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HIGHER EDUCATION


ZGF Architects LLP is an award-winning architectural, planning, and interior design firm with offices in Portland, Seattle, Los Angeles, Washington, DC, New York, and Vancouver, BC. Our portfolio features a diverse mix of projects for both private and public institutions, including work for healthcare, research, academic, civic, corporate, and commercial clients. ZGF’s higher education experience—which includes the successful programming, planning, and design of more than 200 buildings for college and university campuses nationwide— demonstrates our leadership in guiding multi-tiered institutional clients through highly integrated and collaborative processes to identify project goals, prioritize needs, and develop efficient, flexible, and forward thinking spaces for teaching, research, and learning. The range of these facilities is diverse and includes classrooms, lecture halls and art studios, teaching and research laboratories, performance venues and auditoria, residence and dining halls, student centers, libraries, and athletic facilities. Each project is a unique response to our client’s mission, program, budget, and campus. Our design philosophy is centered on the premise that excellence should be reflected in each and every aspect of a building—its fit within the community and campus, its function and relationship to its users, its building systems, and its cost. This dedication to design excellence at every level has resulted in numerous national, regional, and local awards, including the prestigious Architecture Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects, which recognizes the firm’s “high standards, humanistic concerns, and unique ability to capture the spirit of a place and the aspirations of its inhabitants.”


LIVING, LEARNING, AND PERFORMANCE FACILITIES

We’re taking an approach that will make student life and residential life seamless. The goal is to keep students learning throughout the entire day. GREGG LOBBISER, DIRECTOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES Wasserman Football Center

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE NEW 73,500 SF WASSERMAN FOOTBALL CENTER, A STATE-OF-THEART COMPLEX REPRESENTATIVE OF THE UNIVERSITY’S FOOTBALL HERITAGE THAT WAS DESIGNED WITH THE INTENT OF RAISING THE CALIBER OF THEIR ATHLETIC PROGRAM, PROMOTING PLAYER DEVELOPMENT, AND DRIVING THE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF BOTH PLAYERS AND COACHES.

The new building co-locates football staff and student-athletes on the campus for the very first time and is comprised of offices for coaches and support staff, strength training facilities, team meeting rooms, a 160-seat auditorium, locker rooms, training and rehabilitation areas, equipment management facilities, and player amenity spaces, such as a players' lounge, a barbershop, and other casual lounge areas to encourage 4

off-field bonding and a sense of camaraderie. The new football center also offers direct access to Spaulding Field and reinforces the urban fabric of the campus, transforming an existing service area into a new outdoor plaza shared with the existing Los Angeles Tennis Center, Pauley Pavilion, the Acosta Athletic Complex, and the Mo Ostin Basketball Center. Registered with the certification goal of LEED Platinum®, the facility incorporates sustainable features, such as exterior solar shades, daylighting, rooftop solar thermal water heaters, a connection to the campus' cogeneration plant, and a displacement ventilation system.


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UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON MolES and NanoES Buildings

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE TWO-PHASED MOLES AND NANOES BUILDINGS, WHICH TOGETHER PROVIDE 160,000 SF OF CRITICAL RESEARCH SPACE IN THE FIELD OF INTERDISCIPLINARY MOLECULAR ENGINEERING CONSIDERED CRITICAL FOR ENSURING FUTURE ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND MEDICAL HEALTH WORLDWIDE.

Sited within the campus core, the buildings were designed to fit within the historic context while also reflecting the cutting-edge nature of the research housed within them. The 90,000 SF Phase 1 building provides space to support a wide range of wet and dry laboratory uses, including fume hood-intensive chemistry, open plan offices for researchers, faculty offices, common and support space. The design takes advantage of the topography of the site to provide 8

ground and basement level instrumentation laboratories (the largest on the West Coast) with ultra-low vibration and electromagnetic interference requirements, allowing the research laboratories to be above-grade to take advantage of daylight and views. The LEED Gold® building is the first laboratory building on campus with a naturally ventilated office component. It also features optimized laboratory ventilation, energy-efficient chilled beams, and two green roofs. Phase 2 will provide an additional 70,000 SF of research and collaboration space and includes a significant classroom component.


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THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE Purce Lecture Hall Building Renovation

OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE GUT RENOVATION AND ADDITION OF THE EXISTING 25,000 SF LECTURE HALL BUILDING SITUATED PROMINENTLY AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE CAMPUS AND ADJACENT TO THE CENTRAL COURTYARD KNOWN AS RED SQUARE.

Originally designed in the brutalist style of architecture, the renovation transforms the existing facility from an inwardly focused, steeply-tiered, fixed-seat lecture style classroom facility into a flexible, student-centered active learning space that supports a variety of pedagogies and acts as a hub for students, faculty, and visitors. The design retains the building’s largest lecture hall and three gently tiered lecture halls and adds two 80-seat flip classrooms, two 30-seat flat floor classrooms, and an active rotunda. In addition to ambitious goals for developing modern learning spaces that reflect the 12

campus culture of innovation, the design provided equity through accessibility by eliminating the need for elevators and stairs to reach each instruction space. Designed to align with Evergreen’s commitment to environmental sustainability the project is LEED Gold® and uses sustainable strategies such as rooftop monitors to bring daylight throughout circulation spaces and is net-zero ready with the potential for rooftop photovoltaics.


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Washington Commons

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE COMMONS—THE NEW HOME FOR THE OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT AND THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION—TO PROVIDE A WELCOMING, HOSPITABLE AND MEMORABLE ENVIRONMENT THAT CONVEYS THE SPIRIT AND RICH HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY.

The 4,000 SF space includes reception, a living room style main gathering space, and a large conference room supported by a catering kitchen to host fundraising events and alumni gatherings. In working with the university to develop the vision for the space, identify commonalities between mission and program of both groups and to interpret the campus’ history, legacy and image a number of themes emerged that were embraced in the design including concepts of permanence, legacy, timelessness, transformation, and purpose. To evoke these themes gold and purple 14

materials, finishes and lighting—traditional UW colors— were used generously throughout, elements such as the gothic relief and lit panel at the entry recall the historic Suzzallo Library form and stained glass windows at the heart of the campus, and the main board room includes a graphic composition of alumni celebrating the legacy of the institution.


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REED COLLEGE The Grove: Bidwell, Aspen, Sequoia & Sitka Houses

PORTLAND, OREGON

REED COLLEGE HAS EXPERIENCED A CONTINUAL INCREASE IN THE NEED FOR STUDENT HOUSING IN RECENT YEARS. ZGF WAS COMMISSIONED TO PREPARE A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF EXISTING STUDENT HOUSING TYPES AT REED AND A NUMBER OF OTHER CAMPUSES IN THE REGION.

In particular, housing types were sought that would encourage juniors and seniors to reside on campus and at the same time involve them socially and intellectually. In an effort to meet this need, four new residential facilities—the Bidwell, Sitka, Aspen, and Sequoia Houses—were designed and built to accommodate 125 students. This 64,025 SF expansion fulfills a development phase outlined in the College’s Master Plan. The new LEED Silver® facilities are smaller and more intimate than is typically seen on college 18

campuses, with 20 to 30 students in each dormitory. Each of the three-story buildings has a unique design and, together, form a new quadrangle, creating a village environment. They are also a visible demonstration of a long-standing campus commitment to the environment and sustainability. The buildings feature natural daylighting and ventilation, sustainable interior and building materials, and construction practices that protected local streams and rivers, and encouraged recycling.


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REED COLLEGE Gray Campus Center

PORTLAND, OREGON

IN AN EFFORT TO ADDRESS INEFFICIENCIES IN EXISTING FACILITIES AND IMPROVE STUDENT LIFE, REED COLLEGE COMMISSIONED ZGF TO DESIGN A NEW CAMPUS CENTER TO SERVE AS THE HEART OF STUDENT ACTIVITY.

The 72,958 SF Gray Campus Center includes three integrated components: a renovated commons, a remodeled student union, and the new 18,664 SF Kaul Auditorium. Tying the three components together is a covered brick arcade that wraps the commons on two sides and connects to both the student union and the auditorium. Inside are the main dining hall, kitchen and servery; a café; student organization offices; student activity areas; the campus bookstore; a post office; a coffee shop; and a multipurpose auditorium / banquet room. The new Kaul Auditorium building features a main auditorium that can accommodate 760 people during 22

performances, or 435 for large banquets. A 1,900 SF flexible “foyer” space on the building’s south side serves as a lobby for events in the auditorium and, when closed off, as a separate room for college board meetings and smaller banquet events. In addition to serving the needs of the College, the new auditorium provides space for seasonal recitals by Chamber Music Northwest.


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WHITMAN COLLEGE Residence Hall & Dining Facility

WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW 60,000 SF RESIDENCE HALL FOR SOPHOMORES AND A NEW ENHANCED DINING HALL TO SERVE THE ENTIRE CAMPUS.

Based on residential studies that Whitman conducted, it was determined that sophomores currently dispersed throughout the campus would benefit from a centralized space that encouraged a community identity. The sophomore experience is different from that of freshmen in that they prefer more privacy, but also want to strengthen the community experience they established in their first year. The new residence and dining hall provides 150 beds for students, organized into nine clusters of rooms; each cluster forms a community that connects to larger common areas with a lounge, a community kitchen, meeting and study rooms, and television and game rooms. 26

It is also includes space for the sophomore class to assemble for special events. The 500-seat dining facility will operate with extended hours and provide more meal options, outdoor seating, and flexible meeting spaces. It is designed around a “market” concept where food stations and seating are interspersed to create a variety of options and activities, enhancing the overall dining and student life experience. Sustainability was a key consideration for the project. In addition to using low-emitting materials and materials with high recycled and regionally sourced content, the energy-efficient MEP system allows for ducted ventilation to the student rooms, which increases indoor air quality. This is coupled with water-efficient plumbing fixtures and solar PV panels to further reduce the building’s environmental footprint.


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WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY Kaneko Commons

SALEM, OREGON

A TASK FORCE ESTABLISHED BY WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY RECOMMENDED THAT THE UNIVERSITY’S EXISTING RESIDENTIAL LIVING MODEL BE REVAMPED TO IMPROVE CAMPUS LIFE PROGRAMMING, ENHANCE STUDENT GOVERNMENT, AND ENRICH CONNECTIONS BETWEEN STUDENTS AND FACULTY. ZGF’S SOLUTION WAS TO CREATE A NEW MODEL THAT CONSISTS OF A RESIDENTIAL COMMONS SYSTEM THAT COMBINES CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES WITH CO-CURRICULAR EDUCATION

The first of four buildings to establish that system, Kaneko Commons, designed by ZGF, includes 68,235 SF of new construction and an 8,708 SF renovation. Kaneko Commons, a 151-bed addition to Kaneko Hall, has eight different student housing options, including suites and apartments. The mix of student suites and 30

apartments was determined by student input at several focus groups. All new units have private bathrooms. Dining options include apartment kitchens, community kitchens, and an enlarged food service and dining area that supports the Asian influence of Tokyo University. The project includes study rooms, seminar rooms, classrooms, multi-purpose areas, traditional television lounges, and laundry facilities. Sustainability played a significant role in the design process. Environmentally responsible elements include water-source heat pumps, a rainwater-reclamation reservoir, and photovoltaic panels on the roof that supplement the electricity supply for the building and serve as shading devices for the atrium. Kaneko Commons is LEED Gold®; it is the first LEED project on Willamette’s campus, and sets a precedent for future buildings.


UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Executive MBA and Sports Product Management Programs

ZGF DESIGNED A STATE-OF-THE-ART 11,000 SF INNOVATION HUB IN DOWNTOWN PORTLAND FOR THE EXECUTIVE MBA AND SPORTS PRODUCT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS, BOTH PART OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON’S LUNDQUIST COLLEGE OF BUSINESS.

The UO’s brand concepts of community, pursuit, and innovation were incorporated into the design and are highly visible throughout the space. The entrance features regionally sourced wood and a custom ceiling integrating a twinkling, backlit world map, while functioning as a large collaboration and study space. Active learning classrooms and small break out spaces extend throughout the facility. The Executive MBA classroom, with blonde wood and natural light, accommodates 60 people in a tiered design that facilitates interaction through direct lines 32

PORTLAND, OREGON

of sight. The room is ideally suited for the Harvard case study method of learning. Each desk has wired and wireless broadband connectivity and low-glare lighting to reduce eye fatigue. High-performance audiovisual capabilities include carefully calculated screen image ratios and viewing angles. The teaching wall provides adjustability and flexibility for the lecturer to teach in their preferred manner. Students can utilize a “flat” one-level classroom for breakout sessions that doubles as a dining facility and team meeting space. The lecture hall, designed to accommodate over 100 people, has the ability to be reconfigured for use by smaller groups. It also includes floor-to-ceiling white boards and was designed with the intent to encourage student collaboration.


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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Living Learning Center

EUGENE, OREGON

DESIGNED BY ZGF, THE LIVING LEARNING CENTER INTEGRATES CAMPUS LIFE WITH THE ACADEMIC MISSION OF THE UNIVERSITY, SOMETHING THAT HAS DIMINISHED IN RECENT DECADES AS STUDENT HOUSING HAS INCREASINGLY BEEN SEPARATED FROM ACADEMIC BUILDINGS.

Such integration has been found to improve both student retention and scholastic performance. The 120,000 SF Center includes 387 beds, mostly in traditional double-occupancy rooms, housed in two buildings. The facility has two classrooms, a seminar room, and one large classroom that doubles as a performance space. Both student productions, as well professional productions, are held in the performance space, providing another dimension to the student experience. A café provides the social center for the 36

project. The Center’s energy-saving features include both passive and active strategies that seek to reduce and handle loads most efficiently. Passive systems include natural daylighting to all occupied spaces, fixed external shading of all south-facing windows, natural ventilation to all occupied rooms, and natural cross ventilation of first-floor public spaces. Building systems include high-performance glazing and framing, and increased wall and roof insulation. Premium efficiency motors are used throughout the building, as well as high-efficiency water-cooled condensers, air-to-air heat recovery units, and waste water heat recovery.


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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

EUGENE, OREGON

THROUGH THE SEAMLESS INTEGRATION OF ART, ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS, AND ARCHITECTURE, THIS 40,000 SF STATE-OF-THE-ART LEARNING CENTER SERVES TO INSPIRE AND CELEBRATE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS.

The Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes incorporates a range of learning environments, from small spaces for individual tutorials to a large auditorium. The mix of uses is intended to focus on the notion of learning through collaboration and peer interaction. The first floor of the building is open to the public with a café, an auditorium, an atrium for public events, and heritage space that recognizes past, present, and future student athletes at the University. The two floors above are for the exclusive use of the University’s student athletes and staff, and require secure access. The facility includes a 114-seat auditorium, 35 tutor 40

rooms, 25 faculty/advising offices, a conference room, a flexible classroom, and a library, as well as a computer, graphics, and 3D teaching laboratories. The building is adjacent to existing and future amenities, and fronts a campus gateway. The site’s visual prominence led to the building being designed with four public facades and no “back door,” which has reinforced its importance within the landscape as an iconic element. Sustainability was an integral part of the project. A double-wall facade addresses acoustic isolation, thermal insulation, and control of daylight within the building, creating a dynamic response to orientation, while reinforcing the concepts of transparency and connectivity.


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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Athletic Medicine Center

EUGENE, OREGON

OCCUPYING 15,000 SF WITHIN THE EXISTING CASANOVA CENTER, THE ZGF-DESIGNED ATHLETIC MEDICINE CENTER PROVIDES THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON’S ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT WITH A STATE-OF-THE-ART SPORTS THERAPY AND TRAINING FACILITY FOR MORE THAN 400 STUDENT-ATHLETES.

The facility captures the changing nature of healthcare design, reflecting the University’s desire for a holistic approach to healing, stimulation, and focus for its athletes. Comprised of three larger spaces bordered by conference and treatment rooms, the Athletic Medicine Center provides ample space for treadmills and exercise bikes, three hydrotherapy tubs, hot and cold tubs, a nutrition bar, a treatment area with adjacent examination rooms, massage and taping tables, a student seating area, an x-ray facility, and meeting 44

rooms. The design approaches sports therapy as a healing environment more comparable to a spa than a clinic. While it is common for athletes who have suffered injuries to become isolated from the rest of their team, this circumstance is mitigated in the new facility by spaces that maintain visual continuity and connection, but also offer built-in privacy. Glass in the medical exam rooms is transparent, but it can be transformed to an opaque barrier when needed. The therapy pools for injured players are in the same space as the plunge pools for other players, but the pools are separated by a water feature. A similar need exists to keep staff integrated and separated from the athletes. The sophisticated layering of spaces allows people to be grouped or split in an innovative way.


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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Hatfield-Dowlin Complex, Football Operations Center

EUGENE, OREGON

THE NEW 145,000 SF HATFIELD-DOWLIN COMPLEX DESIGNED TO APPEAL TO THE RISING STARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL NATIONWIDE - PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON’S FOOTBALL PROGRAM.

The Complex is comprised of two buildings, a “teaching box” and an “office bar,” with the building program divided into box-like elements, interlocking as a cohesive and interdependent composition. The public lobby and reception areas feature elements that celebrate the legacy of the football program and acknowledge the program’s donors and sponsors. A new outdoor plaza, with a cascading fountain and benches, serves as a public outdoor hub. The program includes a weight room, indoor sprint track, dedicated football position meeting rooms, team video theaters, offense 48

and defense strategy rooms, and a conference suite that accommodates the entire coaching staff. This suite serves as a central hub for fostering communication and collaboration among offensive and defensive coaches. The core area is flanked by office and locker facilities for players, coaches, and support staff. Additional amenities include a players’ lounge, a nutrition bar, an equipment room, a full-service dining facility, a recruiting center to host prospective players, dedicated areas to accommodate professional scouts, a media interview room, an advanced video editing and distribution center, and training and medical treatment facilities, as well as a new enhanced grass football field and two new synthetic turf practice fields.


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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Global Scholars Hall

EUGENE, OREGON

THE GLOBAL SCHOLARS HALL, DESIGNED BY ZGF, IS A 459-BED STUDENT HOUSING FACILITY WITH A VARIETY OF LIVING SPACES, COMMON AREAS, AND ACADEMIC SPACES FOR FRESHMAN AND UPPER-LEVEL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The 195,000 SF building provides a dynamic learning environment for students seeking a comprehensive academic experience, particularly those enrolled in the Robert D. Clark Honors College, College Scholars, or the Global Scholars language programs in Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, German, and French. The building includes a 160-seat Fresh Market Café and a multi-use performance space that can seat 180 for formal dining, 240 in classroom seating, and 300 in theater-style seating for lectures and performances. Five additional classrooms accommodate 20, 35, 52

and 60 students. The residence hall includes a learning commons—a suite of spaces to accommodate group study, with a full-time librarian dedicated to support the use of information technology. Larger spaces are used for scheduled classes during the day and for informal study spaces that can be reserved after hours. There are also dedicated language cafés with in-language news service and other language-specific programming. For the first time in the University’s history, residence hall academic programs are supported by a resident scholar. The building met the University’s sustainable development policy and achieved LEED Gold® certification.


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CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO Meyers Family Sports Medicine Center

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA

ZGF COMPLETED THE DESIGN FOR THE NEW 10,000 SF MARVIN MEYERS FAMILY SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER ON THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO CAMPUS.

Located adjacent to the existing Duncan and Ricchiuti buildings, this state-of-the-art facility is the last of three anchor buildings planned for the student-athlete village on the campus. The Meyers Family Sports Medicine Center provides additional space and enhanced equipment for student-athlete examinations and injury preventative measures, as well as for the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of sports-related injuries and conditions. The design goals were to create a jewellike building at the heart of the student-athlete village to serve as a beacon and attraction for the surrounding community, and to facilitate student-athlete interaction through the creation of a strong sense of place and 56

identity. A comfortable outdoor gathering space beneath a trellis serves as an extension of the building’s entry and student lounge. The building includes a hydrotherapy room, counseling space, and office space for the Fresno State sports medicine staff and doctors. Warm, durable materials with natural finishes were used throughout the building.


IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Gerdin Business Building

AMES, IOWA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 110,790 SF GERDIN BUSINESS BUILDING, A CONSOLIDATED HOME FOR THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS.

Increased enrollment underscored the need for a new facility focused on both teaching and research. A lightfilled commons and central stair serve as the social heart of the building flanked by two perpendicular wings, one which includes all of the primary teaching spaces and the other which provides office space for departmental programs and staff. Faculty and administration offices occupy the upper floors, while classrooms, lab and community spaces fill the lower floors. Generous circulation space throughout the building provides opportunities for planned and chance interaction among students and faculty, enlivening the building. Study alcoves located within the commons 58

provide more intimate spaces for individual or group study. The building is located on the last building site on the historic Olmstead designed Central Lawn, the physical and symbolic heart of the campus, the building was designed to be sympathetic to the surrounding architecture while simultaneously projecting a distinct look and feel appropriate to the business school. The program includes technology enabled lecture halls and a range of active learning classrooms that provide a forum for collaboration and debate, and a range of support spaces, including career services and tutoring.


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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Morken Center for Learning and Technology

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE MORKEN CENTER TO HELP FULFILL PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY’S GOAL TO BETTER PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE DEMANDS OF A RAPIDLY CHANGING, GLOBALIZED WORLD THROUGH NEW LEVELS OF COLLABORATION AND SYNERGY AMONG EDUCATIONAL DISCIPLINES.

