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The Official Magazine of The Canadian Hereford Association


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Message from the Prime Minister

I

am pleased to welcome everyone attending the World Hereford Conference #16. Calgary is proud to host this premier cattle industry event.

Hereford cattle have a distinguished history in Canada. As one of the first British breeds to arrive, they gained widespread acceptance among Canadian cattlemen. Hereford cattlemen were true pioneers and subsequent generations have earned great respect for their resiliency, work ethic and commitment to the industry. To this day, the Hereford maintains a strong presence in Canada. I have a special connection to your industry through my wife Laureen, who once worked for The Canadian Hereford Digest. As your worldwide community gathers here in Calgary, we extend our warmest wishes for a successful event. I know cattle breeders attending the next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tours, shows and workshops will return home better prepared to meet the challenges of competing in the beef cattle industry. With over 500 head of cattle and over 500 guests, the World Hereford Council has assembled an impressive group of beef industry leaders for its events across Western Canada. The Calgary conference is very appropriately timed to coincide with the Centennial of the Calgary Stampede. I know your members will value the chance to experience this historic celebration. On behalf of the Government of Canada, I hope you enjoy a memorable conference and continued success in the future. Sincerely,

The Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper, P.C., M.P. Prime Minister of Canada

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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Message From The Minister

On

behalf of the Government of Canada, a warm Western welcome to cattlemen from Canada and around the world attending the 16th annual World Hereford Conference - and the young people here for the Junior Bonanza Show. Canada is certainly proud to host this prestigious event -and what better place to meet than the Calgary Stampede, which this year celebrates its 100th anniversary as the “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth”? Congratulations to both the Canadian Hereford Association and the World Hereford Council, which has been promoting Hereford breed excellence for more than 60 years. As a former cattleman who proudly wears a Stetson, I know that great beef starts with great genetics. Here at the Stampede, you’ll get a real taste of our topquality, innovative Canadian cattle genetics that are sought after in over 70 countries around the world - thanks in part to the great work of our leading-edge Hereford breeders.

With growing global demand for beef, the Government of Canada is proud to work with the Canadian Beef Breeds Council and the entire industry to ensure that our global trade pathways are built on fair rules and sound science -- and to help get more Hereford genetics on kitchen tables around the world. I wish you all the best for a productive meeting and a memorable visit to this breathtaking region of Canada.

Gerry Ritz, PC, MP

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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Message From Honourable Alison M. Redford, QC Premier of Alberta

On

behalf of the Government of Alberta, it is my pleasure to welcome everyone to the 2012 World Hereford Conference and the 100th anniversary celebration of the Calgary Stampede. In Alberta, we are proud that our province got its start from a foundation based on a rural way of life in a land of great opportunity. For the past 100 years, the Calgary Stampede has evolved and today is the “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth.” Its many events help celebrate our province’s rich Western heritage while highlighting, promoting and supporting our agriculture and food industry.

During the 10-day Stampede, attendees can expect to see one of the finest agricultural sporting spectacles in the world. The event connects rural and urban communities and is an excellent opportunity for agricultural business to network and share ideas. We invite you to explore our agriculture and food industry through the sessions in this conference, the Calgary Stampede, and through the regional cuisine and food trends of our many award winning restaurants. While attending the conference, I would also encourage our Canadian and international guests to revel in the natural beauty of our province and enjoy our mountains, parks, cities and cultural offerings. Enjoy your time in Calgary and welcome to Alberta.

Alison M. Redford, QC July 8 -24, 2012

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Feed Efficient, Fertile, Performance Cattle Horned and Polled Bulls for Sale

BLAIR-ATHOL MAJOR MOVES 57Y EPDs:

CE +1.3

BW +3.7

WW YW MILK TM REA +36.8 +64.6 +21.4 +39.8 +0.17

MARB -0.02

CFH 934W LAD 109Y EPDs:

CE +1.7

BW +1.5

WW YW MILK TM REA +37.4 +59.3 +18.3 +37.0 +0.03

MARB +0.05

Amigo Sale: November 14, 2012 With Pahl Livestock, Medicine Hat, AB

Directions

9 miles North of Hwy 4 on Tempest Road or 7 miles South of Hwy 3 on Tempest Road or 11 miles East of Lethbridge on Jail Road & 3.5 miles South on Range Road 19-4 Byron and Carolyn 403-345-3889 403-308-9971 Roberta, Jocelyn and Rosie

Doran & Denise 403-345-4144

www.xtcherefords.com email: xtcherf@shockware.com 8

Brant & Sara 403-345-4124

Box 1157 Coaldale, Alberta T1M 1M9


HARVIE  MS   GREEN  62R Donor  Dam  of   Elliot  6Y   Embryos  on  offer   at  WHC

OVHF  196T   ELLIOT  6Y Harvie  Dan  T-­â&#x20AC;?Bone   196T  son,  shows   at  WHC

Frank  &  Andree  McNeely

Â&#x2018;Â&#x161;ÍşČ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;ÇĄČ&#x2C6;Ͳ ͲͲ Phone:  ;Ͳ͸Ǥͺ͸ͺnjʹʹͲͳČ&#x2C6;Cell:  306.436-­â&#x20AC;?7908 Email:  amcneely@sasktel.net

OVHF  69T   WILDFIRE  10W First  Lady  Classic   Champion  2010 Outstanding  Traveler   69T  daughter  dam  of   SSAL  15W  Yesman  1Y

SSAL  15W   YESMAN  1Y OVHF  16R  Warden   15W  son

Watch  for  our   new  SSAL  Junior   Herdsire  at  the  WHC

Six  South  Acres  Ltd  

Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÂ&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;ĆŹÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x192; Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020; Â&#x2018;Â&#x161;ͳʹ͚Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;ÇĄČ&#x2C6;Ͳ ÍłͲ Phone:  306.436.4420 Cell:  306.436.7515  (Curtis) Email:  sixsouthacres@sasktel.net

HARVIE  MS  RONDA  41W   &  OVHF  MS  RONDA  4Y Fabulous  Traveler  69T   daughter  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Embryos   for  sale  at  WHC Look  for  41W  and  her   2012  719T  heifer  calf   as  well  as  4Y  at  WHC.

HARVIE  MS   RONDA  41W   Embryos

Jill,  Cole  &  Tinley  Harvie Í&#x201C;Í´Č&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;ÇĄČ&#x2C6;Íś Íł Phone:  403.335.4206 Email:  jharvie1@live.com

41W  x  New  Zealand   Sire  Otapawa   Skymate  2047  ET 9


Foundation Sire

CC 129D  SUPERMAN  77J

Our New  Herd  Sire

CL 1  DOMINO  929W

GIL 22P   Superman   daughter   with  929  bull   calf.

Grandam of  929W

DON 15N     Superman   daughter.

Great Grandam   of  929W

GIL 29Y     Sired  by   929W  and   dam  is  a   Superman   cow.

DON 15R   Superman   daughter.     Heifer  calf   sired  by   929W. Sold  at  Ranch  Ready  Bull  Sale  to   Ian  Glass  for  $9,000  for  half  interest.

We welcome  visitors  anytime  to  come  and  look  at  our  idea  of  the  “NEW  HEREFORD” Donnie  &  Laurel  Gillespie   Donnie  &  Laurel  Gillespie   &  Boys &  Boys 10

(306) 774-­3636 (306)  774-­3636 Wymark,  Saskatchewan Wymark,  Saskatchewan

Don &  Norah  Gillespie Don  &  Norah  Gillespie

(306) 478-­2645 (306)  478-­2645 Mankota,  Saskatchewan Mankota,  Saskatchewan


C 31S EXPLOSIVE 45X {DLF IEF HYF} XTC 8L SUNRISE 66N MHH 66N SUNRISE LAD 31S MHH 22L VIKING LASS 29N

C 27H SUN DOG 8L C 359 MISS D ROBIN 30G VIKING 254 LAD ET 22L MHH 262B VOLTAGE LASS 27L CC 83D SABRE 180H VEDAN 180H SABRE LAD 110K NORTHFORK PEAK VOLTAGE 1A C 110K MISS VEDAN 72N C 18C GENERAL D LAD 80G C 80G L MS STANDARD STAR 134K PDHR 3X STAND LASS 24C

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Canadian, U.S.  &  Australian  Semen  Available Thanks  to  Carlrams  Herefords,  Saskatchewan,  for   purchasing  a  full  1/2  interest  in  45X

FE 44S RED SKYLINE 24U {DLF IEF HYF} ¹ ¹ ¹

:DWFKIRU8·VÀUVWVRQVDWWKH:RUOG&RQIHUHQFH´5DQFKHU 'D\µ\RXZLOOEHLPSUHVVHG 6LULQJWKLFNQHVVERQH SLJPHQW 2ZQHGZLWK)HQWRQ+HUHIRUG5DQFK,QF

Canadian and  U.S.  Semen  Available

Stop by anytime, visitors are always welcome BRAD & TAMMY, TY & MELISSA

                                                                                                                     403-­734-­2111                                        Box  337,  Cluny,  AB  T0J  0S0                                                                                                                            Brad’s  Cell:  403-­934-­8714                    Email  corbiell@pcc-­inet.ca   6.4km  N.,  1km  W.  of  Fas  Gas  Service  Station  on  Hwy  1  at  Hwy  842,  Cluny,  AB

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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Welcome from The World Hereford Council

Welcome

to Canada. The World Hereford Council supported Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s application to host the 16th World Hereford Conference. Calgary was announced as the venue and this added to the anticipation and eagerness of Hereford members from all around the globe to visit Canada. The year 2012 marks the Centennial celebration of The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth, the Calgary Stampede. This event, coupled with ranch visits and a major Hereford Show and display at Olds will provide a great Hereford spectacle.

The global fellowship that exists among Hereford breeders is second to none and this is partially due to the network of communication which exists between World Council members. Hereford conferences have been staged every four years for the past 60 years. Over the course of that time, members have focused on keeping Herefords at the forefront of the beef industry. Conferences provide a vehicle for members to stay current with the latest research and technical developments in beef breeding. Promotion and marketing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the likes of which are offered at the World Conference - are also aspects of the Hereford industry that have played their part in the development of the breed. For some Hereford members, this will be their first World Conference, while for others, it will be an opportunity to rekindle friendships made in the past. On behalf of the World Hereford Council, I welcome everyone. Jan Wills World Hereford Council Secretary General

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Raising Quality Purebred Herefords For 4 Generations and 64 Years BBSF 13P TERRORIST ET 59T

{DLF, IEF, HYF}

Introducing our Herd Sires to the world

BAR-RZ 85U ROLEX 56X

{DLF, IEF, HYF}

Other Sires Represented: GHC FREIGHT 85U SQUARE-D ABILITY 261U BAR-RZ 362U GALAXY 27X

Stuart and Sherri Zoeteman Box 532, Fort Macleod, AB T0L 0Z0 Phone: 403-553-2687

Cell: 403-330-6490 Fax: 403-553-2699 Email: barrz2@telus.net 15


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Welcome from The World Hereford Conference Chairman

On

behalf of the Planning committee, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the World Hereford Conference 2012, with our theme of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Come Celebrate the New Herefordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. It was a generation ago that the WHC was last in Canada, in 1976, and it is well past time for another good celebration.

