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MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & SCIENCES BUILDING UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & SCIENCES BUILDING

OWNER

The University of Washington LOCATION

Seattle, Washington DATE COMPLETE

May 2012

ARCHITECT

ZGF Architects LLP CONSULTANTS Affiliated Engineers, Inc. KPFF Consulting Engineers, Inc. LABORATORY CONSULTANT: Research Facilities Design ENERGY MODELING: SOLARC Architecture + Engineering, Inc. ELECTRO MAGNETIC INTERFERENCE: Field Management Services Corp. VIBRATION/ACOUSTICS: Vibro-Acoustic Consultants COST ESTIMATING: Davis Langdon BUILDING ENVELOPE: Morrison Hershfield LANDSCAPE: Walker Macy / Site Workshop GRAPHICS/WAYFINDING: StudioSC MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEER: STRUCTURAL, CIVIL ENGINEER:

CONTRACTOR Hoffman Construction Company PHOTOGRAPHER

Benjamin Benschneider, except where noted


SIZE

BUILDING PERFORMANCE

90,374 SF / Five Stories

INNOVATIVE SYSTEMS

COST

$78.5 Million

175 16’; Level G is 18’ CONSTRUCTION METHOD Primarily cast-inplace concrete. Skin is a combination of unitized curtain wall and open joint stone panels. BUILDING POPULATION

FLOOR-TO-FLOOR HEIGHT

Daylighting / Natural Ventilation / Heat Recovery Chiller / Phase Change Materials / Reduced Air Change Rates / Variable Air Volume Fume Hoods LEED CERTIFICATION LEED Gold BUILDING PROGRAM 10,620 SF 17,004 SF GRADUATE/FACULTY OFFICES 9,814 SF CONFERENCE ROOMS/GATHERING 3,644 SF MISC. SUPPORT 3,314 SF SHELL SPACE 3,459 SF INSTRUMENTATION LABS RESEARCH LABS

GOALS

PROGRAM

The University of Washington desired a facility to accommodate growth in molecular engineering; respond to the evolving interdisciplinary nature of teaching and research; and fit within an area of campus that is home to recently revitalized facilities, as well as traditional campus architecture. The new space provides the necessary research laboratories and faculty offices to bring together students and researchers in bioengineering, chemical engineering, nanotechnology, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, materials science, and chemistry, which were previously dispersed throughout the campus. Research will lead to new discoveries with beneficial implications for major societal challenges ranging from energy, sustainability, and the environment to information technology to affordable and effective healthcare. Associated molecular and nanotechnology instrumentation is also consolidated into the new facility to provide greater synergy and enhanced research capabilities. The integrated design provides tight adjacency between offices and research laboratories to encourage and facilitate collaboration between various disciplines. A further goal was for the facility to support the University’s commitment to advancing environmental stewardship by targeting new energy-saving strategies in a technically challenging laboratory environment. The performance-driven design encompasses technical systems integration, while simultaneously addressing the environmental impacts of the technologies.

The 90,000 SF five-story building providing light-filled above grade office, laboratory and common spaces is the foundation for the master planned 160,000 SF two phase project. As part of Phase 1, ground and basement level instrumentation labs meet ultra-low vibration and electromagnetic interference requirements, and allow all regularly occupied research labs and offices to take advantage of daylight and views. To accommodate the grade change of the site, and to allow multiple points of access from the campus, the building’s main entrances are split between two levels with ground-level entrances on the east and west sides. As a forward-looking institution that values investment in resources and spaces that will create a center of excellence in scholarship and research, the University of Washington embraced a design concept that was taller than what the campus had initially envisioned. What started as a 77,000 SF building transformed to a 90,000 SF facility for the same budget. Originally a four-story building with half the surface area devoted to open ceiling, the design accommodates another floor. The five-story space allows for the optimum program for the site and accommodates future needs of the campus and research community. The narrow building footprint is appropriately sized for the site, and supports natural ventilation and daylighting strategies. Daylight from all four compass coordinates improves user experience throughout the building, encourages interaction, and supports safety in all four floors of regularly occupied laboratory spaces by increasing visibility for safety monitoring from the open-office to laboratory spaces. In consideration of present and emerging programmatic needs on the campus of the University of Washington, the new Molecular Engineering & Sciences building has been thoughtfully designed to accommodate long-term flexibility, while ensuring sustainable strategies support the energy needs of a high-use laboratory space. The space will accommodate current research needs; attract new talent and researchers; and provide desirable space for collaborative efforts that support interdisciplinary research on a grant, or funding, basis.


