Page 1

projects + research

ZERO

ZERO


zerozero architecture workshops

“We aim to create buildings that are sensitive, efficient and thought-provoking “


zerozero architecture workshops Founded in February 2013, Zero Zero is a new type of architectural practice: our studio is a workshop of ideas that transcends geographical boundaries and bridges disparate disciplines. Our common goal is to improve the built environment and the lives of those who experience it. Drawing on our award-winning international expertise, we form creative collaborations with specialists particular to each project. From small-scale residential alterations to large, complex projects, this approach allows our small core studio to redefine problems beyond usual disciplinary boundaries while retaining personal involvement and minimising cost.

Our multidisciplinary network includes specialists in architecture, engineering, project management, historic conservation, sustainability, landscape and interior design. Together we reach solutions based on a new understanding of complex situations. Based in Auckland (New Zealand), London (United Kingdom) and Modica (Italy), Zero Zero has experience on diverse projects – from large-scale infrastructural works to luxury residences; from museums and galleries to small but smart alterations. Its portfolio specialises in contexts of sensitive architectural and natural heritage, such as Cava d’Ispica in Sicily and Hyde Park in London.

The practice’s maiden project in New Zealand, the Olive Grove House, was shortlisted for Auckland Architectural Association 2013 Unbuilt Architecture Awards.


“We are designing new and richly engaging experiences of history and culture. “


Mark Cannata

architect, ba (hons), dip arch, ma, arb, riba, leed ap Mark Cannata established Zero Zero in 2013 with Francis Scott in New Zealand and opened the Italian office in 2015. Prior to moving to New Zealand, Mark was Head of Culture and Heritage for Europe, Middle East and Africa at HOK. He previously led the Historic Buildings Unit at John McAslan + Partners and worked for a number of Conservation practices in the UK and design practices in Italy. Mark has been responsible for the delivery of a large number of projects that often involve careful interventions in historic contexts, such as London’s King’s Cross Station and the De La Warr Pavilion – one of Britain’s most important Modernist buildings. He has also overseen innovative design proposals for high profile projects internationally, including the reinvention of the BBC Maida Vale recording studios and the creative re-use of seventeenth-century Franciscan convent ruins to house the new Museo Archeologico Ibleo in Ragusa, Italy. In New Zealand Mark

has been responsible, on behalf of Salmond Reed Architects, for the Built Heritage Technical Expert Report for the Auckland City Rail Link, which assessed the impact of the project on central Auckland’s Heritage. Mark has been a visiting examiner and lecturer at several schools of architecture in the United Kingdom including Nottingham, Kingston, Leeds Metropolitan and Cambridge Universities. Since moving to New Zealand, he has been a professional teaching fellow at Auckland University’s School of Architecture, responsible for third-year design studios focusing on Heritage. His articles and research papers have been published in numerous conference proceedings and books, most recently in James Stirling and the Red Trilogy and The Cultural Role of Architecture.

Mark is currently a member of the Twentieth Century Society, the Society for Protection of Ancient Buildings and a committee member for the UK of Europa Nostra, the pan-European Federation for Cultural Heritage Organizations.


“We’ll always look at a brief and ask ‘is there a better way of doing it?’ We want people to come to ZeroZero because they know we will deliver intelligent and memorable buildings.”


Francis Scott

architect, bas, barch (hons), nzrab, nzia Francis heads Zero Zero in New Zealand. Prior to forming the practice with Mark in 2013, Francis was a Senior Designer at John McAslan + Partners where he led the team responsible for the delivery of the refurbishment of the Western Range Building, part of the  of the £500m award-winning Kings Cross Station Redevelopment. He was the Project Leader for a range of work in England and Russia, including the comprehensive transformation of the historic Royal Military Academy in London and the Stanislavsky Centre in Moscow into luxury residential accommodation.

After graduating from Auckland University with Honours, Francis worked in New Zealand, Australia, Italy and the UK, gaining broad knowledge of projects at different scales. His experience includes urban residential towers, university campuses, research facilities, public aquariums, mixed-use redevelopments and master planning. Francis has a particular interest in the way people live, and how that manifests at the scale of both the domestic and the community. His extensive portfolio of residential and mixed-use developments has contributed to a robust understanding of how the unique cultural qualities of places influence the built environment. Equally, he appreciates the opportunities presented by managing the design and delivery of projects, from inception to completion.

