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MATTERHORN MUSEUM ZERMATLANTIS.

UNIQUE AUTHENTIC TRADITIONAL EXCITING ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTRUCTIVE INTERESTING TRUE ATTRACTIVE ORIGINAL

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zermatt.ch

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ZERMATT AROUND 1850 A UNIQUE INTERACTIVE PRESENTATION A subterranean world opens up underground under the glass dome adjacent to the village church: Zermatlantis. You enter rooms as they looked in days gone by in Zermatt. Experience how the people of the poor farming village tried to ward off the forces of nature with God’s help. How mountaineers conquered the surrounding mountains and 4000-metre peaks and how the fatal fall of four climbers on the first ascent of the Matterhorn changed life in Zermatt for ever. Experience the myth of Zermatt and the Matterhorn for yourself through state-of-the-art presentation techniques. The farming village that became a worldfamous holiday resort. And you can’t say that you’ve really been to Zermatt until you have gazed at the original torn rope from the first ascent. A world from the past has been excavated, a forgotten village reappears. Visit the old houses, immerse yourself in the world of mountain farming families, mules, mountain guides and the very first tourists. Experience here how the inhabitants of Zermatt lived in 19th century, when there were no mountain railways and ski lifts, and the first English mountaineers arrived in the village.

Special exhibitions The museum has regular special exhibitions and offers the perfect backdrop for cultural performances.

Private and Corporate Events The Museum premises can be used for private functions outside of normal opening hours (on request).

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Museum concept and design: Steiner Sarnen Schweiz

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HIGHLIGHTS The rope from the first ascent The original rope from the first ascent – a hemp rope – is housed B inC the museum, like a valuable relic behind toughened glass. In 2005, the Swiss rope manufacturer Mammut reproduced the D original rope and tested its tear resistance. A rope like this would E only hold 150 kilogrammes – the four mountaineers on the first F ascent, who fell despite being attached to the hemp rope, had no chance. G A

H I A J B

The discovery of human remains on the Theodul Glacier The ‘soldier’, the discovery of human remains with coins, shoes, L fragments of clothing and a variety of weapons, is an archaeologD ical M sensation. He was discovered by locals on the Theodul Glacier E in 1985. This is the second most important discovery of human N F remains in the Alpine region – following ‘Ötzi’, the Ice man, who O G came to light on an Austrian glacier in 1991. K C

P H A Q I B R J C S K D T L E U M F V N G W O H X P I Y Q J Z R K

Prehistoric stone axe from the Neolithic period The impressive green stone (eclogite) axe was discovered in 1959 above Furgg on the road to the Theodul Pass. A traveller could have lost it. However, this seems unlikely as it is of a respectable size and would have been extremely valuable in its time. The scientific community assumes that it was intentionally put there as a votive offering. It originates from the Neolithic period (about the 3rd to 5th millennium BC).

S L T M U N V O

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A B C D E F G A H B I C J D K E L F M G N H O I P J Q K R L S M T N A U O B V P C W Q D X R E Y S F Z T G U H V I

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AUDIO GUIDE The audio guide (chargeable) offers a unique opportunity to get to know olden-day Zermatt from the viewpoint of two different people: Edward Whymper 1850 – 1911 Edward Whymper was born on 27th April 1840 in London. Like his father, he learned woodcarving as a trade. He became famous through the tragic first ascent of the Matterhorn on 14th July 1865. He wrote books and guides and undertook expeditions. Edward Whymper died on 16th September 1911 in Chamonix.

Hannes Taugwalder 1910 – 2007 Hannes Taugwalder was born on 21st December 1910 in Zermatt and grew up there. He left the valley, then worked as the Director of a knitwear factory and became a self-employed manufacturer of women’s and children’s clothing. He has also written several novels, short stories, poems, radio plays and stage plays. He describes his childhood memories in Zermatt in his book ‘The Lost Valley’. Readers are introduced to the everyday life of a mountain farming family in the years following the First World War.