The 57,000 SF building houses classrooms, laboratories, faculty offices, conference rooms, an atrium, and a café, and brings together three traditionally unrelated departments—the School of Business, the Department of Computer Science & Computer Engineering, and the Department of Mathematics. The facility gives new focus to educational endeavors such as the latest business practices, entrepreneurial leadership, software and hardware development, robotics, mathematical and computer modeling, wireless technologies, and 62

cross-disciplinary program integration in areas such as business statistics and actuarial sciences. Classrooms are located in the two-story wing, while faculty offices are housed in the three-story wing. The two wings are joined by a two-story lobby with common spaces intended to promote informal exchanges between students and faculty. The building was sited to reinforce the bridge between the existing upper and lower campus areas, helping to consolidate academic space from off-campus locations. It is also a keystone building that defines the improved west campus approach and entry. The building design draws from the context of more traditional campus buildings in both form and materials. In addition to incorporating state-of-the-art technology and flexibility, this LEED Gold® building also integrates many sustainable features.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY VANCOUVER Multimedia Classroom Building

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

THE 46,654 SF MULTIMEDIA CLASSROOM BUILDING, DESIGNED BY ZGF, EXPANDS CURRICULUM AT THE VANCOUVER CAMPUS AND PROVIDES SPECIALIZED ACADEMIC SPACE.

This three-story brick and glass classroom building faces the main public outdoor space at the center of the campus, and provides classrooms; community projects offices; computer, multimedia, and graphic arts laboratories; and administrative space for the College of Liberal Arts. Planning focused on creating maximum flexibility within the classrooms and laboratory spaces, such as intentionally allowing all of the wiring systems that support the computer equipment to be exposed. Other features include spaces that are highly visible from within the building and from adjacent outdoor spaces. Informal study areas are provided throughout 66

the building. Classrooms, private offices, and study spaces offer dramatic views into the center of campus or to Mount Hood. The building and landscape design are highly integrated, and both take their cues from their immediate surroundings.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY The SPARK: Academic Innovation Hub

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE 83,295 SF HIGH-PERFORMANCE DIGITAL CLASSROOM HUB TO ENHANCE ACTIVE LEARNING. DELIVERED USING AN INTEGRATED DESIGNBUILD APPROACH, THE BUILDING IS A UNIVERSITY-WIDE RESOURCE DESIGNED TO CATALYZE COLLABORATION AND INNOVATION AND SITED PROMINENTLY TO FORM A GATEWAY AT THE SOUTHERN EDGE OF THE CAMPUS.

A network of flexible, technology-enabled learning environments connect to a central commons, which also serves as a public presentation and event space. The facility includes a variety of classroom types—formal and informal, large group, small group, individual, active, problem-based, and makers spaces—to provide choice and diversity. Due to the building’s autonomy from specific academic departments, classroom space is optimized and easily scheduled by students, faculty and 70

staff for meetings and group work when unoccupied. The interior design strategy employs modular furniture anticipating the need for flexibility for varying degrees of group collaboration. The largest classroom—the active learning hall—is a circle-in-the-round accommodating 360 degrees of projected content, encircling faculty and enabling a pedagogy that encourages democracy, participation, and teamwork between students. Classroom spaces are supported by a Starbucks café, a variety of lounges including the digital marketplace featuring stadium style seating, makers space, a student skills development studio and tutoring spaces, a faculty innovation studio, IT help desk, and hoteling style faculty offices. This building will be LEED Silver®.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA Humanities and Social Sciences Building

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA

THE 156,174 SF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES BUILDING, DESIGNED BY ZGF, HOUSES THE DEPARTMENTS OF ANTHROPOLOGY, ASIAN-AMERICAN STUDIES, CLASSICS, DRAMA AND DANCE, HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES. THE GOAL OF THE PROJECT WAS TO STRENGTHEN AND UNIFY THE CAMPUS.

The building is organized into four connected academic components: a one-story wing for drama and dance; two four-story elements for classrooms and academic offices; and at the prominent northeast corner of the site, a six-story academic and administrative office block. This block, by means of its height, complex roof profile, and pinnacle open-stair tower, provides an anchor and definition for the building. The wings form a landscaped quad that channel cross-campus pedestrian circulation toward a major campus east-west 76

corridor. The quad also creates a much-needed sense of place for the entire campus community. Arcades and porches both direct pedestrian flow, and punctuate activity centers at several points along the edges of the complex. The varied series of roof forms reflect the diversity of the interrelated disciplines housed within the building. Several sustainable features were included in the design, such as natural ventilation to reduce energy consumption while increasing indoor air quality, high-reflectance exterior finishes for reducing heat island effect, and reclaimed water for irrigation.


SOKA UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA Performing Arts Center and Wangari Maathai Hall

ALISO VIEJO, CALIFORNIA

THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AND WANGARI MAATHAI HALL, DESIGNED BY ZGF, ON SOKA UNIVERSITY’S ALISO VIEJO CAMPUS WAS ENVISIONED AS A PREMIER FACILITY TO OFFER EXCEPTIONAL ACOUSTICS FOR A VARIETY OF PERFORMANCES FOR THE CAMPUS AND BROADER COMMUNITY.

The project consists of two adjoining buildings. The three-level, 47,836 SF Performing Arts Center offers several seating-in-the-round configurations—from 723 seats to 1,200 seats—to accommodate an array of events, from concerts to convocations. The four-level, 48,974 SF Wangari Maathai Hall offers 11 classrooms, 29 faculty offices, and a 180-seat Black Box Theatre (5,600 SF). Both of the performance spaces are served by common support spaces, including a loading dock, a green room, dressing rooms, musician warm-up rooms, 78

a dance rehearsal studio, laundry facilities, and storage spaces. The design of the new facilities seamlessly integrates with the existing campus and adjacent buildings to create a warm and inviting feel. Featuring green roofs, photovoltaic panels, and other energy saving elements, sustainability was a central component of the LEED Gold® project.


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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Mary Baker Russell Music Center

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE 44,636 SF MARY BAKER RUSSELL MUSIC CENTER TO FULFILL THE UNIVERSITY’S NEED FOR A CENTER DEDICATED SOLELY TO THE STUDY AND PERFORMANCE OF MUSIC.

The complex houses a concert hall, classrooms, practice studios, faculty teaching studios, rehearsal space, administrative offices, and support areas. Located on a hillside site, and built in two phases, the Center’s multi-story lobby with adjoining courtyard establishes the music building as the “grand stairs” central to the campus. It also provides a connection between the upper and lower campuses, uniting two functionally separate environments. The facility is composed of three components, configured in such a way to conform to the existing slope, thereby retaining most of the existing fir and oak trees on the site. The first component is a 82

teaching wing comprised of individual practice and faculty studios that forms a courtyard and amphitheater through which passersby may be exposed to musicians at work. The amphitheater utilizes the natural slope of the site to create a performance venue with 115 seats on structured terrace blocks in a grass setting. The second component is a large structure containing rehearsal studios for choirs, bands, and orchestras. The third is the 534-seat Lagerquist Concert Hall. The concert hall, critical parts of the teaching facility, the amphitheater, and an outdoor catwalk were constructed as Phase I. Phase II included two rehearsal halls, faculty studios, practice rooms, and support services.


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WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY John & Anne Wilson Art and Music Center

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A REPLACEMENT BUILDING FOR WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY’S ART AND MUSIC DEPARTMENTS.

The departments were previously co-located in a building with poor acoustics and inadequate mechanical exhaust systems. In addition, the music department rehearsed and performed on the opposite side of campus, which affected the transfer of large instruments, and drew students away from faculty interactions. The 65,983 SF replacement facility includes art studios and laboratories, music rehearsal and practice rooms, faculty offices / studios, classrooms, gallery spaces, and a dedicated music performance space. The art department is located on the north side of the building where large windows capture light and provide views into Woods Creek. Spaces for the 86

music department are along the south side, with all departmental offices and public spaces gathered around the atrium. The building is located adjacent to the Lenfest Center for the Performing Arts and defines a distinctive edge to the historic campus.


WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center

SALEM, OREGON

THIS 26,400 SF MUSIC CENTER, DESIGNED BY ZGF, CONSOLIDATES THE UNIVERSITY’S MUSIC DEPARTMENT, WHICH WAS FORMERLY HOUSED IN BUILDINGS SCATTERED THROUGHOUT THE CAMPUS. LOCATED ADJACENT TO THE UNIVERSITY PLAYHOUSE AND FINE ARTS BUILDING, THE NEW BUILDING FORMS AN ARTS CORRIDOR, BRINGING TOGETHER MUSIC, THEATER, AND ART.

The Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center includes the 441-seat Jerry E. Hudson Concert Hall and 18,806 SF of rehearsal, teaching, and support space for recitals, small ensembles, and orchestra, band, and choral uses. The rehearsal hall facilitates both instrumental and choral uses, and supplements the concert hall by serving as a warm-up space, an intimate recital venue, a teaching facility, or a green room. Various support 88

functions accompany these performance spaces, including dressing rooms, storage areas, and a control room. A variety of wood paneling provides a warm, inviting atmosphere for events. In addition, suspended pendant lights, overhead catwalks, and exposed ductwork create a vertically layered ceiling. A transparent lobby and gallery space along the building’s west side provides a prefunction gathering area, and establishes a visual connection between the facility and the campus. Acoustically isolated faculty teaching studios and practice rooms are adjacent to the new administrative core, bringing full-time faculty together for the first time in the music department’s history. An outdoor terrace on the north end offers an alternative class setting and an inviting location for informal musical performances.


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO Center for Creativity and the Arts

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA

ZGF COMPLETED A FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE 50,000 SF CENTER FOR CREATIVITY AND THE ARTS AT CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO TO ASSIST WITH FUNDRAISING EFFORTS FOR THE BUILDING.

The program is comprised of galleries for a permanent arts collection, student galleries, flexible fine arts studios, classrooms, lecture rooms, and public interaction spaces. The building will function as a prominent centerpiece on the campus, while integrating indoor and outdoor spaces in support of the vision laid out in the campus master plan. It will create a point of reception and focus at the north end of Maple Avenue in the form of a cloister-like sculpture garden surrounded by gallery spaces. The courtyard is intended to become an outdoor room and an extension of the gallery spaces, with potential uses including outdoor cafĂŠ seating, 90

gathering or performance space, and a sculpture garden. The garden will be shaded by a large trellised canopy which will help to create an iconic image for the Center. The architecture of the building and patterning of the site is intended to promote interconnectivity through the building from north to south, allowing the project to act as mediator between the end of Maple Avenue and the more public parts of the campus to the south. As designed, the building will integrate sustainable features to provide a high quality and efficient learning environment, while reducing the building’s impact on campus infrastructure resources and the environment as a whole. As part of this project, ZGF also completed a study for the addition of an associated 1800-seat performing arts center on the campus.


STANFORD UNIVERSITY Central Energy Facility

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY CENTRAL ENERGY FACILITY EMBODIES THE LATEST TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES AND ECO-DISTRICT PLANNING SOLUTIONS. THIS TRANSFORMATIONAL CAMPUS-WIDE ENERGY SYSTEM IS ALSO YIELDING COMPELLING RESULTS: GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS SLASHED BY 68%, FOSSIL FUEL USE REDUCED BY 65%, AND CAMPUS-WIDE WATER USE REDUCED BY 15%.