These are special events because they bring together participants from around the world as well as down the road. The objectives that have guided the planning of our events are: s Feature Canadian culture and our cattle industry to an international audience of conference participants. The pre- and post- tours, as well as our stops at the iconic Calgary Stampede and Olds Agricultural Society grounds will give you insights into the Canadian west, our history and values. s Promote breed improvement and education of breeders and juniors through our conference programs and shows. s Promote exchange of Hereford genetics worldwide through informal interactions and tours. s Showcase and promote the value of the Hereford breed within Canada to a broad audience through our closing events on Rancher Day when we open the doors to the commercial industry. While the Hereford breed has a long history of impact in Canada, for over 150 years, the last few years have seen a dramatic resurgence in interest, owing to the quality programs of our breeders but also to the changing demands of the commercial cattle industry that are met using Hereford genetics. It is a time to celebrate but also to learn from our history and continue to evolve as a breed. This event could not take place without the vision and commitment of the many volunteers who have been working over four years of planning and the dozens of sponsors who have partnered with us to bring each event to life. Their passion for the value of the Hereford breed in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cattle industry is infectious and I am indebted to their commitment. We sincerely hope that you enjoy and benefit from the World Hereford Conference. It is our honour to be your hosts! Sincerely, Jay Cross Chairman, WHC 2012 Planning Committee

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EPDs 2.0

CE

-­‐2.0

1.5

BW

6.2

39.0

WW

62.1

63.4

YW

95.9

29.5

M

22.4

49.0

TM

53.5

0.29

REA

0.87

0.20 MARB -­‐0.21

Canadian &  US  Semen  Available   Australian  &  South  America  Semen  Rights  Available

Canadian &  US  Semen  Available   Australian  Semen  Rights  –  Mawarra  Herefords

EPDs -­‐2.1

CE

1.4

5.6

BW

3.0

58

WW

52

97

YW

77

20

M

18

49.0

TM

44

0.69

REA

0.54

-­‐0.04 MARB 0.14

Canadian Semen  Available  

Canadian &  US  Semen  Available  

Exportable Embryo  Packages  (5  embryos  per  package)

ŵďƌLJŽDĂƟŶŐ͗                                                                                                                                                    WĞĚŝŐƌĞĞƐƟŵĂƚĞƐ͗   PDHR  20J  STANMORE  47R    X/'Ͳ'h>>z'K>Θ^/>sZϯϭϭd /'Ͳ'h>>zϲϭϭKhEdzϱϭϳhX/'Ͳ'h>>z'K>^dEZϭϵϰZ ^><sEddsͲϵd    X/'Ͳ'h>>zϰϳZ^dE&Ezϳϯϭt C  CRUZ  0248  ET    X    /'Ͳ'h>>zϲϭϭ^/>sZ>zϭϭϯt

CE

BW

WW

YW

M

TM

Fat

REA

Marb

0.4

3.3

45

75

26

49

-­‐0.02

0.25

0.07 -­‐0.19

-­‐0.8

4.3

49

79

17

42

-­‐0.01

0.47

0

4.0

54

87

26

53

-­‐0.01

0.55

0.14

-­‐1

4.7

52

87

22

48

0.01

0.46

-­‐0.05

Buddy, Frances,  Lance  &  Tyler  Leachman

P.O. Box  535  Maidstone,  SK  S0M  1M0           ͲŵĂŝů͗ůĞĂĐŚŵĂŶͺďŝŐŐƵůůLJΛŚŽƚŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵථථ WŚŽŶĞͬ&Ădž͗;ϯϬϲͿϴϵϯͲϮϴϳϵථථ ƵĚĚLJĞůů͗;ϯϬϲͿϴϵϯͲϳϬϬϭථථ>ĂŶĐĞĞůů͗;ϯϬϲͿϵϬϯͲϳϮϵϵ

160 Breeding  Age  De-­‐Horned  and  Polled  Herefords                                 Performance  &  Ultrasound  Tested Elite  Internet  Sale  in  November Sound,  Stout  and  Striking  Phenotypes

12 miles  north  of  Maidstone  on  Highway  21      ~      5  hour  drive  from  Olds,  AB

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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Welcome from The Canadian Hereford Association

On

behalf of the Canadian Hereford Association (CHA) Directors and all the members of the CHA, we welcome you to the World Hereford Conference in Canada. Our membership is excited to welcome our Hereford friends from around the world to Canada, in July 2012. Our membership is large and diverse like our country but we all share a common goal of raising better Hereford cattle to meet the needs of the beef industry. Canadian Hereford breeders are a dedicated and determined group. We have worked tirelessly to improve every aspect of the Hereford breed – from calving ease to carcass quality and everything in between. We have made significant strides toward improving Canadian Hereford cattle.

Through the economic downturn in the cattle industry in Canada over the past 10 years, Canadian Hereford breeders have made tough decisions, which are now paying dividends, as the current cattle market establishes highs not previously seen. The “New Hereford” is being discovered. Cattlemen who haven’t used Herefords for decades can now see the value of adding Hereford genetics to their breeding programs. For the World Hereford Conference, we have tried to give our visitors every opportunity to discover our “New Hereford”. The pre-conference and post-conference tours across the country will showcase our diverse landscape and breeding operations. The program in Alberta will highlight every aspect of our business from the steer show during the Calgary Stampede, to the Open show and Junior show in Olds. Also highlighted in Olds will be an example of the Canadian tradition of a summer field-day-type show. The Rancher Day show will be a no-halter, non-fitted show, judged from horseback. We, as Canadian Hereford breeders, are proud to demonstrate how our cattle can compete, both in the fitted show ring arena as well as in a pasture environment. We welcome everyone from our closest neighbour to the furthest foreign visitor, to come to the conference and share in the pride we have for our Herefords and our optimism for the future. It will be a pleasure to re-acquainted ourselves with our old Hereford friends and also meet many new ones. We hope the conference is the first of many visits to Canada. Please enjoy yourself and take in all the Canadian hospitality we have to offer.

Randy Radau President, Canadian Hereford Association 18


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MN Herefords

Canadian Genetics  Š

Come see  our  lineup  at  the   World  Hereford  Conference  in  Olds,  AB

MN 6S  SILVER  BRITISHER  118X

MN 17P  ASTER  BRIT  531X

BW: 102 lbs. WW: 856 lbs. YW: 1,326 lbs. DOB: March 31, 2010

BW: 95 lbs. WW: 833 lbs. YW: 1,195 lbs. DOB: March 31, 2010

LO 931N ASTER LAD 6S MN 11F SILVERETT 118M

MN 30L ASTER LAD 931N LLL 2F STD RIBSTONE LASS 6J NJ SUPER BRITISHER 54A PYR 11F MN 64F BRITISHER LADY 018H

Purchased by Pine Butte Ranch Ltd., Cranbrook, BC at the Calgary Bull Sale for $16,500.

MN 532H STANMORE 17P MN 30L ASTER LADY 531S

MN 26E YANKEE VALLEY 532H NJ BRITISHER LADY 17F LO 22H STAND LAD 30L MN 532H MISS ASTER 931L

The Reserve Grand Champion at the 2012 Calgary Bull Sale. He sold for $16,000 to Verbeek Herefords, Evansburg, AB & Eureka Hereford Farm Inc., Eureka River, AB.

MN 26R  PRINCE  DOMINO  499X

MN 6S  STND  LAD  128X

BW: 98 lbs. WW: 897 lbs. YW: 1,340lbs. DOB: April 21, 2010

BW: 92 lbs. WW: 771 lbs. YW: 1,173 lbs. DOB: April 15, 2010

MHH 22L BRITISHER LAD 26R MN 78N PRINCESS STND 499R

VIKING 254 LAD ET 22L MHH 39D BRITISHER LASS 14J WINDIMUIR 21K LEGACY 78N MN 532H SILVER BRIT 299N

One of our Medicine Hat Bull Sale consignments that sold to Misty Valley Farms, Maidstone, SK, for $7,750

MN 30L ASTER LAD 931N LLL 2F STD RIBSTONE LASS 6J 25G VOLT BRIT LAD 237K MVF 237K STD VOLT LASS 128N MVF MVF 63A STD DOM LASS 197J LO 931N ASTER LAD 6S

Another 6S son that was purchased for $7,000 by Tschetter Colony, Irricana, AB at the Calgary Bull Sale.

Other Buyers include: Ensign Farms, Kelowna, BC Meridian Ranch - Cal and Wanda Longson, Cayley, AB

Miller Ranches Ltd., Hanceville, BC Dougdale Agco Ltd., Vulcan, AB

Barry Knight, Kathyrn, AB Bushfield Farms, Airdrie, AB

Thank You to our Bidders & Buyers For Your Continued Support Austin Nixdorff 403-200-4781

R.R. 2, Airdrie, Alberta T4B 2A4

Clark & Cindy Nixdorff Chalsie, Marvin, Kiersty

Edna Nixdorff 403-948-5229

Ph 403-948-7559ÊUÊFax 403-948-7486ÊUÊCell 403-803-1584 Email mnhereford@platinum.ca

Located from Big Hill Springs turnoff on Hwy 2, 6 mi. E. & 1/4 mi. S. or from Trans Canada Hwy. 14 mi. N. on Conrich turnoff 21


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HAVEN WIZARD UK Horned Bull of the Year 2005 Outcross Genetics Semen available throughout the world Stored in Canada at Alta Genetics. His daughters are proving themselves as top cows in our herd.

vœ™G͌™š›GŠˆ“ŒšGš™Œ‹G‰ MAWARRA VICE ADMIRAL —–›–šGˆ›G_G”–•›š Winners of the Sires Group of {™ŒŒGˆ›G›ŒG National Calf Show 2011 HAVEN HOTSPUR

HAVEN LOUISA 55TH

Other Herd Sires HAVEN HARLEQUIN

HAVEN DOWAGER 169TH

HAVEN CAVALIER GH ADAMS 144S BULGE 138W HAVEN GOVERNOR

E.L.LEWIS & SON l‹žˆ™‹Gˆ•‹Gjˆ™–“GsŒžšGˍG{ŒGoˆŒ•SGk“ž •SGoŒ™Œ–™‹SG|•›Œ‹Gr•Ž‹–”SGoy[G_qi {Œ“aGWX\[[GZX_Y\\GˍGt–‰aGW^`^[^[[]]W

l”ˆ“aGŒ‹žˆ™‹gˆŒ•Œ™Œ–™‹šUŠ–Uœ’GˍG~Œ‰a www.havenherefords.co.uk

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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

contents

2012 World Hereford Conference Commemorative Edition Volume 70 | Number 2

Photo Credit: Andre Goulet and Erin Zatylny

features

Pre Conference Tour F O R M E R C H A G E N E R A L M A NAG E R , P E R R Y W I L K E S W I T H A S S I S TA N C E FROM FORMER CHA GENERAL MANAG E R , D U N CA N P O RT E O U S A N D NORMA DUNN

What a difference 36 years makes! Or does it?

34

C AT H E R I N E B R OW N

Good Cattle. Good People. 150+ years of Herefords in Canada

82

3

THE RT. HON. STEPHEN HARPER, P.C., M.P.

4

GERRY RITZ, PC, MP

6

Message From Honourable Alison M. Redford, QC, Premier of Alberta ALISON M. REDFORD, QC

14 Welcome from The World Hereford Council

16 Welcome from The World Hereford Conference Chairman

Fields of Diversity An Overview of Canadian Agriculture

118

JAY CROSS

18 Welcome from The Canadian Hereford Association RANDY RADAU

contents World Hereford Conference Schedule

102 & 113

Message from the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

JAN WELLS

C AT H E R I N E B R OW N

26

Message from the Prime Minister

128

Sponsors

138

124 The World Hereford Council

139

126 World Hereford Conference Biographies

140

127 World Hereford Conference Committee Chairmen

142

42 44 46 48 50

Murphy Ridge Farms Copper Creek Ranch Quilchena Ranch Douglas Lake Ranch Banff National Park

Conference 56 60 66 70 74 78

The Calgary Stampede World Hereford Conference Speakers The World Hereford Conference Bronzes Olds Agricultural Society World Hereford Conference Judges WHC Junior Show

Post Conference Tour 88 90 92 94 96 98 100

The Simmie Hutterite Colony RCMP Heritage Centre Crittenden Brothers Polled Herefords RSK Farms Manitoba Research Station Ontario Tour Niagara

Country Reports from World Hereford Council Member Countries

86 131 132 Canadian Hereford Association Staff 132 Hereford EPD Averages 133 Digest Subscription Form & Ad Deadlines 134 135 Quick Reference 136 Auctioneers, Consultants and Services 136 137

Canada Australia Brazil Germany Hungary New Zealand South Africa Switzerland Uruguay United Kingdom

Cover photo courtesy of Andre Goulet and Erin Zatylny. The cover features the Grand Champion bronze that will be presented at the WHC. For more details on the Bronzes, see page 66. 24

5160 Skyline Way NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6V1

Phone: 1.888.836.7242 Fax: 1.888.824.2329

Email: herefords@hereford.ca


25


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

World Hereford Conference

Schedule

To register for the World Hereford Conference or for more details on any of the events, please visit www.hereford.ca Pre Conference Tour Sunday, July 8