He is a member of INTBAU – International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture and Urbanism and has been a visiting critic and design studio tutor at the University of Auckland.


“We experience Architecture as a ‘Choreography of Space’ rather than an assemblage of various systems to form a whole.“


Mani Lall

architect, ba (hons), dip arch Mani Lall leads ZeroZero’s activities in the United Kingdom. His main focus both in the practice and as a University Architectural Tutor has been the advancement of a conceptual and theoretical base, which informs and promotes design solutions. This is coupled with an advanced competency in the use of digital media and the computer as an investigative tool, rather than just a representative device, backed up by a strong foundation in traditional design representation and investigation methodology.

Prior to joining ZeroZero, Mani set up his own consultancy, working on a number of residential and commercial projects, and was previously Design Director at Archial where he was responsible for business development throughout the UK and India. As Divisional Director at JM Architects he led design in the region and developed of design strategies within the group. During his time at JM Architects Mani was responsible for a number of designs for Mixed Use, Residential, Commercial developments, as well as setting up design and planning strategies for Educational and Healthcare projects.

In addition to practice work, Mani has been teaching Under-Graduate and Post-Graduate Architectural Design studio at the University of Nottingham since 2001. He has also taught at Nottingham Trent University, Manchester School of Architecture, and been a visiting critica at Leeds Met Universityand Liverpool University. Mani has given lectures on Digital Design Creativity, and contributed to numerous publications related to Architectural Design.


zerozero projects + research

residential cultural transportation commercial hospitality research interiors heritage sustainability

“Step into our ideas workshop....“


Windy House This is a project for a new family house of approximately 450 square metres, including a secondary self-contained unit for the extended family and guests, set on a steep hill South of Auckland. The client’s brief was for a home that would be easily capable of adapting to the changing needs of its occupiers over the years and act as a receptacle for an extensive art collection Rather than being a hindrance, the inspiration for the project derived from the harshness of the site and above all its exposure to harsh sunshine and powerful winds. The building responds to the natural phenomena by adapting its shape to harness them, creating shelter, seclusion or expansion depending on orientation. A simple, constant, building section follows the contours of the land and opens up to the views, placing at its central light-filled gallery for the client’s art collection, whilst the hard timber shell opens up to reveal more of the interior corresponding to the main living areas of the building. The architectural language that derives is that of a deceptively simple building with a subtle palette of natural materials, recalling the robust pragmatism and understated elegance of New Zealand farmhouses, where the complexity is derived instead from the response of a simple built form to the site setting. A house, therefore, sculpted by wind and sun and connected to the natural environment. Location:

Auckland, New Zealand

Size: 450 m² Completion:

Completed


Caitina House Interiors Taking its inspiration from Japanese dwellings, the design proceeded from the inside out, generating a central construct around which the spaces unfold and unravel. The underlying design concept is that natural light erodes the surfaces that define the spaces, penetrating into the centre of the house and allowing partial views across them, giving a feel of an ambient that is at once open and intimate. The idea of ‘erosion’ did not stop there as it was a case of literally about carving out functional living areas out of the existing configuration and targeting adaptation only to a limited number of areas for cost reasons. These interventions would have to ‘work’ extremely hard and absolve more than one function at a time. The linchpin of the composition is the new staircase that leads to the mansard space (originally storage space). The staircase is at the same time about connection and separation. It is itself a ruin, starting as stone and then dissolving into closed and open timber treads. It is at once a light-well, a bench, a storage area. The walls that would appear to bind the staircase fragment and unravel becoming ceiling and floor, leading to and visually connecting the main living spaces on the two floors. Again these surfaces are carved creating openings and articulated volumes that separate the spaces, but never completely. Light and views are what binds the spaces together.