The high-performance, climate-responsive design of the plant administration building will result in net positive energy performance. Solar photovoltaic arrays shade the structure while generating more electricity than needed to power the building. Sited at the edge of the campus, the new facility responds to the goals of Stanford’s long-range Energy and Climate Action Plan and overall Stanford Energy System Innovations (SESI) program. 92

The new 125,614 SF electricity-powered regeneration plant, which replaced the existing natural gas-powered cogeneration plant, will significantly reduce Stanford’s fossil fuel consumption and utility costs. The new plant was designed to sensitively integrate into the surrounding Stanford campus. More than a power plant, the Central Energy Facility is a learning center. Students have the opportunity to see first-hand the systems and technologies at work. Administrative features include workstations for plant operations and management staff; and flexible support space, including collaboration rooms, training / conference rooms, classrooms, staff lounge, and testing laboratories. Other sustainable features include natural ventilation, radiant flooring and chilled beam systems for heating and cooling, and LED lighting.


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SCIENCE FACILITIES

ZGF’s work has transcended traditional standards of quality design and technology. They have developed an innovative model of flexible, open laboratory research space that places researchers of various disciplines together to bring about new discoveries. ROBERT SMITH, AIA, SENIOR ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS, THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA


UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING Engineering Education and Research Building (EERB) & High Bay Research Facility (HBRF) LARAMIE, WYOMING

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH MALONE BELTON ABEL AND GSG, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 100,000 SF ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND RESEARCH BUILDING (EERB) AND THE 80,000 SF HIGH BAY RESEARCH FACILITY (HBRF).

The two facilities function individually but work together to promote engineering education and research, interdisciplinary collaboration and support a range of learning pedagogies. The EERB provides research and teaching space for students and faculty in a broad range of disciplines and create a highly flexible and dynamic learning environment. The facility includes a student entrepreneurship center, active learning classrooms, teaching laboratories and makers spaces—all designed to seamlessly adapt to a range of pedagogies and technologies. The HBRF provides high bay space for 98

numerous University departments such as the School of Energy Resources, the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences as well as specialized research in fields relevant to the Mountain West region, from largescale testing to nanoscience. Both facilities will be LEED Platinum®.


MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY Norm Asbjornson Innovation Center

BOZEMAN, MONTANA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH A&E ARCHITECTS, IS PROVIDING PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN FOR THE 116,709 SF NORM ASBJORNSON INNOVATION CENTER (NAIC).

The building will house parts of the College of Engineering and the Honors College in nine classrooms, 17 laboratories and a lecture theater seating 300 called Inspiration Hall. The building also includes an Innovation Alley, the central commons of the building, where projects are on display, promoting engineering research and education within a dynamic integrated environment that encourages student-faculty collaboration. The building was carefully programmed to promote dynamic interdisciplinary engagement, meaningful student-faculty interaction, and accelerate innovation that responds to and anticipates emerging 100

trends in education, industry and society. As the first major expansion outside of the campus core, NAIC will serve as a gateway to the University and as a destination for the public. The two wings of the building flank the central Innovation Alley, a highly transparent community space. One wing accommodates classrooms, including two active learning and one digital classroom. The other wing houses research and teaching laboratories, prototyping and makers spaces that are flexible and scaled to encourage a wide range of research activities and pedagogies. Classrooms and labs are supported by a student success center, informal lounges, and a cafĂŠ.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF HAS DESIGNED THE NEW 358,346 SF ALTMAN CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CTRI) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO (UCSD). THE BUILDING WILL HELP RESEARCHERS OBTAIN THE EDUCATION, RESOURCES, AND COLLABORATIONS NECESSARY TO TRANSLATE DISCOVERIES INTO PRACTICE.

At the University of California, San Diego, the Institute is a partnership among the University and other local institutions dedicated to improving human health. The mission of the Institute is to create an environment that advances healthcare through interactions between basic scientists, clinical investigators, community physicians, and patients. Named for donors Steve and Lisa Altman, the new LEED Gold® building creates a unique, multidisciplinary environment that brings together laboratory scientists and clinical investigators 102

to understand disease, develop new methods of treatment, and translate clinical research results into clinical practice. The dry bench research space includes computing spaces, exam and interview rooms for human subjects participating in clinical trials, staff and faculty offices, and other specialty spaces. The building also includes wet bench laboratory space, as well as equipment space, tissue culture, other specialized rooms, and core facilities.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PLANNED AND DESIGNED A NEW BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH FACILITY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO’S SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TO ACCOMMODATE GROWTH AND TO HOUSE A NEW MULTI-DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM IN GENOMIC MEDICINE AND AN EXPANDED DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCES.

The five-story, 190,000 SF project incorporates wet bench laboratories, laboratory core facilities and support space, administrative offices, and conference space for Health Sciences interdisciplinary programs, including medical genomics. Offices are separated in the northern wing, with floor-to-ceiling glass for abundant, even daylight and operable windows to take advantage of the mild climate much of the year. The project has achieved LEED Platinum® with the incorporation of high-performance features, such as a dynamic, 106

climate-responsive exterior solar shading system on the east, west, and south façades that eliminates solar gain while optimizing daylight. The project also includes a water reclamation system that will collect approximately 890,000 gallons per year from air handler condensate, primarily during the dry summer season when coastal fog and humidity occur more frequently. This in turn will reduce potable water use for landscape irrigation by 100%, and for toilets by more than 50%. The water filtration system was expanded to collect condensate from a neighboring laboratory building on the campus as well.


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NYU LANGONE HEALTH Alexandria Center for Life Science – NYC East Tower / Laboratory Fit-Out

ZGF PERFORMED A FEASIBILITY STUDY, PROGRAM, AND DESIGN FOR 65,000 SF OF FLEXIBLE LABORATORIES IN THE ALEXANDRIA CENTER FOR LIFE SCIENCE – NYC EAST TOWER TO ACCOMMODATE NYU LANGONE HEALTH’S CURRENT AND FUTURE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH NEEDS IN PSYCHIATRY, NEUROLOGY, OTOLARYNGOLOGY, MEDICINE (RHEUMATOLOGY), ANESTHESIOLOGY, NEUROSURGERY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND BIOCHEMISTRY.

The project was comprised of the laboratory fit-out of floors 3, 8, and 9, and a vivarium for neuroscience. Each floor included space for office / administration, open laboratory, and laboratory support, in addition to providing core facilities, conference rooms and spaces for interaction. Among the project’s goals was the need for optimal efficiency and flexibility to accommodate long-term research needs. The laboratory 110

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

module developed for this project has become the planning standard for NYU Langone Health. The design maximizes the building’s spectacular East River and City views by locating the laboratories on the east and west sides, while placing office and shared spaces to the north and south ends of the building. Circulation spaces are enhanced by wall-mounted, illuminated light-boxes with gels of natural patterns, back-painted glass write-up panels, and tack-boards for the display of current research.


CORNELL UNIVERSITY Duffield Hall Nanotechnology Research Facility

ITHACA, NEW YORK

ZGF DESIGNED A 150,930 SF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL CENTER WITHIN THE ENGINEERING QUADRANGLE TO SUPPORT SCIENCE IN THE FIELDS OF ELECTRONICS, OPTOELECTRONICS, MATERIAL SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING, MICROELECTRONICS, AND NANOTECHNOLOGY.

Approximately one-third of the facility is comprised of cleanrooms. The building also has low vibration and low electromagnetic field standards, and extensive central laboratory service requirements. The modular design can be adapted to changing functional needs. As changes in use are called for by new researchers, research direction, or organization, partitions can be relocated, doors moved, and rooms expanded into larger rooms or contracted into several smaller rooms without requiring reconstruction of structural or building 112

services. An important requirement of the design was to create an environment that would foster interaction among all disciplines of the College. Spaces for casual interaction or “intellectual collisions” are provided through the strategic location of common facilities, such as stairs, alcoves, and conference rooms, as well as a library and a café. The atrium also provides visibility between floors, enabling researchers to see colleagues moving from one space to another.


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DUKE UNIVERSITY Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Sciences DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 330,000 SF, LEED SILVERÂŽ FACILITY FOR THE PRATT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND THE DUKE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.

The Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Sciences supports teaching and research efforts in bioengineering, photonics and communications systems, integrated sensors and simulators, materials sciences, and materials engineering. It also expands Pratt’s partnership with the medical school, providing laboratories for collaborative research in healthcare, genomics, and biotechnology. Program elements include research and teaching laboratories, a 22,500 SF cleanroom, a characterization and testing facility (Class 1000 to Class 100), a 206-seat conference center, lecture halls, classrooms, and administrative spaces. The Fitzpatrick Center 116

consists of two buildings linked by a publicly accessible atrium and conference center, which provides the engineering school with indoor gathering spaces and identity within the larger campus environs. Serving as a catalyst for the formation of a new engineering quadrangle, the Fitzpatrick Center is constructed in front of the existing engineering building and forms a new pedestrian axis and open space to integrate the new facility with the historic core of the west academic campus. Native materials help mold the pedestrian and landscape experience of the new facilities and connecting forest pathways. The project site was chosen to encourage use of public transportation, including a planned intermodal transit station.


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DICKINSON COLLEGE Stuart Hall and James Hall

CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

ZGF DESIGNED A NEW 90,000 SF SCIENCE FACILITY, WHICH SERVES AS A UNIFIED HOME FOR FIVE PREVIOUSLY DISPERSED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, AND ENHANCES DICKINSON COLLEGE’S TRADITION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY AND COLLABORATION.

The building includes interactive learning and research spaces for biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, chemistry, neuroscience, and psychology. The facility extends in a two-wing configuration, with each wing connected by a shared spine. Each wing includes classrooms, teaching laboratories, faculty offices, and informal meeting spaces. The spine is the social heart of the building, home to a large, light-filled atrium, and smaller spaces for group study and project displays. The building design balances a contemporary look

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with elements that are responsive to existing campus construction. Sloped roofs and limestone reflect the existing character of the campus, while the use of iridescent stainless-steel shingles and the glass curtain wall treatment convey a fresh, modern design approach. Multiple courtyards have been integrated to facilitate indoor and outdoor teaching and interaction. Texture, color, and the playful use of materials at the exterior extend inside the building to humanize and add richness to the interiors. The project has achieved LEED Gold®.


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CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN LUIS OBISPO Warren J. Baker Center for Science and Mathematics

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA

THE LEED GOLDÂŽ WARREN J. BAKER CENTER FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS, DESIGNED BY ZGF, IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE ACADEMIC CORE OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC, SAN LUIS OBISPO CAMPUS.

