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Journey – A Magazine by Hawker Beechcraft EMEA Digital Edition available on the iPad Issue 01

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Digital Journey Available on iPad

Welcome to Hawker Beechcraft Magazine Your Journey Starts Here…

With the new Apple iPad 2 having launched in March 2011, there is no denying that digital publishing is here to stay. For Hawker Beechcraft, it makes absolute sense to create a digital version of our new magazine – we can add dynamic content whilst reaching a far wider global audience of clients, enthusiasts and partners at the same time.

Welcome to the first issue of Hawker Beechcraft EMEA Journey magazine. I’m sure you’ll find it a lively and informative read. At Hawker Beechcraft we especially value the long-term relationships we build with our customers, suppliers and partners. Journey gives us new ways of keeping you up-to-date from a regional perspective including company and product news, as well as entertaining you with intelligent content and design from an award-winning team.

‘Journey’ magazine is available to download for FREE via the Apple iTunes store. The magazine does have dynamic content, so you can choose whether to download the entire issue, or simply stream as you read. However you decide to view this content, we hope you enjoy it and please feel free to email us with any comments. The second digital issue of Journey will also be available on Android.

The change is more than skin deep: right across the full range of our activities we are further improving our delivery on innovation, performance, cost of ownership and reliability. Everything we do is driven by our determination to understand your requirements and exceed your expectations.

You will find features on Yuri Gagarin, scuba diving in the Antarctic and our new King-Air 250. Although the selection is varied, there’s a single theme that you may notice. We are changing the face of our company to give you – our owners, operators and partners – a better understanding of what we can do for you.

Journey is part of that process. I hope you enjoy taking the trip from cover to cover, but my aim is to make this a two-way exchange. So, in future editions we’ll keep you informed of our exciting new product plans and, in return, I’d certainly value your comments and suggestions on any aspect of our activities. You can drop me a line at presidentEMEA@hawkerbeechcraft.com – I look forward to hearing from you.

Sean McGeough President, EMEA

editorEMEA@hawkerbeechcraft.com

Summer 2011 Events for your diary Follow Us! We’re on Twitter

EBACE

17th – 19th May

Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland

Aero Expo (Bitburg)

27th – 29th May

Bitburg Airport, Germany

Euravia

09th – 11th June

Cannes, France

Continuing with the digital news, you can now follow Hawker Beechcraft on Twitter. This is a valuable resource for news and views from Hawker Beechcraft and you can follow us by going to: twitter.com/HBCnews

Aero Expo (Sywell)

17th – 19th June

Sywell Aerodrome, UK

Paris Air Show

20th – 26th June

Paris, France

MAKS International Aviation & Space Salon 16th – 21st August

Zhukovsky, Moscow, Russia

Jet Expo Moscow

Business Aviation Centre, Moscow

15th – 17th September


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Bruce Smith Photographer

J O U R N E Y L AU N C H

Bruce is an international fashion photographer with a distinguished career that has spanned over 30 years. His editorial and advertising images have been published in many consumer and custom publishing magazines. In this issue Bruce shot our fashion feature (page 62) at Claridge’s, with stylist Sarah Nash – the former Fashion Editor of The Sunday Telegraph’s ‘Stella’ fashion magazine.

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Journey – A Magazine by Hawker Beechcraft EMEA Digital Edition available on the iPad Issue 01

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Cover: James Paterson The cover image shows our international travellers with a Hawker 4000 at Farnborough Airport in the UK – just returning from their journey. The painting was created by James Paterson and his work can be found here… www.james-paterson.co.uk

Jonathan Bell Architecture Editor Jonathan is a design writer and editor. Since 2005 he has been wallpaper* magazine’s Architecture Editor. He has contributed to numerous books and magazines, including Blueprint, Architectural Design, Crafts and V&A Magazine. His books include ‘Penthouse Living’, ‘Concept Cars’, ‘The 21st Century House’ and ‘The New Modern House: Redefining Functionalism’, published in October 2010 by Laurence King. Journey Magazine is published on behalf of Hawker Beechcraft Corporation by Zero Collective. For all publishing and advertising enquiries, please contact: ZERO COLLECTIVE Barn B2 ARC Progress Beckerings Park Road Ridgmont Bedfordshire MK43 0RD United Kingdom T: +44 (0)1525 288 134 F: +44 (0)1525 280 257 E: hello@zerocollective.co.uk www.zerocollective.com twitter.com/zerocollective www.hawkerbeechcraft.com

Patrick Jephson Editor In more than a decade as a writer and broadcaster, Patrick has built a reputation for creating high-quality, entertaining material with an emphasis on the unusual. As both a New York Times bestseller and a qualified private pilot, he firmly believes that writing and aeroplanes are an inspiring combination. He regularly writes and speaks about the world of private aviation and his by-line as reporter and feature-writer has appeared in many British and European publications including The Times, The Sunday Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian, The Spectator, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Stern. editorEMEA@hawkerbeechcraft.com

Hawker Beechcraft Editorial Team

Contributors

SEAN McGEOUGH President EMEA

PATRICK JEPHSON JONATHAN BELL JAKE TOWNSEND AARON WEDDELL BRUCE SMITH KATY INGRAM ELINE FEENSTRA RENE LIPMAN EDDY BUTTARELLI TIM SKELTON JAMES PATERSON

RICHARD THOMAS Strategic Marketing Director EMEA FAYE GOODYEAR Marketing Communications Manager EMEA Zero Collective Key Team Members PAUL DEDMAN Creative Director JAMES DALE Art Director NINA MAYER-SCHEIBEL Account Director RICHARD BEARD Digital Director RODNEY DEDMAN Advertising Sales Director JEFF PETTITT Print Management

SARAH NASH IAN McINTOSH STEVE KORVER RENÉ NUIJENS LUKE JAMES Special thanks to IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM HBC ARCHIVE GETTY IMAGES

Print All paper supplied by Antalis McNaughton. Main text pages: Challenger Offset Range pages: Novatech Matt www.antalis.co.uk Advertising Please direct all enquiries through rod@zerocollective.co.uk

©COPYRIGHT 2011 HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION. All material strictly copyright and all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior permission of Zero Collective and/or Hawker Beechcraft Corporation is strictly forbidden. All content believed to be correct at time of going to print. The views expressed are not necessarily those of Zero Collective or Hawker Beechcraft Corporation. Hawker Beechcraft Corporation does not officially endorse any advertising materials or editorials for third party products included in this publication. DATA PROTECTION STATEMENT. Hawker Beechcraft Corporation respects the privacy of every individual that receives the ‘JOURNEY’ magazine. Any information collected about you will be used to fulfil the delivery of the magazine, for readership profiling purposes and for further marketing of Hawker Beechcraft products and events. We do this by making appropriate use of the information. This information will not be disclosed to anyone outside of Hawker Beechcraft, its affiliated or associated companies, its agencies, dealers, partners or licensees. It will be treated in accordance with the relevant legal provisions concerning data protection and may be stored and processed inside or outside the European Union anywhere in the world. You have the right as an individual to find out what information we hold about you and make corrections if necessary; you also have the right to ask us not to use the information. We will make all practical efforts to respect your wishes.


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Service Centre Welcome to Chester Hawker Beechcraft Service Centre in Chester, UK, is more than just a state-of-the-art maintenance facility. It’s also a place of legendary aeronautical significance, birthplace of aviation icons including the very first of the Hawker jet dynasty. It attracts a suitably discriminating class of customer, from royalty and governments to NetJets Europe. Being co-located with the factory where major components of today’s Hawkers are built, the Centre draws on a pool of talent that guarantees a unique level of product knowledge. Generations of local people have added to Chester’s special character – and to the handcrafted quality of the aircraft they have sent into the world’s skies.

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Hawker Heritage A Tradition Of Design Excellence

Lotus T125 This is the Exos Experience by Lotus

Icy Depths Diving at The World’s End in Antarctica

Hurricane, Hunter, Harrier, HS125… all aircraft that have flown into aviation immortality – and all part of Hawker’s rich heritage. From Harry Hawker’s first pioneering trans-Atlantic flight, through the golden age of biplanes to the aerial battlefields of the Second World War and the jet trailblazers of the ’fifties, this tribute brings the story right up to the present day. The design genius of Sir Sydney Camm and the heroism of wartime aces add a rare lustre to one of the greatest brand names in aeronautical history. It’s a history that’s still being written: the latest composite Hawker 4000 and its elegant sister jets can all claim an ancestry that’s pure aviation aristocracy.

Despite efforts from other manufacturers in recent years, driving a Formula 1 car has since remained a concept. Until now. With the T125, Lotus is now enabling customers to live this dream and drive their very own F1 inspired race car. Powered by a Cosworth 3.5 litre V8 engine and 640bhp, the Lotus T125 is limited to 25 examples and can be further personalised with bespoke livery. As an elite club, The Exos Experience by Lotus provides access to first class European race circuits and expert advice from Jean Alesi and Nigel Mansell. Owners can also improve on personal mental and physical fitness and enrol in an F1 level fitness programme…

Flying into the world’s most southern airport to go diving in icy waters is a dangerous adventure. With less than one percent not covered in ice, the Antarctic is certainly the world’s coldest and driest continent and not necessarily known as a diving and snorkelling destination. But with a wealth of underwater flora and fauna, over 300 algae species and a good chance for a close experience with leopard seals, penguins and whales it’s certainly one of the most exciting ones.

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Fashion Claridges, Mayfair The stunning Piano Suite by Diane von Furstenberg at Claridge’s with its bold patterns and strong colours was the perfect location for this elegant fashion shoot styled by Sarah Nash. Staying at one of London’s most opulent and luxurious hotels, Claridge’s provided the perfect combination of glamour and comfort for a busy schedule in and around this fascinating city. As part of our ongoing relationship with Claridge’s, ‘Journey’ readers are being offered a special VIP offer – see page 10 for Booking Details and Terms and Conditions.

Mille Miglia Still The Worlds Finest Road Race Once seen as an event to demonstrate the latest automotive developments to future motorists, the Mille Miglia has turned from a premier event in the early years of the World Sportscar Championship into the most prestigious classic car driving event in the world. It’s a highly selective presentation of rare historic cars and a must for every vintage car enthusiast if your pre-1957 automobile is one of the 375 chosen to attend. There are around 800 applications each year including rare models from Bugatti, Alfa, Ferrari, Maserati and Aston Martin as well as the famous Mercedes-Benz Gullwing and 300 SL. Drivers include racing legend Sir Jacky Stewart, Mika Häkkinen and David Coulthard but the race is inherently won by Italians…


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iPad in the sky Apple device used to navigate the skies?

Introducing the King Air 250…

The most interesting thing you can do on your iPad is, of course, to read Journey Magazine, but you soon may be using the tablet to navigate aircraft. Lufthansa have recently announced that a group of their pilots are testing the iPad for use as a navigational tool in the cockpit.

Hawker Beechcraft products are renowned for their stylish design and high-quality finish. But with the advent of the new King Air 250, there’s a reminder that some models are specifically intended for quick-change multirole operations in the harshest environments. Equally effective as luxurious VIP transport or humanitarian supplies airlifter, the 250 also delivers industry-leading fuel economy

Earlier this year, Executive Jet Management, a subsidiary of NetJets, announced that the FAA had approved that company’s sole use of the iPad for navigation and reference both on the ground and in the air. Apple’s device is already in use at Southwest Airlines, where ground personnel use the device for ground operations including tracking maintenance.

with operating costs of just $3.08 per mile. Disaster-relief and air-ambulance missions dramatically demonstrate the 250’s remarkable toughness and versatility. In crisishit communities all over the world, the 250’s power, agility and cargo-capacity have already proved its worth as an essential helpmate to the unsung heroes who bring hope and help to those most in need.

Hawker Beechcraft VIP Special Book Best Available Rate at time of booking and receive: – Complimentary upgrade on arrival to the next room category, subject to availability – Welcome bottle of champagne – Daily Continental breakfast

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How To Book: Hawker Beechcraft VIPs should call our reservations team on +44(0)20 7107 8830 or email reservations@maybourne.com and quote “Hawker Beechcraft VIP Special”.

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Terms & Conditions: Rates are exclusive of 20% VAT and 5% discretionary service charge. Rates are subject to availability. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer or negotiated rate. Applies to new bookings. Valid at Claridge’s, the Connaught and the Berkeley until 31 December 2011.

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‘Green’ Jet Fuel Though it may sound like an oxymoron akin to a “down escalator”, Green Jet Fuel – jet fuel produced from plant-based sources – is now a reality. Developed by Honeywell UOP Corporation under a grant from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the American Military’s research wing responsible for the technologies behind GPS and the Stealth Fighter, this ground breaking jet fuel is produced from sustainable feed stocks including camelina, jatropha and algae; all of which do not compete with the human food chain. Meant to be mixed with traditional jet fuel, Green Jet Fuel requires no mechanical modifications to the aircraft and shows no measurable effect on aircraft performance. The fuel was successfully put to its first commercial test on a recent Interjet Airbus A320-214 flight from Mexico City to Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas using jatropha-derived Green Jet Fuel combined with traditional petroleum based jet fuel. The fuel is expected to be commercially available by 2012.

HBC London Boutique Gallery opens in Mayfair

VIP Reader Offer Available at Claridge’s, the Connaught and the Berkeley To celebrate the launch of our new ‘Gallery’ opening this year, we have negotiated a special VIP offer for our readers at Claridge’s, the Connaught and the Berkeley.

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01 Linley Suite at Claridge’s in Mayfair 02 Coburg Bar at the Connaught 03 Berkeley Suite at the Berkeley

Hanimaadhoo Airport Concept Beautiful airport worthy of the Maldives The Maldives is among the most beautiful places on earth and this extraordinary island nation just may be getting one of the most aesthetically striking airports the world has ever known. The Hanimaadhoo Airport concept, developed in a joint effort by Norway’s Narud Stokke Wiig Architects, in collaboration with London-based Haptic Architects, seeks to simultaneously create a sustainable transportation hub that works in concert with the land and an alternative airport to the existing Male International Airport located on the main island. The main terminal, an undulating form of wood and glass, will sit away from the runway in a small lagoon, connected to the jetway via a bridge that spans the electric blue ocean that has made the Maldives an unparalleled holiday destination. The concept sets aside a parcel at the southern tip of the proposed site for the future inclusion of hotels, resorts and retail.