A HOME FOR MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & SCIENCES RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON The building is home to the University of Washington’s Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute, which brings together research teams from across the University of Washington campus to catalyze translational research in the areas of clean and biotechnology. The Institute is intended to serve both as an intellectual accelerator to bring fresh approaches and ideas to societal grand challenges in sustainable energy and materials, and in medical therapeutics and diagnostics, and as a physical incubator where new interdisciplinary teams can come together in a shared space. At the University of Washington, molecular engineers are capitalizing on a decade of advances in nanotechnology to design new molecules and systems of molecules that may not exist in nature. With great precision, they manipulate structure and function, often one molecule at a time, an exceedingly difficult challenge. In the next ten years, complex molecular nanosystems and devices will allow scientists to penetrate ever deeper into molecular and atomic processes.

RIGHT The Molecular Engineering & Sciences building is clad in glass and limestone. A prominent skylight – providing natural daylight to the basement level – rises into the courtyard.


3

GRANT

PLACE JOHNSON CIRCLE

A PH

SE

II

W STEVENS WAY NE

2

OKANOGAN LANE

SITE Site and campus context were key drivers of design for the new facility. Adjacent to a recent courtyard revitalization effort, the building enhances outdoor public space, pedestrian pathways, wayfinding and connections to the surrounding community. The location at the cross-section of a busy campus thoroughfare puts research and teaching on display at a hub of campus learning. The University anticipates that the high-functioning and aesthetically inviting space will attract top tier students, faculty and research staff. The building is designed to accommodate a second phase of the project directly adjacent to the current building, potentially doubling the size and research capabilities of the current space. The site design incorporates rain gardens – a first for the University. Stormwater runoff will be directed to the roof gardens, reducing runoff to additional drainage systems. Green roofs are planted with vegetation to attract native bees, and support on-site water conservation efforts. Building users on levels 3 and 4 are afforded views of the green roof, comparable to the views of natural foliage typically only available on ground floors.

1

9

8


4

T AN

E

LAN

GR

5

6

6

7

UW CAMPUS

N

1 Molecular Engineering & Sciences Building 2 Architecture Hall 3 Meany Hall 4 Gerberding Hall

5 Johnson Hall 6 Atmospheric Sciences Geophysics Building 7 Bagley Hall 8 Chemistry Library Building 9 Guthrie Hall


ARCHITECTURE From the outside-in, the building design supports transparency and connectivity. The primarily glass façade facing east and west allows light to filter all the way through the building while maximizing daylighting strategies and placing research on display. The pragmatic building design is envisioned to inspire and inform. Hand-placed limestone, selected for the exterior, was chosen for its neutral hue that blends seamlessly with adjacent more traditional Collegiate Gothic architecture. High performance glazing and sun shading systems respond to the sun’s orientation, reduce solar gain and support the project’s natural ventilation strategies.

ABOVE West-facing view of the Molecular Engineering & Sciences building. LEFT A skylight providing daylight to below-ground research space rises prominently into the building’s courtyard. The large underground space protected from vibrations and electromagnetic interference is the largest such lab space on the West Coast.


JOHNSON HALL

GROUND FLOOR

QRC Seismology Lab ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES-GEOPHYSICS BUILDING

COLLABORATORY SPACE LABORATORY LABORATORY SUPPORT OPEN PLAN GRAD STUDENT OFFICE CIRCULATION MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

N

0’

15’

30’


FIRST FLOOR

Phase II

Closed Faculty Office Collaboratory Space

Circulation Conference Laboratory

Laboratory Support

CLOSED FACULTY OFFICE

Open Plan Grad Student Offi

COLLABORATORY SPACE LABORATORY

Support

FIRST FLOOR

LABORATORY SUPPORT OPEN PLAN GRAD STUDENT OFFICE CONFERENCE CIRCULATION MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

N

0’

15’

30’


SECOND FLOOR

Phase II

Closed Faculty Office Collaboratory Space

Circulation Conference Laboratory

Laboratory Support

CLOSED FACULTY OFFICE

Open Plan Grad Student Office

COLLABORATORY SPACE LABORATORY

Support

SECOND FLOOR

LABORATORY SUPPORT OPEN PLAN GRAD STUDENT OFFICE CONFERENCE CIRCULATION MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

N

0’

15’

30’


THIRD FLOOR

Phase II

Closed Faculty Office Collaboratory Space

Circulation Conference Green Roof

CLOSED FACULTY OFFICE

Laboratory

COLLABORATORY SPACE

Laboratory Support

LABORATORY

Open Plan Grad Student Office

LABORATORY SUPPORT

Support

THIRD FLOOR

OPEN PLAN GRAD STUDENT OFFICE CONFERENCE CIRCULATION GREEN ROOF MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

N

0’