Incorporating many indoor and outdoor study and collaborative spaces, the building has become a physical and social hub of campus. This landmark project, the largest state allocation of funding in California State University history, includes 208,608 SF of flexible space for three academic departments and three research institutes. It consists of general and studio classrooms, wet and dry laboratory and research space, and administration and support offices. The studio laboratories integrate traditional lecture with simultaneous team-based, hands-on experimentation

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in a single setting for a seamless transition. The building allows faculty and students to pursue innovative, applied, and interdisciplinary research projects, while also helping to teach about sustainability and building performance. It features a passively ventilated atrium, radiant heating and cooling in the faculty offices, and hydronic chilled beam heating and cooling in the laboratories. This represents the first time chilled beams are used in a teaching laboratory in California, and will reduce energy consumption by more than 30% compared to a conventional laboratory building.


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WILLIAMS COLLEGE Science Center

WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS

THE SCIENCE CENTER, DESIGNED BY ZGF IN ASSOCIATION WITH EYP, WAS BUILT TO CONSOLIDATE NINE DEPARTMENTS AND FOUR INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS INTO ONE UNIFIED SCIENCE COMPLEX.

The new facility accommodates astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental analysis, geosciences, mathematics, physics, psychology, and other science disciplines. The project included construction of a new 118,000 SF modern laboratory building that connects three existing science buildings, all of which were renovated for dry laboratories, offices, conference rooms, and classrooms. At the heart of the facility is the 30,000 SF Schow Science Library, a skylit space that knits together the old and new buildings. The 250-seat library consolidates six departmentbased science libraries into one location, and is easily 128

accessible from both laboratories and classrooms. To foster the interdisciplinary approach to teaching science, interaction areas are interspersed along the primary circulation path, and equipped with blackboards, tables, and comfortable furniture.


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IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Biorenewables Complex

AMES, IOWA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH OPN ARCHITECTS, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE TWO-PHASED 244,300 SF BIORENEWABLES COMPLEX SHOWCASING THE STATE OF IOWA'S AND IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY’S SHARED COMMITMENT TO CUTTING-EDGE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND MATERIALS RESEARCH.

The complex integrates research and teaching laboratories, classrooms, offices, meeting and support space connected by a central atrium to optimize collaboration and cross-fertilization of ideas in a single transparent, daylit facility. Phase 1 houses the 74,300 SF Biorenewables Research Laboratory (BRL) which includes research laboratories and a high bay. Phase 2 includes Elings Hall, a 70,000 SF office and classroom wing, and Sukup Hall, a 100,000 SF research and teaching wing for ISU’s top-ranked Department of 132

Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering (ABE). Located on the last open site on the west edge of central campus, the complex creates a hub for student, faculty, and visitor activity, while establishing front door for the campus’ high profile program. The complex is LEED Gold®.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science

DAVIS, CALIFORNIA

ZGF DESIGNED THE NEW 139,000 SF ROBERT MONDAVI INSTITUTE FOR WINE AND FOOD SCIENCE, ESTABLISHING A HOME FOR ONE OF THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS WINE AND FOOD SCIENCE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS IN THE WORLD.

Consolidating the University’s departments of Viticulture and Enology, and Food Science and Technology, the Robert Mondavi Institute offers students more courses in food and beverage science than any other university in the nation. The Institute serves as a gateway between UC Davis and a broad community of scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, and industry professionals engaged in all dimensions of wine and food science-related activities. To support interdisciplinary teaching and research, the laboratories themselves were designed to facilitate flexibility and reconfiguration. Just as the concept of 136

terroir is used to denote the special characteristics that geography bestows upon wine, the term can also be applied to describe the impact of place on architecture. Housing the Sensory Research Theater, sensory teaching / research laboratories, conference spaces, multi-level interaction areas, and offices, the Institute is articulated in an ensemble of buildings, reflective of nearby farms and wineries, and organized around a central garden. The concept is intended to express the synthesis of science and culture, and present a dramatic and inviting new regional face to the UC Davis campus. The design of the facility reflects the agricultural roots of the campus coupled with the today’s collaborative approach to research.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

AFTER COMPLETING A SERIES OF STUDIES TO REPLACE THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY’S WARREN HALL, ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW FIVESTORY, 204,365 SF REPLACEMENT RESEARCH BUILDING, WHICH PROMOTES COLLABORATION AND DISCOVERY IN A HIGHLY FLEXIBLE, EFFICIENT, AND WELCOMING FACILITY.

Located at a prominent entry to the campus, the Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences is the anchor for a quadrangle of research and teaching buildings dedicated to the biomedical and health sciences. The Center’s four pillars of research are cancer biology, infectious diseases, stem cell biology, and neurogenerative diseases. Designed to house 30 to 35 research laboratories, as well as lecture halls, teaching laboratories, and classrooms, the Center is home to The Henry H. Wheeler Jr. Brain Imaging Center, 140

The Berkeley Stem Cell Center, The Henry Wheeler Center for Emerging and Neglected Diseases, and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, with scientists tackling the complexities of such diseases as cancer, Alzheimer’s, tuberculosis, and HIV. The building is divided into two programmatic zones: laboratory research and office / interaction. Abundant natural light and views, high ceilings, adjustable casework, “plug-and-play” services, individual task lighting, and shared support rooms create a flexible and collaborative laboratory environment. Office suites are adjacent to laboratories with strong visual connections between the two. Informal gathering spaces are located throughout the facility. The project is LEED-Gold certified and also incorporates Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Stanley Hall

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOENGINEERING TEACHING AND RESEARCH BUILDING TO FIT WITHIN A SENSITIVE CAMPUS CONTEXT AND TO PROMOTE A UNIQUE SYNERGY AMONG SCIENTISTS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, AND ENGINEERING DISCIPLINES.

Key project issues for the 290,000 SF, eight-story Stanley Hall included creating a flexible layout for the laboratories that would respond to new and changing multidisciplinary research, integrating adaptable building systems and infrastructure, and designing open, inviting spaces to stimulate interaction among faculty and students from the various departments and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Organized around research themes relating to health, energy, 144

and the environment, major program elements include research and teaching laboratories, a bionanotechnology center with cleanrooms, support functions, lecture halls, an NMR suite, specialized low-vibration optical suites, a multimedia / distance learning center, and administrative space. The building responds to its sloping site and the rich architectural context of the site, bridging between the classical Beaux Arts and Arts and Crafts traditions of the campus.


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE Entomology Building

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

ZGF DESIGNED A STATE-OF-THE-ART REPLACEMENT FACILITY TO CONSOLIDATE EXISTING FUNCTIONS AND TO SUSTAIN INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ENTOMOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE.

The three-level, 71,020 SF building houses offices, laboratory support facilities, an insectary, conference rooms, and modern laboratories for programs in biotechnology / molecular entomology, environmental toxicology, behavior and chemical ecology, biological control, urban / medical / veterinary entomology, and agricultural entomology / integrated pest management. The building is designed as two wings, each comprised of four faculty offices and four laboratory suites per level, except for the lowest level of the east wing that takes advantage of the sloped site by incorporating 148

partially below-grade administrative offices and conference facilities. These two wings are linked on the southwest corner by a vertical circulation element containing a passenger elevator and stairs. This curving glass enclosure acts as a signature design feature of the building; internally it facilitates interaction among occupants of the various laboratories by drawing them into a unified series of common areas. Both the first- and second-level entrances of the building open directly into these common areas, which also house departmental exhibits, graduate student offices, and other shared facilities. Another uniting feature is the sheltered courtyard on the west and south sides, which is used for outdoor research and teaching, as well as for departmental social functions.


OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY Linus Pauling Science Center

CORVALLIS, OREGON

THE NEW LINUS PAULING SCIENCE CENTER, DESIGNED BY ZGF, HONORS OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY’S (OSU) MOST DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS, LINUS PAULING, WITH A HIGH PROFILE WORKING “MONUMENT.”

The 108,000 SF building embodies Linus Pauling’s commitment to health, chemistry, and improving the human condition. It synthesizes program elements from OSU’s Health and Life Science Institutes and the Department of Chemistry into an interdisciplinary research facility, while providing distinct identities for both. Multiple research initiatives pursued by the Linus Pauling Institute are now accommodated in a continuous, open laboratory space that facilitates collaboration among scientists and provides flexibility for research protocols to evolve over time. The building also incorporates glass-enclosed “Green Chemistry” 150

teaching laboratories, as well as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Electro-Magnetic Imaging suites. An interior “street” along the chemistry teaching laboratory exposes the science taking place within to student passersby. These spaces place OSU at the leading edge of “Green Chemistry,” ensuring that students and researchers are working with less hazardous substances and under safer protocols, among other benefits. Additionally, a two-story atrium connecting the top two floors of the building, around which all scientists’ offices are located, achieves an independent identity for the Institute. A café at ground level serves as an amenity that opens out onto a campus green.


ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY Biodesign Institute C

TEMPE, ARIZONA

ZGF PROVIDED PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN SERVICES FOR ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY (ASU) BIODESIGN INSTITUTE C, A FIVE-STORY, 188,447 SF RESEARCH FACILITY WITH A BASEMENT LEVEL.

Intended as a “workhorse” addition to existing research facilities on campus, Biodesign Institute C houses researchers from the Biodesign Institute, the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The building contains a mixture of laboratories, including high bay space, high hood-density laboratories, and three levels of generic laboratories, as well as a Compact X-Ray Light Source facility in the basement. An extension of the existing Biodesign Institute, the building forms the northern edge of a research quadrangle centered on a James Turrell skyspace sculpture. Biodesign Institute C is targeting 152

LEED Platinum®, with an energy savings goal of 44% compared to existing campus laboratories. The project team worked with the ASU Environmental Health and Safety Department to enact standards for reduced air change rates, which supported the use of a chilled beam hydronic system, where ventilation is decoupled from cooling. All non-laboratory air is transferred from perimeter offices through the laboratories, providing “free” air conditioning for the research spaces. Low-flow fume hoods minimize air change rates while lowering turbulence in laboratories, thereby increasing user safety. The high-performance double skin façade, consisting of an insulated metal panel and copper screen, minimizes heat gain, maximizes views, and increases daylight penetration into interior environments.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Bioscience Research Laboratories

TUCSON, ARIZONA

THE NEW 156,515 SF BIOSCIENCE RESEARCH LABORATORIES IS THE THIRD ZGF-DESIGNED FACILITY IN THE RESEARCH COMPLEX THAT INCLUDES THE MEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING AND THE THOMAS W. KEATING BIORESEARCH BUILDING.

It accommodates research informatics in the life sciences, translational imaging, and research to help advance the understanding of the molecular basis of human health, aging, and disease. The new building provides creative spaces to foster individual creativity and facilitate collaboration among scientists from different disciplines, including the physical sciences. Comprised of wet, damp, and dry research laboratories, laboratory support areas, offices, conference rooms, and specialized core facilities, the building’s design and layout maximizes flexibility to allow reconfiguration 156

of the laboratories and office spaces in response to evolving changes in technology and research priorities. The project is registered with the certification goal of LEED Gold®.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Chemical Sciences Building

TUCSON, ARIZONA

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED A NEW 85,661 SF LABORATORY BUILDING TO HOUSE THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA.