Location:

Modica, Italy

Size: 150 m² Completion:

Completed


Olive Grove House Inspired by natural forms of the site, the 250sqm Olive Grove House in Whitford draws on its existing environment at a range of scales – from the existing steep topography and sweeping views, to the textural, weathered bark of the surrounding olive trees. Surrounded by a mature olive grove, the building is understood as being born of the land, sculpted by sunlight and wind. It is imagined as a series of walled layers that progress from a robust, rugged outer shell to reveal smoother and more delicate internal layers. Rough garden walls that stand at different heights shelter the inhabited areas and create outdoor spaces with increasing degrees of enclosure, while also rationalising the steep gradient of the site. This spatial configuration allows a dual aspect in most rooms with openings that frame different views while also offering protection from the sun and prevailing wind. Overhead, extended roof eaves offer further shelter from the elements. The ‘wall’ therefore forms the main feature of the project and anchors the new building to its site. Largely incorporating natural materials, this simple palette captures the spirit of place to create a home that is at once elegant, functional and enduring. The project was shortlisted for the Unbuilt Architecture Awards 2015.

Location:

Auckland, New Zealand

Size: 250 m² Completion:

Ongoing


Bay House Addition The brief for this project was initially to future proof the adjacent holiday home so it could become the clients’ main abode during retirement. The main aspiration was to add a bedroom from which the client could ‘wake up and see the sea’, but the completed building is much more than that. Indeed, apart from new bedroom with a view of the bay, the addition also needed to include a car space, utility room, bedroom, kitchenette, ensuite bathroom, walk-in wardrobe and study and all in 50 sqm. By careful arrangement of the stairs and doors, the new addition also has the flexibility to be closed off from the main house and operate as a self-contained unit. The design of the addition was inspired by the bay and headland form of the coastline. The rocky headlands with steep inaccessible cliffs offer excellent views of the surrounding coastline and for this reason were prized by Maori as Pa (fortified village) sites. The addition’s staunch monolithic appearance, by concealment of doors at the lower level and minimal detail, emphasises the sense of an elevated vantage point which sits in contrast to the existing house with it’s more horizontal emphasis, casual feel and array of architectural features.

Location:

Kawakawa, New Zealand

Size: 50 m² Completion:

Completed


Sustainable House n.1 This is a project where Conservation of Historic buildings and conservation of natural resources come together. Based closed to the Mediterranean Sea in Southern Sicily, the protected ruins of a 19th Century stable block are being transformed to provide a new family home . The project adopts passive and active measures to achieve its sustainable goals; from shading to thermal mass; from rainwater harvesting to photovoltaic arrays; from recycled materials to re-used structural elements. All of these come together together to create a building that works incredibly hard, whilst providing the lifestyle spaces desired by the client, including an open plan living area with an indoor garden and an intensive green roof with panoramic views of the sea. The project is currently in detail design phase.

Location:

Donnalucata, Italy

Size: 210 m² Completion:

Ongoing


Cava Ispica House This project series is about the reinvention of three humble historic stone buildings. All three are a testimony to a successful building type and the vernacular construction methods, being made out what had been the readily available material for millennia and sharing similar details although they were constructed at very different times and on different sites. The three buildings also appear at once to literally ‘grow’ out of the ground and be one with it, incorporating within their volume pre-existing caves and other natural features. This was man literally sculpting and carving a shelter for himself, his family and his few possessions and protecting them with thick walls and few openings. The design of the three projects stems from the idea of ‘growing within’. New surfaces and volumes delicately but assuredly colonize the historic building protected by its stone carapace and instil new life within it. The two remain distinct but at the same time rely on each other for their continued existence, in a quasi-symbiotic relationship.

Location:

Modica, Italy

Size: 50 m² Completion:

Completed


CBRB, Fondazione RiMED A 25,000-square meter building, the Biomedical Research and Biotechnology Centre(BRBC) will be established in Carini, a few miles from Palermo International Airport. The Centre will host a structural biology laboratory, biomedical engineering research labs, neuroscience and molecular imaging laboratories, facilities for in vivo preclinical studies, vaccine development laboratories, and core laboratories with the latest generation equipment for development of new regenerative medicine devices and techniques that could make organ transplants obsolete one day. The project, won via international competition, by a multi-disciplinary team which included ZeroZero as a Consultant for Design and LEED Certification and is expected to break ground early in 2018. The project aims to achieve LEED Gold rating.