Arrival day in Vancouver, B.C. • Evening on your own

Monday, July 9

Vancouver to Merritt, B.C. • View cattle from B.C. and enjoy lunch at Murphy Ridge Farms in Abbotsford, B.C., hosted by Henry & Velma Braun. • Ranch tour and barbeque dinner at Copper Creek Ranch, hosted by the Stevenson Family of Copper Creek Ranch

Tuesday, July 10

Merritt to Kamloops, B.C. • Lunch at the Quilchena Hotel (meet Guy Rose and family and hear history of the Quilchena Cattle Company) • Tour of Douglas Lake Ranch where staff will outline the history on one of the largest commercial Hereford Ranches in Canada

Wednesday, July 11

Kamloops to Banff, Alberta • At Three Valley Gap, enjoy a tour of the Bell Gardens and the Ghost Town before a Steak Barbeque Lunch

Thursday, July 12

Banff to Calgary, Alberta • Free time in Banff to explore the sites • Meet in the early afternoon for your motor coach transfer to the Sheraton Cavalier in Calgary

Technical Conference Friday, July 13

Sheraton Cavalier Calgary Hotel, Calgary, Alberta 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m 12:00 p.m 1:00 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 1:40 p.m. 2:40 p.m. 3:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 4:40 p.m. 5:00 p.m. 5:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 14

Palomino Room – Stampede Park, Calgary, Alberta 9:00 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

26

World Hereford Council delegates meeting – McKnight Ballroom Registration desk for World Hereford Conference open Lunch – World Hereford Council Delegates Luncheon – McKnight Ballroom Welcome by Technical Conference Chairman, Neal Church World of Herefords Part 1 – Country Reports – South America - Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina World of Herefords Part II - Country Reports – Europe – Hungary, Germany, Ireland, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Estonia Coffee Break Dr. Brian Wickham – Performance Recording with Icar World of Herefords Part III - Country Reports – Australasia – New Zealand, South Africa, Australia World of Herefords Part IV - Country Reports – Scandinavia – Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark World of Herefords Part V - Country Reports – New Members – Kazakhstan, Switzerland World of Herefords Part VI - Country Reports – USA Delegates Council Meeting – Review – Jay Cross Adjournment Informal Reception – Sheraton Hotel Junior Social and Pizza party for all International Juniors and WHC Junior Committee members – McKnight Ballroom

Official Opening and White Hat Presentations to special guests Marching in of Country flags by Juniors from represented countries with Piper and RCMP member in Red Serge. Welcomes by Chairman Jay Cross & Secretary General Jan Wills Speeches - Stampede officials • CHA President • CJHA President • Government Dignitaries White Hat Ceremony presentations Coffee Robert Meijer: President, Canada Beef Inc. • Review and forecast of Beef Industry Trends on a world basis. Dr. Steve Miller: Associate Professor, University of Guelph, Faculty of Animal & Poultry Science • Meat Tenderness - Genomics / Research / Consumer Trends


C A N A D I A N

Saturday, July 14 Continued

11:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 1:15 p.m. 1:45 p.m. 2:15 p.m 2:35 p.m. 2:50 p.m. 3:20 p.m. 3:40 p.m. 3:50 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, July 15

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Dr. Dorian Garrick: Professor of Animal Science, Iowa State University • 50 K SNP Hereford Panel program/Horned, Polled Scurred DNA SNP panel update. Lunch Dr. Dave Daley: Program Coordinator/Professor, Chico College of Agriculture • Heterosis in Beef Cattle Dr. Robert Weaber: Assistant Professor of Animal Science, University of Missouri • Economics of Docility in Beef Cattle Dr. John Basarab: Beef Research Scientist, Lacombe Research Centre • Feed Efficiency in Beef Cattle Coffee Dr. Kee Jim: Managing Director of Feedlot Health Management Services Ltd., Okotoks • Feed Efficiency in Feedlot Cattle / Carcass Trait Research Stan Jacobs: Hereford breed strengths – cow-calf production Dr. Jay Cross: Closing comments Jan Wills: Closing comments Adjournment to the Calgary Stampede UFA Classic Steer Show Dinner – Rangeland Tents Chuckwagon Races and Grandstand Show Free Day at the Calgary Stampede

Monday, July 16

National Junior Bonanza Cattle Show - Olds Agricultural Society Grounds, Olds, Alberta

Tuesday, July 17

WHC National Hereford Open Show - Olds Agricultural Society Grounds, Olds, Alberta

Wednesday, July 18

Rancher Day, WHC Hereford Pen Show - Olds Agricultural Society Grounds, Olds, Alberta Closing Ceremonies

Post Conference Tour Thursday, July 19

Calgary to Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan • Stop in Maple Creek for lunch • Visit Simmie Hutterite Colony near Swift Current, Saskatchewan

Friday, July 20

Moose Jaw to Regina, Saskatchewan • Your morning will be at leisure. Experience the Spa or visit tourist attractions in Moose Jaw • Afternoon tour of the RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) Heritage Centre in Regina • Barbeque supper & Hereford Cattle displays hosted by Crittenden Bros Polled Herefords and the Saskatchewan Hereford Association

Saturday, July 21

Regina, Saskatchewan to Brandon, Manitoba • Supper at RSK Farms – hosted by the Manitoba Hereford Association

Sunday, July 22

Brandon to Winnipeg to Toronto, Ontario • Visit and tour the AAFC Research Centre in Brandon. A picnic lunch will follow on the Centre’s grounds • Transfer to the Winnipeg Airport for your flight to Toronto, Ontario. Upon arrival in Toronto you will be met and transferred to your hotel

Monday, July 23

Toronto, Ontario • Morning at the Orangeville Agricultural Society Grounds. There will be a cattle display by local breeders. Lunch will be provided along with entertainment featuring traditional Canadian/Ontario music and dance hosted by the Ontario Hereford Association. • Visit to the Schaus Land and Cattle Feed Lot • Short scenic drive through the rolling countryside of Dufferin County and a visit to the Dufferin County Museum. Coffee and Tea will be available and sponsored by NBG Polled Herefords of North Gower, Ontario • Dinner at Tucker’s Marketplace Restaurant hosted by the Canadian Hereford Association

Tuesday, July 24

• • • •

Niagara Falls, Ontario Full day at Niargra Falls Travel through the lush wine region on the Niagara Peninsula Ride aboard the famous Maid of the Mist to the base of Niagra Falls Lunch at Skylon Tower prior to your return to the Toronto Airport. Expected time of arrival at the airport is 3:00 p.m. 27


28


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29


30


Thank  you  and  congratulations  to  Fenton  Hereford  Ranch  Inc.  for  purchasing   the  2012  Calgary  Bull  Sale  Champion  and  High  Seller,  

͡Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x201C;Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x160;͸Ͳ

Stop  by  our  stall  at  The  World  Hereford  Conference,  our   show  string  will  all  be  brothers  and  sisters  to  60X.

Hope  to  see  you  there! Ä&#x160;Ä&#x153;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x2030;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x2DC;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x17D;Ä?Ä&#x160;Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2122;Ä?Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x201C;Ä?Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x2014;ʹͲͳʹÄ&#x2021;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x2018;Ä&#x2021;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x160;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x2DC;ÇŁ Č&#x2C6; Â&#x192;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x203A;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013; Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2022; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x160; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021; Â&#x192;Â&#x2122;Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;ĆŹ Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x192;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;

Č&#x2C6; Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021; Č&#x2C6; Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A;

Scott  Nixdorff  &  Sons

Rob  (403)  948-­â&#x20AC;?2569 Cell  (403)  510-­â&#x20AC;?2687 Scott  (403)  948-­â&#x20AC;?5232

Paul  (403)  935-­â&#x20AC;?4334 Fax  (403)  935-­â&#x20AC;?3576 Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x2022;̡Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;ǤÂ?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;

ǤǤÍ´ÇĄÂ&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;ǥ͜ʹ͜ 31


Harvie Ranch, Olds, Alberta, has now obtained Tophat semen for use in their own program.

Watch for our 2012 show cattle sired by TOPHAT 92T

Miss Wal Yantze 205Y

Wal Yale 125Y

Intermediate Reserve Heifer Calf Champion 2011 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair

Placed first in the Senior Bull Calf Class 2011 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair

William and Audrey Lyons 10893 Mill Rd. RR 7, St. Thomas, ON N5P 3T2 Phone: 519-764-9560 Cell: 519-639-8991 Fax: 519-764-9615 Email: ablyons@amtelecom.net 32


    TH  223  71I  VICTOR  755T              TH  8J  57G  LORETTA  6M      

EPDS

DNA  Tested  Homozygous  Polled

 DRF  JWR  PRINCE  VICTOR  71I  KBCR  19D  DOMINETTE  223       RU  20X  BOULDER  57G    TH  125Y  LORETTA  8J

Â&#x2021; Semen  Packages  Available  during  the World  Hereford  Conference

CE

BW

WW

YW

MM

Milk & Growth

Calv. Ease Mat.

Scrotal Circ.

Fat

Rib Eye Area

Marb.

+3.3

+2.1

+51

+86

+19

+44

+2.0

+0.9

+0.020

+0.40

+0.12

The  Nicholas  Family

Box  479,  Milestone,  SK  SOG  3L0   Gary  &  Florence  -­  306.436.4301   Chad  &  Carrie  Â&#x2021;)D[ FQLFKRODV#PFFR\FDWWOHFRPÂ&#x2021;ZZZPFFR\FDWWOHFRP 33


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

feature story

What a difference 36 years makes! Or does it? Author: Former CHA General Manager, Perry Wilkes with assistance from Former CHA General Manager, Duncan Porteous and Norma Dunn Canada had the privilege of hosting the 7th World Hereford Conference in 1976 which was attended by 30 delegates, and 8 observers from 18 member countries. In addition invitations were sent to 34 other countries of which 8 countries responded and sent representatives to the Conference. All of this activity was the result of the inaugural meeting held in July of 1951 in Hereford England when representatives from Great Britain, the United States, Canada, Argentina, Uruguay, South Africa, New Zealand and Ireland met to form the World Hereford Breeders Council under the direction of J. A. (Tony) Morrison who was the Secretary of the Hereford Herd Book Society of Great Britain. At the 4th WHC held in Dublin Ireland in June of 1964 the aims of the Council were focused on maintaining the purity of the breed and spreading the genetic influence of the breed to developed and developing countries. Working closely with the Food and Agricultural Organization in

34

developing countries, the World Hereford Council spearheaded a program to provide semen to large scale breeding programs to expedite the genetic improvement of domestic cattle. Training programs were initiated to assist in the areas of husbandry, forage development and meat processing. Other issues dealt with by delegates attending the World Hereford Council meetings were related to the reciprocal recognition of pedigrees between member countries. These issues were soon resolved and as the technology and health protocols were developed; live cattle, semen and embryos were easily exchanged between member countries throughout the world. Canada’s bid for the 7th World Hereford Conference was successful and that’s when the work started. Determined to stage a world class event, the Canadian Hereford Association Directors and Manager, and the Presidents and Managers of the provincial Associations came together to start planning for 1976. The planning of the business portion or Council meeting was under

the direct control of the Secretary General Tony Morrison. Serving on his committee was Jim Lewthwaite WHC Chairman, Tony Dean from Argentina, Hop Dickenson from the American Hereford Association, Orville Sweet from the American Poll Hereford Association, Walter Romay from Uruguay, Joaquim de Cavalho e Silva from Portugal and Duncan Porteous from Canada. In addition to dealing with matters pertinent to the Hereford Breed and the interplay between member Associations the conference business agenda included speakers on topics related to animal breeding. While the issues of the decade were important and the sharing of solutions to problems deserved discussion the Canadian Hereford Association focused their efforts on showcasing Canadian Herefords. Keep in mind that the planning was taking place before memory typewriters, fax machine and the internet. Long distance phone calls were expensive, especially overseas calls, and International travel was not as inexpensive and common as it is today. No less than 11 committees were established to address, plan and carry out all of the details related to every detail surrounding Conference events. The Banff Springs Hotel was selected as the headquarters for the World Hereford Conference meetings. However the beautiful setting in the Rocky Mountains which attracts tourists from all over the world, was not to everyone’s liking. One committee member said “Why are we taking people up to Banff to look at a pile of rocks”. I do not think there was anyone in attendance, including the person previously quoted, who did not agree that the Rocky Mountain site