Located in the historic campus core and directly adjacent to the campus’s original chemistry building, the Chemical Sciences Building consolidates and frames usable open space, while enhancing the environment, and strengthening the campus precinct south of the main mall. Program areas include organic, inorganic, analytical. and physical chemistry research laboratories and support spaces; a Class 1000 cleanroom; instrument laboratories; faculty and student offices; and administrative support spaces. The building is organized by its two distinct types of space: laboratories and offices. Office support spaces are grouped together 160

to promote interaction among users. The laboratories were designed using a modular approach, and are served by a linear equipment room to maintain a separate service access and to accommodate future changes in research programs and staffing. The eastern end of the building is clad in corrugated copper and acts as a backdrop to a newly landscaped piazza. A glass curtain wall takes advantage of the north orientation, where all offices are located, to take advantage of views. The glass curtain wall, comprised of clear and fritted glass, metal panels, and a sunscreen, is flanked at each end by entry lobbies at the building’s corners. To the south, brick was used with a rich three-dimensional patterning that gives the façade its own identity and at the same time ties it back to the traditional vocabulary of the campus.


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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON Engineering Research Building

ARLINGTON, TEXAS

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH PAGE, DESIGNED ONE OF THE LARGEST ACADEMIC FACILITIES ON THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, ARLINGTON CAMPUS TO HELP FURTHER THE CLIENT’S EXPANDING RESEARCH AND EFFORTS TO BECOME A TIER ONE INSTITUTION.

The 234,265 SF, six-story Engineering Research Building (ERB) is comprised of efficient and flexible state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories, laboratory support spaces, classrooms, and faculty, student, and administrative offices. Located on the north-central quadrant of the Arlington campus, the building supports the growing academic and research demands of the Departments of Sciences, Bioengineering, and Computer Sciences within the College of Engineering, which were previously scattered in other buildings. The ERB allows the consolidation 164

of these departments in a highly interactive research and teaching facility that is equipped to accommodate evolving technologies for teams of multidisciplinary research investigators. Incorporating numerous sustainable features, such as rainwater harvesting, green roofs, recycled content materials and finishes, high-efficiency water-saving fixtures, and daylighting, the ERB is the first LEED Gold® building on the campus.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Paul G. Allen Center for Global Animal Health

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

ZGF PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE PAUL G. ALLEN CENTER FOR GLOBAL ANIMAL HEALTH, WHICH IS DEDICATED TO PROVIDING RESEARCH SOLUTIONS TO WORLDWIDE HEALTH CHALLENGES.

The 62,000 SF Phase 1 building is designed to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration and offers the flexibility necessary for grant funded research. The ground floor features an entry lobby and reception area open to the floors above. The entry opens on to a terrace with sliding glass doors which support larger gatherings and fundraising events. The highly contained, ground floor BSL-3 laboratory provides safe access for research specimens. Upper floors include BSL-2 laboratories and open offices organized into neighborhoods to facilitate exchange and discovery. Laboratories and offices are

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visually connected by a glass wall to allow continuous visual connection and maximize daylight and views. The Phase 1 building is LEED Silver®.


UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE ConocoPhillips Integrated Science Building

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ECI/HYER, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 129,559 SF RESEARCH AND TEACHING LABORATORY WHICH PLACES SCIENCE EDUCATION ON DISPLAY AND PROMOTES CROSS-DISCIPLINARY FERTILIZATION AND SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY.

Laboratories are highly adaptable and include dramatic views. A daylit atrium provides gathering space linking the three building wings—research, teaching, and office. Emphasizing vertical and horizontal connectivity, a central stair and bridges link the three-story building at every level. Additional open interaction spaces dispersed throughout the building feature white boards to encourage impromptu discussion among students, faculty, and staff. Extensive use of glass provides a high level of transparency throughout the facility, while the

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use of a variety of wood finish materials adds warmth during long winter months.


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WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Orville A. Vogel Plant Biosciences Building

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

ZGF DESIGNED THE 93,700 SF ORVILLE A. VOGEL PLANT BIOSCIENCES BUILDING, THE FIRST FACILITY TO BE COMPLETED FOR THE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION COMPLEX BEING DEVELOPED ON WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY'S MAIN CAMPUS IN PULLMAN.

As the cornerstone project and entry for the new development, the Plant Biosciences Building houses state-of-the-art research and teaching laboratories for molecular and biological plant sciences research. The main goal for the building was to create a functional and aesthetically pleasing educational facility that establishes a distinct look and feel for the Research and Education Complex. The four-story facility provides research and laboratory space for approximately 40 principal investigators and more than 40 post-doctorate students, as well as general laboratory support spaces, 174

specialized growth chambers, and major instrument rooms. Level one houses teaching laboratories, a large study hall, and primary circulation. Levels two through four accommodate research laboratories and support spaces. A large archive for plant specimens is housed below-grade. The research laboratories are linked by a three-story atrium and connecting stair, with gathering and conference space located at the atrium’s base level. A greenhouse display area for exhibits and multi-use interaction is provided at the south end of each research floor. The new building connects to the existing Plant Sciences Building to facilitate a shared environment and to allow an integrated approach to research.


PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science

PORTLAND, OREGON

THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE FOR THE NORTHWEST CENTER FOR ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, DESIGNED BY ZGF, WAS TO COMBINE ALL OF THE ENGINEERING DISCIPLINES INTO A STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITY IN AN EFFORT TO ENHANCE INTERACTION AND LEARNING WITHIN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE.

The project involved a new 138,000 SF building and renovation of an existing facility. By bringing together programs previously dispersed in multiple buildings throughout the campus, the project creates a regional center for the growing number of collaborative programs with Oregon Health & Science University, the Oregon Graduate Institute of Technology, and other institutions. It is also a key element in the University’s goal to increase its emphasis on engineering, science, 176

and technology by accommodating a growth of engineering graduates, being doubled from 250 per year to 500. The Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science provides interdisciplinary research and teaching facilities in five above-grade stories that incorporate classrooms, 48 laboratories, a 120-seat lecture auditorium, faculty offices, student service offices, and offices for the college’s dean. The building incorporates many high-performance design features, including a geothermal heat exchange system, and has achieved LEED Gold®.


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Sciences Laboratory Building

DAVIS, CALIFORNIA

ZGF DESIGNED THE THREE-STORY, 152,574 SF SCIENCES LABORATORY BUILDING, WHICH FORMS THE EAST EDGE OF THE CAMPUS’S BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES DISTRICT.

The facility consolidates programs that were housed in four locations within a core campus area, creating an environment that emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the field. The building includes the John M. Tucker Herbarium, the Biotechnology Outreach Program, offices, and a bio-informatics computer laboratory. A freestanding 11,355 SF lecture hall seats 517 students, the largest such facility on the campus. The building’s exterior design provides continuity in the area’s architectural vocabulary through the use of tan precast concrete wall cladding, contrasting window surrounds, and clay-tile roof detailing. Extensive site improvements, including bikeways, bike parking, and 178

student plazas accommodate the large number of students and visitors who use the facility on a daily basis.


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UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Cancer and Cardiovascular Research Building

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ALLIIANCE, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 285,000 SF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH LABORATORY, A SIGNATURE BUILDING MARKING THE GATEWAY TO A NEW MEDICAL RESEARCH PRECINCT KNOWN AS THE BIOMEDICAL DISCOVERY DISTRICT.

Providing an iconic front door, the building forms the heart of the district’s research functions, provides public amenities, and establishes a central point for future district expansion. The facility collocates faculty and staff associated with expanding cancer and cardiovascular research programs with a shared research commons, laboratories, offices, café, and conference space. The facility supports partnerships between the University and surrounding research institutions like the Lillehei Heart Institute and The 182

Masonic Cancer Center. Laboratories are open, transparent and daylit with modular bench layouts that encourage visual and physical connectivity between researchers. Offices have views of the exterior courtyard and internal atrium, providing connectivity and sense of community throughout the building. The building is LEED Silver® and meets the 2030 Challenge, using 60% less energy than typical laboratories.


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UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Physics and Nanotechnology Building

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

ZGF, IN ASSOCIATION WITH ALLIIANCE, PROGRAMMED AND DESIGNED THE 144,000 SF LABORATORY WHICH COLLOCATES DISPARATE PROGRAMS WITHIN A FLEXIBLE, INTERDISCIPLINARY ENVIRONMENT LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CAMPUS’ SCIENCE PRECINCT.

The building includes physics experimental and theoretical research groups and faculty and graduate student office space and the Center for Nanostructure Applications (CNA), a federally-funded, campus-wide initiative to promote interdisciplinary collaboration and discovery of nanotechnology research. The design leverages shared space and equipment needs while providing distinct identities for each group within the building. A 5,000 SF glass-enclosed Class 10 cleanroom, sited prominently on the first floor at the main entry,

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puts science on display, supporting institutional goals of education and recruitment. The project is LEED Silver®.


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GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY / LINCOLN PROPERTY COMPANY Potomac Science Center

WOODBRIDGE, VIRGINIA

LIVING AN ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS LIFESTYLE IS AT THE HEART OF THIS PROJECT AND THE MESSAGE TO WHICH THE UNIVERSITY IS DEDICATED, NOT ONLY BY THE PROGRAMS WITHIN THE BUILDING, BUT THROUGH THE ARCHITECTURE ITSELF.

The 52,000 SF building, which will sit on the banks of the Occoquan River, provides space for George Mason University’s Potomac Environmental Research & Education Center; the Geoinformatics Training and Research Center; as well as K-12 and community outreach. Program elements are grouped by air change requirements and fed by separate high-efficiency mechanical systems best suited to their use, while daylight modeling helped sculpt the façades of the narrow floor plates to maximize deep daylight penetration with minimal glare. The university has also 190

partnered with the neighborhood and regional utility companies to install solar panels across the upper deck of the adjacent new parking garage. The architecture and the extensive, landscaped gardens containing native plantings and bio-filtration systems will play an active role in the research and teaching being performed within the Center. ZGF is serving as the design architect in association with HKS. In accordance with the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Public-Private Education Facilities and Infrastructure Act, the team of Lincoln Property Company, Belmont Bay LLC, HKA, and ZGF collaborated to offer George Mason University the land and to lead the development of the project. The project was designed to achieve LEED Silver®.


VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY Goodwin Hall

BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RECENTLY COMPLETED AN UPDATED STRATEGIC FACILITIES PLAN TO TRANSFORM THE COLLEGE’S EXISTING, AND INCREASINGLY OBSOLETE SPACE, INTO MODERN FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT CUTTING-EDGE AND EXPANDING PROGRAMS.