Location:

Palermo, Italy

Size: 25000 m² Completion:

Ongoing


Hyde Park Boathouse Francis Scott was responsible for this project in the heart of London’s Hyde Park. The new Boathouse includes a kiosk, a souvenir shop and the operational facilities for the Serpentine Lake boat hire company. Sympathetic to its highly visible location in one of the Royal Parks, the building of steel and timber is modular in design, allowing off-site fabrication to minimise the construction period in one of London’s most visited public places, and the site of many events, including the London 2012 Olympic Triathlon. Measures for passive environmental control were actively sought and include: an exposed concrete floor that retains heat through the winter and is shaded from summer sun by projecting timber louvres; a band of operable windows below the eaves that provide cross-ventilation, as well as visually separating the roof from the main volume of the building; finally, capitalising on the opportunity provided by the lake, a water-source heat pump that provides additional heating and cooling.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 300 m² Completion:

Completed


Museo Archeologico Ibleo Mark Cannata was the architect and conservation architect leading the renovation of a historic Jesuit convent and adjacent church in the ancient Sicilian city of Ragusa, located in Sicily. The abandoned, partly ruined convent and church of Santa Maria del Gesu’ form part of the Val di Noto UNESCO World Heritage site in southeastern Sicily. They were built in 1639 using recycled materials from the abandoned Castle of Ragusa. After suffering damage in an earthquake that devastated the city in 1693, the church was almost completely rebuilt in 1700. It was used as a school and hospital until falling into ruin in the 19th century. The project conserves the buildings, converting them into a new, permanent home for a regional archaeological museum. A new white concrete surface forms the main intervention providing the infrastructure for all the systems that a modern museum requires to function and as display for the existing collection, which includes artefacts from the Neolithic era up to late ancient times, as well as never-displayed objects from the ancient Greek settlement of Kamarina.

Location:

Ragusa, Italy

Size:

600 m²

Completion:

Ongoing


Luxury Hotel The inspiration for the form for this project to transform an existing 1970s building into a five-star hotel was, the local vernacular: traditional materials and forms are reinterpreted, giving a strong demonstration of the historical continuity, whilst avoiding historicisms or architectural inconsistencies. The geomorphology of the Hyblean plateau is the generator of the local vernacular and then the primary design reference. The stone is sculptured and fragmented by the atmospheric elements and water forms cracks, valleys, quarries, rocky walls and caves - the natural caves modified by humans are, after all, also the first example of Hyblean architecture - that the local flora then completes by creating a habitat where it is easy to recognize juxtaposition of materials that is subsequently found in traditional architecture. The stone thus becomes the leitmotif of the design proposal; the building becomes one with the stone of the square and of the cathedral, as well as with other historic buildings nearby. The existing building is therefore ‘sculpted’ by our architectural proposal, remodeling it to the new function and to the historical context and thus creating spaces that are more consistent with the context. Furthermore, the transformed is completed by nature and that will be different than season after season, year after year. Nature, therefore, as designer-in-chief.

Location:

Ragusa, Italy

Size: 900 m² Completion:

Competition


selected project experience before zerozero...


King’s Cross Station Mark Cannata and Francis Scott led the transformation of the historic King’s Cross Station while at John McAslan and Partners, which has created a remarkable dialogue between the original 19th century station and 21st-century architecture. Opened to the public in March 2012, in advance of the 2012 London Olympics, King’s Cross is now an iconic architectural gateway to the capital. The project involved three very different styles of architecture: re-use, conservation and new build. The centrepiece of the £500m redevelopment is the new vaulted, semi-circular concourse to the west of the existing station. The concourse rises some 20m and spans the full 150m-length of the existing Grade I Listed Western Range, creating a new entrance to the station through the south end of the structure and at mezzanine level to the northern end of the Western Concourse The scheme also repaired and transformed the Grade I listed historic fabric, the complex’s biggest component of which is the Western Range, which provides working environments for the employees and rail companies. In addition, the previously destroyed northern wing was accurately rebuilt, the 250 meter long train shed features a barrel-vaulted roof which spans 65 meters - to encompass the 8 platforms - was upgraded to include 10,000sqm of photovoltaic arrays along the linear roof lanterns and a new glass pedestrian footbridge was inserted to provide access to the trains from the concourse.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 250000 m² Completion:

Completed


British Museum Percival David Collection Gallery The Percival David gallery is one of four new permanent galleries at the British Museum. Within this gallery of almost 1,700 objects are examples of the finest Chinese ceramics in the world, dating from the 3rd to the 20th century. Some are unique creations, while others were mass-produced in batches of several hundred at a time. Technological innovations and the use of regional raw materials mean that Chinese ceramics are visually diverse and often strikingly modern in their appearance. Mark Cannata’s Culture and Heritage team at HOK led the creation of this new gallery.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 100 m² Completion:

Completed


Burberry Boutique Hotel The 18-22 Haymarket is a 3600 sqm building in central London, just south of Piccadilly and in one of the most prominent locations for theatre and tourism in the world. The building was historically home to the headquarters of Burberry’s and is now a Grade II listed building set within the Haymarket Conservation Area. The design brief was to produce proposals for the redevelopment of the building and create a new ‘Boutique Hotel’ of fifty keys by adapting and potentially extending the existing historic building and demolishing and rebuilding an adjacent building. Key to the success of the project, led by Mark Cannata whilst at HOK, was the sensitive transformation of the former Burberry headquarters and the insertion of a new building, designed to be a meaningful contemporary addition to the historic district.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 5000 m² Completion:

Unbuilt


BBC Maida Vale Studios BBC Maida Vale Studios is one of the most instantly recognized music venues in the world and well loved by musicians, staff and members of the public despite its many shortcomings. Originally designed as a roller-skating rink and part of the aptly defi ned ‘rink-o-mania’ of the early 20th Century, it was acquired by the BBC in 1934 and transformed in what was -at the time,- a state-of-the-art venue for rehearsal and recording. One hundred years on Maida Vale Studios is still providing the backdrop for unique and memorable music, but the building’s performance and its overall condition is often less than satisfactory and legendary for the wrong reasons. Mark Cannata’s Culture and Heritage team at HOK was commissioned during the summer of 2010 to look into the feasibility of refurbishment proposals for Maida Vale as part of the BBC’s review of the future of the building. The proposals included the complete transformation of the building, the public spaces and support spaces whilst retaining the world-famous recording studios,

Location:

London, UK

Size: 3000 m² Completion:

Unbuilt


The Boltons The interior design of this 19th Century period property, in one of the most desirable addresses in London, were conceived to reflect the owners’ eclectic interests, bringing together period details and the best of contemporary design solutions. The house included 8 bedrooms, an underground cinema, swimming pool and spa, as well as an underground hydraulic parking system. The scope of the project included the selection or design of all furniture, finishes, and fittings and custom-made details throughout.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 450m² Completion:

Completed


The Roundhouse Built in 1846 as a steam engine repair shed, this remarkable building later became a warehouse for Gilbey’s Gin. From the 1960s, it was used as an alternative arts venue, hosting performances by Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, and Peter Brook’s avant garde theatrical group.  The multiple award-winning transformation of the Grade II* listed structure required a fusion of architectural skill, historical respect, and the visionary determination of private and public funders.  Mark Cannata, then at John McAslan and Partners, led a multi-disciplinary team which repaired the existing main fabric, re-programmed sections of the building, modernised the auditorium, increased audience capacity, and extended the building’s functional range.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 6500 m² Completion:

Completed


Highfields This is an interior design project that sought to remodel completely a simple, but spacious, early 20th Century house in the countryside on the outskirts of London. The design sought to retain some of the rustic feel of the property but provide state of the art facilities and contemporary interiors. A vast living and kitchen area, nicknamed the ‘Great Room’, lies at the heart of the remodelled house, which included an artist studios and guest apartment.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 320m² Completion:

Completed


33 Davies Street Located in a Conservation Area among the Georgian townhouses and imposing Victorian facades of Mayfair, the office building needed to balance contemporary and traditional aesthetics, whilst providing Grade-A air conditioned offices built to the highest specification, spanning five floors, flexibly designed for multi-letting. Mark Cannata’s design, carried out at HOK, reconciled a classically inspired elevation design, which typically would require decreased floor-to-floor heights moving up the building. By varying the size and detailing of the windows, an illusion of “piano nobile” exists along ground floor retail spaces. This helps integrate the building into its historic surroundings while maintaining the floor-to-floor heights of a modern office building on higher floors. An elegant double-height entry space completes the composition and includes a 3.6m bronze portcullis gates, designed by artist Wendy Ramshaw. The building achieved an ‘Excellent’ rating by BREEAM.