In our globalised world, there are very few products heretofore unavailable to the retail consumer – though private aircraft wasn’t one of them – until now. In what is an industryleading evolution in private aviation, Hawker Beechcraft recently opened its doors to the general public via its first retail showroom: the Hawker Beechcraft Gallery. Located in London’s landmark Claridge’s Hotel in the heart of Mayfair, the retail space will feature interactive presentations of the full Hawker Beechcraft range of private aircraft, including the Hawker 4000, widely known as the world’s most advanced business jet. Sean McGeough, Hawker Beechcraft President of Europe, Middle East and Africa, says: “We have a lengthy pedigree as one of the UK’s most advanced manufacturing companies, meeting the needs of clients who rightly demand the most rigorous attention to detail. As a result of conversations with our customers, we have created an on the ground presence in London, in an establishment which has the same heritage.” Staffed by a specialised team of Hawker Beechcraft trained sales personnel, the HBC Gallery will remove complexity from the purchase of a private jet. Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7408 5080


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01 01 Hawker 800 extensive fuselage repairs 02 Routine maintenance inspection

Service Centre Welcome to Chester

03 HBS Chester 04 HBS engineer performing Pitot – Static system checks

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There was once an airline ad campaign which promised its customers “only the aeroplane gets more attention than you.” That subliminal association of attentive cabin crew with diligent - if slightly oil-stained - engineers presumably hoped to fulfil a deep human desire to be both loved and protected. Fifty years later we may all be a bit more blasé about nudging Mach 1 while the ice-cubes clink in our glass…but we still need to be reassured that people who absolutely know what they’re doing have devoted the necessary tender loving care to our beautiful flying machine. And then some. Of course, today’s Hawker owners and operators have a wide selection of service centres from which to choose, every one of which can field a perfectly-qualified team of plane doctors. But for some people, just keeping the maintenance records up to date isn’t quite enough. Perhaps they’ve been flying Hawkers for forty years and want to be sure their latest airborne investment is in familiar hands. Or perhaps they are new customers who wouldn’t entrust their pride and joy to strangers any more than they’d let the village garage tinker with their Aston Martin. For these people, there is Chester. Chester – also known as Hawarden - has been a centre of aviation innovation and excellence for more than 70 years. Drawn from the towns and countryside for miles around, the workforce came to invest their skills and dedication in

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“ What we offer is ultimate product knowledge” says Customer Experience Manager Stuart McNeilis. By which he means that the service technicians at Hawker’s European HQ know all their products inside out. Like the backs of their hands. That’s because Stuart and his colleagues learned their trade building the world’s best midsize business jets in the factory right next to the service centre. Piece by piece. With their own hands. As craftsmen always have.

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the manufacture of iconic aeroplanes, in war and in peace. In this part of the world, where north Wales meets northwest England, you might say aerospace is in the blood. This was the birthplace of the de Havilland 125, founder of a business jet dynasty to which the latest flagship Hawker 4000 can trace its direct ancestry. This is the place chosen by Hawker Beechcraft’s EMEA region to build the cornerstone of its entire customer support operation with a major investment in facilities, inventory and human capital. From here centralised standards are devolved through a hub and spoke system to 22 factory owned- and authorised service centres – more than any other manufacturer. It’s a system that empowers personnel in the field to apply Chester-quality service to every corner of the operation. It also puts the expertise closer to where customers are most likely to need it – out in the real world where time is money and an AOG needs to be fixed PDQ. The logistics back-up is equally impressive. With a $10m parts holding, strategically divided between London, Dubai and Singapore supply lines are short and dependable. Combined with a region-wide partnership with Execujet and an expanded team of quick-response Field Service Representatives, it all works together to get aircraft back in the air faster than ever before. 06

“ These days our equipment and procedures are state-of-the-art. But we’ve kept our best traditions. I could show you the statistics about how we compete with the best on efficiency, cost and downtime. What really makes the job worthwhile, though, is welcoming back a familiar aircraft and sending it out again, as good as new.”

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He smiles at the memory of the birds that have flown his nest. And just for a moment a whisper of history flits among the lines of gleaming jets…

Like everything else at Chester, the quality of customer support benefits from a blend that mixes the best traditions of the past with the latest in technical capability. It’s probably no coincidence therefore that the most discriminating customers – such as the British Ministry of Defence (including Royal and VIP units) and NetJets Europe – make Chester their first-choice service centre. Clive Prentice oversees the whole operation with a benign but expert eye. As Vice President & General Manager EMEA Operations, Global Customer Support he has master-minded a comprehensive overhaul and re-focusing of the entire organisation. So of course, he’s well-versed in the latest terminology. But to him, the secret of Chester’s success owes nothing to marketing jargon and everything to the people who carry forward its proud traditions. It’s a place whose reputation has been built by the oldest and still the best brand-enhancement tool in the book. You might say it’s as old as the pretty Welsh hills that rise to the west of the airfield: it’s simply “word of mouth.” People say Chester is the best for Hawker maintenance, engineering, repair and even special mission modifications. It’s worth making a visit to find out why. Oh, and they also make a great cup of tea… 07

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06 Major airframe repairs 07 Nose bay inspections 08 HBS engineer carrying out area inspections on Hawker wing / fuselage


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02 01 Harry Hawker 02 The 4000 is the latest chapter in the fascinating heritage that is associated with the Hawker brand 03 Three Hawker Hunter F1s of 43 Squadron RAF in a verticle climb, high above the clouds

Hawker Heritage A Tradition Of Design Excellence Patrick Jephson takes a look back over the HBC Archives – all images are copyright Hawker Beechcraft and Imperial War Museum.

On your next transatlantic flight, take a moment to glance out of the window at the ocean far below. Then imagine how it must have looked to Australian Harry Hawker and his navigator Kenneth Mackenzie-Grieve as they prepared to ditch their stricken Sopwith biplane Atlantic into the waves. The year was 1919 and the pioneers were hoping to claim the Daily Mail’s £10,000 prize for the first non-stop flight between North America and Europe – a prize successfully secured just a few weeks later by John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown in their converted Vickers Vimy bomber. Fortunately for the future of the Hawker aerospace dynasty, the Atlantic stayed in the air long enough for Harry to find a passing steamship, aboard which the would-be record-breakers eventually reached dry land six days later. In recognition of their bravery, the Daily Mail was moved to award them a consolation prize of £5,000. After such a narrow escape from a watery tomb, lesser men might have given up on aeroplanes as an occupation. But not Harry Hawker. Within a year he had joined with Tommy Sopwith and two other investors to found H G Hawker Engineering Ltd. Thus began the lineage from which all Hawker jets can trace their aristocratic ancestry. Alas, Harry himself did not survive to see his name fly into aviation’s hall of fame. Hardly had the new company been formed than he was killed in a plane crash at Hendon, North London. Hendon is now home to the Royal Air Force Museum where great Hawker aircraft are preserved to inspire future generations – and remind us that today’s

cheerful expectation that we’ll fly the Atlantic with dry feet has been bought at a heavy price. Undeterred by his violent death, the company founded by Harry survived and prospered. True, its aircraft naming policy wouldn’t win any prizes from modern corporate image gurus, featuring as it did such delights as the Hedgehog, the Hornbill and the Danecock. However, Hawker Aircraft Ltd (as it became in 1933) was soon in the business of serious brand acquisition. One by one it gathered under its wing many of the iconic names of British inter-war aviation: Gloster, Armstrong Siddeley, Armstrong Whitworth and A. V Roe & Co. Ultimately, in 1935, the merged company was renamed Hawker Siddeley – a brand that itself endured right up to the formation of British Aerospace in 1977. However, back in the mid ’thirties, it was decided that Hawker Siddeley’s constituent companies would continue to manufacture under their own names. Little could they have known that, in the coming conflict, many of their products would win aviation immortality. On the drawing boards and in the factories of the Hawker Siddeley group, aircraft were being conceived that would make the difference between victory and defeat. Even today, their names carry the resonance of mythology: Typhoon, Tempest, Lancaster, Meteor. Hurricane. So often overlooked in favour of its more glamorous sister the Spitfire, it was nevertheless the

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05 04 Squadron Leader Stanford Tuck DSO DFC CO of 257 Squadron, Royal Air Force seated in his Hawker Hurricane at Martlesham Heath, Suffolk 05 Fleet Air Arm Hawker Sea Hurricanes operating from Yeovilton, flying in formation

06 06 Inside the hangar of HMS AVENGER, showing the lift bringing down a Hawker Sea Hurricane of 802 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm from the deck 07 Three Hawker Hurricane Mark Is of No. 73 Squadron RAF, based at Rouvres, form an attack in line astern of the target aircraft

“ I climbed, dived, looped, rolled, stalled, spun and did everything I knew with it – I became aware of its virtues. The Hurricane was solid and it was obvious she’d take a lot of punishment. She was as steady as a rock, even going fast downhill, and was a very impressive gun platform, having good forward visibility. The two banks of four guns were mounted closely together, each just firing clear of the propeller arc. She hardly shuddered when the eight Brownings blasted off…” Squadron Leader Stanford Tuck recounts his first time in a Hurricane P4190 with 257 Squadron ‘Burma Boys’

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Hurricane and her air and ground crews which deserve the most laurels. During the Battle of Britain in the fateful summer of 1940, Hurricanes accounted for more than 55% of all enemy aircraft destroyed – more than all other fighter and ground defences combined. First flown from the famous Brooklands race circuit and airfield in 1935, the Hurricane earned praise for its docile handling, its stability as a gun platform and its dog-fightwinning tight turning circle. Add its toughness - one pilot counted 28 cannon shell hits and 43 bullet holes on his Hurricane which nevertheless carried him safely back to base – and it’s easy to see why the Hawker design won the respect of its enemies and the affection of so many of its pilots. Roland Beamont (1922 – 2007) – later to become a Hawker test-pilot – was an early admirer: “Then, with tail trimmer set, throttle and mixture lever fully forward...and puffs of grey exhaust smoke soon clearing at maximum r.p.m. came the surprise! There was no sudden surge of acceleration, but with a thunderous roar from the exhausts just ahead on either side of the windscreen, only a steady increase in speed… My Hurricane was never hit in the Battles of France and Britain and in over 700 hours on type I never experienced an engine failure.” Such was its versatility that the Hurricane went on to serve successfully in the ground-attack role and even, catapulted with insane bravery from merchant ships, as convoy escort. In total, more than 14,500 Hurricanes were built before production ceased in 1944. This total included


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of a tradition of passenger aeroplanes that rivals any on the planet.

08 Mr A W Bedford, chief test pilot of Hawker Aircraft Ltd, being welcomed on board HMS ARK ROYAL by Commander A R Rawbone, after he had made the first ever vertical landing on an aircraft carrier at sea by a jet aircraft, the Hawker P1127.

Of all the forebears of the present company, none evokes more romance than de Havilland. Acquired by Hawker Siddeley in 1960, de Havilland added to the group a history of thoroughbreds that included pre-war classics such as the Tiger Moth, the wartime “wooden wonder” the Mosquito and post-war pioneers such as the world’s first trans-Atlantic jet airliner the Comet and the elegant Trident, first airliner to make fullyautomatic landings. Always on the leading edge of innovation, de Havilland already had plans for the world’s first purpose-built corporate communications jet. Conceived as a replacement

for the Dove piston-powered 8-seat feederliner – itself the replacement for the 1930’s vintage Dragon – the de Havilland DH 125 “Jet Dragon” was the first business jet to be designed and constructed by a manufacturer of full-scale airliners. Today’s Hawkers still have that unique lineage - including the latest of the breed, the 4000, which is the world’s first composite super-midsize business jet. Now Hawker flies high again, this time in close formation with its equally-historic Beechcraft partner. Boasting isn’t their style but, in an echo of brave Harry Hawker, they might justifiably be called the first and still the best. It’s a claim that could sound pretentious… unless of course you have the history to back it up.

09 09 The de Havilland DH 125 was the first business jet to be designed by a manufacturer of full-scale airliners 10 The Hawker 4000 is the latest in the generation

Hurricanes which flew for other European air arms including those of Romania, Poland, Belgium, France, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, Turkey, Portugal, Yugoslavia and Norway. Any tribute to the Hurricane would be incomplete without mention of its designer – Sir Sydney Camm (1893 – 1966). In the space of a single career, Camm graduated from designing simple wooden gliders, through streamlined biplanes and World War II fighters to post-war jets such as the Hunter and the Harrier. Not surprisingly, his staff held him in awe. As one recalled: “Camm had a one-track mind – his aircraft were right and everybody had to work on them to get them right. If they did not, then there was hell. He was a very difficult man to work for, but you could not have a better aeronautical engineer to work under. With regard to his own staff, he did not suffer fools gladly and at times many of us appeared to be fools. One rarely got into trouble for doing something either in the ideas line, or in the manufacturing line, but woe betide those who did nothing, or who put forward an indeterminate solution.” Camm’s genius runs like a thread through the Hawker story. His 1944 Sea Fury, the pinnacle of piston fighter design, has the rare distinction of being a propeller plane credited with a jet “kill” – a Mig-15 downed by Lt Peter Carmichael, Royal Navy, in the Korean War. To this day, Camm’s thunderous masterpiece can be seen and heard powering around the racing circuit at Reno, Nevada.

Camm seems to have mastered the aerodynamics of the jet age as readily as those of the Edwardian era, when he had designed a man-carrying glider just nine years after the Wright brothers’ first flight. Four decades later his sublime Hawker Hunter took the world speed record in the hands of the legendary Neville Duke – a Hawker test pilot from the heroic age of supersonic research. The Hunter was another Hawker export success story, flying in peace and war with customers in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and beyond including Abu Dhabi, Belgium, Denmark, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, the Lebanon, the Netherlands, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sweden, Switzerland and Zimbabwe. Some examples are reported still to be active to this day. The last of Camm’s creations perhaps carries more sentimental payload than any since the Hurricane. The Hawker Harrier was the world’s first – and still its only – operational V/STOL combat aircraft. But it was also the last truly British fighter, signing off with a record of airto-air and air-to-ground successes that stand comparison with any of its illustrious predecessors. Inevitably, with life-and-death its daily currency, aerial warfare steals much of the limelight from its peace-loving commercial counterpart. But here too, the Hawker story contributes more than its fair share to the vivid tapestry of manned flight. Through its complex evolution of mergers and takeovers, today’s Hawker Beechcraft is the inheritor

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Lotus T125 Introducing the ultra-exclusive Exos Experience by Lotus

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IN CELEBRATION OF THE EXCLUSIVE NEW PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN HAWkER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION AND gROUP LOTUS, RECEIVE A LOTUS ROAD CAR WITH ANY HAWkER BEECHCRAFT AIRCRAFT PURCHASED BETWEEN 17 MAY AND 30 JUNE 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CALL +44 (0)1244.523.803 OR EMAIL LOTUSPARTNERSHIP@HAWkERBEECHCRAFT.COM

01 Lotus T125 testing at Yas Marina. 02 The T125 is a carbon composite super-light racer with nearly 1,000 bhp per tonne.