The 159,500 SF Goodwin Hall / Signature Engineering Building focuses on undergraduates with highly specialized laboratories to support hands-on problem solving and active-learning. The new facility consists of classrooms, instructional and research laboratories, offices, and support space for the Departments of Mechanical, Chemical, and Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, as well as administrative space for engineering education and student services. Additional 192

building components include meeting rooms, casual study space, and a café. Public corridors and student gathering spaces wrap around highly transparent teaching and research laboratories and a central atrium, which includes a Rolls-Royce jet engine and a study / meeting “capsule.” The building also has more than 240 sensors embedded into the structure to study real-time the building vibration for a variety of research projects. Energy efficient strategies, such as heat recovery, recycled air in public spaces, and stormwater management systems helped the building achieve LEED Gold®.


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EMORY UNIVERSITY Health Sciences Research Building

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

EMORY UNIVERSITY HAS PARTNERED WITH CHILDREN'S HEALTHCARE OF ATLANTA TO BUILD THE HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH BUILDING. DESIGNED BY ZGF, THE BUILDING ENHANCES TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AND PROVIDES CONNECTIONS TO EMORY'S EXISTING CLINICAL AND RESEARCH PROGRAMS.

The new 212,000 SF facility is the initial phase of a large complex with 60% of the program dedicated to pediatric research and the remainder focused on other cancer, immunology, and drug discovery research. The design concept consists of three functional components: a wet laboratory building, a tower containing public functions and dry research space, and an enclosed dry research bridge that connects the new research facility to clinical and research operations on Emory’s core campus. The laboratory building provides four research 196

levels, while the tower consists of an auditorium, break-out spaces, and a café on the first floor, and three floors of dry research above. The dry research bridge consists of two floors of computational office space and circulation, and provides a much-needed physical connection between Emory’s disparate research precincts. Laboratory spaces are organized into discrete research neighborhoods to promote scientific interaction and the formation of group identity within different research sectors. The project is LEED Silver®.


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STATE UNIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION FUND State University of New York at Cortland, Bowers Hall Upgrade to Science Hall Phase 1 CORTLAND, NEW YORK

ZGF DESIGNED AND IMPLEMENTED THE PHASED REHABILITATION AND ADDITION TO THE BOWERS SCIENCE BUILDING AT SUNY CORTLAND.

The original four-story, 83,950 SF Bowers Science Building was built in 1960. In 1965 the campus expanded the science center further by building an attached west wing addition, almost doubling the floor area to 142,000 SF. ZGF was selected to provide design services to renovate and expand the original 1960’s building to encompass contemporary teaching standards and methodologies, while creating better links to the west wing addition. After a Program Verification Phase that included the entire Bowers Science complex, the design team settled on a scheme that added a three-story, 24,432 SF addition for program spaces and a basement level mechanical room, as well as a new 200

1,755 SF stair tower. The original 1960’s building was demolished, leaving only the foundations, concrete and steel superstructure, and portions of the exterior brick veneer wall assembly. All interior partitions, finishes, and MEP systems were demolished, and hazardous materials and asbestos containing materials were remediated and abated. The new addition includes teaching laboratories, instructional space, a 55-seat digital projection dome planetarium, entrance lobby, student work rooms, a multilevel connection between the two original buildings, a stair tower, a 130-seat lecture hall, and future shell space for a natural science museum. The Bowers Science Building is targeting LEED Silver®.


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UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT STEM Space Needs Assessment

STORRS, CONNECTICUT

ZGF ASSISTED THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT IN A COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING STUDY OF ALL INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH LABORATORIES ASSOCIATED WITH STEM DISCIPLINES LOCATED AT THE STORRS CAMPUS.

Through a series of workshops and tours with University and departmental stakeholders, ZGF assessed the existing conditions and physical infrastructure of nearly 1,200,000 SF of space to identify those buildings that had exceeded their useful lives and those that warranted investment and improvement. The team sought to maximize the utilization of recently constructed facilities in an effort to realize its full value. Based on that careful assessment, the University’s existing buildings were put to their highest and best use with new construction dollars reserved for functions that are not supported 204

by the existing facilities. This project was developed in an evolving context of space demands, including a significant increase in both the student and faculty populations, particularly in the School of Engineering, and a desire to double the University’s annual research grant awards. ZGF analyzed a number of data sets that guided stakeholder decision making to differentiate perceived need versus actual need, revealing the necessity to redevelop lower-division instruction to support more active learning environments, and an expanding taxonomy of instructional laboratories—such as maker spaces—that are currently absent on campus.


PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Programming Studies for Multiple Science Facilities

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY

ZGF IS ENGAGED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DETAILED PROGRAMMING STUDY FOR PRINCETON’S SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES (SEAS) AS PART OF A COMPREHENSIVE CAMPUS MASTER PLANNING EFFORT.

The division has seen a tremendous rise in applicants in recent years, as well as a significant increase in the number of students seeking to enroll in engineering coursework. Although the University has added a substantial number of new research and teaching laboratories, the bulk of the existing programs still reside in antiquated buildings that are close to the end of their useful lives. The pressing need to revitalize, replace, or otherwise improve the quality of SEAS facilities presents numerous opportunities to reinvent and reinterpret the relevance of engineering practice within the campus today. Uniquely positioned to offer a high-caliber

engineering education within a liberal arts environment, the school is looking inward and to its peers to help re-define the practice of engineering both within and beyond the context of the University. Through a series of workshops with the SEAS strategic planning task force and the SEAS programming committee, ZGF assessed the existing physical infrastructure and identified the quantities and types of new facilities to be brought online to support the articulated pedagogical and research goals. Working with the campus planning team and the University, ZGF collaborated on strategies for site evaluation and selection, and planning strategies for the overall SEAS campus.

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CAMPUS MASTER PLANS

ZGF’s Campus Master Plan will guide our pursuit of excellence in learning and discovery. It will help chart a course for effective engagement with community, government, business, education, healthcare and non-profit organizations, and individuals throughout Central California. JOHN WELTY, PRESIDENT, CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO


STANFORD UNIVERSITY Redwood City Campus Phase 1

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA

ZGF WAS SELECTED TO LEAD MASTER PLANNING AND DESIGN FOR STANFORD UNIVERSITY REDWOOD CITY, A 34-ACRE SATELLITE CAMPUS THAT WILL EVENTUALLY HOUSE 6,000 ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF IN 3,200,000 SF.

The ZGF team is bringing together expertise in urban planning and workplace and open space design that connects this new satellite campus to Stanford’s main campus, while also creating a unique identity for it. The development is being driven by the escalating real estate values and scarcity of land around the existing Palo Alto campus, in addition to a development cap in Santa Clara County. Two major goals of the master plan are: integration with the fabric of Redwood City and a ‘branded’ Stanford experience, which gives all employees a feeling of connection to the main campus. The first phase of this project, approved by the Stanford 208

Trustees, is comprised of 980,000 SF of buildings and parking, along with extensive plazas, landscaping, and public access open areas. In addition to work space, amenities for Stanford employees will include a conference center with food services, a childcare center, a health and fitness facility, and convenience retail. The master plan also includes a privately-owned, publicly-accessible park and greenway that give back to the Redwood City community. Potential streetcar connections to downtown Redwood City are being explored.


STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Institutes of Medicine (SIM) Master Plan Update & Foundations in Medicine (FIM) Master Plan and Implementation PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

FOLLOWING THE STANFORD INSTITUTES OF MEDICINE 1 (SIM1) MASTER PLAN UPDATE AND SUBSEQUENT 204,640 SF LORRY I. LOKEY STEM CELL RESEARCH BUILDING, ZGF COMPLETED THE FOUNDATIONS IN MEDICINE (FIM) MASTER PLAN.

The FIM Master Plan focused on establishing a research precinct that addresses the School of Medicine’s new “Research Facilities Model of the Future” while reinforcing campus planning and design guidelines and principles. It encompasses FIM1 and two additional replacement teaching research facilities, totaling 415,000 SF. The SIM and FIM sites are aimed at transforming the campus into a 21st century teaching and research environment, enforced through new teaching and research laboratories with strengthened connections to the School of Medicine Campus, School 210

of Engineering, and the Biology and Chemistry precincts. Key planning components of the project included the transformation from a rural to an urban campus setting and making connections to the broader campus communities. The plan also established transportation and campus utility networks. Beyond the broader FIM Master Plan, ZGF looked specifically at the FIM1 Building at a higher level of programming. Taking lessons learned from SIM1 in laboratory planning, a layout was developed for FIM1. When completed, the 183,000 SF FIM1 building will accommodate up to 640 research benches.


THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Brigham Young University / LDS Business College, Salt Lake City Campus, Urban Design and Master Plan SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

ZGF COMPLETED A MASTER PLAN AND AN URBAN DESIGN VISION FOR A NEW BUSINESS COLLEGE IN DOWNTOWN SALT LAKE CITY.

The plan includes the three blocks immediately west of Temple Square and incorporates facilities to support an initial 5,000 students to a projected 15,000 students expressed by different phasing options. Goals included designing a successful urban campus with the capacity to grow for several generations, making an identifiable place that is recognizable as an institution of higher education, which at the same time enhances the civic qualities of the city, creating a suitable neighbor for Temple Square, and adding to the increasing vitality of the downtown area. The plan addressed issues relating to the incorporation of sustainable design elements, utilization of the light rail infrastructure for connectivity 212

between civic amenities, acknowledgement of the precedent of both natural and man-made landscapes, and preservation of vital view corridors.


CALIFORNIA LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Campus Framework Master Plan and Update

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIFORNIA

ZGF COMPLETED A MASTER PLAN FOR THIS 290-ACRE CAMPUS, WHICH IS DIVIDED BY A SCENIC HIGHWAY THAT SEPARATES THE DEVELOPED SOUTH CAMPUS FROM THE UNDEVELOPED LANDS TO THE NORTH.

The master plan retains much of the natural landscape qualities on the north campus, with development limited to a new athletic center, stadium, track, and playfields. It also recommends reinforcing the central Library Walk that connects the library with the academic precinct, and integrating the natural waterway that meanders through the campus. The academic precinct will be comprised of two-story academic classroom buildings built around intimate courtyards. Along the eastern edge of the campus, a tree-lined pedestrian promenade will provide a landscape transition to the 214

adjacent residential development, while serving as a public amenity for strolling and jogging. Subsequently, an update to the original master plan was completed to reflect new development on campus.


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO Campus Facilities Master Plan Update and Peace Garden

ZGF COMPLETED A FACILITIES MASTER PLAN FOR THE 363-ACRE ACADEMIC CAMPUS AND THE ADJOINING FARM LABORATORY OF 900 ACRES.

An important aspect was to expand and improve facilities to match the needs of emerging higher degree and research programs and, at the same time, integrate the landscape fully with other facilities. The landscape master plan was integral to the campus facilities master plan. Working closely with University staff, ZGF undertook an extensive series of interviews to identify changes in academic and campus life programs and changes in facilities that would be necessary to accommodate them 10 and, in some cases, 20 years into the future. Interview questions were based on the Strategic Plan for the University.