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1 1 2 1 1 6 2 3 3 2 21 7 3 1 4 14 3 32 81 4 2 5 25 4 1 43 92 5 3 6 36 5 2 54 1 103 6 4 7 47 6 3 65 2 114 7 5 8 58 1 7 4 76 3 125 8 6 9 69 2 8 1 5 87 4 136 9 7 10 710 3 9 2 6 98 5 147 10 8 11 1 10 811 4 3 7 10 6 9 158 11 9 1 12 2 11 912 5 4 8 11 7 10 169 12 10 2 13 3 12 1013 6 5 9 1211 8 13 11 10 Hotel 17 3 14 14 4 13 11 7 6 1312 91 10 18 14 12 11 4 15 5 14 1215 8 7 1413 102 11 19 15 13 Gallery 12 Church 5 16 6 15 1316 9 (Gallery) 8 1514 113 12 20 16 14 13 6 17 7 16 1417 10 9 1615 124 13 21 17 15 14 7 18 8 17 1518 115 14 10A 13 Matterhorn 1716 22 18 16 15 room 8Alpine126 19 1 9 18 1619 11 Museum 15 1817 Tea House Dairy B 14 Hotel 23 19 17 16 9 20 2 10 19 1720 137 16 12 1918 15 24 A 20 18 17 10C 148 21 3 Mountain 11 20 1821 House Guides’13 Hut 16 17 20 19 Research 25 21 19 18 Laboratory B 11D 22Vicarage 4 12 21 1922 15 Granary 21 A 14 179 18 20 26 22 20 19 C 12E 23 5 13 22 2023 16 10 19 15 Mule 18 2221 27 23 21 20 B Drivers 24 24 6 House 14Barn 21 D 13 17 23 11 Church 16F 19 20 2322 Barn 28 24 21 22 25 25 7 C 14 15 24 22 18 12 E 17G 20 21 2423 29 25 23 22 26 8 D 15 16 25 2326 19 13 22 2524 30 F 18H 21 26 24 23 Audio 27 9 E 16Guide 17 26 2427 20 14 Menu: 19 23 2625 22 31 27 24 25 G 17 I 28 / Welcome 10 Introduction 18 27House – Window 2528 21 15 24 F 20 2726 23 32 28 26 25 H 18 J 11 Mountain Hut29 19 28Dairy 2629 22 16Guides’ 21 25 2827 24 33 29 27 26 G 19 30 12 Rescue Sledge 20 29Granary 2730 I 22 23 17 26 K 25 2928 34 30 27 28 20 31 13 H Historic 21 30Barn II Alpine Museum 2831 24 18 J 23L 26 27 3029 35 31 29 28 21 32 14 I Mountain 22 31House Bench 2932 25 19Guides’ 28 3130 36 K 24M 27 32 30 29 22 Monte 33 15 J Hotel 23 32Barn I Rosa – Staircase 3033 26 20 29 25 3231 28 37 33 30 31 L 23N 34 16 Hotel 24 33Church Monte Rosa – Reception 3134 27 21 30 K 26 3332 29 38 34 32 31 M 24O 35 17 Tea 25 34Vicarage House 3235 28 22 31 27 3433 30 39 35 33 L 32 36 18 N 25 26 35 3336 29 23 32 28P 31 3534 40 36 33 34 26 museum 37 19 M The 27 36Tour: approx. 1h is accessible to wheelchairs 3437 30 24 33 O 29Q 32 3635 41 37 35 34 38 20 N 27 28 37 3538 31 25 34 3736 42 P 30R 33 38 36 35 39 21 O 28 29 38 3639 32 26 35 31 3837 34 43 39 36 37 Q 29S 40 22 30 39 Free entry 3740 33 27 36 P 32 3938 35 44 40 38 37 R 30T Museum 31 40 •23Swiss 3841 34 28 37 Pass41 33 4039 36 45 41 39 Q 38 42 32 41cards •24Raiffeisen ‘VISA’ or ‘MasterCard’ 3942 S 31 35 29‘Maestro’, 34U 37 38 4140 46 42 39 40 R 32 43 Pass and Swiss 33 42 Pass 4043 Youth •25Swiss Flexi 36 30 Swiss T 35V Pass, 39 4241 38 47 43 41 40 44 26 S 33 34 43 4144 37 31 40 4342 48 U 36W 39 44 42 41 45 27 T 34 35 44 4245 38 32 37 41 4443 40 49 45 43 42 V 35X 46 28 36 45 4346 39 33 U 38 42 4544 41 50 46 44 43 47 29 W 36Y 40 37 46 4447 34 39 43 4645 42 51 V 47 45 44 48 30 X 37Z 41 38 47 4548 35 40 44 4746 43 52 48 46 45 W 38 49 31 39 48 4649 42 36 45 Y 41 4847 44 53 49 47 46 ospekt-Museum-DE-EN.indd X 39 7 50 1