C A N A D I A N

was an excellent choice. Murphy’s Law surfaced a couple of days before the conference. Attendees travel plans were disrupted by a strike at Air Canada. Not to worry, everyone rallied and between cars making round trips to Great Falls Montana and small aircraft being mobilized everyone made it to the Conference on time. Topics covered in 1976 included, Chromosome research being conducted in Australia, carcass evaluation, standardization of performance and progeny testing of bulls, and vaccines for cancer eye control. When the formal business and Council discussions wrapped up in Banff it was off to Calgary for the World Hereford Conference show staged at the “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth”, the Calgary Stampede. “The World Hereford Conference Show” was held in the 3500 seat Corral at the Calgary Stampede. The poll and horned cattle were shown separately. Lloyd Pickard, a prominent Angus breeder and exporter was selected as show Chairman. Lloyd had extensive show ring experience both with beef cattle and Holstein dairy cattle. Keith Gilmore owner of the Canadian Hereford Digest was the announcer, who kept everyone up to date as to placings in both rings. George Edgar from Little Red Deer Herefords at Innisfail Alberta judged the horned Herefords, assisted by Joe Rogers from Rogers Hereford Ranch at Penticton British Columbia. W .W. “Wib” Donaldson of Louada Farms at Peterborough Ontario judged the poll Herefords assisted by Ron Pitchford of Pitchford Bros. Poll Herefords at Melfort Saskatchewan. Canadian Hereford and Poll Hereford breeders brought out the best they had and visitors enjoyed seeing over 600 head of Canada’s best Herefords. It was a great boost for Canadian breeders as several off shore breeders bought Canadian Genetics. Norma Dunn a member of the Canadian Hereford Association living in Calgary was asked to take an active role in structuring of the women’s program. Norma’s involvement ended up covering a far broader range of activities than

the women’s program, for which Duncan Porteous was forever grateful. The post conference tours were well attended by overseas visitors and Canadian cattle producers. There were over 1000 persons in attendance at the field-day held at B& H Herefords at Millet Alberta. The tours of farms and ranches throughout Canada gave visitors the opportunity to meet and mingle in a more relaxed atmosphere with purebred and commercial cattle producers. The farm and ranch tours provided the opportunity for visitors, especially overseas visitors, to ask questions and become more familiar with animal husbandry practices in Canada. Everything from temperature highs and lows summer and winter, winter shelter, length of the winter feeding period, types of pasture utilized, feeding regimes, fencing, labour requirements, marketing of both commercial and purebred cattle came under the microscope. The question asked by overseas visitors evoked a similar number of questions about cattle production in the overseas countries. It was a ‘WIN WIN’ situation and the post conference tours were a tremendous success for everyone who participated. After spending so much time planning and executing all of the activates required to stage the last World Hereford Conference held in Canada, it was gratifying to everyone involved the positive impact the Conference had on the demand for Canadian Hereford genetics. The world of communications has changed dramatically since 1976 with Google, Wikipedia, the internet, webinars, web sites, Twitter, Face book, Linkedin the list goes on and on. Information is just a click away and covers just about everything a person would want. The younger generation may buy a car, for example, over the internet. However for most people the rush when you buy a new vehicle is when you sit in it in the show room, smell the leather, reach out and touch the controls and imagine how those paddle shifters are going to smoothly take you through the gears when your trying to show up some young buck in his noisy

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Vrooom Honda Civic. The cattle business isn’t much different. I’ve spoken to quite a few breeders who have purchased semen or embryos overseas through the personal recommendation of a friend or fellow breeder, or from a picture on the www. They cannot wait to travel abroad to observe the bull or embryo donor of the genetics they have purchased. Canadian Hereford breeders, you have a great opportunity this summer to be on the main stage. Remember, “It is better to be prepared and not have the opportunity, than to have the opportunity and not be prepared”.

35


EPDs: BW  6.6 WW   69.1 YW   108.4 MILK   11.4 TM   46.0

ALNK 282P -â&#x20AC;? Dam of 915W

Y V 2 Y -â&#x20AC;? Calf  Champion  bought  by  Ridder  Hereford  Ranch,   Callaway,  Nebraska  for  $23000.00  at  the  Calgary  Bull  Sale  2012

(PE\RVDQGVHPHQIRUVDOHĂ&#x201E;%XOOV )HPDOHVIRUVDOHDWDOOWLPHV We welcome you all

15 minutes north of Calgary International Airport or 45 minutes south of Olds, Alberta COME VISIT DURING THE CONFERENCE Bulls for sale by private treaty anytime at the ranch

Nels and Terri Nixdorff Hal, Adam, Coleman

3K  &HOO  )D[  (PDLOQQL[GRUII#HĂ&#x20AC;UHKRVHQHW <DQNHH9DOOH\5RDG55$LUGULH$OEHUWD7%$NP(DVWRI+Z\RQ<DQNHH9DOOH\5RDG

Website: www.YVRanch.ca 36


37


Three generations   of  home  raised   herd  bulls DBHR  35N  STANDARD  LAD  129S

Where we’ve  been  and  where   we’re  headed.    Our  focus  is  on   a  strong  line  of  easy  fleshing,   good  uddered,  traditional  cattle   that  excel  in  Canada’s  Ranch   conditions,  for  both  the  purebred   breeder  and  commercial  rancher. DBHR  129S  UNLIMITED  52U

BR 52U  MONTANA  STANDARD  163X High  Seller  2012  Ranch  Ready  Bull  Sale  to   Tide  Creek  Herefords,  Jenner,  AB

Dick and  Lorraine  Braun Phone/Fax  306-­297-­6404 38

Craig and  Carrie  Braun Phone:  306-­297-­2132 Cell:  306-­297-­7114

Plan a  visit  to  Braun  Ranch,   along  the  scenic  Swift  Current   Creek  while  in  Canada  for  the   World  Hereford  Conference.  email:  braunranch@xplornet.ca  Simmie,  SK


Matt (306) 697-7822 Box 1268 Grenfell, SK S0G 2B0

Mark & Lori (306) 697-7584 Box 118 Mistatim SK S0E 1B0 lohnerherefords@gmail.com

Lohner Herefords

R111

Dam of 1181

1181 is a calf with as much genetic New Era potential as any Sire of 1181 coming from two superior animals. Purchased from Colyers in their February sale. LCI 159T STANMORE 172Y Purchased ½ interest in last fall’s sale. He has extra performance, hair and great disposition. 159T is breeding very well at Doenz’. CHURCHILL STAR Our breeding machine, first daughters calving now, marbling phenom. Thank you to T-K Herefords for purchasing half interest in Star.

REPLAY is a Star son we are using by AI after selling to Quebec. Thank You to Beebe Plain Farm for their confidence. Full brother sold to Sheldon Wolfe, Grenfell, SK.

CHURCHILL STERLING First calves looking very stout, will be put to heavy use this spring. Owned with Jenkins Ranche, Churchill Cattle Co. and Linda Lonas. 39


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

We sell two-year old bulls plus bred and replacement heifers all raised naturally. Located in the geographic centre of British Columbia, just off of Highway 16.

We Welcome The World #JFOWFOVFBV$BOBEBt8JMMLPNNFOJO,BOBEBt8FMLPNJO$BOBEBt#JFOWFOJEPB$BOBEÈ Trevor and Janice Tapp

Phone: 250-699-6466 E-Mail: ttapp@bcgroup.net

Box 185, Fraser Lake, BC V0J 1S0

KURT 33X

Born

March 10, 2010 BW:88 lbs

WW: 710lbs adj

We will  have  a  number  of  bulls  on  offer  ready  to  go  to  work  if  you  prefer  live  cover  for  either   your  purebred  or  commercial  cows.  We’re  serious  about  raising  good  cattle  and  serious   about  having  a  little  fun.  If  you  like  talking  cows,  stop  in  for  a  coffee,  we’d  love  to  see  you!

40

EPDs

CE -­2.9

BW 5.0

WW 50.0

YW 84.1

Milk 12.5

TM 37.5

Brady Moncrieff   Senlac,  SK

Home: 306-­228-­2239        Cell:  306-­228-­9177


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6U

10U

18U

19U

66X

67X

CASH

CHINOOK

KILO

PILGRIM

THIRTY-THREE

TOTAL

MAGNUM

NIRTO DESIGN

KILO

We always welcome and enjoy your visit. Our annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back To The Basicsâ&#x20AC;? Bull Sale is held the second Saturday of February, where we sell over 100 bulls and approximately 150 commercial females. We are proud of our sale bulls and of the mothers who raise them. Mick & Debbie 3]Z\;PIVVWV5I\\PM_:aIV 5IZS3ZQ[\Q <ZMĂ&#x2026;IS +I[Ma<ZMĂ&#x2026;IS 4IJW]KIVM

*Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2021;näŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;xxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Ă?Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2021;näŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;xxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ViÂ?Â?Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2021;näŽĂ&#x160;n{Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2021;nnĂ&#x17D;x Web site: www.mjt.ca Email: mick@mjt.ca or kurt@mjt.ca ,°,°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A;ÂŁ]Ă&#x160; `}iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;/ä Ă&#x160;ÂŁäĂ&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;7>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁĂ&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,>Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x160;{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D; 41


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Monday, July 9, 2012

Murphy Ridge Farms Henry Braun was the President and C.E.O. of Pacific Northern Rail Contractors Corporation, until December 2002 when he retired from the rail business, having sold the business to an American firm. Henry & Velma Braun began their adventure in the cattle business three weeks before BSE (Bovine Spong iform Encephalitis/Mad Cow Disease) hit Canadian cattle markets. Murphy Ridge Farms is situated at the northern edge of the urban development of the City of Abbotsford in Southern British Columbia. Today, the purebred Hereford cowherd numbers 21 cows. The majority of the operation’s Hereford genetics are originally sourced from Remitall Cattle Company. Herdsires include Remitall Reality NGA 25U and Haroldson’s WLC Vegas ET 24W. A.I. bulls used are primarily Harvie Traveler CVIH 69T and Remitall Keynote NGA 20X (having purchased the remaining 45 Straws of 20X at the Remitall Dispersal). In 2010, they purchased a one-third interest in Merawah Shamrock C130, the second high selling lot at the Merawah Polled Hereford female dispersal of the Mackay family of Boggabilla, New South Wales, Australia. Australian breeder James Walters, along with Jimmy Henderson, of Majestic Cattle Company, Alberta, also partnered in the cow. Shamrock C130 joins the Murphy Ridge embryo program and her calves are highly anticipated. In 2008, Murphy Ridge purchased an interest in a 500-cow commercial operation in the historic Hat Creek Valley, located east of Cache Creek. In 2011, the adjacent Upper Hat Creek Ranch (formerly the 2P Ranch owned by Gordon Parke) was also purchased. Brian Parke – fifth generation

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on the Upper Hat Creek Ranch – manages the commercial cowherd with one other cowboy and two dogs. Additional cowboys are hired during the summer months to help with the flood irrigation and haying. The Hat Creek Valley Floor sits at an elevation of 3,000 to 3,200 feet. Ranching in this valley dates back to the 1860s. Cattle spend the summer and fall on the mountain range lands at elevations between 3,500 and 7,500 feet. The commercial cowherd is predominantly Black Angus, with some Red Angus, Simmental and Charolais cows which were part of the original herd. Some of these cows are bred to Hereford bulls, raised at the Abbotsford location, resulting in baldie calves. Black Angus bulls are also used. Heifers begin calving in a confined corral just below the main ranch house in late February. The remainder of the herd calves three weeks later in open fields. The hard mountain bunch grass is rich in protein and at roundup, the calves weigh in between 600 and 700 pounds. About 110 heifer calves are retained as replacements and the rest of the heifer calves and steer calves are sold at a local farm market which finishes animals to their own specifications (hormone free). The commercial cowherd is rounded up by the end of October and is turned out onto the range adjacent to the operation’s haylands until the end of December when hay feeding begins. The goal at Murphy Ridge Farms is to augment its purebred Hereford herd to somewhere around 100 -150 cows. The bulk of the current Hereford herd runs on 60 acres at the Abbotsford farm while the rest of the herd is at the Upper Hat Creek location. Henry and Velma Braun are honoured to host conference


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attendees during the pre-conference tour, at their farm in Abbotsford â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the â&#x20AC;&#x153;City in the Countryâ&#x20AC;?. Abbotsford is a thriving, rapidly growing city, surrounded by the lush Fraser Valley. It is close to the multi-cultural Vancouver, sandy ocean beaches, mountains, lakes, parks and farms. It is commonly referred to as the raspberry capital of Canada, although it boasts thriving blueberry and strawberry production as well. Local vineyards

are now also gaining international attention. In addition, the vast majority of the poultry, egg and dairy products produced in British Columbia come from Abbotsford farms. Murphy Ridge Farms will display its Herefords at its Abbotsford location, along with 20 to 30 additional Herefords from local breeders.