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FRESNO, CALIFORNIA

These led to recommendations for a multi-phase series of improvements that coordinate new developments, facilities relocation, remodeling, and demolition of selected buildings. An important outcome was progressive elimination of vehicular traffic from the center of the academic campus, coupled with restoration of open spaces as useable landscape to achieve a closer integration of indoor and outdoor activities. These phased improvements are organized so that they can occur in different sequences as funding becomes available. With the projected increase in enrollment from 18,000 to 24,000 full-time students, thoughtful planning of each space on the academic campus was required and subsequently addressed in this plan.


DICKINSON COLLEGE Sustainable Campus Master Plan

CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

DICKINSON COLLEGE LEADERS COMMITTED TO THE AMERICAN COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT’S CLIMATE COMMITMENT IN 2007 AND EXTENDED THEIR GROWING INVOLVEMENT IN THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP, PROMPTING A NEED FOR A SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, WHICH WAS COMPLETED BY ZGF.

From the outset, the master plan was conceived in the context of sustainable principles spanning every aspect of life at Dickinson College, ranging from academic programming to landscaping practices. The master plan anticipates long-range needs, helps to meet current needs, and enhances the quality of academic life. Specific objectives include planning for new renovations and construction; analyzing existing campus space and student housing; integrating landscape, parking, 218

and vehicular / pedestrian circulation; and enhancing town-grown relationships. An unanticipated outcome of this approach was a reorientation of the campus around a large new central open space that includes a water treatment garden—another explicit demonstration of the College’s environmental commitment. Roofs, pathways, parking lots, and planting beds will be integrated in a comprehensive water treatment, storage, and reuse program. In addition, seasonal use of natural ventilation in new and remodeled buildings will lessen energy demands.


THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE Campus Master Plan

OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON

ZGF COMPLETED A COMPREHENSIVE LONG-TERM MASTER PLAN FOR THE PUBLIC LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE FOUNDED IN 1967 WITH A BRUTALIST CAMPUS ARCHITECTURE.

The overall objective of the master plan was to translate strategic goals into a physical plan and identify where the college should be focusing its resources to meet future demands on its facilities and surrounding ecological areas. More specifically, the master plan provides a framework for new development and strategies to repurpose a number the existing buildings on campus for modern teaching and research needs, as well as the goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2020. Significant updates included new initiatives related to Indigenous Arts programs and facilities and the purchase and integration of Evergreen’s Tacoma 220

campus, which was previously leased by the college. The plan also included the incorporation of energy efficient commuting, green and alternative energy, materials reuse and recycling, on-site storm and wastewater management, and resource stewardship.


WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY VANCOUVER Master Plan and Updates

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

ZGF COMPLETED A MASTER PLAN FOR THE NEW VANCOUVER CAMPUS OF WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY. THE GOAL WAS TO CREATE A LONG-TERM PLAN THAT WAS FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND CHANGES IN ADMINISTRATION AND ARCHITECTURAL STYLE, WITHOUT LOSING ITS IDENTITY.

Both the century-old academic heritage of the university’s parent institution and its close relationship with the land are respected in this entirely new concept for a place of higher learning. Washington state university wanted to develop this new campus in a more populous locale and adapt its land grant mission to the urban environment. As such, residential neighbors, employers, city and county planners, and university leaders were active participants in the planning process. The 351-acre site includes wooded slopes and 222

grassy terraces, with panoramic views of the cascade mountains and a wetland bordering two streams. This natural beauty is an attribute that the master plan both preserves and uses to its advantage, requiring great sensitivity in the development of new facilities. Plan concepts were based on topography, views, access, and the need to accommodate progressive development over the next 10 and 20 years, as well as the longer term. Subsequently, ZGF completed two updates of the original campus master plan—each prompted by changing conditions.


ADDITIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION PROJECTS MASTER PLANNING ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN

PASADENA, CALIFORNIA

Master Plan

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

BOISE / NAMPA, IDAHO

Campus Master Plan and Update

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

LAIE, HAWAII

Hawaii Campus Long Range Development Plan

DRAKE UNIVERSITY

DES MOINES, IOWA

Campus Master Plan

EARLHAM COLLEGE

RICHMOND, INDIANA

Master Plan Update

GEORGE FOX UNIVERSITY NEWBERG, OREGON Master Plan

LINFIELD COLLEGE

MCMINNVILLE, OREGON

South Campus Master Plan

OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Framework Master Plan and Capital Improvements Plan

OREGON GRADUATE CENTER

PORTLAND, OREGON

Master Plan

OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY

PORTLAND, OREGON

Framework Master Plan

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Campus Master Plan

REED COLLEGE

PORTLAND, OREGON

Facilities Master Plan and Updates

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

Campus Master Plan

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

Long Range Development Plan Amendment

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Revelle College Neighborhood Planning Study

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LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA


UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Framework Master Plan

WHITMAN COLLEGE

WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

Campus Master Plan

WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY

SALEM, OREGON

Campus Master Plan

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PHOENIX, ARIZONA

Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 6

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (CALTECH)

PASADENA, CALIFORNIA

The Bechtel Residence

CALIFORNIA LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIFORNIA

Center for Education and Technology Mogen Hall Student Residence

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA

Jordan Agriculture Research Building

GEORGIA REGENTS UNIVERSITY

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA

Cancer Research Building

GEORGE FOX UNIVERSITY

NEWBERG, OREGON

Hoover Academic Building Renovation and Addition

LOS ANGELES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT, PIERCE COLLEGE

WOODLAND HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Green Technologies Building

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS

Richard and Barbara Silverman Hall for Molecular Therapeutics and Diagnostics The Arthur & Gladys Pancoe NorthShore University HealthSystem Life Sciences Pavilion Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Hall, Center for Nanofabrication and Molecular Self-Assembly

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLUMBUS, OHIO Physics Research Building

OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY

PORTLAND, OREGON

Biomedical Research Building Vollum Institute

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Xavier Hall Renovation

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY

PORTLAND, OREGON

School of Business Administration

REED COLLEGE

PORTLAND, OREGON

Arthur F. Scott Chemistry Building Biology Building Addition and Remodel Bragdon Hall Educational Technology Center Hauser Library and Addition Psychology Building

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

Stanford Institutes of Medicine 1, Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, A California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Facility Environmental Health & Safety Laboratory Building Programming

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

NEW PALTZ, NEW YORK

New Science Building

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

LDS Business College Triad 4

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

TUCSON, ARIZONA

Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building / Medical Research Building

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Gwen and Jules Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

RICHARDSON, TEXAS

Natural Science and Engineering Research Building

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

Ecosystems Biomedical Laboratory

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

FAIRBANKS, ALASKA

Westridge Natural Science Facility

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

DAVIS, CALIFORNIA

Life Sciences Building Plant and Environmental Sciences Replacement Facility

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Engineering Unit 2 Natural Sciences Unit 2

226

IRVINE, CALIFORNIA


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

South Tower Seismic Renovation

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

Biological Sciences Building

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Engineering Building Unit 2 Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Genentech Hall

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,SANTA BARBARA

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA

Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management Marine Sciences Building

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA

Earth and Marine Sciences Building

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI

CINCINNATI, OHIO

Behavioral Sciences Center

UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Trimble Hall Wyatt Hall

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI / WEXFORD SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

MIAMI, FLORIDA

Life Science & Technology Park

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute Ralph & Goldy Lewis Hall, School of Policy, Planning and Development Ray R. Irani Hall, Molecular and Computational Biology Building

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Engineering Research Center

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY

BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA

William C. and Elizabeth H. Latham Agriculture and Natural Resources Building

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON

Holland Library

227


WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

Library Student Services Building Classroom Building Engineering and Life Sciences Building

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON

Biology Building Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center

WHITMAN COLLEGE

WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

Bratton Tennis Center

WHITTIER COLLEGE

WHITTIER, CALIFORNIA

The Rose Hills Foundation Center for Library and Information Resources

WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY Goudy Dining Commons

228

SALEM, OREGON


INDEX A

M

Arizona State University Biodesign Institute C 152

Montana State University Norm Asbjornson Innovation Center 100

C California Lutheran University Campus Framework Master Plan and Update 214 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Warren J. Baker Center for Science and Mathematics 124 California State University, Fresno Campus Facilities Master Plan Update and Peace Garden 216 Center for Creativity and the Arts 90 Meyers Family Sports Medicine Center 56 Cornell University Duffield Hall Nanotechnology Research Facility 112

D Dickinson College Stuart Hall and James Hall 120 Sustainable Campus Master Plan 218 Duke University Fitzpatrick Center 116

E Emory University Health Sciences Research Building 196

G George Mason University / Lincoln Property Company Potomac Science Center 190

I Iowa State University Biorenewables Complex 132 Gerdin Business Building 58

O Oregon State University Linus Pauling Science Center 150

The Evergreen State College Campus Master Plan 220

University of Oregon Athletic Medicine Center 44

Purce Lecture Hall Building Renovation 12

Executive MBA and Sports Product Management Programs 32

The University of Arizona Bioscience Research Laboratories 156

Global Scholars Hall 52

Chemical Sciences Building 160

P

The University of Texas at Arlington Engineering Research Building 164

Pacific Lutheran University Mary Baker Russell Music Center 82

U

Morken Center for Learning and Technology 62 Portland State University Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science 176

R Reed College Gray Campus Center 22 The Grove: Bidwell, Aspen, Sequoia & Sitka Houses 18

S Soka University of America Performing Arts Center and Wangari Maathai Hall 78 Stanford University Central Energy Facility 92 Redwood City Campus Phase 1 208 Stanford Institutes of Medicine (SIM) Master Plan Update & Foundations in Medicine (FIM) Master Plan and Implementation 210 State University Construction Fund State University of New York at Cortland, Bowers Hall Upgrade to Science Hall Phase 1 200

T The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Brigham Young University / LDS Business College, Salt Lake City Campus, Urban Design and Master Plan 212

University of Alaska Anchorage ConocoPhillips Integrated Science Building 170 University of California, Berkeley Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences 140 Stanley Hall 144 University of California, Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science 136 Sciences Laboratory Building 178 University of California, Los Angeles Wasserman Football Center 4 University of California, Riverside Entomology Building 148 University of California, San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute 102 Health Sciences Biomedical Research Facility 106 University of California, Santa Barbara Humanities and Social Sciences Building 76 University of Minnesota Cancer and Cardiovascular Research Building 182 Physics and Nanotechnology Building 186

John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes 40 Living Learning Center 26, 36 University of Washington MolES and NanoES Buildings 8 Washington Commons 14 University of Wyoming Engineering Education and Research Building (EERB) & High Bay Research Facility (HBRF) 98

V Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Goodwin Hall 192

W Washington and Lee University John & Anne Wilson Art and Music Center 86 Washington State University Orville A. Vogel Plant Biosciences Building 174 Paul G. Allen Center for Global Animal Health 168 Washington State University Vancouver Master Plan and Updates 222 Multimedia Classroom Building 66 Whitman College Residence Hall & Dining Facility 26 Willamette University Kaneko Commons 30 Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center 88 Williams College Science Center 128


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