Lotus Evora

Terms and Conditions apply. Offer valid in Europe, the Middle East and Africa through 30 June 2011 for Hawker Beechcraft turbine purchases. ©2011 Hawker Beechcraft Corporation. All rights reserved. Hawker and Beechcraft are trademarks of Hawker Beechcraft Corporation.

With design echoing that of the latest generation of F1 cars, the Lotus T125 is a visually arresting spectacle and the beauty of this machine is more than skin deep with a whole host of innovative technology and superlative engineering beneath the evocative lines. Lotus’ core philosophy has consistently been one of weight saving and the T125 takes this to new levels with a bespoke carbon composite with nomex and aluminium core chassis, carbon composite panels resulting in a weight of just 560kg. The Cosworth 3.5 litre V8 engine is linked to a six-speed semi-automatic gearbox with paddle-shift and 640bhp is transmitted to the rear wheels, endowing the T125 with peerless performance and a phenomenal power to weight ratio of nearly 1,000 hp per tonne. Although a highly limited and desirable vehicle, purchasers of the Lotus T125 will be able to personalise their car further with a selection from a stylisation of a classic Lotus livery, the Exos concept design, or as an option, request their own, bespoke livery.

Lotus T125 At A Glance: Engine Configuration: Cosworth 90º V8 Location:

Mid, longitudinally mounted

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6-speed semi-auto paddle shift, rear-wheel drive

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3.5 litre / 213.6 cu in

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4 valves / cylinder, DOHC

Aspiration:

Naturally Aspirated

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640 bhp / 477 KW

BHP/Litre:

183 bhp / litre


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06 06 French F1 legend, Jean Alesi, is the Exos Experience ambassador for Lotus Motorsport 07 James Rossiter testing the car at Yas Marina

“ I’m particularly passionate about anything that brings people closer to the racing action and the Type 125 does exactly that, it’s the ultimate race experience.” Jean Alesi

Exos = Exosphere - a reference to the Earth’s outer atmosphere - the exosphere - where space begins and G-forces lessen, where atoms are on ballistic trajectories and the lightest gases including atomic oxygen reside.

03 Legendary Formula One World Champion, Nigel Mansell is part of the development team for Exos

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04 James Rossiter is the lead test and development driver for the Lotus T125 05 Lotus T125 uses F1™ technology

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The Exos Experience by Lotus Much of the anticipation generated by the project is on account of the car itself, one only has to take the most cursory of glances at the images and specification to see why. Yet unlike superficially similar projects from other hyper-car manufacturers, the Exos Experience is not simply a case of gaining the advantage on track through the engineering and technology of the machinery itself. The Exos Experience is an elite club, one in which the fortunate few Lotus 125 owner drivers can refine their driving skills and challenge themselves in Formula 1 inspired technology fused with expert one-to-one advice from former Grand Prix drivers and trainers. The racing concierge service extends beyond improving your lines and refining braking points through to perfecting vehicle set-up alongside a race engineer and an innovative focus on the mental and physical fitness of the driver. An F1 level fitness programme incorporates nutrition, strength and fitness training alongside driver tuition from former Lotus Forumula1 drivers with a view to honing skills and extracting your full personal potential as well as that of the 125. The extensive offering also covers assisting with travel arrangements, transfers to the track and any documentation and/or specialist member requests enabling you to concentrate purely on the business of driving. When F1 luminary Jean Alesi states ‘it’s the ultimate race experience’ you need not query his credentials.

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Just as the racing greats involved in the Exos Experience had to prove themselves week-to-week on Grand Prix tracks around the world, Exos members will experience first class European circuits, including the famous Paul Ricard Circuit, France, and the Autódromo do Algarve, Portugal. Not only will owner drivers test their mettle in conditions similar to the most demanding race proven circuits in motorsport but thanks to Lotus’ sophisticated data-gathering systems they’ll also be able to compete with past and present heroes through data comparison of lap times, racing lines, entry and exit speeds and terminal velocity. Each of the events will be structured to enable the driver to sharpen their skills allowing them to develop as a more complete driver and experience a near facsimile of a Grand Prix weekend with Lotus’ team of driver coaches, technicians and physiotherapists at their service. The ultimate challenge set by the Exos Experience is to enter an atmosphere shaped by the world of Formula One – a place of meticulous attention to detail and precision combined with the utmost efficiency and quality. The experience will immerse the driver in automotive performance and engineering exactitude, surrounded by a team of Lotus experts, each driven in their field, each respected for their ability to make the car/driver package as close to perfection as possible. The Exos Experience by Lotus truly provides a thrillingly unique opportunity.


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into a stable base for major buildings. First up is the Zayed National Museum, a monumental structure dedicated to the ‘life and person’ of the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, who founded the United Arab Emirates in the early 1970s. The building, by Foster and Partners, will be topped by five towers inspired by the wingtips of a falcon (falconry has a long history in the Gulf states and was one of Sheikh Zayed’s favourite pastimes). The museum combines this overt symbolism with high-tech energysaving underpinnings, in common with other Foster projects in the region.

01 Louvre Abu Dhabi by Jean Nouvel

The Zayed will stand alongside the new Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. Rather than commission a striking building simply to house artworks from the expansive Solomon R.Guggenheim Foundation, the GAD is a stand-alone institution, a chaotic tumble of forms set on its own artificial promontory. Designed by the Canadian Frank Gehry, it represents not just the peak of the 82-year old architect’s career but also of the idea of the museum as catalyst for a region. For the GAD is committed to commissioning, not just display, becoming a focal point for new artistic work.

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02 The vision that is Saadiyat Island 03 Manarat Al Saadiyat 04 View from South of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi

Saadiyat Island Architects Create Cultural Oasis Jonathan Bell looks at the ambitious and rather exciting Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi, UAE.

The idea of the grand museum complex as a major piece of urban fabric has plenty of historical precedent. Berlin’s Museum Island dates back to the early 19th Century, while the Albertopolis cluster in London’s South Kensington grew out of the 1851 Great Exhibition in nearby Hyde Park. In Washington DC, the Beaux Arts behemoths that line the National Mall form one of the world’s largest cultural zones. As the twentieth century progressed, fine art, natural history and science were forced to take a back seat to the means of presentation, as a new age of museum architecture ushered in an entirely separate phenomenon; the building a spectacle in itself. In the Gulf, such highly expressive architecture has become a valuable commodity. It is modern buildings that are the symbols of the region, rather than the landscape itself. Nowhere is this more evident than in the UAE, where one of the world’s largest construction sites is forming the groundwork for what will eventually become, circa 2020,

‘the world’s largest single concentration of premier cultural institutions’. This is Sim City-style nation building. Starting from scratch on the triangular chunk of a sandy peninsula, due north east of Abu Dhabi, Saadiyat Island is being driven by Abu Dhabi’s Tourism Authority and overseen by the Tourism Development & Investment Company (TDIC).

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Saadiyat will be carved up into seven distinct zones; beach, marina, reserve, promenade, lagoons, retreat and, perhaps most importantly of all, the Cultural District. Located on the most westerly tip of the island, closest to Abu Dhabi itself, the Cultural District is unprecedented, a 2.4 million square metre zone anchored by four major cultural attractions, punctuated by hotels, luxury apartments, retail and an ersatz canal and souk. Naturally, it’s the big four that have captured the global imagination, even though the site is currently little more than a pincushion of concrete piles to turn the soft sand

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It will be joined by the Louvre Abu Dhabi, another scaled up and modernised famous name. Designed by the atelier of French architect Jean Nouvel, the new Louvre sits beneath a cat’s cradle of rooflights. Underneath this colossal, striated span will be a ‘micro-city of small galleries, lakes and landscaping,’ an artificial environment dedicated to culture and housing an expanding new collection and loans from the three major Parisian art museums (Louvre, Orsay and Pompidou). Nouvel is good on the grand gesture - he tends to get mired in details and his vast dome promises to house one of the world’s most extraordinary interior spaces. Finally, the fourth anchor is the Performing Arts Centre, a typically virtuoso composition by Zaha Hadid Architects. Hadid’s sinuous forms attract attention and criticism in roughly equal measure, self-conscious and overly dramatic but also visceral and alien in their way they provoke our preconceptions of what a building should look like. On Saadiyat Island, the PAC will rise up out of nothing, a piece of bravado form-making that suggests the delirious aura of super-architecture is still an unparalleled way of making cultural waves.

In the Gulf, such highly expressive architecture has become a valuable commodity. It is modern buildings that are the symbols of the region, rather than the landscape itself.


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01 Gagarin became a valuable propaganda tool of the USSR

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Yuri Gagarin – 50 Years On The Man And The Myth On April 12 1961, Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin was launched from the steppes of Kazakhstan, to become the first human in space. After his 108-minute circuit of the Earth, he became a global icon, thanks to his easy manner and monumental smile. But Gagarin was also a propaganda tool of the USSR and as such was deemed too valuable as a symbol ever to be blasted off again. Steve Korver and René Nuijens talked to those who knew both Gagarin the myth – and Yuri the man.

Gagarin was born to very modest means near the town of Gzhatsk. On the road connecting Moscow with Europe, the area had been used by everyone from Napoleon to the Nazis in their failed attempts to conquer Russia. During WWII, while his older brother and sister were sent to work camps in Germany, Yuri lived with his remaining family in a tiny underground turf house. In his ghost-written memoir, Road to the Stars, he described the mind games he played with the Nazis as a boy saboteur and he wrote of the joy of seeing his first planes and meeting his first pilots. At 17, Gagarin was called to take the trajectory of any promising child in the USSR. He went off to learn how to become a working class hero. But as would prove characteristic, he went further than most: 800 km south of Moscow down the Volga River to Saratov, where he learned steelwork at the city’s industrial training college. Dr Victor Porohnya, current head of the historical department at Moscow Aviation Institute and an acclaimed academic and author, met Gagarin when they were schoolboys together at Saratov College and they remained best friends until Yuri’s premature death. “Yuri was always the first. Even at a young age he knew what time it was. He also always knew he wanted to fly.” After taking his first lessons at the local flying club, Gagarin joined the air force where he was soon noticed

among thousands. Dr Vitaly Volovich, a specialist in human survival in extreme conditions, recalled giving Gagarin many tests during the whole gruelling selection process for the first cosmonaut team. “He was very interesting, with a sympathetic face. And like all the first cosmonauts, he could enjoy life, drink and women. They were all normal males.” Leading up to the First Flight, Gagarin was said to be unnaturally relaxed: sleeping soundly the night before, softly whistling a tune to his motherland while awaiting countdown and keeping his heartbeat steady during lift-off. While careening around the planet at 28 000 km/h, he also reported back: “I can see everything! It’s beautiful!” Meanwhile, Radio Moscow interrupted normal broadcasting to play the song ‘How Spacious is My Country’. Volovich was also the first doctor to examine Gagarin after his flight. “When I saw him, he was very good. Talking. Smiling. He spoke of his space flight and some of the details: the blue of the water and how his pencil floated. When I checked him, all was good: blood, pulse and the rest. I made a joke: ‘Yuri, maybe you did not fly at all!’ Yuri answered laughing: ‘Maybe you are right!’.” It was a game-changing moment in human history. As USSR Premier Khrushchev taunted the West with visions

of Soviets pumping out rockets “like sausages”, the Americans were motivated to free funding whereby they could finally win the Cold War’s space race by putting a man on the moon by the end of the decade. While Gagarin famously claimed that he saw no God during his flight through the cosmos, two days after his flight when Red Square filled beyond capacity to greet him, he himself became a deity – one who worried about tripping over his untied shoelace as he made the long redcarpet walk towards the star-studded Soviet podium. The cult of the cosmonaut was born and, as the saying went, “every boy wanted to be a cosmonaut and every girl his wife.” Meanwhile, out on world tour, Gagarin charmed both the masses and the elite with his easy and friendly manner. Sergei Krikalyov (1958) followed in Gagarin’s footsteps. As a cosmonaut, he has spent more time in space than any other human being: 803 days, 9 hours, 39 minutes. He is also famous as being the ‘last citizen of the USSR’, because in 1991/92, he spent almost a year maintaining the MIR space station after the collapse of the Soviet Union. He is currently the director of Star City’s Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre, helping bring this once top secret facility up to date in today’s world of international space cooperation. “Gagarin was the first. At that time,

people had no idea if we could even breathe out there. It was all completely new. His flight was the first step. Although his flight was quite short, it was very heroic.” To this day, before any launch, cosmonauts take their respect for Gagarin to truly obsessive lengths. They will visit his recreated office at Star City to ‘meditate’ and sign a log and then finally urinate – just as Gagarin did – on the back tyre of the bus that had brought them to the launch pad. While Gagarin adapted remarkably well in his new role as the most pleasant of peasant icons, it was not easy. Being the first man in space attracted many female admirers that put stress on his marriage. His face soon began showing the fattening effects of all the vodka toasts he had to endure as a Soviet superstar. Krikalyov, the world’s most famous living cosmonaut, certainly agrees that cosmic fame can come at a price. “Some stories about you can start living a life of their own. You can no longer influence them…” For the past 49 years, Dr Rostislav Bogdashevsky has been the doctor/psychologist to all cosmonauts, astronauts and space tourists trained at Star City. He was also a close friend of Yuri Gagarin and witnessed how Gagarin was caught in the middle. “But because he was a very direct and truthful man with a good sense of humour, he was

02 16.04.61 Izvestija, Communist Propaganda Newspaper, features first flight 03 Billboard in the Town of Gagarin showing a smiling Yuri Gagarin 04 Painting of Gagarin in the Town of Saratov


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able to stay human. When you see those films of how people interacted with him and celebrated the event and by looking at his face, you realise he was really a very good person. And to be good is a natural thing. Something you were born with.” But Gagarin’s true desire to fly again was thwarted by the state. Bogdashevsky: “Yuri always dreamt of returning to space. He did everything to fly again. And he was absolutely prepared for it. But the politicians and chiefs understood the worth of his phenomenon and kept him away from all dangerous situations.” Eventually Gagarin decided to return to his first love: flying jets. At 10.41am on March 27, 1968, during a fighterpilot training flight in a MiG-15UTI with another ‘Hero of the Soviet Union’, Vladimir Serugin, Yuri crashed in a quiet forest near the town of Novoselovo, 100 km from Moscow. The cause of the crash was ruled accidental, but since it occurred at a time when everything was hushed up, it left many wanting more concrete answers. After the breakdown of the Soviet Union in 1991, newspaper features appeared that suggested Gagarin was abducted by aliens, or that Brezhnev - driven by a jealousy of Yuri’s close relationship with Khrushchev - had him killed. Or that Yuri

had gone mad from something he’d seen in outer space. The most ridiculous scenario had him drunk, flying low and trying to shoot a moose with a rifle. Today, most Russians credit Yuri’s enduring stature with the fact he was not only a hero, but also a ‘nice, normal guy’. In a recent poll he edged out Stalin as Russia’s most popular 20th century figure. Certainly he is the only person from the Soviet period who is still spoken of in almost universally positive tones. As a symbol, he not only continues to inspire the space travellers that followed him, but also artists, writers, musicians, fashion labels and fresh graffiti (‘Yuri we are with you!’). On April 12th 2011, there were literally hundreds of ‘Yuri Parties’ around the world celebrating his achievement and memory, some 50 years after that first flight. When asked whether Gagarin had changed much with his new status, his old school friend Dr Porohnya answered: “He understood that he wasn’t special and it was just a twist of fate he was selected to be first. That’s why he stayed normal without any pretensions. I’ve had the opportunity to observe many powerful people of the USSR who also came from poor families and became famous public figures. Compared to them, Yuri did not change – absolutely not.” 07

05 Student in a school outside of Moscow with a faded Gagarin sign 06 The office of Yuri Gagarin in Starcity 07 Memorial at the location of the crash that killed Gagarin and Seregin

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08 Rusting old Yuri Gagarin Monument in the Smolensk Oblast, Russia

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Travel Essentials Here is a collection of elegant items we’d love to take with us on our travels in 2011. How about a Bottega Veneta custom interior for my King Air C90GTx?

