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YAWKEY CENTER FOR CANCER CARE DANA-FARBER CANCER INSTITUTE


THE NEW YAWKEY CENTER FOR CANCER CARE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF DANAFARBER’S RESPONSE TO THIS NEED FOR THE BEST 21ST CENTURY CANCER CARE AND FOR NEW MODES OF CLINICAL RESEARCH DESIGNED TO BRING BETTER TREATMENTS TO PATIENTS MORE QUICKLY AND SAFELY.


YAWKEY CENTER FOR CANCER CARE OWNER

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

LOCATION

Boston

DATE COMPLETE

January 2011

PHOTOGRAPHERS  Chuck Choi,

Peter Vanderwalker & Aerial Boston

SIZE 14 STORIES

285,000 SF

7 PARKING LEVELS

215,000 SF of Parking

TYPICAL EXAM ROOM

130 SF

COST

$325 million

CONSTRUCTION METHOD CM-at-Risk

BUILDING PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE CERTIFICATIONS  Gold Certified

/ LEED NC v.2.2 Pilot / Green Guide for Healthcare v2.2

BUILDING PROGRAM EXAM ROOMS 100 INFUSION CHAIRS INCLUDING CLINICAL RESEARCH 150 CONSULTATION ROOMS

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ARCHITECT DESIGN ARCHITECT AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

ZGF Architects LLP

ASSOCIATE ARCHITECT

Miller Dyer Spears

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT HEALING GARDEN

Carol R. Johnson Associates

CONSULTANTS M/E/P ENGINEER Bard

Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineers

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

Simon Design Engineering

LIGHTING DESIGN

Fisher Marantz Stone

CIVIL ENGINEER

VHB

CONTRACTOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Walsh Brothers


PROJECT OVERVIEW Located within Boston’s dense Longwood Medical and Academic Area, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s newest clinical building has become the new main entrance for Dana-Farber and the signature image for the Institute. This 285,000 SF facility, the Yawkey Center for Cancer Care, stands 14 stories above grade providing clinical care, clinical research, and public services for dining, retail and quiet reflection. The facility also includes seven levels of underground parking. The Yawkey Center has several connections to other DanaFarber buildings that link to affiliated hospitals, bringing research and clinical staff into close proximity. Dana-Farber’s primary goal for the Yawkey Center was to create a state-of-the-art clinical building that promotes personalized, multidisciplinary, safe, respectful, and compassionate cancer care for patients and families in a healing environment. Other goals were to stimulate translation of research into the care of patients, optimize flexibility and utility of space, streamline the flow of patients and materials, minimize wait and treatment times, foster productivity and collaboration of staff, and create a new front entrance and presence.


EMBRACING THE URBAN FABRIC Creating a signature entrance for Dana-Farber was a key goal for the Yawkey Center for Cancer Care, and the success of the project contributes significantly to healing the dense yet disjointed urban fabric of Boston’s Brookline Avenue. Due to the limited site area, the project involved razing two low-rise buildings on Brookline Avenue and building on one of the few remaining surface lots in the area. The 14-story building is designed as a series of glass and terra cotta boxes. Volumes are broken and stepped back as the building rises so it does not overwhelm the pedestrian experience and the neighborhood. However, it has become an iconic building visible in and around the neighborhood. Along each step in the building’s massing, calming green roofs are visible from patient and office areas and emphasize Dana-Farber’s commitment to sustainability in the urban environment. At night, the top level glows like a beacon. The exterior glazing is articulated with vertical fins that animate the unique coastal light as it moves across the building masses. The composition of terra cotta accents, with the framing of the glass, interprets Boston’s tradition of red brick in a fresh way. As a result, the building is optimistic and welcoming for patients and their families. The site offers street-level retail that addresses the street corner, including a gift shop and space for a coffee shop. At the prominent corner of Brookline Avenue and Jimmy Fund Way, a two-story lobby combined with a two-story interior healing garden above it create an anchor of glass and light. These spaces proclaim a message of hope, health and healing to all passing by on this major thoroughfare or entering the Institute. In order to help establish an identity along Brookline Avenue, an outdoor plaza was created that celebrates the Pan-Mass Challenge, an annual cross-state bicycle ride that has become the largest fundraising event supporting Dana-Farber. The pedestrian way now includes space for an outdoor café seating and respite for patients, families, staff and neighbors.