15’

30’


FOURTH FLOOR

Phase II

Closed Faculty Office Collaboratory Space

Circulation Conference Laboratory

Laboratory Support Open Plan Grad Student Office

CLOSED FACULTY OFFICE COLLABORATORY SPACE

Support

FOURTH FLOOR

LABORATORY LABORATORY SUPPORT OPEN PLAN GRAD STUDENT OFFICE CIRCULATION MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

N

0’

15’

30’


PENTHOUSE PLAN

Phase II

Circulation Green Roof Support

FIFTH FLOOR

CIRCULATION GREEN ROOF SUPPORT

N

0’

15’

30’


SUSTAINABILITY The University of Washington fosters a strong commitment toward environmental stewardship. Washington state projects are required to achieve a minimum of LEED Silver, and the University of Washington was an early signatory to the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment, putting the campus on the path to carbon neutral operation. The LEED Gold certified Molecular Engineering & Sciences Building embodies an integrated design that focuses on the specific and significant environmental impacts of laboratory operations—largely due to the enormous ventilation demands and the energy associated with moving and conditioning the air to meet stringent programmatic and safety requirements. Air change rates can be the single most influential factor in building energy use – as much as 50% of energy loads. The team worked closely with the University to re-examine the number of air changes per hour required to provide high air quality. Consequently, minimum air change rates were adjusted from approximately ten to six per hour in main laboratories and as low as two in microscope labs; low face velocity fume hoods were used throughout the building to minimize the degree to which fume hoods drive air change rates above these minimums. All of this resulted in a 40% reduction in energy associated with ventilating, heating, and cooling the lab spaces. Chilled beams were selected for use in less air-change-driven spaces, primarily the microscope labs in the building’s basement. The natural ventilation strategy for the office portion of the building is a direct extension of these strategies. Naturally ventilated offices are modeled to reduce the energy required for cooling of the office portion of the building by 98% annually. Internal sun control options were evaluated for their effect on daylighting and ventilation when glare or direct

sunlight was an issue, resulting in the selection of daylight optimized internal blinds. The automated blinds with manual override automatically position themselves to block direct sunlight while redirecting daylight to the ceiling. Additionally, the blinds permit cross-ventilation utilizing a guidewire to minimize movement from the wind. Full natural ventilation (with no mechanical cooling) in the offices is a highly unusual and technically challenging strategy for a research laboratory building and holds the potential to set the standard for future campus developments and similar research facilities nationally. A custom-designed, elevated-temperature, chilled water loop, fed by a heat recovery chiller system, serves the process cooling equipment associated with the microscopes, as well as the chilled beams that provide space cooling in the microscope spaces. Overall building energy savings are significantly augmented by modular heat recovery chillers that simultaneously provide cooling to lab equipment and chilled beams, then transfer and upgrade otherwise wasted heat to building space heating and laboratory hot water systems. A gel form of phase change material (PCM) developed from vegetable oils was selected for the building. PCM provides thermal storage to allow cold-energy to be stored for future use. Panels with a thin 1.25 cm strip of the bioPCM have been inserted into numerous wall and ceiling surfaces across the new building. The strips act like the thermal mass of 25 centimeters of concrete. The gel is installed in 5-10 ml pockets to enhance the effectiveness of the product and reduce damage to the building should the surface become punctured. The flexibility and efficiency of the design is expected to draw first-class researchers from around the world, while providing the University with operational cost savings.


LEFT Three extensive green roofs (one shown) covered in local Northwest sedum attract honeybees and contribute to on-site water mitigation and irrigation strategies. The green roof overhanging the courtyard is directly adjacent to third floor office spaces and extends the indoor-outdoor connection. BELOW An aerial view of the eastern and northern faรงades of the building, and courtyard. PHOTOGRAPHER John Stamets


Daylit Research Labs

Airflow Pathway and Stack Assist Enable Natural Ventilation

Green Roofs

Lab / Office Interface

Integration of Radiant Heating and Thermal Mass


AIR CHANGE RATES Optimized Façade and Solar Shading

Minimum air change rates were adjusted from ten to six per hour in main laboratories and as low as two in microscopic labs. Low face velocity fume hoods are used throughout the building to minimize the degree to which fume hoods drive air change rates above these minimums.

AIRFLOW PATHWAY At night, upper windows are mechanically actuated to be open when needed. Lower windows can be manually operated during the day by building occupants.

DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS Naturally Ventilated Daylit Offices

Office and laboratory spaces are located above-grade to take advantage of views and natural daylight. When necessary, optimized internal blinds allow users to mitigate glare by redirecting daylight to the ceiling.