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05 Bernhard Lederer Gagarin Tourbillon Limited Edition Features a 60-second flying orbital tourbillon that rotates counterclockwise (symbolising east) 360° around the dial in 108 minutes, which is the time Gagarin took to orbit the earth in the Vostok capsule. £124,000.00

The travel essentials on this page are all from Bottega Veneta (bottegaveneta.co.uk) 01 Chene Intrecciato Nappa iPad Case Soft, durable nappa intrecciato will keep your Ipad clean and is excellent for travel. £365.00

06 Tom Ford acrylic aviator sunglasses Mens aviator style sunglasses with cool two-tone acrylic frames. (flannels.com) £235.00

02 Nero Intrecciato VN Trolley A piece that will last forever. This trolley has plenty of room, with generous exterior and interior zip pockets. 36cm W x 44cm H x 19.5cm D £3,015.00 03 Nero Intrecciato Nappa Eye Mask This nero-colored intrecciato nappa eye-patch provides pitchblack darkness. Elegant and comfortable. £135.00

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Tom Ford Charles aviator sunglasses Ladies aviator style sunglasses with metal frame. (flannels.com) £230.00

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007 Lotus Esprit The perfect car for when you arrive at your destination. Okay, so you cannot strictly buy this car yet, but you simply must register your interest.

The new Esprit is powered by a 5.0 litre V8 pressure charged engine delivering up to 620 PS, the Esprit retains exceptional performance through it’s unique lightweight design making it the ultimate expression of Lotus supercar ownership. It is the supercar that will redefine ride and handling, performance, comfort and exclusivity.

We’ll take ours in Burnt Copper with the optional ski-rack on the back (Roger Moore style) and keep it at our place in St.Moritz...Production starts in 2012 with first deliveries for Spring 2013.

Circa £110,000.00

Can’t wait for the Esprit? Buy a new Hawker in May or June 2011 and get a Lotus Evora for FREE! (see ad, page 24)

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Ladurée Aviation catering It’s all very well flying private, but it’s equally important to have that perfect bottle of Bordeaux and fine food to make the overall experience perfect for you and your passengers…

In Summer 2010, the famous French tea house, Ladurée, launched ‘Ladurée Aviation’ to cater to its regular customers who were frequently requesting special deliveries for their private aircraft. That service has now expanded and it’s possibly catering’s best-kept secret (until now) for the private jet sector.

Offering everything from their signature Macaroons (£1.80 ea) through to roasted Lobster in filo pastry (£32.50), they really do raise the catering bar to the right altitude. For a copy of their menu go to www.ladureeaviation.com

£ Price dependent on order

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04 Chene Intrecciato Rete Nappa Tote Relatively unconstructed, the tote has a generous volume that folds in on itself, imparting a soft, slouchy look. The handles can be extended long enough to fit on the shoulder. £4,445.00

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Patrick Jephson considers the new and improved King Air – the 250. Optimised to meet the growing demands for dependable air transport in the more remote parts of the world.

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Birds. Big ones. Three or four, you didn’t have time to count. But they’ve just made a catastrophic mess of your starboard prop and suddenly you’re the busiest pilot in Africa. Even as one part of your brain works the engine failure drill, another thanks the gods of aviation that the port engine still sounds sweet. Automatic rudder boost is already smoothly correcting the inevitable yaw and after all the excitement, it’s nice to find you’re flying straight and level again. Which is especially good news because, far below, an unbroken green sea of jungle stretches to the horizon. Not good gliding country… An unlikely scenario? Perhaps – especially if you believe statisticians. But for pilots flying over remote or inhospitable terrain anywhere, a multiple bird-strike – or indeed any kind of major powerplant malfunction – is a theoretical possibility which can suddenly become all-too real. The debate about the best number of engines for an aircraft is as old as powered flight. Most pilots – and their passengers – would probably agree with the designer of what was the last airliner of the Hawker family, the 146. According to legend, he was asked why, when two engines were increasingly the fashion for jet transports, he had

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opted to give his new plane four. His answer may have been flippant but it made the point. “Because there isn’t room for six.”

family of turbine-powered aircraft in history, the 250 carries its pedigree DNA to a new level of refinement and engineering maturity.

It wasn’t fashion that determined the number of engines on the first Beechcraft King Air back in 1964. 47 years later, despite all the intervening advances in engine reliability, the latest of the dynasty – the 250 – maintains the same familiar configuration. The reason owes something to the feathered friends who share our airspace everywhere. It’s also thanks to the healthy pessimism of aircraft designers and airworthiness authorities who live by the gloomy rule that “if something can go wrong it probably will… and at the worst possible moment.”

This evolutionary approach to product development is apparent in some significant detailed changes. The new winglets aren’t just there to look good – they also improve performance in all phases of flight by effectively increasing wingspan and minimising drag. Composite props are lighter and stronger than their predecessors (high-flying birds please note) and the engines that drive them now benefit from ram-air recovery – an ingenious system for ensuring peak performance even when, for instance, antiicing vanes are deployed.

After all, it’s not just thrust and airspeed that are suddenly in short supply after an engine failure. Electrical power and hydraulic pressure can vanish just as fast. Duplicated systems are the norm for brakes on the family saloon – so why not in the air too?

All these improvements result in real commercial advantages, especially when it comes to compliance with international air operators’ licensing regulations. A 250 can shave almost 500ft of a 200GT’s take-off role even at maximum weight. That adds about 1,000 extra airfields to the already impressive list of those accessible to King Airs. And because the 250 is just as much at home on a gravel strip as at a major airport, its multi-role capabilities can be fully exploited by owner-operators as well as by full-size flight departments.

Safety considerations apart, there are plenty of other good reasons why the imminent arrival of the 250 is so eagerly awaited. As the latest offspring of the most successful

Beechcraft King Air 250 No pretence, just a can-do attitude

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Whether the task is surveillance, flight inspection, casevac or utility transport, the 250 looks likely to reinforce the King Air reputation for reliability, profitability and versatility. It may not be much of an aesthetic compliment, but the 250’s nickname of “the flying SUV” certainly sounds beautiful to operations controllers and company accountants. The new King Air is optimised to meet the growing demand for dependable air transport in remote regions from the steppes of Russia to the deserts of the Middle East or the vastness of Africa. It’s in these most demanding environments that twin-engine performance comes into its own. That’s even before you factor in peace of mind. Sector lengths are typically far longer than in Europe or even America. Airfields are widely scattered – and of widely varying quality. Maintenance demands are heavy and the spare parts supply chain long and easily broken. No wonder there seems to be keen interest in a plane that builds on five decades of proven mission success and design evolution. Plus, as everybody knows, the remote regions of the world are home to some very big birds…

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The Elbe Philharmonie is not just the cultural lighthouse of the new HafenCity, it is also of the musical city of Hamburg itself. The design by architects Herzog & de Meuron also includes a hotel and 45 apartments. Jonathan Bell looks into this controversial new musical hub in Hamburg.

In Europe, big cultural projects have to navigate their way across busy airspace. The hazards are numerous, as concerns about the wider social impact and the demands of existing urban heritage conspire to make a new building a major piece of political manoeuvring. The residents of the German port of Hamburg are better placed to understand the process than most. Since 2007, they have been watching as the city gets a new landmark, laboriously erected above the tough brick walls of an existing warehouse on the banks of the Elbe. Two years late and at nearly double the original budget, the Elbe Philharmonie is a performing arts venue that’s as controversial as it is bold, bringing to mind former epic battles between the artistic and the pragmatic, such as the Sydney Opera House or the abandoned Cardiff Opera House. The likelihood is that the Philharmonie will make it to its 2013 opening ceremony without any compromises, let alone cancellations, unlike its celebrated antecedents. Designed by the globally acclaimed Swiss studio of Herzog & de Meuron (responsible for London’s Tate Modern and Tate 2, Madrid’s Caixa Forum and the

Elbe Philharmonie New kid on the dock

01 Elbe Philharmonie by night and day. © 2011 Images courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron


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With a €480m cost, double the original budget, the Elbe Philharmonie will be one of Europe’s most expensive buildings when it opens in September 2013, delays permitting.

The new hall is being built on the site of Kaispeicher ‘A’ warehouse, a titanic piece of austere industrial architecture that is wedged into the pointed westerly tip of what has now been rebranded as ‘HafenCity’. This ongoing transformation of the city’s former docklands aims to bring the city centre back to life. After destruction of the port, then the post-war expansion and subsequent decline following the containerisation of trade from the late 50s onwards, Hamburg’s dock district was bleak and derelict. The majority of the original industrial buildings have been demolished (save for the huge Speicherstadt warehouse complex) and the 157 hectare HafenCity site is one of Germany’s major development zones. Combining new build and mixed-use, it will ultimately represent a 40% expansion of Hamburg’s city centre area once the 25-year long development is finally completed. The Philharmonie will be its centrepiece, not just a new symbol of the city but potentially one of the boldest and most imaginative buildings in all of Western Europe. Herzog & de Meuron’s design preserves the skin and solid feel of Kaispeicher ‘A’, using the brick blockbuster as a platform for a new structure housing concert halls, restaurants, public areas, apartments and a hotel. From the architect’s very first sketch right through to the final presentation renders, this idea of a spiky glazed superstructure sat atop the existing brick was maintained and refined.

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The statistics are heady; at Plaza level, visitors have some 200,000 tons of concrete and 18,000 tonnes of steel above them. Giant columns punch through the space at unexpected angles, while the Plaza itself, at around 4,000 square metres, forms a covered public square in the city. All around, an expanse of 21,500 square metres of custommade glass panels wrap around the spiky ‘crown’ of the Philharmonie. Each glass pane,weighing around 1.2 tons, is given a coating of reflective dots, while key locations get specially curved panels that form balconies and open up the view.

de Young Gallery in San Francisco, among many others), the Elbe Philharmonie is a literal representation of culture triumphing over commerce.

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In reality, once construction began in 2007, the old tea and cocoa warehouse was filleted right back to the original bricks before being bolstered by thousands of tons of concrete and steel to support the concert hall above. Below it is a parking garage and within its practically windowless walls are the Klingende Museum and an experimental music foundation. In cross section, the Kaispeicher Warehouse is bisected by an 82m-long escalator that takes visitors up to the open-air tier between the old and the new façades. This new Plaza will be publically accessible, its varied roofscape formed by the concrete underbelly of the Grand Hall above it, with views right across the whole building to Hamburg’s skyline of soot-blackened spires and cranes in the distance. Here you’ll be able to book tickets and eat at a variety of restaurants and bars before taking your seats in the hall above for the performance. This is one of Europe’s most remarkable building sites. Before the installation of the mountainous roofscape, with its peaks and curves, one could stand on the edge of the upper circle, looking down upon the massively complex jigsaw of steel that formed the balconies and staircases for the 2,150 seat Grand Hall. The auditorium itself is formed from a nest of steel tiered seating, slung between the twin concrete towers of the upper structure, resting upon specially designed steel springs to keep it acoustically isolated from the rest of the building. When finished, the complex steelwork will be concealed beneath an array of interlocking seating tiers, sculpted and placed so as to maximise sight lines and acoustic performance for every member of the audience. Two smaller halls, the Recital Hall and the Kaistudio, are included in the complex.

Currently costed at 480 million euros, up from an original budget of around 240 million, the Elbe Philharmonie will be one of Europe’s most expensive buildings when it opens in September 2013, delays permitting. It will be a central spoke in Hamburg’s plan to become a ‘Music City’ and the building’s first Artistic Director, Christoph Lieben-Seutter, is establishing a new concert programme. The hall will become the new home of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Hamburg. Destination architecture rarely lives up to the hype. The Elbe Philharmonie is a rare and very deserving, exception. 04

02 Elbe Philharmonie will be completed in 2013 03 The Elbe Philarmonie is located right on the River Elbe 04 The construction site –each pane of glass weighs around 1.2 tons

The HafenCity site will ultimately represent a 40% expansion of Hamburg’s city centre area once the 25-year long development is finally completed. The Philharmonie will be its centrepiece…


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Special Missions Saudi Arabia’s Presidency of Meteorology and Environment Patrick Jephson gets an insight into the work done by Saudi Arabia’s governing body responsible for the provision of aeronautical weather services.