For more information or to enter cattle for this display & tour stop, please contact: Henry or Velma Braun at (604) 852-2729 or hvbraun@shaw.ca

Building on a Solid Foundation 2012  NWSS  Champion  Sr  Yearling  Pen  

2011  American  Royal  Class  Winner

2011  NWSS  Reserve  Sr  Yearling  Pen

With  over  70  years  experience  in  the  Registered  Hereford  business,  Middleswarth  Hereford  Ranch  strives  to  meet  the   needs  of  purebred  and  commercial  men  alike  by  blending  both  U.S.  and  Canadian  genetics  to    produce  performance   GULYHQIHHGHI¿FLHQWFDWWOH&XUUHQWO\ZHDUHWHVWLQJRXUIRXUWKJURXSRIEXOOVXVLQJWKH*URZ6DIHV\VWHP

Annual Bull Sale in January ~Bulls, females, embryos and semen always available Torrington,  WY Jay,  Marsha  and  Jessica  307.532.5427                                       iddleswarth  Hereford  Ranch  www.middleswarthherefords.com                      6Mbulls@hughes.net

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Monday, July 9, 2012

Copper Creek Ranch When Ron and Sharon Stevenson and family founded Copper Creek Ranch, they did so with a sense of partnership with the rest of the Hereford industry. The ranch’s new slogan is: Moving Herefords Forward. Together. The Stevensons work tightly with their family and their extended “family” of ranch managers and workers. They have been supporters of Hereford association programs and have helped sustain a healthy Hereford junior program through generous funding and other initiatives. Copper Creek Ranch Herefords have been marketed throughout North America and abroad, partly due to the popular appeal of bulls like CCR 57G Stamina ET 199S and GoldenOak 4J Maxium 28M. Nestled in the mountains and valleys near Princeton, in southern British Columbia’s interior, Canada’s most westerly province, Copper Creek Ranch is one of Canada’s largest and most progressive Hereford operations, participating in the Canadian Hereford Association’s Total Herd Enrollment program and making genetic improvements with modern tools such as artificial insemination, embryo transplants, expected progeny differences, genomic/DNA profiles and ultrasound scanning. Structural phenotype, hardiness, efficiency and temperament are also key selection criteria. Strong, consistent cow families are also very important. Bulls are performance tested on forage-based rations with grain. Only the best ones are pedigreed. Copper Creek Ranch currently runs about 400 cows, half of which are pedigreed, purebred Herefords. The commercial herd is comprised of Hereford and Hereford-influence females, some of which are recipient mothers to embryo transfer calves. The bulk of the herd is managed on expansive mountain range pastures from June through to mid-October. The cows start grazing the lower 44

valleys and mountain slopes, grazing higher as the spring-like pastures mature. They progress to higher elevations throughout the summer where the bugs are less persistent. Pastures are mostly bunch grass and wheat grass with some wild alfalfa, shrubs and riparian areas. In late September, the ranch crew begins moving the cows down to wean the calves. The best heifers are kept as herd replacements and the best bulls kept for breeding at home and in local commercial herds into which they are sold. The rest are sent to the auction market. The ranch employs four families – Kevin Clement, who oversees haying and winter feeding; Bob Proulx, the equipment and irrigation manager; cowboy Dick Holland and new ranch managers, Phil and Catherine Brown. Cayley Brown, the daughter of Phil and Catherine, plays an active part in the Canadian Junior Hereford Association, with her own Herefords. It is a team effort when it comes to calving cows and moving the herd. Copper Creek Ranch is just beginning to break into new specialty restaurant and butcher markets in the Vancouver area with its Herefordlabeled Beef. It therefore serves all sectors of the beef marketplace, from the weanling feeder calves which are backgrounded and fed for conventional end-markets, to supplying the commercial cow/calf industry with hardy, performanceoriented bulls, to moving the Hereford and wider beef industry forward through genetic selection, to marketing top-shelf Hereford beef into specialty markets. It does so on least-cost, foragebased rations throughout the year, ensuring that well-known Hereford efficiencies are maintained and promoted. Copper Creek Ranch proudly welcomes international guests as visitors to the world of BC Hereford producers on the pre-conference tour of the World Hereford Conference.

For more information or to enter cattle for display, please contact: Phil or Catherine Brown at (250) 293-6858 or coppercreek@xplornet.ca


MH DAKOTA  LAD  6238  1ET ‡ Moderate  birth  weights,  calves  very   uniform  and  full  of  muscle. ‡ Trait  Leader  in  Total  Maternal ‡ Daughter  are  top  producers

Canadian and  USA   semen  for  sale. EPDS:   BW  2.9    WW  51.5    YW  91.8    MM  27.8    TM  53.6

New to  the  program  in  2012

SNS 5S  STANMORE  LAD  38X EPDS:  BW  6.5    WW  45.1    YW  84.3    MM  14.2    TM  36.8

LBH 102T  SUPER  RIB  335X EPDS:  BW  3.6    WW  43.5    YW  73.1    MM  20.7    TM  42.5

Bulls for  sale  at  the  farm  by  private  treaty MERLE  &  NEELTJE  WYATT  AND  FAMILY 403-­534-­2277                      Cell  403-­485-­8289 Peter:  403-­485-­2246                                                                                      Cell  403-­423-­0083 Justin:  403-­601-­9058 Box  30,  Arrowwood,  Alberta    T0L  0B0          Email:  wyatt@wildroseinternet.ca 45


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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Quilchena Ranch In the Nicola Valley of British Columbia is Quilchena Ranch, another one of Canada’s largest ranches, at 28,000 acres. Quilchena Cattle Co. Ltd. was founded by Joseph Guichon in 1882. Joseph is credited for introducing the first Herefords to the Nicola Valley. The ranch is rare in B.C. in that ownership has remained in the family since Joseph settled it 130 years ago. It is currently owned by Joseph’s grandson, Guy Rose and remains one of only a dozen B.C. cattle ranches with more than 1,000 head of cattle. The name Quilchena was given to the ranch by nomadic natives who once gathered there to hunt and fish. Literally, it means “a gathering place near water”. The ranch currently depends on the cattle market and tourism for its income. The historic Quilchena Hotel, a 1908 Edwardian hotel with white pillars, red porches and blue railings, is surrounded by sweeping lawns and hard-grass rangeland. It was built in 1908 in anticipation of a pending railway that was never built. Running the landmark hotel and marketing top-grade Hereford and Hereford-Red Angus cross cattle have made Quilchena famous. Filled with western art and old family photos, with a cozy ranch house feel, the hotel acts as informal headquarters for the third, fourth and fifth generations of the Rose family. The Quilchena tourist operation now includes an RV park, a general store and a golf course. Along with a hired farm and cowboy crew, Guy and Hilda Rose’s children and grandchildren help with dayto-day ranch operations. Guy and Hilda’s son Mike is the ranch manager. Quilchena runs two cattle herds: Hereford and Hereford-Angus cross,

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for a total of about 1,500 cows and calves and 1,400 yearlings. The cows and their calves graze spring to fall on mountain grasses, 40 miles (64 kms) away from the ranch base. The 1,400 yearlings are kept over their first winter at the ranch feedlot and are then turned out on bunchgrass near Douglas Lake. A crew of six cowboys and a herd of 80 horses work together to move cows to prevent over-grazing and protect native grass species, on a three to five-week range rotation, depending on conditions. Quilchena produces all the feed – hay and silage – needed to winter the outfit’s cow and horse herds. In total, over 5,000 tonnes of silage and 2,000 tonnes of hay are produced annually. Each hayfield at the ranch is regularly soil tested, then fertilized with a custom blend of nutrients. The management believes their success starts with the soil. Heifers are wintered on a high protein second-cut alfalfa and grain ration in order to ensure maximal growth and good milk production after calving. Bred to Red Angus bulls, which throw lighter calves, the first-time calving heifers rarely experience calving trouble. Calving begins in early March and by late May, the calves have gained enough weight to begin moving them to the high country grazing range. About 400 heifers are selected to be sent to the range to be bred. In late August, the long-yearlings (18 months old) selected for the beef market are brought back to the home ranch, where about 1,000 yearlings are sold. Cattle are sold electronically, with the bidding process displayed on an overhead screen in the hotel’s banquet room. Over 100 buyers attend the two-hour e-sale. While others link up to bid by computer. By September, about 75 bred heifers are pregnancy checked and


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marketed, to take advantage of the current heifer shortage. By October, the calves in the main herd are trucked down from summer range to the ranch, are processed, weaned and put on feed. The final cattle drive takes place in late November when the cows are trailed to the home ranch and are hay-fed during the snowy months of winter. Challenges of the ranch, over the years are similar to those of many other western Canadian ranches.

Besides skyrocketing fuel and grain prices, they have included urban recreational pressures, uncertainty around native treaty negotiations, increasing government environmental regulations, strict new range management laws, predators, market slumps and market closures due to BSE.

Gordie & Allyson Raymond 107 McFarlane Road Waterford, New Brunswick E4E 4Y1 Â&#x2021;JDUD\#QEV\PSDWLFRFD

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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Douglas Lake Ranch The history of Douglas Lake Cattle Ranch spans 120 years and several owners. The first 350 acres (130 hectares) was homesteaded by John Douglas Sr. in 1872, along the shores of Douglas Lake. It has since become the largest privately owned ranch in Canada. It operates on a 500,000-acre land base, which includes 165,000 acres of deeded land and more than 350,000 acres of government-owned land on which the ranch holds a grazing license. Located in the ThompsonNicola Region, south-east of Kamloops, British Columbia, the ranch is currently owned by U.S. businessman Stan Kroenke, who has other ranches in Montana and Wyoming. Douglas Lake has a history of employees who have spent their entire working careers at the Ranch, who seldom find the need to leave its boundaries. The operationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fulltime staff numbers 60 employees, which includes about 18 cowboys. Stan Jacobs is the ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime cow boss. The Douglas Lake Cattle Ranch herd numbers about 20,000 head. About 300 horses are kept on the ranch for tending cattle. The cattle operation remains the ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary enterprise. It prides itself in the high-quality, uniform cattle it produces on minimal resources. The herd base consists of about 4,500 Hereford cows, 2,500 black baldie cows and 450 bulls, producing in the range of about 6,600 calves annually. Jacobs appreciates the British breeds for their efficiency and their ability to easily handle the winter months. His moderate-sized mature cows average about 1,200 pounds (545 kgs). First-calf heifers begin calving in mid-February, while mature cows begin calving around March 20th. All calves are identified by radio-

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frequency identification tags (RFID) and all are age-verified. From May to mid-October, Douglas Lake Ranch cattle are grazed on over 350,000 acres of Crown grazing land. From Autumn until early spring, the cattle are brought down and grazed on Ranch-owned grassland. Forages are stockpiled in order to extend the grazing season as long as possible. The average winter feeding period is 45 days. The ranch relies on about 5,000 acres of irrigated land for hay production, which provides enough hay for winter feeding. Calves are weaned in November. About 4,500 yearlings are put on a backgrounding ration in a ranch feedlot for the winter and are turned out on grass the following spring to be sold as long yearlings in the fall. About 1,500 yearling heifers are retained as replacements for the cow herd each year. Otherwise, about 2,000 head are sold as calves each fall. Herd management has been based on a 20-year-old breeding and marketing program that has worked well for the ranch. The ranch maintains three distinct breeding groups. There are Hereford bulls with Hereford cows; Black Angus bulls with Hereford heifers and first-calf baldies; and there are Charolais bulls with second-calf and older Black Baldie cows. All its market calves are sold in lots, according to sex, weight and colour, through the satellite auction service.