ENERGY USE Laboratories will employ low-flow VAV fume hoods, and chilled beams will be used to supply cooling where additional ventilation is required.

HEAT RECOVERY CHILLER Overall building energy savings are significantly augmented by modular heat recovery chillers that simultaneously provide cooling to lab equipment and chilled beams, then transfer and upgrade otherwise wasted heat to building heating and laboratory hot water systems.

LANDSCAPE DESIGN Native vegetation requires less irrigation and maintenance, while three extensive green roofs contribute to on-site water irrigation and mitigation.

NATURAL VENTILATION The project features the first naturally ventilated offices in a laboratory building on the University’s campus. Natural ventilation strengthens the connection to the campus and outdoor environment.

Public Campus Courtyard

PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL A vegetable-based phase change material provides thermal storage to allow cold-energy to be stored for future use.

RADIANT HEATING AND THERMAL MASS Rigid insulation with the slab assembly, exposing thermal mass in the ceiling and floor of all spaces limits “wasted” radiant heat to the slab and results in better zoning control of each space.

SOLAR CONTROL Best practice load reduction strategies include a façade strategy that optimizes daylight while reducing peak solar cooling loads. Sun shading is optimized to reduce glare to the building interior.


LIGHT FILLED LAB SPACES Providing for the safety of lab researchers while optimizing energy performance, access to daylight and open connections to the labs was a high priority. A full airtight glass partition between the offices and laboratory spaces supports these goals. Unlike traditional, closed, windowless lab research spaces, the new facility provides some of the best views on campus. Open, light-filled research labs face west, affording views of the western mountain range and Seattle skyline. The design also serves to put “research on display” above a busy campus thoroughfare. The number of fixed impediments in laboratory spaces is limited to accommodate flexibility and reconfiguration to adapt to changes in research,

laboratory needs and work styles. Flexibility in the above ground lab bench areas allows “dry” research areas to be converted into “wet” laboratory benches to adjust to the needs of various research disciplines, grants and funding. An array of “plug and play” power and gas in the ceiling provides additional flexibility. In lower level instrumentation laboratories, all utilities are located close by, and significant floor to floor space is provided for overhead utilities to easily accommodate future modifications.

LEFT Modular lab benches enable easy reconfiguration to accommodate the evolving research landscape, while the open layout promotes interaction and collaboration.


OFFICE SPACES Office and collaboration spaces are located immediately outside lab spaces on the east side of the building where they are more protected from noise, pollution and excessive sun exposure, allowing natural ventilation for fresh air and cooling to provide greater user comfort and energy efficiency. The open offices are designed to accommodate various configurations of work groups now and well into the future. On the second floor, additional office space cantilevers over the courtyard below. The additional space accommodates programmatic needs of the floors’ users, and is designed to distinguish the building’s massing.

ABOVE Open office spaces on floors one through four support an environment conducive to collaboration, while enhancing synergy between researchers. RIGHT Offices and laboratories are separated by a glass partition, contributing to researcher safety in the labs and allowing natural daylight to filter across the entire building.


ABOVE Natural light and views toward campus connect users with the outdoors. RIGHT A researcher’s desk on the third floor is positioned next to an operable window with views of the sedum planted green roof and emblematic campus architecture.


COLLABORATION SPACES Impromptu collaboration spaces including benches, small-group lounge seating and marker boards are spread throughout the building in office spaces, labs and passageways to encourage the cross-pollination of ideas. Kitchen and casual seating spaces on each floor are located immediately adjacent to the glassenclosed staircase connecting all five-stories of the building. The transparency encourages interaction as users move throughout the building. Three spacious conference rooms offer an arrangement for larger group interaction.

LEFT Corridor with whiteboard space looking West. ABOVE The luminous stairwell naturally prompts interaction and provides views into kitchen lounge spaces on each floor.


LEFT A fourth-floor balcony offers covered outdoor seating and vistas of Mt. Rainier and the Seattle skyline. ABOVE Light-filled lounge and kitchen areas on each above-ground floor provide space for respite and collaboration. BELOW View of west-facing conference room.


ABOVE Abundant daylight and views provide building users with a direct connection to the outdoors. RIGHT East faรงade of the University of Washington Molecular Engineering & Sciences building pictured at night.


CONTACT Leslie Morison 925 Fourth Avenue, Suite 2400 Seattle, Washington 98104 206 521 3481 leslie.morison@zgf.com WEBSITE www.zgf.com TELEPHONE EMAIL

Printed on recycled paper. 1409

University of Washington, Molecular Engineering & Sciences Building  

Seattle, Washington

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