In the aviation industry, as in nature, the most successful species adapt and evolve. The Hawker Hurricane, for example, appeared in more than twenty versions. The same evolutionary imperative is evident in the most successful business jets: today’s composite Hawker 4000 is the latest offspring of a design pedigree going back some fifty years to the DH 125. The Beechcraft story is also one of perpetual refinement. Thanks to the fundamental integrity of the original design, its aircraft have probably been the industry’s leading exponents of sustained product improvement. The Bonanza leads the pack, being the aeroplane in longest continuous production in the world, but the King Air - twenty years its junior - is on course to set an impressive record of its own. Already established as the world’s best-selling turbine aircraft, its sector market share (deliveries) in the MiddleEast and North Africa for the past three years topped 93%. The King Air owes much of its success to its spacious cabin and robust construction – qualities that have earned it the workmanlike nickname of “the flying workhorse.” Not always very glamorous perhaps but you get the idea: this is a multi-role airframe and it’s extraordinarily adaptable to meet a wide range of mission requirements. The list of these is long and growing but typically includes pilot training, ground surveillance, maritime surveillance and patrol, cartography, geophysical sensing, air ambulance, search and rescue, pollution detection, flight inspection, calibration and utility/VIP transport. The cargo door and “quick change” options just add to its remarkable flexibility. 01

01 WMI ejectable flare racks mounted to the belly of the aircraft 02 WMI aircraft data acquisition system for recording atmospheric measurements

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05 03 WMI wing-mounted flare rack shown with both glaciogenic and hygroscopic flares 04 Fargo Jet Center corporate headquarters in Fargo ND USA

To take one further instance: there has never been a more urgent need to study and understand our atmosphere. Meteorology, pollution analysis, scientific research - all require us to explore that thin layer of gases that keeps our planet habitable. A platform that’s at home in this precious element, that can accommodate bulky and delicate instruments and can operate reliably in the harshest environments is therefore more than desirable – it’s a necessity. It also needs to be adaptable enough to accept major modifications without adverse effects on handling or performance. It was with just such a demanding list of requirements that Saudi Arabia’s government body responsible for the provision of aeronautical weather services, the Presidency of Meteorology and Environment (PME), selected Hawker Beechcraft products for the role. Working with Weather Modification, Inc. and the Fargo Jet Center, both of Fargo, North Dakota, USA they have acquired eleven airframes (six King Air C90 GTi, two King Air B200GT, one King Air 350, two Hawker 400XP) to support current plans to grow and widen the department’s capabilities. Under the overall direction of its President-General HRH Prince Turki Bin Nasser Abdulaziz, the PME undertakes the full range of meteorological activities including weather forecasting and modelling. It also has responsibilities in relation to environmental issues such as water resource management and air quality assessment and protection.

05 WMI-modified B200 aircraft highlighting the wing mounted flare racks and underwing pylons with atmospheric sampling probes

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Such a far-reaching remit makes the PME’s aircraft requirements particularly exacting, especially if you take into account its overall charter “to preserve, protect and develop the environment and safeguard it from pollution.” Its new fleet will be kept busy on a wide variety of atmospheric resource technology development tasks such as air quality measurements, atmospheric chemistry, cloud physics and magnetic imaging. The aim is to provide nothing less than one of the most advanced and sophisticated atmospheric science programmes in the world. The chosen aircraft – not to mention the personnel operating them – therefore need to be the best available and the best prepared. So, naturally, such an ambitious undertaking requires investment at all levels. The PME has set up an advanced training regime for atmospheric scientists, meteorologists and pilots to take advantage of the latest developments in related disciplines and technologies. It’s a truly global undertaking with PME scientists travelling the world to receive the latest scientific updates. Meanwhile, the PME’s pilots have undergone Flight Safety International training to obtain the necessary Hawker Beechcraft type ratings. And, acknowledging the responsibility to share the resultant scientific data around the planet, the PME will offer its results to other countries on a technology transfer basis. In deciding to work with WMI, the PME has certainly picked an expert in this highly-specialised area. The company has been providing atmospheric science services for the international community for over five decades. WMI and Fargo Jet Center scientists, technicians, pilots and engineers are the ideal choice to modify the new aircraft and associated special mission instruments.

With 75% of its clientele drawn from overseas, WMI has an exceptional level of international experience. Its customers for weather modification services and aircraft sales have included operators in Burkina Faso, Greece, Jordan, Mali, Morocco, Senegal, Spain, Turkey and the UAE as well as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For their part, WMI are in little doubt about the PME’s choice of airframe supplier. Says CEO Pat Sweeney, “WMI has found that Hawker Beechcraft aircraft are designed with the payload, performance, durability and versatility required for the variety of clients that WMI serves.” Sweeney goes on to explain that modifications to the PME aircraft were engineered to stringent FAA approval standards (Supplemental Type Certification STC) after extensive WMI research and development. These modifications allow for multiple usage of the aircraft including atmospheric research, precipitation enhancement and VIP transport. Now fully commissioned into service by the PME, the aircraft are being maintained by Arabian Aircraft Services Co. Ltd (ARABASCO) – an established provider of aviation services in Saudi Arabia with locations in Jeddah, Riyadh, Medina and Yanbu. ARABASCO was recently appointed as a designated services centre for the Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, with all associated technical, spares and training back-up. Overall, it’s an impressive effort. Which is probably just as well since, along with all the more immediate benefits, the Hawker Beechcraft aeroplanes chosen by the Saudi PME might just help save the Earth… and missions don’t come much more special than that.


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01 Jake Townsend delves into the riches that make South Africa the perfect destination all year round.

01 Panorama of Blyde River Canyon

South Africa The perfect climate with nearly 3000km of coastline My South Africa adventure began, as many seem to, at Farnborough Airport with an unexpected conversation with a stranger whilst waiting for a plane to land. But I’m getting ahead of myself. The balance of the universe, from electrons in an atom to the massive gravitational dance between planets all depends on the inherent duality of the forces of nature. Dark and light, positive and negative: these opposed states are part of the invisible oppositions that make our world what it is and so too do these concepts describe travel to South Africa. It is among the most beautiful and yet most beguilingly frustrating places on our planet – and it is South Africa’s bewitching magnetism that has pulled me to her sun bleached shores yet again. Any traveller knows that time and optimism always erase those less than perfect memories and it is back to her that I run, always cursing myself along the way. And a long way it is. From my door to South Africa’s shores is an exceedingly long day- and- a- half sojourn, though this time would be very, very different. A friend, a very good friend I should say, was kind enough to lend use of a private plane. By the end of my six-day sprint through this magnificent country at the southernmost tip of the cradle of humankind, I would be thanking this generous friend profusely.


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There was a time when South Africa was not an ideal place to go, but when you are the child of diplomats and said diplomats have been ordered there, you don’t really have a lot of choice. My first experience in the country and on the Continent in general, was during the waning years of Apartheid. It was a different world then and even as a small child, I have a distinct memory of feeling disconnected and constantly ill at ease. Diplomats in those days were not encouraged to wander outside the cities and it was fear of the teeming unnamed ‘other’ that kept so many citizens of this magical place (and it is magical, I assure you) cloistered behind vine covered walls, at the end of twisting driveways and flag -covered guard posts. The country was an exercise in separation. As I grew, I felt as if South Africa grew with me and my entrance into young adulthood, barely into my teens, with each subsequent trip back to Cape Town and Riversdale, back to Durban and to Kimberley, afforded witness to a country that was in a state of flux. And now, through adult eyes, I experience a very different South Africa than that of my youth. It is a place for which I have reserved a special piece of my heart, for it is the only country in the world where a grand and radical transformation took place in the way that it has there and

though imperfect, strives to serve as an example of the ways that a new generation of people—people of all colors—can do their best to co-exist in a world of polarities. And so it was during an hour between flights at Farnborough that I happened to sit next to another traveller who had just come back from several days in the front row at the 2010 World Cup. His enthusiasm for the people and his new found respect for this misunderstood place brought a lifetime of memories flooding back.

04 Table Mountain 05 South African fan of Brasil in front of a typical hair cutting shop in a township 06 Local children playing in Cape Town, South Africa

I had to go. It is a land of beauty and stark contrasts and of such magnificence; South Africa is truly one of the world’s most beguiling and bewitching destinations. The scenery; sweeping vistas, plains dotted with animals that you truly do only see in zoos and a collection of peoples so diverse as to rival any major urban centre the world over is narcotic in its effect. It was the aforementioned World Cup, a major nation branding campaign and a growing global reputation for progressive, diplomatic relationships both internally between citizens and government and externally between South Africa and the rest of the world that have brought this once-torn place together again.

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And though the World Cup crowds are long gone, their Vuvuzelas thankfully packed away, the nearly £3 billion investment in infrastructural improvements is here to stay. I took full advantage.

02 Catamaran on a sea cruise near Western Cape

I first touched down in the densely populated financial and commercial capital Johannesburg. Fortunately, Johannesburg International Airport is well equipped for those of us in private aircraft and was happily welcomed by a ground crew whose expertise was a welcome change from my experience in other airports on the Continent.

03 Map of South Africa showing main points of interest 02

03 For anyone who has spent more than just a stopover in South Africa, or has ventured into the bush, they know that a ‘private plane’ could mean anything from a rusting single engine from the 1960’s whose riddled shell is pitted from one too many rhinoceros attacks, all the way to full capacity private jets. The country is surprisingly well equipped for private aircraft. The three international airports: OR Tambo in Johannesburg; King Shaka International in Durban and Cape Town International are all outfitted with terminals, crew and training to accommodate private aircraft.

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This former frontier village has grown from rough and tumble mining town to major metropolis in just over a hundred years. In many ways, it is Johannesburg and not Cape Town, that pulses with that sparking polarized energy that I have only experienced in this country. The city is easy to navigate, but I remembered why I had been warned against travelling alone on foot so many years ago. Though I am loathed to pass up exploring a city on my own, Johannesburg is still very much a frontier mining town at heart and I was not in my element. I hailed a cab. The city is growing and with it, its population of young artists, writers and poets who have worked together to create several artists collectives downtown. I love the Arts on Main Complex; a contemporary warehouse space that features an ever-revolving roster of shows, exhibitions and performances. I’ve also been tempted more times than I would like to admit into buying things I have absolutely no room for at Gallery Momo, where a collection of international artists shows their work.


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Johannesburg is green and I was determined to take it in as best as one can when racing across a continent, trying to take in a full country in just a few days, but I managed it at Moyo restaurant, located over Zoo Lake. My room at the luxurious and always full AtholPlace was beyond compare and offered just a bit of a respite from what can be an intense city full of surprises around unexpected corners.

07 Monument to French Huguenots, Franschhoek, South Africa 08 Room with a view – One & Only Table Mountain Suite 09 Inside the Penthouse

My next stop was the town of Port Elizabeth, located on the sweeping Algoa Bay on the Southern Cape. This coastal town is one of the most desirable locations to experience both the warmer beaches – as much of South Africa’s oceans are exceedingly cold-- and an ideal starting point to experience wildlife. Day trips from this sleepy town to animal preserves Shamwari and Addo Elephant National Park will reveal an abundance of incredible animal life and will not disappoint. It was at Addo that I saw the densest collection of elephant, buffalo and black rhino roaming about in the bush that I had ever experienced.

10 Directions Post at the Cape of Good Hope

Though tempted to stay, I had a plane waiting at Port Elizabeth Airport, where thankfully the jet had been prepped for immediate take off. I piled into the cabin and as I fought heavy lids from closing, I watched a group of adult baboons amble their way across the Northern edge of the airport, just outside of the gated runways in what seemed to be the evening simian rush hour. 08

When venturing beyond South Africa’s urban centres, the bush offers safari experiences that should not be missed. Though there was a time when private air travel beyond Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban was limited, the massive improvements that came with the FIFA 2010 World Cup have greatly increased accessibility to luxury resorts in the famed Kruger National Park. Indulgent safari camps like Sabi Sand, Madikwe, Timbavati and Phinda are accessible via Skukuza airport and Kruger Mpumalanga (MQP) in Nelspruit, both well -versed in handling private aircraft.

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After just a short flight, a nap and a quick rundown of the list of people to see and places to visit, I was bounding out of the plane and into the private terminal at Cape Town International Airport. Cape Town is truly one of the world’s most interesting capitals; at once cosmopolitan and coastal, there is no other city with its combination of cultures, terrain and history. My first stop would be the newly opened One&Only hotel located on the Waterfront. And though there is a superb restaurant in the One & Only, I would recommend the Africa Café on Heritage Square. This is the perfect setting in which to enjoy dishes from across the Continent like curries from Malawi, breads from Somalia and meats from all sorts of game that you would never encounter anywhere else. Whenever I’m in Cape Town, I always head to Long Street for shopping where I pick up first editions from Baobab used books. I managed a Kipling first edition this time around. After a day trip to Cape Peninsula and more than my share of tastings in the Winelands, a collection of world renowned vineyards and farms colonised in the 17th century by the Boers, I felt as I always do after time spent in South Africa: I felt as if I had just arrived right as I was heading home.


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Patrick Jephson talks with the Spanish golfer, Sergio Garcia. World-class professional, Hawker 4000 owner and thoroughly nice chap…

04 Sergio studies his card as he waits to tee off while playing in a pro-am ahead of the Australian Masters to be played at the Victoria Golf Club in Melbourne 05

Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images

05 Sergio plays his tee shot on the par 4, 16th hole during the third round of the 2011 Omega Dubai Desert Classic on the Majilis Course at the Emirates Golf Club

Sergio Garcia World-class golfer with a truly global schedule

Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images

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02 Dubai Air Show and dinner. L to R: Sean McGeough, HBC President EMEA; Bill Boisture, HBC CEO and Sergio Garcia 03 Sergio Garcia hits out of the sand on the first hole during the third round of the Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club, 2011

For all its outward glamour, it’s a tough existence. Arguably the most psychologically-demanding of sports, golf puts its top stars through a relentless cycle of practice, preparation and public scrutiny where no mistake goes unnoticed – or unpunished. It’s lonely out there on the final green, when an expectant hush falls over the packed grandstands and the armchair experts wait to deliver judgement… Long distances. Irregular timetables. Lots of gear. Stress. Professional golfers know them all, which is probably why they prefer to travel by private aircraft. But, for people so notoriously picky about their clubs and gloves and shoes, that creates another tricky choice: which plane is going to give them the best competitive advantage? The range of available options is bewildering. Picking just the right combination of performance, reliability, comfort and cost can be as critical as picking the right iron for that career-defining approach shot. Sergio Garcia is Spain’s golfing prodigy who is currently enjoying a return to the kind of success that saw him lionised - when still just 19 - as the youngest ever player in the Ryder Cup. As he says of his recent form “it seems to be getting better every time.” Sergio knows all about life on the road. Hard personal experience has taught him the huge demands, mental and physical, of his chosen profession. From South Africa to China, Dubai to St Andrews, the demands are unrelenting. It’s no surprise, then, that he takes great care to choose the perfect equipment to back-up his prodigious talent.

“Having the right gear is vital” he explains. So we can conclude that his preference for Omega timewear, Adidas sportswear and Taylormade clubs is no coincidence. And when it comes to his personal aircraft, Sergio’s selection is inevitably going to be measured against some pretty demanding criteria. This is a man who, for all his athletic prowess, can’t afford to waste time sprinting through airport terminals just because his flight is on final call. Nor can he allow worry about technical delays to affect his pre-match mind-set.