HARVIE DAN MS FIREFLY 69S

HARVIE MS FIREFLY 30T

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2WDSDZD6N\PDWH+DUYLH-DFFL- )GDXJKWHU

Dam  of  many  Division  Champions  at  Denver  and  Agribition

Outcross  pedigree,  calving  ease,  maternal  strength

HARVIE OVHF MS UNIQUE 80W

BBSF 100L MS UNIQUE ET 131R

+DUYLH5DIWVPDQ5%%6)/0V8QLTXH(75   

%5/&DOO/%%6)&8QLTXH.

Highest  selling  female  in  Canada  2011  to  Anita  Doktor        

Top  producing  female  from  a  great  cow  Family

HARVIE MS NYLON ET 34R

HARVIE MS FIREFLY 24U

%5/&DOO/+DUYLH0LVV1\ORQ<     

        %10+3+3+HDW6+DUYLH0V&RQQLH</

    Dam  of  the  2010  Agribition  Champion  Female          

Daughter  sold  for  $13,500  in  our  Internet  Sale  2011

Harvie Ranching invites you to come visit the Ranch during the WHC 55Â&#x2021;2OGV$OEHUWD7+3 KDUYLHUDQFK#[SORUQHWFRPÂ&#x2021;ZZZKDUYLHUDQFKLQJFRP

,DQDQG0DUOHQH+DUYLH &ROH-LOO 7LQOH\+DUYLH 6FRWWDQG.HUULH+DUYLH Home (403) 335-4180 (403) 994-1314 (403) 586-4278 Cell (403) 507-3886

:LOO+DUYLH (403) 994-3825 49


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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Banff National Park Banff National Park, Canada’s first and the world’s third national park, is one of four adjacent national parks designated as the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the fall of 1883, three Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) workers stumbled across a cave containing hot springs on the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains. From that humble beginning was born Banff National Park, named after the original CPR investors’ home of Banffshire in Scotland. Today the area spans thousands of kilometres of breathtaking scenery made up of valleys, mountains, glaciers, forests, meadows, rivers and lakes making it one of the world’s premier destination spots. The Canadian Pacific Railway announced plans in 1886 to build a hotel in Banff that would attract people to the mountains and fill the passenger seats on the transcontinental railway. “Since we can’t export the scenery, we’ll have to import the tourists,” said CPR general manager William C. Van Horne. That hotel, now known as The Fairmont Banff Springs, has since become the baronial, historic and iconic landmark that continues to dominate the Banff townsite. The small town’s charming streets remain abuzz to this day with world-class shopping, dining and accommodation. Banff National Park boasts a seemingly endless array of activities for the outdoor enthusiast and cultural explorer alike. Three worldclass ski resorts operate within the park’s boundaries, offering skiers and snowboarders the ultimate in downhill and cross-country fun during the winter, and scenic hikes and wildlife viewing throughout the summer. Canoeing, kayaking and boating take place on the various beautiful waterways scattered

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throughout the park and visitors can still enjoy bathing in the soothing, “healing” waters of the hot springs that started it all. Banff town boasts no less than seven museums celebrating everything from the First Nations cultural heritage of the region to the best of Canada’s fine arts. It is truly a destination for everyone. Known as Canada’s “Diamond in the Wilderness” and the hiking capital of the nation, the Lake Louise area of Banff National Park offers a tremendous diversity of recreational and sightseeing opportunities. The region abounds with spectacular scenery, from picture-postcard lakes to glaciers, waterfalls and majestic mountain peaks. The First Nations people who originally lived here called the nowinfamous lake the “Lake of the Little Fishes”, perhaps because fish stayed small in the cold waters at such an altitude. The emerald colour of the lake’s icy waters comes from rock sediment and minerals carried into it by run-off from the glaciers above. Fairmont’s Chateau Lake Louise, one of Canada’s grand railway hotels, is located on Lake Louise’s northeastern shore. It is a luxury resort hotel first built in the late decades of the 19th century by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) to establish the area as a year-round international destination resort. Lake Louise is renowned as the birthplace of Canadian mountaineering. While building the hotel, the CPR imported Swiss guides to begin developing an extensive mountaineering trail system that would eventually radiate into the backcountry from the shores of Lake Louise. Some of these trails are now open to mountain biking and horseback riding, and the surrounding mountain faces offer opportunities for rock climbing. Kayaking and canoeing are popular


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activities during summer, and a boat launch and rental facility are maintained on the north-eastern shore. In winter, the lake is used for ice fishing and ice skating, while the surrounding area offers ideal settings for dog sledding, snowshoeing and ice climbing. With some of the best powder skiing on the continent, the nearby Lake Louise Ski Area offers amenities for alpine and cross-country skiing as well as snowboarding. During

the summer months, the ski area operates a gondola from which visitors are most likely to see grizzly bears foraging on the lower slopes. There is also an interpretive centre where visitors can learn about the historical significance of the area and partake in guided hikes. Though it is stunningly beautiful, Banff National Park isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a place to see. It is a place to be explored.

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FE 44S RED SKYLINE 24U

{DLF IEF HYF}

Owned with  Corbiell  Herefords Semen  Available                  Look  for  offspring  featured  at  the  World  Show Al & Lori Fenton Becky

Conrad & Janel Fenton Dalee, Prior & Emerson

Blair and Jessica Gray & Tayva Jean Fenton

Phone/Fax: 780-754-2384 Cell: 780-842-7806

Phone: 780-754-3321 Cell: 780-209-3600

Phone: 780-754-2891 Cell: 587-281-0900

Email: fentonherefordranch@gmail.com Box 479, Irma, AB T0B 2H0 7 mi. E. of Irma on Hwy. #14 or 11 mi. W. of Wainwright - Look for Hereford Sign 52


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The Calgary Stampede There is nothing in the world like the Calgary Stampede. From its humble beginnings as an agricultural fair in 1886 it has earned its reputation as The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth through more than 100 years of celebrating the unmistakably timeless heritage and values of the Canadian west. The appeal of the Calgary Stampede may stem from the mythology of cowboys and the settlement of the western half of North America but today’s Calgary Stampede represents much more than mythology. It’s a volunteer-supported, not-forprofit community organization. A visit to the Calgary Stampede and Stampede Park offers an authentic experience characterized by western hospitality, commitment to community, integrity and pride of place, 365 days a year. Year-round facilities host more than 1,300 events per year, and agricultural programs bring together rural and urban communities. At the heart of the organization

is The Stampede – the ten day celebration every July which is famous around the world. Each year, over a million visitors come from across North America and around the world as well as from Calgary and Alberta to experience the heart-stopping action of one of the world’s roughest and richest Rodeos … the awesome power of the world’s top Chuckwagon Races … the spectacular theatrical presentation known as the Evening Grandstand Show … world-class agricultural activities … and adrenalin-pumping rides at North America’s largest mobile midway. In the Indian Village, a cornerstone of the Stampede since 1912, visitors step back in time to share in authentic Plains Indians’ cultural practices. Western Showcase embraces western culture through its world-class art displays. The Calgary Stampede is proud to be the community’s cradle of western heritage and traditions, helping to preserve the unique identity and soul of Calgary.

Information: 403-261-0101 or 1-800-661-1260 Tickets: 403-269-9822 or 1-800-661-1767 For the latest information, including current ticket prices, visit www.calgarystampede.com.

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TRIARA  UNLEASHED  893U

EPDS

CE

BW

WW

YW

MM

TM

MCE

SC

CW

Stay

MPI

FMI

1.7

2.8

59.2

87.7

17.8

47.4

3.5

0.9

82.3

-­0.5

163.5 136.3

Fat

REA

MARB

-­0.004

1.03

-­0.04

Justamere  has  been  successfully  breeding  livestock  for  over  110  years.     Our  program  focuses  on  producing  balanced  trait,  problem  free  highly  productive  cattle.    We   invite  you  to  our  stall  at  the  WHC  and  also  to  our  ranch  nestled  on  the  northern  edge  of  Riding   Mountain  National  Park,  to  see  the  program  at  work.

International  Semen  available.    Please  inquire  for  price We  annually  host  the  Sale  Of  The  Year  in  early  December  and  

the  ION  Bull  Sale  in  early  May ail   rite,  Em Call,  W ime! t y n  By  A or  Stop

Ben & Linda Fox

RR #4 Comp 30 Dauphin, MB R7N 2T7 6MĂ&#x201E;JLÂ&#x2039;4VIPSLÂ&#x2039;-H_ ^^^Q\Z[HTLYLYHUJOLZJVTÂ&#x2039;Q\Z[HTLYLYHUJO'NTHPSJVT 57


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Registered and Commercial Horned Herefords Box 25, Landis, Saskatchewan S0K 2K0 Email: grltd@yourlink.ca Bill & Luke (306) 658-4750 Verne (306) 658-2022

Wes, Bernie, Dustin, Cody & Austin Phone: (306) 658-4535 Cell: (306) 948-9663

SPECIALIZING IN  BRED  HEREFORD  HEIFERS

BREEDING 500  STRAIGHTBRED  HEREFORDS  ANNUALLY  TO  HORNED  HEREFORD  BULLS  BULLS  AND  HEREFORD  FEMALES  FOR  SALE  AT  ALL  TIMES

We’ve had a great calving season and we’re using the breed’s leading sires

Current Sires: SUPER DUTY, BAILOUT, ABOUT TIME, NEW ERA, MAXIUM, WONDER, BOOMER 29F, BOOMER P606

Semen, Embryos, Breeding Stock And Show Prospects For Sale At All Times

4th Annual

DownEast Hereford Sale September 8th, 2012 at 1:00PM (ATL)

Location: Bird’s Hill Farms, 240 Wilmot Road, Wilmot, New Brunswick Contact: Jocelyn Barrett

506-328-7011 (cell) or email: jocelynb@barrettcorp.com

Website

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Join us online or come visit us anytime

www.birdshillfarms.com


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world hereford conference speakers Kee Jim, DVM

Dr. G. Kee Jim was born in Little Fort, British Columbia where he grew up on his family’s Hereford ranch. He received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) in 1983 from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. He is a founding partner of Feedlot Health Management Services Ltd. (FHMS), based in Okotoks, Alberta, of which he is the CEO and Managing Director. Dr. Jim is the 2008 recipient of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners’ Practitioner of the Year award. He is also a past recipient of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners’ Beef Award for Excellence in Veterinary Preventative Medicine, the Schering-Plough Animal Health Veterinary Award from the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, and the Canadian Animal Health Institute Leadership Award. Kee Jim’s companies, G.K. Jim Farms and affiliated companies, Cattlinc Inc., Silverado Cattle Inc., Taweel Cattle Company Ltd., Korova Feeders Ltd., and Diamond Feeders, are major players in the Canadian and U.S. cattle industry through ownership of cows, backgrounding cattle and feedlot cattle. Kee has also served on the board of directors of several beef industry groups, including the Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Livestock Identification Services Ltd., Canadian Cattle Identification Agency and the Canada Beef Export Federation. Recently, he has served as Board Chair of the Canada Beef Export Federation and Vice Chairman of the Alberta Cattle Feeder’s Association. Currently, he serves on the board of the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency.

Stephen P. Miller, Ph.D.

Dr. Steve Miller is the Director of the Centre for the Genetic Improvement of Livestock at the University of Guelph where he has been a faculty member in beef cattle genetics since 1999. Born and raised on a part-time cow-calf operation near Cambridge, Ontario, Stephen, now married with six children, continues to work with the family farm in the production of Angus Hybrid seedstock, evaluated through BIO (the Ontario based, Beef Improvement Opportunities). Miller received his Ph.D. from the University of Guelph in 1997. Miller directs the breeding programs of the Elora and New Liskeard beef research stations and has been involved in developing tools for genetic improvement in the beef industry multi-breed genetic evaluation and economic selection indexes. Making beef cattle more profitable through genetic improvement is the main goal of his research team. The primary emphasis of that research is on the improvement of efficiency of feed utilization and beef quality, including tenderness. More recently, Dr. Miller’s research has focused on genomic tools for selection. His research team has developed a marker for beef tenderness that is being used commercially and the team has been involved in the validation of markers prior to commercial use. His projects range from the detection and validation of genetic markers through to live animal measures using ultrasound, infrared and feed intake recording technologies in a state-of-the-art beef cattle research facility. Dr. Miller spent extended time in Australia working on beef genetics research and has been an invited speaker on topics related to the genetic improvement of beef cattle in Canada, the U.S.A., Mexico, China, France, Brazil and Uruguay.