Location:

London, UK

Size: 5000 m² Completion:

Completed


Stanislavsky Centre The multi award-winning Stanislavsky Centre project in Moscow set a new benchmark for innovative, adaptive re-use of historic buildings in Russia. Originally developed by one of Russia’s leading 19th-century industrialists and cultural patrons, the Stanislavsky family, the site includes a theatre, built by Konstantin Stanislavsky, famed as the originator of the Method acting system. This theatre, which hosted the first performance of Chekhov’s ‘Cherry Orchard’ in 1904, is now once again one of Moscow’s leading alternative cultural venues. As part of his role as Historic Buildings Unit at John McAslan and Partners, Mark Cannata developed the repair strategy for all the historic buildings and contributed to the design of the original theatre, whilst Francis Scott was responsible for the new-build apartments blocks on the site.

Location:

Moscow, Russia

Size: 20000 m² Completion:

Completed


Tiffany & Co. From 1999 to 2001, Mark Cannata worked as Executive Architect for the new Tiffany and Co. stores in Milan (pictured) and Rome. Working in close collaboration with the design architects and the construction team, Mark helped deliver two luxury stores in historic buildings in the fashion districts of the two cities.

Location:

Milan, Italy

Size: 200 m² Completion:

Completed


3 The Terrace Originally built in 1767 and attributed to Sir Robert Taylor, one of the most influential architects of the Georgian period, the building had fallen into disrepair and was deemed to be at risk. Mark Cannata, then at specialist Conservation practice Roger Mears Architects, was project architect and conservation architect and worked in close collaboration with the Italian practice Sottsass Associati, who were designing the custom-made furniture and fittings. The project involved extensive conservative repair throughout the building and the reinstatement of original surfaces, colour scheme, supported by intensive research, as well as the creation of imaginative new spaces to house the new insertions.

Location:

Richmond, UK

Size: 200 m² Completion:

Completed


A sustainable outlook Forty percent of all energy generated goes towards constructing, heating, lighting, cooling and powering buildings. Buildings, then, should be part of the solution to the energy/ environmental problems society now faces. If architecture is looking for a new agenda or manifesto on which to base an aesthetic – the 21st century equivalent of Modernism, for example - then sustainability surely provides the momentum for a new language and approach. Buildings should be entirely responsive to their sites, while architects should deploy the fullest range of techniques and materials to ensure that the buildings they create behave efficiently, sustainably and responsibly. We are also aware that society has lost a considerable amount of knowledge in the name of progress; people managed to live comfortably in extreme conditions for many centuries by deploying simple building techniques, and ZeroZero is seeking to recover some of that expertise. The careful use of massing, volumes and natural materials can provide many of the solutions we need, if only we can fully master them again. Nature, too, offers many answers.

ZeroZero put environmental performance at the heart of its work ethic before green issues became mainstream concerns. We do not regard sustainability purely as a research project. There is much we are doing right now. Every one of our offices champions sustainable issues –in order to maximise the potential for sustainability in their projects, and that high standards are met under the UK’s BREEAM regime and the US LEED system (for which Mark Cannata is a “Green Associate”). The practice is also working towards the goal to secure accreditation under ISO 14001, the international environmental management standard. As well as designing sustainable buildings, we seek to practice sustainably. The fit-out of our new offices, for example, has been achieved through using non-toxic paints, recycled tiles and sheep’s wool insulation.

Our clients are becoming increasingly sympathetic to the environmental agenda – not least because a building designed with sustainability in mind can lead to lower running costs and higher comfort levels. Also, part of our mission is to prove the case that sustainable architecture need not be expensive. Rather than a bolt-on extra, environmentally responsible design is an important strand within our design methodology. It is embedded in the way we think. It is part of our attitude.


ITALY t +39 331 9833010 Corso Umberto 49 | 97015 | Modica | RG NEW ZEALAND t +64 (0)22 092 1228 PO Box 37984 | Parnell | Auckland | 1151 UNITED KINGDOM t +44 (0)7855 746603 23 Croftlands | Bradford |West Yorkshire | BD10 8RW www.zerozero.co

ZeroZero_projects+research  
ZeroZero_projects+research  
Advertisement