“ I used to have a Hawker 900. It never let me down. So when I was looking for a replacement, I looked first at Hawker products. Now I’ve moved up to a 4000…”

“I used to have a Hawker 900. It never let me down. So when I was looking for a replacement, I looked first at Hawker products. Now I’ve moved up to a 4000 and it’s more capable but just as reliable. For me, it’s more than just transport: it’s a business tool.” A business tool? “Golf is my business and my Hawker gives me a vital edge. I can plan my own schedule, relax in the air, and get home sooner to spend more time with my family. All of those things add up over a busy year travelling all over the world. Arriving at work in the right frame of mind is critical, in professional sport as in anything else.” He pauses. There’s something more than just mere practicality involved here. “I’m lucky. I drive fast cars, I get the chance to appreciate beautiful design – and I like things to feel just right. That’s why my Hawker isn’t just a plane that gets me to work or brings me home. Like a lot of British craftsmanship, it has a character all of its own. When I get to the airport after a really tough match, it’s a friend I can rely on.” It’s probably his romantic Spanish imagination. Not even Hawker has a friendliness option on the spec sheet. But you kind of know what he’s driving at…

Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

01 A volunteer places Sergio Garcia’s name in the board during the second round of the 2011 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 8, 2011 in Augusta, Georgia

Professional golfers are some of the most well-travelled people in the world. In pursuit of glory and the little white ball they criss-cross the globe from tournament to tournament, nomads of the planet’s finest tees and fairways.


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Icy Depths Diving at The World’s End 01

Eline Feenstra and Photographer, Rene Lipman, flew into the worlds southernmost international airport in the world before continuing their journey by boat to The World’s End in Antarctica – in order to go diving. This part of the Earth is known for its harsh conditions, yet it is so rich in life and spectacularly beautiful…

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The awakening sun lights up the white world stretching out in front of us. A glacier extends its arms across the horizon. Mountains rise up and touch the soft sky. Our location is 64º 41’ S, 62º 38’ W when we see the continent of Antarctica for the first time. As we move away from our expedition vessel, the dinghy that carries us penetrates deeper into a wilderness of icebergs. And then, against the face of a glacial abyss, a tail lifts out of the water.

A day earlier we passed by the South Shetland Islands, about 120 kilometres north of the peninsula. Due to the mild climate, these sub-Antarctic islands are home to many birds, including albatrosses, skuas and penguins. A quick equipment test on Half Moon Island gave us the opportunity to see a rookery of more than four thousand Chinstrap Penguins. But our first ‘real’ polar dive happened on Deception Island.

It is a Humpback Whale. Known for their displays at the surface, they breach and slap, sending misty plumes of water upwards. Humpbacks are easily recognised by their long pectoral fins and knobbly head. Their name derived from the humping motion they make when they dive.

The centre of Deception Island is a caldera, which has been flooded by the sea. A black beach inside the caldera betrays the island’s volcanic origin. An abandoned whaling station stains the view with a somewhat desolate hue. Beside the factory lie the remains of a research station, destroyed by the fairly recent volcanic eruptions of 1967 and 1969.

I quickly strap on my fins, mask and snorkel. Peter Szyszka, our Waterproof Expeditions dive guide, manoeuvres the dinghy to ensure we get an up-close encounter. We only have to wait for his ‘OK’ sign. There! Not more than a couple of metres away a fountain spurts into the air. Soon she will be under us. I am already in the water gazing into the darkness. Then a white flank appears, reflecting bright rays of light. I am snorkelling with a Humpback Whale! Her lumbering body draws past me, dissolving into the distance.

01 Dark waters and rough landscapes makes you feel so alive 02 Gentoo Penguins at Port Lockroy 03 Almirante Brown Antarctic Base, view at Paradise Bay

Expedition It has taken us almost three days to reach the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia, Argentina’s southernmost city. Our total journey will take eleven days. We have been travelling an ice-reinforced expedition vessel able to host 45 passengers and which is fully equipped for polar diving. A Waterproof Expeditions container is situated on the front deck to keep our dry-suits warm. Further forward are four Zodiac dinghies to enable us to get both into the water and onto land. A towering bridge oversees it all. It is from here the captain has set our course for World’s End.

Whilst our captain manoeuvres the ship into the natural harbour, we gear up. A crane lifts the dinghies into the water and we hop onboard via a mobile staircase. With a loud noise the outboard engine pushes the dinghies out into the caldera, until we stop at one of the crater walls, where embedded metals strike out beautiful waves of red and orange. “Ready?” asks Peter. Yes! Cold icy water splashes onto my face. For a second it feels like a hundred knives have found their way into my skull. A swell takes over and rocks our heavily equipped bodies slowly back and forth. I try to situate myself, but I don’t have enough time. Four huge fur seals behind my buddy make me jump. They’re not planning to let either of us get away! But soon I feel relaxed; these eager creatures are gentle. Their brown bodies perform a shadow play. They dance. In a weird manner they speed forward and pull back. Then one gets too cheeky and briefly sets his teeth into the lens of my camera. Surprised by the cold greeting of his own

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04 04 A Leopard seal is looking back to the divers in the Zodiac. 05 Whalebones at Port Lockroy, a natural harbour on the Antarctic Peninsula of the British Antarctic Territory.

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reflection, his big black eyes stare straight into mine. And suddenly his presence becomes tangible, in a kind of way that brings us together. What an amazing experience! Dive protocol Diving in Antarctica is not without danger. Water temperatures drop below zero and hypothermia is a real threat. We are also likely to deal with uncharted waters – not to mention dive sites – and there are no decompression facilities. In these circumstances strict dive protocol is necessary. “The maximum dive time is 45 minutes and nobody dives deeper than twenty metres,” explains Mike Murphy, our expedition leader during the mandatory briefing. “Whoever disregards the rules, does not dive,” he adds. It sounds tough, but is for our own safety, something Waterproof Expeditions could not stress enough. We dive with two first stages, both coated with a coldwater seal, to avoid and manage freeze-ups. Of course we use dry-suits, plus a thousand more layers underneath. It reminds me of our outward journey. A vague sign of astonishment had appeared on the face of the ground staff when I checked in the 59 kilos of dive equipment at the airport. “Where are you going?” she asked. “To the South Pole!” I said proudly. Now, standing on the deck of our ship, a thin layer of snow covers our rigged tanks in the dinghies. We were advised to leave all the equipment outside during the night. “It gets cold anyway and taking the equipment inside only leads to water condensation on the inside,” Mike explains. This is especially true for cameras. Jurassic Park Twice a day we leave the ship: to go diving, snorkelling, cruising, landing onshore and hiking. We – of course – try to stretch out every minute and do everything at once. “Lets look for Leopard Seals!” Peter said with a promising grin on his face. Together with the Orca, the Leopard Seal

is the supreme predator in the Antarctic food chain. They are also huge - females can grow up to four metres long. They hunt for penguins and krill, though less frequently they also eat other seals, such as Crabeaters. As February comes to an end, so does the mating and reproduction season. Now is the perfect time for hunting. Peter manoeuvres the boat skilfully between the icebergs. Floating sea ice grates along the rubber skin of the Zodiac. Apart from that, all is quiet. But it seems we are fortunate. A silver fleece lights up the surface. The head of a Leopard Seal makes me think of a dinosaur – a predator from another time and place. And this one has something - with feet trapped in the seal’s mouth a small penguin dangles above the water. The seal violently shakes his head and disappears below the waves. Then both appear again, still attached to one another. They approach the foot of an iceberg, where the water is shallow and turquoise blue. I hold my breath. I have heard that Leopard Seals skin their prey alive by hitting them on the water. Not a nice sight, as you can imagine.

as a scientific reserve. The building gives me a somewhat primitive and nostalgic view of our presence here. A whale skeleton catches my eye. The curved jawbones shape a perfect egg form, once covered with baleens. Shag Wall Back on board the mother ship we disinfect our shoes, standard protocol for those who have gone ashore. Then we head to Paradise Bay, where we will dive along Shag Wall, one of the peninsula’s most famous dive sites. Shags nest atop the 70 metre deep cliff, providing nutrients for everything that lives beneath. Big leaves of brown kelp form most of the vegetation. Slowly we descend. Opening up the algae, we reveal a hidden forest. From the largest of things we now switch focus to the smallest. But this miniature world is just as fascinating, just as unreal and even more secretive. Take the giant isopod. Not only do they look prehistoric, they are! Fossils show its ancestors existed more then 160 million years ago and it has barely changed.

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But then the penguin escapes! With breakneck speed the little bird leaps onto the iceberg. As the penguin flees in shock, the seal glides angrily up and down. We can almost touch them now; that is how close we are. Nature in its wildest form. I feel like I have entered Jurassic Park. But here everything is white and, despite the cruelty of Nature, it all somehow seems in harmony.

An orange anemone shines almost fluorescent, hanging of the steep wall. A gigantic sea star with more than thirty tentacles spreads its legs wherever it can. What an odd creature. Earlier today, during the morning dive, we saw hundreds of pink sea stars on the grey ocean floor. All these images are surreal. And being there, along Shag Wall, I am again fascinated by the wondrous biodiversity of this place.

Port Lockroy Port Lockroy is a natural harbour along the Antarctic Peninsula. After our whale and seal adventures it is time for some cultural heritage. In the early morning we pass Goudier Island, in the middle of an 800m-long harbour. A wooden building, black with red window frames, stands on top of the island. Once used by the British government for scientific research and military activities, the House of Bransfield is now an historic monument under the Antarctic Treaty, which was signed in 1959 and set Antarctica aside

“You guys want to do a landing?” Peter asks from the Zodiac when we finish our dive. I try to move the floating pieces of ice as I make my way back to the boat. But they are so heavy. Once onboard Peter takes us to the pier, near the cliff. Just above the pier is Almirante Brown, an Argentinean research station - along with some Gentoo Penguins. A hill rises up behind the station.

06 Sailing with the Zodiac through Pleneau Bay – this bay is filled with nature’s artwork

As the sun is about to set we have to hurry to reach the top. Restricted by dry suits we clamber upwards, not without

07 Eline Feenstra sailing through the grounded icebergs of Melchior

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slipping and stumbling. Still wet from the dive, the water freezes on my face. Exhausted, I make it to the summit and look out over Paradise Bay, hidden between a 2,000-metre-high mountain range and a glacier. I stretch out my arm and catch the wind. Tears roll over my cheek; I am at world’s end. Ecosystem Of the seven continents Antarctica is without doubt the coldest and driest. It almost never rains here and is so cold it is permanently covered in snow and a sheet of ice that in some places reaches four kilometres thick. Only the ‘nunataks’, the rocky peaks of the mountain range buried beneath, are exposed. The ice sheet is in fact a glacier, but so massive and widespread that the topography of the continent doesn’t limit its course. The glaciers we know are formed by the shape of the mountains, where they flow under their own weight, much like a river. In Antarctica they form ice shelves at their margins, floating on the sea but still attached. From there they clave icebergs into the water, sometimes with ferocious intensity.

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Polar Diving “Pleneau Bay is also known as the iceberg graveyard!” shouts Jonas Sundquist over the engine noise. It’s our last day on the continent. I signed up for the polar diving speciality course, which might come in handy when diving near icebergs for the first time. Jonas is our instructor. The water is flat as a pancake, reflecting mirror images of the icy statues that fill the bay. Leopard Seals enjoy the sun, by lying on the ice floes. They tilt their heads to acknowledge our company. Jonas brings the dinghy to a stop when we approach a table-shaped iceberg. “The most important thing is to know whether the iceberg is grounded or not,” he says. He does that by measuring the depth with a small yellow instrument. An iceberg is more likely to be grounded when the water is shallow. “That’s what you want,” he continues. “When an iceberg floats you should estimate the likelihood of it rolling over - something you don’t want to happen whilst diving next to it! If the iceberg has rolled over recently, the ice on top has a pattern of dimples affected by the seawater. Signs 40 ∞ of snow on top mean it hasn’t rolled over recently. Best to avoid those mountains…” By the time we find the right one, I am ready to start the adventure. I am a little bit nervous: this time our dive site is moving too. Underwater we enter a totally different realm. The icy blue colours mesmerise me. The skin of the iceberg feels60∞soft. Just below the waterline I see the dimples Jonas told us about. Slowly they fade into deepening ridges that travel all the way down, as far as I can see. Their black shades eventually mix with the dark blue water. It looks spooky.

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Less then one percent of this continent is not covered in ice. Cold comfort for birds that are unable to lay eggs there. But despite the harsh circumstances a rich flora and fauna does flourish - underwater. “That’s because of krill,” explains Jamie Watts, the biologist and field guide who organises land expeditions and lectures on board the ship. “Their substantial biomass feeds everything around here,” he continues. In one lecture we learn that Antarctica has more then 300 algae species. One of them, a lichen, which is actually a symbiosis of algae and fungi, lives 20 0 pink spots in the20 above the water. ∞ Jamie points out ∞ice - I ∞ OUTH AFRICA had wondered what these were. Besides that there isS only one real plant on the continent. And even that one has to absorb its nutrients from stone.

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80 at my computer – the temperature display says minus I look ∞ two degrees Celsius! That is cold. I become aware of an increased breathing rate and I struggle to get horizontal. What is going on? It feels like the iceberg is slowly pulling me down into the icy blue. I guess the ice really does 100 ∞ mesmerise. Then suddenly, out of nowhere, a Leopard Seal appears. You have to be kidding! I push myself back into the iceberg, grabbing my buddy’s hand. This is even spookier. The seal is so fast that every approach comes by surprise. “Close 120 your eyes to relax in such a situation,” Peter had told ∞ me. I close my eyes and immediately my heart rate drops. Still shut, I realise I want to be here and nowhere else. It works! I open my eyes and the seal is right in front of me.

Exploration An old picture, taken by Alfred Lansing, shows an endless landscape with several tracks running across - the white plains of Antarctica. The ski tracks and ski pole marks were left by Robert Falcon Scott on his first attempt to reach the geographic South Pole. Behind him he pulls a sled - for traditional reasons they refused to use dogs. A small line measures the distance and perpendicular to the tracks are the tiny footprints of an Adelie Penguin. The picture was taken in 1911, yet somehow I feel I am following in their footsteps, albeit a century later, but still subject to the same harsh circumstances. Humans will always be guests in this alien world.

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08 Extensive colony of Gentoo Penguins in the Antarctic Peninsula. 09 Diving near icebergs works its mesmerizing deceptions.