Rebecca Long Chaney

Rebecca Long Chaney is a mother, farm wife, writer and speaker. She and her husband, Lee, live with their twin eight-year-old daughters, Rianna and Sheridan, on a 200-acre Hereford farm in Thurmont, Maryland. She is a freelance writer for the National 4-H Council, Pennsylvania Beef Council and for numerous agricultural publications. In addition to helping on the farm, she is also busy promoting three books by her daughters which are part of an agricultural education children’s book series called “The Chaney Twins’ Series”. Book number four, “Cowgirl Up! Let’s Go Ranching”, will be released just before the World Hereford Conference. Rebecca grew up on a dairy farm actively involved in 4-H and FFA (Future Farmers of America). She is a graduate in agricultural business management from the Institute of Applied Agriculture at the University of Maryland-College Park and a proud graduate of the agricultural journalism program of the University of Winsconsin-Madison. Rebecca is a 4-H Cloverbud leader, a Sunday School teacher and a volounteer at her daughters’ primary school. She is an active member of the Maryland Cattlemen’s Association, the Maryland and National Hereford Associations, the Frederick County and Maryland Farm Bureau and the American National Cattle Women’s Association. She enjoys traveling the country sharing two presentations – “Dare to Risk Life Change”, which highlights the trials and tribulations she and her husband had during a life-changing adventure on a million-acre cattle ranch in the Australian Outback (before children); and “If Five-Year-Olds Can Do It, So Can You”. This powerpoint presentation equips farmers and ranchers with ideas and tools to better “tell their story” and encourages them to find easy ways to promote their farm business and industry. Touting themselves as Agricultural Warriors, Becky and her daughters make appearances in libraries, schools and fairs, sharing agricultural information, reading their books and encouraging others to appreciate and love farmers and what they do. 60


C A N A D I A N

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John Basarab, Ph.D.

Dr. John Basarab grew up on a cow-calf operation in northern Alberta and received his Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Ph.D. degree in Animal Genetics and Biochemistry from the University of Alberta in 1981. He has worked for Alberta Agriculture as Provincial Beef Management Specialist and Research Scientist since graduation. John’s interest in cow efficiency builds on the work of scientific icons such as Drs. Roy Berg and Harlan Ritchie. As Senior Research Scientist with Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, John has over 25 years experience in beef cattle production and management. His current areas of work include improving feed efficiency, genetic markers development for economically important traits and Greenhouse Gas mitigation in beef cattle. Dr. Basarab is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Alberta and Manitoba, member of the senior management team for Livestock Gentec and past Associate Editor for the Canadian Journal of Animal Science. He is also the author and co-author of more than 300 scientific and extension articles and is the winner of the 2010 Canadian Animal Industries Award in Extension and Public Service. Feed costs are a severe and growing challenge to the global competitiveness of beef production in Canada. Two-thirds of the feed energy consumed each day by steers, heifers or cows is used for maintenance, with considerable individual animal variation. “Over the last 100 years, feed efficiency has remained largely unchanged in beef cattle, while competing protein sources such as pork and poultry have made dramatic improvements in feed efficiency through both genetic and non-genetic means,” says Basarab. Dr. Basarab will talk to World Hereford Conference attendees about measuring feed efficiency through residual feed intake (RFI) measures and identifying animals that make more efficient use of their feed. His presentation will review the phenotypic and genotypic relationships between RFI and growth rate, carcass characteristics, body composition, heat production, feeding behaviour, methane production and net energy required for maintenance. It will also present current information on the relationship between RFI and age at puberty, pregnancy rate and cow productivity and its economic benefits to the cow-calf producers and feeder. New and innovative research that identifies feed efficient animals early in their lives is critical to the adoption of this technology. In this regard, research is progressing on the discovery and validation of genetic marker panels for RFI and some of the work associated with Livestock Gentec, an Alberta Ingenuity Centre at the University of Alberta, will be presented at the conference.

Bob Weaber, Ph.D.

Dr. Bob Weaber grew up on a cow-calf operation in southern Colorado and earned a Bachelor of Science in animal science followed by a Master of Agriculture degree in the Beef Industry Leadership Program at Colorado State University. He completed his doctoral studies in the Animal Breeding and Genetics Group at Cornell University. While there, he served as the Interim Director of Performance Programs for the American Simmental Association for over three years. Previously, Weaver was Director of Education and Research at the American Gelbvieh Association. Dr. Weaber joined the faculty of the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry at Kansas State University in August of 2011 as Cow-Calf Extension Specialist. Previous to that, he served in the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri (MU) as a Beef Genetics Extension Specialist. Dr. Weaber also serves as central regional secretary of the Beef Improvement Federation, is a co-coordinator of the National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium education programs and has served as a member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Policy Division Board of Directors. The focus of Weaber’s extension and research programs have been to broaden the availability, use and understanding of genetic selection tools (Expected Progeny Differences, DNA markers and selection indexes), as well as performance data collection schemes implemented by cattle producers. He became involved in docility/temperament research shortly after joining the University of Missouri. He uncovered, in a literature review, that docility or temperament is moderately heritable and that it has varying effects on and associations with animal stress, immune function and performance. However, most of the work had been conducted in bos indicus derivative breeds. “There was little in the literature looking at the phenotypic and genetic relationships between temperament and production traits in bos Taurus breeds,” says Weaber, so he strived to change that. Dr. Weaber will talk to World Hereford Conference participants about the positive impacts of behaviour improvement on human handler safety, animal welfare and facilities maintenance. But he will also reveal the growing body of evidence which demonstrates that animals with better temperaments tend to have lower levels of stress hormones and better immune function, as demonstrated by better responses to vaccinations. Bob and his wife Tami and their three young children live near Wamego, Kansas. Bob and Tami both have deep roots in the Hereford business and each served on the American Junior Hereford Association Board of Directors.

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Dorian Garrick, Ph.D.

New Zealand-born Professor of Animal Science, Dorian Garrick’s current projects are to improve the accuracy of predicted genetic and phenotypic merit using high-density genomic information. Dr. Dorian Garrick was appointed to the Jay Lush endowed Chair in Animal Breeding and Genetics at Iowa State University in August 2007, following five years at Colorado State University and 15 years at Massey University in New Zealand, where he has held the A.L. Rae Chair since 1994. He received a First Class Honours degree in Agricultural Science from Massey University in New Zealand and a PhD from Cornell University. Dorian has been integrally involved in the development and implementation of national animal evaluation programs, performance recording databases and breeding schemes. He has worked in the design of experiments to detect major genes and to exploit them in breeding programs. Dr. Dorian’s recent work has focused on theoretical and applied aspects of using genomic information to predict performance. He views animal breeding in a systems context, involving the integration of knowledge and understanding of business goals, production systems and processing and marketing, in concert with quantitative and molecular genetics. Dorian has worked with a variety of genetic improvement programs, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, dual-purpose sheep, fine-wooled sheep, pigs, elk, salmon and tree breeding. He works with fellow researchers and producers as well as industry groups that seek to include animal breeding approaches in the attainment of their farm or ranch business goals. Dr. Dorian is a Director of the U.S. National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium that focuses on the development and application of methods that use genomic information to predict genetic merit in beef cattle. Dorian will share with World Hereford Conference attendees what is working and what is not working in terms of predictions based on phenotype data in the Hereford breed. He will also discuss what he and his research team are doing to make genetic predictions more reliable.

Dave Daley, Ph.D.

Dr. Daley is a professor of Animal Science at California State University, Chico and the director of the beef program at the University Farm. He also serves as the Associate Dean for the College of Agriculture there. Dr. Daley earned his Masters in Science and Ph.D. at Colorado State University with an emphasis in Beef Management Systems. While his interests have focused primarily on the application of technology to the cattle industry, his studies have put strong emphasis on the utilization of alternative feedstuffs. He has conducted a major national study on the utilization of DNA fingerprinting in genetic improvement, with industry collaborators like Harris Ranch; significant work on the use of electronic identification (RFID) in national animal identification; leadership in animal disease traceability at the national level; extensive work in the economic impacts of crossbreeding; and a multi-year on-going project with Sierra Nevada Brewery on the utilization of brewery byproducts as a livestock feed. More recently, Dr. Daley has become actively involved in animal welfare and rights, conducting research on non-ambulatory cattle, while serving in a leadership role both in California and nationally on improving animal welfare practices. Dave is a fifth-generation cattle producer from Butte County, California. Dr. Daley and his spouse, Dr. Cindy Daley, and their three children, also run a commercial cow-calf, stocker and purebred Angus program. The commercial cattle are managed on extensive lands (national forest). Dave will talk to World Hereford Conference attendees about the practical implications of crossbreeding and heterosis in commercial beef production systems. His presentation will focus on a three-year study funded by the American Hereford Association and Harris Ranch Beef Company, on the economic impacts of crossbreeding in vertically coordinated beef production systems. Over 600 predominantly Angus cows were randomly mated to Hereford and Angus sires in an extensive range environment. Impacts of crossbreeding on all phases of the production chain have been monitored (cow-calf, feedlot, carcass), along with resulting economic impacts.

Stan Jacobs

Stan Jacobs’ journey took him from the world of horses to the world of cattle in a very large way. Raised in Alberta, Stan had no family background in the beef business but now ably manages Canada’s largest commercial cattle ranch, where Herefords figure prominently, near Douglas Lake, British Columbia. After high school, Stan spent a couple years working at an A.I. unit where he learned what the beef industry deemed worthy of being there. He moved from there to working for an embryo transplant centre, managing recipient cows. From the mechanics of the elite world of purebred genetics, Stan moved to British Columbia to try his hand at cowboying for some of the larger ranches there. From that perspective, he “learned what kind of cow it took to produce in a large, low maintenance environment,” in his own words. Stan moved to Douglas Lake Cattle Company in 1987 with his wife Shirley and his two children, Megan and Cameron and has been there ever since. He became the cowboss in 1989 and has since been responsible for 6,500 to 7,000 mother cows. He buys all the bulls for the herd, sets up the breeding program and manages the grazing rotations. Stan has judged the Armstrong IPE, Medicine Hat Bull Show and Sale, and the Bull Congress in Camrose. What motivates him is “being involved in something as unique as Douglas Lake, where the cattle, horses and the people all work together to convert grass into beef.” 62


BAR-­‐RZ 59T  TRIPLE-­‐X  23X

BW: 6.3  WW:  63.2  YW:  109.2  MM:  20.2  TM:  51.8

BILL LAMPORT (403)226-­‐0345

BRAD &  CHRISTINE LAMPORT (403)226-­‐0450

LAMPORT’S 21N  REDEYE  75U

BW: 4.1  WW:  44.4  YW:  72.3  MM:  16.1  TM:  38.3

263176 Panorama  Rd   Rockyview  County,  AB   T4J  3L5

lamport@telus.net

BAR-­‐H CHALLENGER  82W

BW: 4.1  WW:  56.5  YW:  92.9  MM:  21.2  TM:  49.5

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Power Bull JNHR  WEIGHMASTER  728W

The Mighty JNHR  UNIQUE  TIMBER  715W

BP 101T  STANDARD  DOM  LAD  63W Most  popular  bull  of  the  2011   Spring  Campaign

394U Calf  Sucking JNHR  STANDARD  DEE  330H Backbone  of  our  Polled  Hereford   program.  See  her  with  her  2012   Bull  Calf.