TOP Aerial View of Pan-Mass Challenge ABOVE Pan-Mass Challenge Walk and Café Seating RIGHT Main Entrance on Brookline Avenue


FLOOR PLANS SITE PLAN 1 Yawkey Center for Cancer Care 2 PMC Plaza 3 Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Research Laboratories 4 Joslin Park

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JIMMY FUND WAY

BROOKLINE AVENUE

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GROUND FLOOR 1 Entrance 2 Friends’ Corner Gift Shop 3 Shapiro Center for Patient and Family Services 4 Blum Resource Center 5 Friend’s Place (appearance center)

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2

1 3 2

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5

N 00' 25' 50'

N 00'

25'

50'


SECOND FLOOR 1 Waiting 2 Levine Family Central Registration 3 Outpatient Pharmacy 4 Laboratory Services 5 Chapel

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THIRD FLOOR 1 Stoneman Healing Garden and Morse Conservatory 2 Dining Pavilion 3 Servery 4 Cutler Art Gallery 5 Conference Center

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1

1

4 5 2

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N 00'

25'

50'


STONEMAN HEALING GARDEN Visually and symbolically anchoring the building at the corner of Brookline Avenue and Jimmy Fund Way is the Stoneman Healing Garden, providing an easily accessible area of quiet respite for patients, families and staff, with yearround access to nature. The wood- and stone-clad two-story space at the third floor is designed with a plant structure that surrounds the visitors with tall plantings, supplemented with vibrant, seasonal displays. To provide a safe, infectionfree environment, the 1,790 SF garden has a double-door entry vestibule and its own air handling system that prevents garden air from mixing with the system supplying other public and clinical areas. Every effort has been made to prevent exposure to airborne infectious agents, from selection of plant material to surface treatments. The adjacent Morse Conservatory, surrounded on two sides by the garden, provides a protected sitting area for severely immunocompromised patients. TOP View of garden from across Jimmy Fund Way RIGHT Morse Conservatory for severely immuno-compromised patients


CONNECTIVITY As the front door for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Yawkey Center serves to connect the campus both visually and physically, creating a core that did not exist previously. It facilitates interaction among clinicians by bringing them into closer proximity and allows for the sharing of resources by linking the garage and dining pavilion, as well as specialty clinics and unique equipment, to all the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute buildings. A tunnel inside the garage connects to the basement of the Dana Building, where imaging and radiation oncology services are located. The tunnel, located on top of the parking ramp, features donor walls onto which names are engraved into a DNA strand. The wall lights up the space with changing colors throughout the day. On the third floor, a skybridge connects the new Yawkey Center to the laboratories and additional clinics of the Dana Building. Overlooking the green roofs below, another campus connection occurs via a bar of bridges to the Smith Research Laboratories. This bar connects researchers to the clinic spaces and offers lounges for impromptu interactions among staff. By linking these double height spaces with staircases, these halls also connect floors to allow staff to move about without elevators.


HIGH PERFORMANCE DESIGN The City of Boston has a strong interest in sustainable design, and its policies integrated well with the Yawkey Center for Cancer Care. This project has been certified as LEED Gold and, in addition, the design team followed the Green Guide for Health Care. A project goal was not only to design a healing environment but also to bring nature back into what is a dense high-rise neighborhood. In order to achieve a park-like setting in an urban, multi-story building, green roofs are located on the 4th floor connection to the Smith building; the 11th, 12th and 14th floors. Each includes native and adaptive, non-invasive plants to mitigate storm-water runoff and provide a habitat for local fauna. Other sustainable strategies include: ƒƒ The building utilizes a daylight sensor-operated dimming system that automatically reduces artificial lighting levels in public areas when daylight is available. ƒƒ Low-flow plumbing leads to a 55 percent reduction in water use. ƒƒ A heat recovery system transfers heat between the intake and exhaust air streams, in order to reduce the amount of energy needed to bring the incoming air to a comfortable temperature. ƒƒ Approximately 8,100 tons—or 92%—of construction, demolition and land clearing waste was diverted from landfills or incinerators.


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Dana Farber Yawkey Center for Cancer Care  

Yawkey Center for Cancer Care is the centerpiece of Dana- Farber Cancer Institute’s response to thIs need for the best 21st century cancer c...