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THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN History Between 1857 and 1865, 15 unsuccessful attempts were made on the Matterhorn from the Italian side and 3 from the Swiss side. In July 1865, London-born Edward Whymper made a further attempt with the Italian mountain guide Jean-Antoine Carrel. As Whymper waited for good weather in Breuil / Cervinia, he heard that Carrel had set out for the Matterhorn with an Italian roped party. By chance, Whymper met Lord Francis Douglas and learned of his intention to conquer the summit from Zermatt with Peter Taugwalder.

Departure On 12th July, Whymper and Douglas reached Zermatt through the Theodul Pass and met the mountain guide Michel Croz, who was also planning the ascent with the Reverend Charles Hudson and D. Robert Hadow. They decided to make the ascent together and also involved Peter Taugwalder’s son, also called Peter. They spent the night at the foot of the Matterhorn on 13th July and on 14th July 1865 at 3.40 a.m. climbed onto the rock pyramid on the Hoernli Ridge (Hörnligrat). The higher they climbed, the more difficult the ascent became – the inexperienced Hadow relied on help.

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The Triumph 14th July 1865, 1.40 p.m.: The group stood together on the Matterhorn summit. There were no traces of their Italian competitors. Whymper spied the Italians far below. The victors drew attention to themselves with cries of joy and by throwing stones down the mountainside. Carrel recognised Whymper by his brightly-coloured trousers and disappointed began his descent.

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The Disaster After an hour, Croz, Hadow, Hudson and Douglas roped up to their strong rope and started their descent. Taugwalder senior also secured Douglas, the last in the party. He used his thin reserve rope, which was the only one he had available. Whymper and the young Taugwalder followed in a second rope party. Douglas noticed Hadow’s lack of confidence and asked Whymper to rope himself to Taugwalder senior. The seven men now formed a single rope party. To secure them, Taugwalder senior tied the fixed club rope that connected him to Whymper to a rock spur. Hadow suddenly slipped and pulled Croz, Hudson and Douglas with him. The impact of the auxiliary rope hit Taugwalder senior and injured his hands and chest, then severed off. The four unfortunate men plummeted down the North wall. The three survivors were deeply shocked and spent the night under the Hörnli shoulder. Whymper wrote later that, at sunset, they saw shadows that looked like crosses above the Lyskamm. On Saturday morning 15th July they arrived back in Zermatt.

The Rescue The following day, Whymper climbed with three Anglican priests and five foreign mountain guides to the Matterhorn Glacier. They discovered the shattered bodies of Hadow, Croz and Hudson. They only found Douglas’ gloves, one shoe and his belt. The body remained missing. The three dead were buried in the compacted snow of the glacier. On the orders of religious and secular authorities, the corpses were transferred to Zermatt on 20th July. Croz was buried with Roman Catholic rites in the cemetery, Hadow and Hudson were buried outside of the cemetery by an Anglican priest. Hadow’s bones were later transferred to England, and Hudson’s remains were enclosed within the altar of the Anglican Church in Zermatt.

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The Epilogue The court decided that Hadow was to blame for the accident. And yet no crime had been committed. Malicious tongues later claimed that Whymper or Taugwalder senior had cut through the rope to save themselves. The two suffered badly from this accusation. The tragedy brought worldwide attention to Zermatt and had a lasting effect on tourism development in the village.

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Matterhorn Museum Kirchplatz 11 CH-3920 Zermatt Tel. +41 (0)27 967 41 00 matterhornmuseum@zermatt.ch More Informations & opening hours: www.matterhornmuseum.ch

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Matterhorn Museum Zermatlantis (en)