Slowly the ship moves through Lemaire Channel, one of the most beautiful spots on the Peninsula and so photogenic it has been nicknamed ‘Kodak Gap’. On the rear deck we celebrate with food, vodka and Russian music. And then something remarkable happens. A Minke Whale lifts it entire body out of the water, just a few metres away. Then again. And again. “She is coming to say goodbye!” I hear someone shout. These are leaps of happiness. And that is how our perfect journey comes to a perfect end. The next day the sky turns lead grey. On top of the bridge I finally start to feel the cold. With great force the bow of our ship crushes into the waves of the Southern Ocean. The Drake Passage is about to be crossed once more.

Calling all adventurers…

Ushuaia Worlds Southernmost International Airport Ushuaia International Airport is located 4km (2.5m) south of the centre of Ushuaia, a city on the island of Tierra del Fuego in the Tierra del Fuego Province of Argentina. This small international airport was opened in 1995 and is the world’s southern-most international airport. This is the best airport to fly into for your Antarctic adventure.

Want your own Antarctic adventure? Expeditions to the Antarctic Peninsula leave from Ushuaia, Argentina. The eleven day trips organised by Waterproof Expeditions offer diving and land programmes as well as lectures on biology. Dependent on the weather, the schedule aims to leave the ship twice per day by Zodiac dinghy. Divers can make up to eight or ten dives, but there is also room for snorkelling, which is preferred with whales and Leopard Seals. You will also spend time sailing around and making shore landings.

Best time to travel The best time to visit Antarctica is the Antarctic summer, from November till March. The days in November are long enough to take pictures at midnight. In March you have a chance to see the southern lights. Travel Company Waterproof Expeditions is dedicated to dive and photography-related travel. They are highly experienced and specialise in polar expeditions. www.waterproof-expeditions.com

http://tierradelfuego.org.ar/aeropuerto/


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WHERE THE SMART MONEY IS MOVING

Here’s the deal: you charter your private jet with Victor at the most competitive price in the market, and you can choose your preferred operator and aircraft. Victor then gives you the chance to recover a

Business Jet Travel What Are The Real Benefits?

significant proportion of your cost by selling seats, on either your outbound or returning aircraft, to other like-minded Victor members. When you charter your next aircraft through Victor we guarantee to hold both legs, so you can profit from selling your spare capacity. Of course this won’t happen every time you fly but, with a significant membership already following the most popular routes across Europe, the odds look promising. Victor is the first online quote comparison and transactional platform for private jet charter. Our model is simple, there are no upfront costs, and we only make money when we sell seats on your aircraft.

FLY SMARTER_

For more information about membership visit www.flyvictor.com

Patrick Jephson takes a moment to look at the benefits of Business Jet travel whilst speaking to some key people in busines to see why they couldn’t return to Business Class on a commercial aircraft… Illustrations by Luke James.

In these straitened times, the corporate aircraft might seem an unnecessary indulgence: all very well when world economies are booming but surely first in line for the chop when non-essentials are being axed. Surprisingly, however, the opposite is true. Get past the tabloid talk of fat cat bosses – a surprisingly small minority of business aircraft users - and the benefits become clear enough for the most energetic cost-cutter. For example, a recent study* shows that, by a range of key parameters, companies using business aviation outperform those without aircraft. According to the analysts, business aircraft users had a dominant presence (an average of 92 per cent) among the most innovative, most admired, best brands and best places to work, as well as dominating the list of companies strongest in corporate governance and responsibility. There’s more: The report also finds that business aviation alone is “the only asset capable of accelerating strategic transactions and therefore providing a competitive edge to top-performing companies.” A competitive edge. The last thing, surely, you could afford to lose just when the race is at its toughest. But is the competitive edge blunted by negative associations which sometimes come to mind when corporate planes are being discussed? Let’s face it, there are those who would portray the corporate aircraft as an expensive luxury item – an invitation to resentment or worse.

522 Fulham Road, London, SW6 5NR | Office: +44 207 384 8550 | Fax: +44 207 384 8539 | membership@flyvictor.com

As is so often the case, however, once rational consideration is allowed to replace knee-jerk emotion, a very different picture emerges.

“Whether there’s a problem depends on the circumstances,” explains Leonard Brooks, a professor of business ethics.** “When jets are used for business purposes and they free up time for executives to work, or improve their state of being when they arrive somewhere to do business, the costs may well be justified.” And there we have it. The justification is in the bottom line: the savings in time and stress translate into savings in costs and increases in profits. These aircraft are not toys or perks – they are actual assets, money makers and flying proof that the stockholders’ confidence in the management is fully justified. But when business users are asked to make the case for their aerial steeds, they usually go beyond mere economics. There are invisible benefits such as that invigorating rush known as “charging the entrepreneurial spirit” that regularly affects the most jaded executive on climbing aboard the company plane. Consider, for example, the improved use of company information: not just the data held on computers or publications but the stuff in employees’ heads. Nor are we necessarily talking only about god-like senior executives. In one assessment, *** the single most compelling case for business aircraft operation is “the preservation of any scarce knowledge resource.” So that’s why geeks and nerds will inherit not just the earth but the sky as well. Plus, their precious Intellectual Property will be safer in the company plane than on a baggage carousel or in an airline seat pocket. There’s a special class of panic that’s suffered by those who suddenly realise they left the quarterly figures nestled alongside the sick bag in the


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“ At NetJets Europe, why did we choose Hawkers? It was a 100% commercial decision. As an operator offering guaranteed availability, reliability was absolutely crucial. Our Hawkers had the best despatch reliability of all the types we used – not just slightly but by an exponential margin. I would have been happy operating an all-Hawker fleet… I always slept better when I knew my customers were flying in a Hawker.”

Even if your employees are paragons of documentary security; even if they’re more likely to leave their toddler on a traffic island than their company laptop in an airport lounge; even if they never lost the keys to the rental car… even then there’s still an excellent chance that their productivity and overall time-efficiency could be improved by using a company plane.

The productivity argument is one of the most compelling. In a recent report, business aircraft passengers rated their productivity in a company jet at 6.2 on a 0-10 scale which set 5 as the productivity level in an average or typical office hour. Average productivity in a company turboprop was reported as 5.2 while productivity aboard commercial flights was rated as 3.2 and commuter turboprops as 2.1. That’s at least partly due to the lurking threat that a nosy neighbour will find that what’s showing on your laptop is more entertaining than the in-flight film. Consider, also, the benefits of modern airborne communications. This of course is a mixed blessing. Not so long ago, “thinking time” was the best part of flying private – especially since the activities covered by this heading might include eating, drinking, gossiping, reading the sports section or just staring out of the window. As Shana Alexander observed: “Though a plane is not the ideal place really to think, to reassess or re-evaluate things, it is a great place to have the illusion of doing so and often the illusion will suffice.” No longer. Thanks to Blackberry connectivity and other accursed new productivity-boosting gadgetry, today’s business aircraft is not so much a flying palace as a flying sweat shop. This is an office with wings. So when the engines throttle back for descent, the flaps crank out for landing and the undercarriage clunks into position the modern executive may – if lucky - share Professor Brooks’s view that this is a great way to arrive with “an improved state of being.” Equally, however, it may be with the gloomy thought that there’s now no excuse for opting out of that tiresome conference call on the flight home or catching-up on a Matterhorn of emails.

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Airbus they just got off… and which is even now taxiing away from the gate. Think of the time wasted getting that little oversight corrected.

Think of it: by flying privately they can land closer to their actual destination – rather than the nearest airport served by a scheduled flight. En route they can work, confer, prepare and generally get their act together. They can tailor their timetable to fit precisely to actual work requirements, instead of compromising to suit an airline’s convenience. That way they probably also avoid accommodation costs and ground transportation and the always-contentious per diems and assorted incidentals. Plus, when they come into the office next day, they have no excuse to be late, travel-weary or otherwise less than totally productive.

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Per Thrane Entrepreneur (Copenhagen)

David Marcus

More happily, the tired executive can take comfort from knowing that the company plane will speed him or her back to the family more quickly than an airline schedule might permit. And if that means more time for helping load the dish washer or changing nappies... that has to be better than dining with your laugh-a-minute new client in some distant Michelin-starred temple of gastronomie. Well, hasn’t it…? Such dilemmas aside, research certainly suggests that the business aeroplane can vastly improve customer relations. Among other reasons, a recent report* identifies “responding faster to customer needs, spending more time with customers, expanding relationships with existing customers, having a more focused attention to customer needs and demonstrating new products and services to customers. Companies can differentiate their service from their competitors’ in a safe, secure travel environment. Developing new products based on more customer input accelerates time-to-market.”

01 David Marcus formerly COO of NetJets

David Gold

02 David Gold regularly flies with his King Air 90GTx throughout Europe

Entrepreneur (Rome)

03 Per Thrane (right) with his King Air C90GTx. His twin brother, Lars (left), who also has his own King Air B200GT – keeping Hawker Beechcraft in the family

David Marcus Former COO NetJets Europe

Which is perhaps a very thorough way of saying that, if the customer really is king, then you had better show proper respect for his majesty by arriving in suitable transport. Something really appropriate like for instance (why not) a King Air… Or – even more effective – you can graciously despatch your aircraft to collect customers and give them the grand tour of your far-flung factories and facilities. A grateful (and impressed) potential client is much more likely to be in a mood to sign the big contract. Face-to-face is still the best way to do business. The concerns of the 21st century business aeronaut don’t end with the customer. No conscientious corporate aircraft user should fail to be aware of the “soft” benefits it can bring. Charitable and humanitarian tasks are a great way of utilising capacity that might otherwise be flying empty and quite apart from the favourable publicity spin-off, you might very well find yourself experiencing a warm virtuous glow. What might even qualify as Professor Brooks’s “improved state of being.” And that’s another productivity-booster you won’t find in the quarterly figures. Assuming you haven’t left them in an airline seat pocket...

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QUOTE SOURCE * MacLeans In Defence of the Corporate Jet, Feb 2009 ** NEXA Advisors *** NYT 31 Jan 2009

“Because it’s our business, NetJets are probably the world experts on why people fly private. The reasons come down to just two things: a private plane is a time machine and it’s a profit machine. For example, a London-based executive who has business in France might just manage to squeeze two meetings in a day if he travelled by commercial airline. But with a private aircraft he can manage four and be home in time for dinner. That’s because he can set his own schedule, use airports closer to his clients and avoid airport delays. The savings in hotel bills, car hire and per diems put the economic argument beyond question. We had clients who achieved in one day what would have taken three days without their own plane. Compared to taking an airline, it’s chalk and cheese. The jet could take a team of six colleagues plus luggage and they had a discreet, secure environment in which to discuss business and leave their confidential papers. That can make all the difference if something goes wrong: we had one very famous client who left a laptop on our aircraft and we returned it to him before he’d even noticed it was missing. Try doing that on an airline!”

“Quite simply, the advantages are fabulous. It’s changed my life – and the way I do business. My schedule takes me all over Europe and there’s no way commercial flights could compete with the speed and versatility I get from having my own aircraft. My King Air 90GTx takes me into airports that are often too small for the airlines but which are close to where I need to get to. I’m freed from timetables, terminal delays, security queues – I decide where I want to go and when I want to come back. That alone saves on hotels and ground transport. In today’s markets, you need to be flexible and fast. I can work on the plane, negotiate with clients and carry an incredible amount of equipment and luggage. The King Air never lets me down. It’s truly a great aircraft. Just fill her up and go. And there’s no plane I’d rather be in when the weather’s bad - it feels incredibly solid and trustworthy. Money comes in different forms. My own aircraft gives me time, flexibility, opportunity, peace of mind – you can’t put a price on these things. I couldn’t go back to life without it.” 02

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“I fly all over Europe for business and pleasure - to the UK, Switzerland, Italy and Southern France and Spain and so on. With my own plane, I’m able to fly directly to the closest airports to wherever I’m going. When we were starting the business that was particularly important. We were flying high-tech equipment – mobile satellite communications – all the time so we could just land at, say Biggin Hill and put the kit in a taxi and it would be with the client with absolutely no delay. We had no trouble justifying the expense: with three on board it was cheaper than the equivalent business class fares – and of course if, like me, you fly yourself then the economics make even more sense. You really can’t put a price on the convenience. For instance, to visit clients in Eindhoven by flying in our own King Air we can make the trip in two hours. The same journey by airline via Amsterdam would take six. I get home in good time and next day I can put in a full day’s work. That matters to me: time is short and life is for living. And I’m not very good at standing in lines!”


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20:30. The hotel. Luxury Accommodation in the heart of Mayfair – staying in Claridge’s.

Champagne silk full length dress, £650, by Amanda Wakeley (+44 20 7590 9150); Black suede shoes with metal stiletto, £495, by Christian Louboutin (+44 20 7491 0033); Black fur clutch bag, £329, by Diane von Furstenberg (+44 20 7499 0886 www.dvf.com); Gold cocktail ring, from a selection, by Dinny Hall (+44 20 7792 3913 www.dinnyhall.com); Piano Suite by DVF £8,500 per night. (+44 20 7107 8842 www.claridges.com)

Photographed by Bruce Smith and James Dale on location at Claridges. Fashion Stylist: Sarah Nash Styling Assistant: Abi Walker Hair & Make-Up: Ian McIntosh Models: Rodrigo Muller at M&P; Sarah MacDonnell at Bookings.

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White cotton jeans, £65, Black calfskin watch, £3,400, Brown leather polo boots, £800, all by Asprey (+44 20 7493 676 www.asprey.com); Navy cotton polo top, £150, by La Martina at Harrods (+44 20 7730 1234 www.harrods.com)

10:00. The Game. A decent breakfast, mental preparation, the journey to the Polo Grounds, the game – playing to win.

White cotton jeans, £65, Black calfskin watch, £3,400, Brown leather polo boots, £800, Black leather weekend bag, £4,995, Tan polo bag, £1,595, Polo ball, £3.40, Polo mallet, £85, all by Asprey (+44 20 7493 676 www.asprey.com); Navy cotton polo top, £150, Grey jersey blazer, £495, both La Martina at Harrods (+44 20 7730 1234 www.harrods.com); Porsche Cayenne Diesel in Umber Metallic, from £45,256.00, as featured £56,950.00 (www.porsche.com)

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Blue silk jersey with stud detail full length dress, £530, by Halston Heritage at www.net-a-porter.com; Black suede shoes with metal stiletto, £495, by Christian Louboutin (+44 20 7491 0033); Gold earrings, £440, by Dinny Hall (+44 20 7792 3913 www.dinnyhall.com)

20:00. The victor. Celebrating the win, booking the best table in town – dinner in Gordon Ramsay at Claridge’s

White cotton dinner shirt, £99, Black silk bow tie, £30 both by Thomas Pink (www.thomaspink.com); Sentryman Cap Engine Turning cufflinks, £225 by Dunhill (www.dunhill.com)

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01 Between 1927 and 1957 the Mille Miglia (one thousand miles) was the most important open-road endurance race in Italy. The route crossed Italy from Brescia to Rome and back, with thousands of racing enthusiasts lining the roadside. Now the competition has been revived and transformed into a road trip driven at legal speeds. The only cars permitted to enter are those that participated in the original event. Eddy Buttarelli and Tim Skelton witness a celebration of hard-fought battles between Mercedes and Ferraris. Images by Cuboimages.

