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUREAU OF OVERSEAS BUILDINGS OPERATIONS, NEW EMBASSY COMPOUND PLANNING SERVICES BELGRADE, SERBIA Registered LEED-NC v2009

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, JERRY L. PETTIS MEMORIAL VETERANS MEDICAL CENTER

LOMA LINDA, CALIFORNIA

Registered LEED-HC v2009

UNC HOSPITALS, HILLSBOROUGH CAMPUS

HILLSBOROUGH, NORTH CAROLINA

Registered LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO, ALTMAN CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Registered LEED-NC v2009

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH MEDICAL CENTER, CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE SCIENCE

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Registered LEED-NC v2009

103


VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, SIGNATURE ENGINEERING RESEARCH BUILDING BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA

Registered LEED-NC 2.2

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY - PULLMAN, PAUL G. ALLEN CENTER FOR GLOBAL ANIMAL HEALTH

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

Certified Silver LEED-NC v2009

CERTIFIED LEVEL BAPTIST HEALTH SOUTH FLORIDA, MIAMI CANCER INSTITUTE

MIAMI, FLORIDA

Registered LEED-HC v2009

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL COLORADO, EAST AND WEST TOWER ADDITIONS AND REMODELS DENVER, COLORADO Registered LEED-NC v2009

FRED HUTCHINSON CANCER RESEARCH CENTER, ROBERT M. ARNOLD BUILDING

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Certified LEED-NC 2.1

GEORGE FOX UNIVERSITY, LE SHANA HALL

NEWBERG, OREGON

Certified LEED-NC 2.1

LEGACY HEALTH, SALMON CREEK MEDICAL CENTER

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

Registered LEED-NC 2.1

MICROSOFT CORPORATION, BUILDINGS 30, 31 AND 32

REDMOND, WASHINGTON

Certified LEED-EB 1.0 (Pilot Program)

PFIZER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CAMPUS

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Certified LEED-NC 2.0

SELLEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Certified LEED-EB 2.0

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUREAU OF OVERSEAS BUILDINGS OPERATIONS, NEW EMBASSY COMPOUND SCHEMATIC DESIGN SOFIA, BULGARIA Certified LEED-NC 2.0

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA, MARINE SCIENCES BUILDING Certified LEED-NC 2.1

ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP, SEATTLE OFFICE Certified LEED-CI 1.0 (Pilot Program)

104

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA


INDEX B

P

Bolsa Chica Conservancy Center for Coastal Ecology 62

Pearl Izumi USA, Inc. Pearl Izumi North American Corporate Headquarters 6

C City of Portland Simon and Helen Director Park 56 City of Seattle King Street Station Renovation 46 Civic San Diego / City of San Diego San Diego Civic Center Complex / City Hall 24 Clif Bar & Company Clif Bar Headquarters 28 Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Headquarters, Phase 1 32

D

Portland State University, Living City Design Competition Symbiotic Districts: Towards a Balanced City 48 Port of Portland Headquarters & Long-Term Parking Garage 52

R Rocky Mountain Institute Rocky Mountain Institute Innovation Center 2

S

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Yawkey Center for Cancer Care 90

Soka University of America Performing Arts Center and Wangari Maathai Hall 86

Dickinson College Stuart Hall and James Hall 38

Stanford University Central Energy Facility 10

G

T

Gerding Edlen Development Company Twelve | West Mixed-Use Building 42

J J. Craig Venter Institute J. Craig Venter Institute La Jolla 16

N National Capital Planning Commission / U.S. General Services Administration SW Ecodistrict Plan 60

The University of Texas at Dallas Bioengineering and Sciences Building 94

U University of California, Berkeley Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences 74 University of California, San Diego Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility 78

University of California, Santa Barbara Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management 14 University of Southern California Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research 82 University of Washington MolES and NanoES Buildings 20 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Headquarters 66 U.S. General Services Administration Federal Center South Building 1202 70


ZGF ARCHITECTS LLP

Portland

1223 SW Washington Street Suite 200 Portland, OR 97205 T 503.224.3860

Seattle

925 Fourth Avenue Suite 2400 Seattle, WA 98104 T 206.623.9414

Los Angeles

515 South Flower Street Suite 3700 Los Angeles, CA 90071 T 213.617.1901

www.zgf.com

Washington, DC

1800 K Street NW Suite 200 Washington, DC 20006 T 202.380.3120

New York

419 Park Avenue South 20th Floor New York, NY 10016 T 212.624.4754 ZGF ARCHITECTS INC

Vancouver

355 Burrard Street Suite 350 Vancouver, BC V6C 2G8 Canada T 604.558.8390

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