“ It is necessary to relax your muscles when you can. Relaxing your brain is fatal.” Stirling Moss

01 The well-used steering wheel of a priceless classic Ferrari 02 Sublime gullwing Mercedes-Benz awaiting technical check in Brescia 03 Stirling Moss after his record-breaking win in 1955

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Mille Miglia Still The Worlds Finest Road Race You may boo the speed limit that has slowed today’s Mille Miglia to a procession. The breathtaking speeds are no more, but at least spectators have a proper chance to ogle some restored masterpieces of 20th century automobile engineering as they parade past with their shiny paint and glittering chrome. If you’re going to drive 500 miles across Italy and back again, you may as well do so in style.

The first field consisted of 77 unmodified production cars, driven by leading Italian racers and by public figures such as the mayor of Bologna and car manufacturer Bindo Maserati. Each paid the same nominal entrance fee: one lira. At 8 am on March 26 the race was started by Augusto Turati, Secretary of the National Fascist Party. Maserati was first off, followed by the others at one and two minute intervals.

The original Mille Miglia, or ‘One Thousand Mile’, developed as an open-road race run 24 times from 1927 to 1957. It owes its existence to the Brescia Automobile Club - in 1922, when the Italian Grand Prix was moved from the Montichiari circuit near Brescia to the all-new Monza circuit near Milan, the club took it as a personal insult and the chairman and vice-chairman, Franco Mazzotti Bianchelli and Count Aymo Maggi di Gradella, resolved to respond. They assembled a group of wealthy friends and arranged a race from Brescia to Rome and back, covering a figure-of-eight course 1,600 km – 1,000 miles – long, passing through Parma, Bologna, Florence, Rome, Perugia, Ancona and Treviso. The route has varied over the years, but the total length remained the same since.

Victory in that first race went to a 2-litre OM 665S driven by the Italian Giuseppe Morandi. It took him 21 hours to finish, an average speed of over 77 km/h - astonishingly fast given the road conditions that shredded tyres and necessitated several changes. The organisers had expected average speeds below 50 km/h… The pre-war events in the years that followed were dominated by Italian drivers and cars, but in 1931 Rudolf Caracciola (European Grand Prix champion three times in the mid-1930s and a German despite his Italian name) won in a supercharged Mercedes-Benz SSKL, averaging more than 100 km/h for the first time. It was the first of only three wins for foreign drivers.


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06 04 1000 Miglia is now a sporting brand in its own right 05 The cars are the stars in the modern Mille Miglia – and people come in their thousands to pay their respect 06 The 1000 mile route has changed a little over the years, but its length remains the same

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The race grew steadily in popularity and the cars got faster. By 1938 the winner was averaging 135 km/h. But an accident that year killed a number of spectators, prompting fascist dictator Benito Mussolini to ban the 1939 event. Although it returned briefly in 1940, it was held over nine laps of a 100 km course. The Italians continued dominating after the war, when the Mille Miglia was restored to its familiar format of a single giant lap. Few foreigners even made it onto the podium, but one was legendary Argentinian Juan Manuel Fangio, who won five Formula One World Championships in the 1950s. He finished second in 1955 - half an hour behind a young Briton named Stirling Moss, whose Mercedes 300 SLR completed the race in a record 10 hours 8 minutes. That year was the peak of the race’s popularity, with 521 cars entering, but a series of fatal crashes in 1957 marked the beginning of the end. Joseph Göttgens died when his Triumph crashed in Brescia and far more serious was the accident involving the Ferrari containing Spaniard Alfonso de Portago and his co-driver Edmund Nelson, in the village of Guidizzolo. Besides the car’s occupants, nine spectators were also killed, five of them children. The cause was probably a blow-out - the Ferrari team, to save time, had decided not to change tyres – and the bad press this created forced the organisers to change the event into a procession at legal speeds, with only short stages driven at full pelt. Mille Miglia struggled on, but the spark had gone. Audiences quickly lost interest and it was discontinued in 1961.

Fortunately for us, the story doesn’t end there. In 1977 the Brescia Automobile Club decided to organise a rally to mark the 50th anniversary of the first race, under the new title Mille Miglia Storica. They used the old route from Brescia to Rome and back and only invited vintage cars that had run in the original event. Run on public roads at legal speeds, with short competitive trials (the format of the last three Mille Miglias), standings were determined not by the first to cross the line, but by the results of the precision tests along the way. The revival was a hit. Enthusiasts came from around the world to show off their vintage cars. And by 1987 growing public interest had persuaded the organisers to make it an annual occasion. Today, this magnificent parade of classic machines turns Brescia into meeting place for car nuts every May, as they gather to do battle on the road. Since 2002 the number of entrants has been limited to 375, but that’s more than enough to create an incredible spectacle as they queue up, one behind the other, on the starting line. Times have clearly changed in the years since the first Mille Miglia, even if the cars have not. In 1927 it was seen as a way to grab the attention of future motorists, by demonstrating the reliability of new production models. Now there is no intention of looking forward. The only spark comes from the plugs and perhaps from the glint of nostalgic tears forming in the eyes of enthusiasts, as they catch sight of those vintage Alfa Romeos, BMWs, Maseratis and Porsches – the very same makes that once turned ‘Gran Turismo’ sports cars into household names.

Mille Miglia Museum Viale della Rimembranza (between Via Indipendenza and Via della Parrocchi) Open: Tues-Sun 10 am to 6 pm. Entry: €7 euro www.museomillemiglia.it


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Global Customer Support

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Bonanza G36 The legend lives – and the latest model is the best yet

Hawker Beechcraft has invested in the world’s largest factory-owned service network, dedicated to providing the very best support in the general aviation industry.

01 Bonanza G36 cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 3.84m Width 1.07m Height 1.27m

The 3,000-strong Hawker Beechcraft Global Customer Support workforce includes some of the industry’s most respected experts, operating in state-of-the-art facilities, backed by a $500 million parts inventory. When required, they deploy in mobile response teams to keep customers’ aircraft flying, even in the remotest regions. Round the clock, every day of the year, they supply on-site and hotline support, print and online publications, M&O seminars and scheduled inspections through the assurance of Support Plus™. In a continuous process of product development, Hawker Beechcraft is constantly searching for new ways to reduce aircraft operating costs, increase resale value and improve the overall ownership experience.

The G36 has a certified ceiling of 18,500ft with a maximum cruising speed of 326km/h Maximum range of 1,722km

01 Hawker Beechcraft EMEA Headquarters in Chester, England

Single-engine pilots prize the high-performance control and proven reliability of the Beechcraft Bonanza G36. Faster, roomier and more comfortable than any aircraft in its class, the legendary G36 is the personal aircraft of choice. The Beechcraft Bonanza is also designed and built 15% stronger for certification in the rugged utility category. Equipped with Garmin G1000® avionics, it’s a pilot’s dream – and offers superior value for the investment.


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Baron G58

King Air C90GTx

The best six-seat twin in the world

Why settle for a VLJ? The Beechcraft King Air C90GTx is the one aircraft that can boldly go wherever opportunity awaits, with fullyintegrated Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21™ avionics – the same system found on larger jets costing millions more – and the trademark ability to land in places that no Very Light Jet can. Impressive enhancements to payload and performance include composite winglets that improve climb rate while further increasing fuel efficiency, as well as an increased gross weight that doubles the full-fuel payload compared to its predecessor, the C90GTi.

King Air C90GTx cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 3.84m Width 1.37m Height 1.45m The C90GTx has a certified ceiling of 30,000ft with a maximum cruising speed of 500km/h Maximum range of 2,426km

The Beechcraft Baron G58 is the undisputed leader in its class, carrying more payload further and faster – all with the quality and comfort for which Beechcraft is renowned. With a fully-integrated Garmin G1000® avionics package as standard equipment, the Beechcraft Baron’s mission adaptability plus six-seat capability make this the ultimate light twin.

Baron G58 cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 3.84m Width 1.07m Height 1.27m The Baron has a certified ceiling of 20,688ft with a maximum cruising speed of 374km/h Maximum range of 2,926km

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King Air 250 cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 5.08m Width 1.37m Height 1.45m The 250 has a certified ceiling of 35,000ft with a maximum cruising speed of 574km/h Maximum range of 2,982km

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King Air 250

King Air 350i

Technologically equipped for the most

The undisputed flagship – and the best-selling

demanding conditions

turbo-prop in history

The King Air is the world’s most popular business aircraft. Why? Because a medium-range business aircraft must be able to land almost anywhere and perform flawlessly in all conditions. The King Air 250 accomplishes these tasks better than any other aircraft in its class. With the addition of composite propellers and winglets and a new ram air recovery system that ensures maximum power, the King Air 250’s delivers substantial improvements in takeoff performance, without compromising speed, range or climb.

The Beechcraft King Air 350i does what others in its class cannot. From the very beginning, the King Air has been the world’s leading turboprop aircraft. Its unmatched versatility, reliability and safety are the reasons why individuals, companies and governments in 105 countries around the world have purchased more than 6,500 King Airs.

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King Air 350i cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 5.94m Width 1.37m Height 1.45m The 350i has a certified ceiling of 35,000ft with a maximum cruising speed of 578km/h Maximum range of 3,343km


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Military and Special Missions

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T-6 Proven excellence. Extraordinary versatility. Exceptional value.

The Beechcraft T-6 military trainer, used by the Greek Hellenic Air Force, offers military organizations worldwide the most proven and most cost-effective training system available today. The T-6 is versatile, safe and effective for the most basic flight training tasks. With a top speed of 316 knots, a 7G to 3.5 G airframe and an advanced digital cockpit, it is equally adept at teaching the most advanced aerobatic manoeuvres and simulated combat training tasks – tasks that could previously be accomplished only in far more expensive aircraft. The next-generation Beechcraft T-6B/C offers air forces worldwide the most proven and cost-effective training system available. Accommodating instruction in instrument flight procedures, aerobatics and aerial combat manoeuvres and weapons delivery, the T-6B/C spans the military training spectrum with just a single platform.

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01 All of the Beechcraft King Air and Hawker series aircraft can be fitted with medical packages as air ambulances for medical evacuation (medevac) missions

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02 King Air 350iER (Extended range) have been customised for various uses, for example – air ambulance, maritime surveillance and photographic to name just a few

Hawker Beechcraft has delivered more military training and special-mission aircraft than any other general aviation manufacturer, setting the standard for dependable versatility in applications ranging from pilot training and surveillance to air ambulance, flight inspection and utility/VIP transport. Used by armed forces and governments worldwide, the Beechcraft T-6B/C trainers deliver capable, cost-effective solutions while the customisable Beechcraft King Air 350iER (Extended Range) has proven itself by combining versatility for special missions with unmatched value – all the qualities for which King Air is justly renowned. In a world where unpredictability is commonplace and flexibility is critical, Beechcraft delivers robust, purposebuilt, multi-mission solutions.

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Hawker 200 maximum cruising speed is 876km/h with a maximum operating altitude of 45,000ft Maximum range of 3,010km Maximum baggage capacity is 2.2 cu m with a maximum weight of 340kg

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Hawker 200

Hawker 750

Superior performance and comfort without compromise

The standard that defined an entire class of aircraft

The moment you push the Hawker 200’s throttles forward, you will know you are at the helm of the world’s bestperforming light jet. The exquisite pairing of its advanced composite airframe with high technology engines delivers the capabilities needed for almost any light business jet mission. It offers the highest cruise speeds, burns less fuel and produces fewer emissions while providing passengers with the largest, most comfortable cabin in its class.

The Hawker 750 not only leads the light-midsize jet category, it has totally redefined it. The 750 provides the same spacious and comfortable stand-up cabin found in the Hawker 900XP, coupled with an operational efficiency and acquisition cost previously found only in smaller, less capable jets. The Hawker 750 is the only jet in its class that provides the ability to fill all nine seats, load both external and in-cabin baggage compartments, fill the fuel tanks and fly more than 2,000 nautical miles – 650 miles further than its nearest competitor. Yet, as impressive as that is, it is just the beginning of what sets the Hawker 750 (and those who travel in it) apart from the rest.

Hawker 750 cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 6.50m Width 1.83m Height 1.75m The 750 has a certified ceiling of 41,000ft with a maximum cruising speed of 861km/h The Range with 4 passengers is 3,910km. With max payload, the range is 3,663km


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Hawker 900XP The world’s most popular mid-size business jet is better than ever Offering unequalled mission versatility, the Hawker 900XP can take as many as nine passengers further, delivering greater value than any other midsize jet. Or it can load up four passengers with luggage and cover more than 2,800 nautical miles. How? With a combination of advanced aerodynamics, new-generation Honeywell engines and, of course, unmatched Hawker quality. The Hawker 900XP is certified to operate from unimproved grass or gravel runways, so it can literally go where other comparable business jets cannot. It all means that a Hawker 900XP will take crew and passengers further, faster and with more reliability and cost-efficiency than the closest competition.

Maximum cruising speed of 863km/h Maximum range of 5,371km The 900XP boasts the new Honeywell TFE731-50R engines The Hawker 900XP cabin is the largest in its class – dimensions are (internal): Length 6.50m Width 1.83m Height 1.75m

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Hawker 4000 has a certified ceiling of 45,000ft with a maximum cruising speed of 896km/h Maximum range of 6,038km Large cabin luxury and international range with midsize economy The spacious Hawker 4000 cabin dimensions are (internal): Length 7.62m Width 1.97m Height 1.83m

Hawker 4000 Quite simply, the world’s most advanced business jet No matter how it is measured, the award-winning Hawker 4000 is the most technologically-advanced super-midsize business jet in the world – at the right size and at the right price. It is the first aircraft in its class to feature an advanced composite fuselage, along with a swept supercritical wing. Couple that with peerless craftsmanship in a cabin that accommodates eight passengers, advanced high-efficiency engines and cutting-edge avionics typically found in larger jets costing millions more, and it is no surprise that the flagship Hawker 4000 delivers superior capability, comfort, performance, efficiency and value to business.

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Journey Magazine  

Hawker Beechcraft are one of the world's leading aircraft manufacturers. Our brief was to create an intelligent lifestyle title that is dist...

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