JNHR BUCKSHOT  680W Unique  -­  Muscle  -­  Dimension Performance

11Y

Norm, Joanne,  Michael,  Marc  Parrent 64

Box 111  Clyde,  Alberta,  T0G  0P0 Phone:  1-­780-­348-­5835        Fax:  1-­780-­348-­5839 Norm  Cell:  1-­780-­307.6586

Rob, James  &   P e t e r,   N o r m ,   &  Joanne  with   Oliver  taking  the   picture

Summer 2011 Friends  from  England


Allan &  Candace Ph/Fax  403-­748-­2374

Merlyn &  Eileen 403-­748-­2364

We sell annually at  the  Calgary  Bull  Sale,  Lacombe  Bull  Sale  &  at  home

CDN 18Y

CDN 54Y

We enjoy  and  welcome  your  visit!  Stop  by  and  see  the  bulls  anytime!   3  miles  West  and  2  1/2  miles  South  of  Bentley

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Aderian  &  Julie  Nixon :HHWDODEDK+HUHIRUGVÂ&#x2021;&KLQFKLOOD4/'$XVWUDOLD

ZZZZHHWDODEDKFDWWOHFRPÂ&#x2021;HPDLOZHHWDODEDK#DFWLYQHWDX

The World Hereford Conference By Catherine A. Brown

A S S O CIAT E ED ITO R

A second World Hereford Conference in Canada will forever conjure the memory of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;cowboyâ&#x20AC;? in all of us. The bronze trophies created for the Grand Champions of the World Hereford Conference National Shows, will symbolize the pride and honour in breeding savvy, good stockmanship and the cowboy way of life. They represent a moment in time, in our breedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. And they encapsulate it with a piece of western Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heritage. Canadian Hereford Association General Manager Gordon Stephenson and World Hereford Conference Chairman, Jay Cross, discovered the bronzes and their artist at a western art show at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Calgary Stampede. The pieces reflected to them a â&#x20AC;&#x153;typical ranching scene,â&#x20AC;? as Stephenson puts it. They represent both polled and horned elements of the breed and they ended a long search for a Grand Championship prize that would be treasured by its recipients.

The bronze sculptures will feature Hereford cattle branded with the World Hereford Conference logo. There will be 12 such bronzes to be won, for each Grand and Reserve Grand Champion Bull and Female of the National Hereford open show and the purebred pen show. The creator of the bronze trophies is American rancher and artist Ken Mayernik, of Great Falls, Montana. His bronze trophies were chosen and commissioned for the Calgary Stampede Chuckwagon Races and Rodeo Events from 2003 to 2007. Meyernik has won many awards for his work. They include 1993 and 2009 Calgary Stampede Collectorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Choice Three Dimensional; 1999, 2006 and 2008 Calgary Stampede Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Choice Three Dimensional; 2000 and 2009 Calgary Stampede Jurorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Three Dimensional; Calgary Stampede 2009 and 2011 Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Best of Show Three Dimensional; and two Calgary Stampede Best Sales Salon awards. Mayernikâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s work was also the Sculpture Category winner at the American Royal Western Art Show

Bronze for the Reserve Grand Champion Bull and Female of the National Hereford open show and the purebred pen show. 66

Bronzes and Auction in Kansas City in 2009 and 2010. Mayernik says that his sculptures document his ranch upbringing and western heritage, as well as the ups and downs of life. The bronze, â&#x20AC;&#x153;To the Branding Fireâ&#x20AC;?, represents a common North American ranching tradition at branding time. The bronze sculpture of a cow and calf pair entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gettingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a Lickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? comes from Mayernikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memories of calving time and young calves out on early spring pastures in the sunshine. Mayernik rarely works from photographs. Sculptures are moulded from images in his memory bank, he says. He is honoured to produce the bronzes for the 2012 World Hereford Conference, particularly because the event only occurs every four years. Mayernik will once again show his work at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Calgary Stampede and just might be present when the coveted bronzes are awarded on show day.

Bronze for the Grand Champion Bull and Female of the National Hereford open show and the purebred pen show.


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C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Annual Production Sale Each February Since 1977

Breeding 700-800 purebred and commercial Hereford females annually. Come to MISTY VALLEY for HORNED HEREFORD bulls, registered and commercial bred heifers and grass calves. MISTY VALLEY bulls are working on some of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest ranches from Ontario to B.C. as well as in the U.S. Practical Herefords raised in a commercial ranch environment. Harold Oddan Maurice Oddan R,R, #1 Ph/Fax 306-893-2783 Maidstone, SK Ph 306-893-2737 Fax 306-893-2777 S0M 1MO Email mvf@sasktel.net Ranch located 20 km N of Maidstone on Hwy 21, then 6.5 km W on Hwy 303 and 6 km N on Range Road 3241 OR just east of Lloydminster on Hwy 16 to Hwy 303, then 38.5 km to MVF sign and 6 km N.

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H.S. Knill Co. Ltd. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION Established 1933

Specializing in Purebred Livestock Transportation Providing weekly service across Canada & the USA. Gooseneck service available to your farm in Ontario. Pick up and delivery points across Canada and USA. U.S. and Canada Customs Bonded Carrier. We thank you for your past business and look forward to your future livestock transporting needs. 155 King Edward St., Paris, ON, Canada, N3L 3E3 Toll Free 877-442-3106 or 519-442-6242 Fax 519-442-1122 hsknill@pppoe.ca www.hsknilltransport.com


meet  him  at  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worldâ&#x20AC;? Registration  No.:C02930395           BW:  96  lbs    ADJ  205  WW:  908  lbs.adj       DXB  73J  PROWLER  35M DXB  35M  TORQUE  26T   BAR-­E-­L  74F  CHANTELLE  16K   K-­COW  NACHO  MAN  ET  36N DUNROBIN  SALSA  87S     DUNROBIN  REDLADY  77P

EPDs BW:    7.7 WW:    73.8 YW:    126.7 MM:    23.7 TM:    60.6

K-­COW  WIDELOAD  87W  possesses  some  of  the  highest  gain  EPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  of  the  breed  and.....

....NOTHING  BEATS  PRICE  TIMES  POUNDS! Kevin  &  Janice  Wirsta Kailey  &  Lexi 780.614.5959           kcow@telus.net www.kcow.ca

Wayne  Skelton  &  Family 55:LQ¿HOG$%7&; Phone:  780-­839-­8600   lklcows@gmail.com www.skeltoncattlecompany.com

World HEREFORD

Conference #16 69


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Olds Agricultural Society… Primary Agriculture Showcase Led by community leaders, Olds Agricultural Society (OAS) was created in 1899 with one major goal: to celebrate and enhance primary agriculture production in the Olds region. Little did those insightful and hardworking farmers and ranchers know that OAS would become a national and international destination for many prestigious livestock events for the next 113 years. OAS promotes awareness and understanding of agriculture’s vital role in the community, respectful of a rich heritage with a progressive focus on innovation for the future. OAS provides dynamic leadership and vision as a crucial contributor of community development in the Town of Olds and its surrounding rural area, through independent and collaborative events and programs, organized and delivered with professionalism, focusing on the community’s goal of satisfaction through utilization of its people. OAS is committed to economic self-sufficiency and accountability,

promoting and facilitating the same in this community. Signature annual events that are produced or hosted by OAS include Canadian Cutting Horse Finals, Chautauqua Annual Fundraiser, Central Alberta Draft Horse Classic, Summer Synergy, Super Six Team Roping, Cutting Horse Classic, Team Roping Canada, Olds Fall Beef Classic and Alberta Supreme, Provincial Vaulting Competition, Fall Warmblood Breeders Classic and the Provincial 4-H Beef Heifer, Dairy, Sheep and Light Horse Shows. OAS Directors, staff and volunteers welcome World Hereford Conference delegates and exhibitors. OAS is very proud to be the official host venue for the 2012 World Hereford Conference, and is confident that you will appreciate the impressive quality of cattle, the camaraderie with top breeders and enjoy the majestic setting in rural central Alberta. All of these ingredients will contribute to sharing western values and hospitality to make this a trip of a lifetime!

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Summer Synergy… Youth in Action! Summer Synergy Youth Livestock Showcase is born from a conviction to a demographic, in this case rural youth, and an innovative idea to enhance the traditional experience and provide opportunities for that segment of the population. It is developed and nurtured by dedicated volunteers and industry support. Its vision is “To produce a rural youth showcase that is recognized

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regionally, provincially, nationally and internationally as the premier celebration of achievement and opportunity for the advancement of youth.” Olds Agricultural Society (OAS) is tremendously proud of the 2010 and 2011 presentations of Summer Synergy and is confident that a strong foundation has been forged for future productions. Summer Synergy hosted by OAS July 10th – 13th, 2012 is an exceptional


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concept and one that will provide countless opportunities for the rural youth of Alberta including many Alberta Junior Hereford participants. It is also an ideal vehicle to showcase 350 youth and over 600 head of livestock who demonstrate personal achievements and celebrate excellence in both skill and production in an elevated public arena. This will all culminate at the Calgary Stampede Supreme Saturday, July 14th. Opportunities exist in all facets of the event including increased participation, sponsorship, scholarships, industry synergies, renowned clinicians, adult programming, signature components, achievement showcases and overall heightened awareness of this unique programming. OAS salutes the outstanding young Hereford breeders who have been acknowledged for their outstanding achievements in 2010 and 2011 include Cody Coleman, Brandon Fraser, Wyatt Hanson, Coleman Nixdorff, Hal Nixdorff, Sarah Nixdorff, Emily Latimer, Isaac Latimer, Brittney Matejka, Carling Matejka, Tyson Matejka, Ruth

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Schuepbach and Rosie Templeton. The year 2012 will prove to be extra special as the year the Canadian Hereford Association brings the world together to celebrate the World Hereford Conference while also saluting the historical significance of the Calgary Stampede Centennial. To commemorate these events, in tandem with Calgary Stampede, Summer Synergy will award more than $60,000 worth of scholarships and award trips, one of the most generous youth livestock events in Canada. Summer Synergy is truly a platform to promote evolution and transformation within the agriculture sector through the generation that will drive the industry in the future. There is no question that Summer Synergy can provide a bridge between the individual focus of the stakeholders that is critical to maintaining historical breed identity while forging a progressive program that promotes stronger agriculture relationships. You won’t want to miss it!

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(Owned with  Chula  Vista  Polled  Herefords) MHPH  504L  Klondike  102K  x  WTK  75A  Continental  66F  

2012 U.S.  National  Champion  Bull Projected  EPDs BW WW YW Milk 3.75 52.95 85.80 22.5

TM 49

Patch Daughter

Inquire at  gnboose@sympatico.ca Gary  &  Norma  Jean  Boose P.O.  Box  25  Nobleton,   Ontario  L0G  1N0 Phone:  905-­859-­0497     Mobile:  416-­574-­7180

CHULA VISTA  POLLED  HEREFORDS  

Casey &  Jill  Van  Kessel 6781  10th  Line,  RR  3 Thornton,  Ontario  L0L  2N0 Phone:  (705)  458-­2618     Fax:  (705)  458-­2151 kcjill@rogers.com

2006 Canadian  National  Champion  Bull Projected  EPDs BW WW YW Milk TM 5.3 53.0 86.4  23.9  50.4

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The Future Looks Bright The Looks Bright You canFuture choose with confidence from a cowherd with over

50 years of performance records, built on maternal strength to perform in any environment and management style

Consistency in Volume

LBH 2Z by 20J

LBH 18Z by 40W

LBH 26Z by 102T

LBH 27Z by 53W

LBH 34Z by 397W

LBH 35Z by 40W

LBH 43Z by 397W

LBH 49Z by 40W

LBH 56Z by 39T

LBH 69Z by 20J

LBH 72Z by 39T

LBH 105Z by 40W

LBH 111Z by 20J

LBH 114Z by 39T

LBH 115Z by 40W

LBH 130Z by 105X

LBH 132Z by 198T

LBH 137Z by 147W

LBH 151Z by 53W

LBH 153Z by 40W

LBH 165Z by 40W

LBH 168Z by 52N

LBH 181Z by 52N

LBH 184Z by 39T

LBH 186Z by 53W

Calves pictured in mid-April 2012

Home of the largest ultra sound program for registered Herefords in Canada

We collect and keep track of any measurable trait, ask us about it, we also retain ownership on all our steers to finish 72


Welcome to WHC 2012 in Canada

We invite you to come and see these boys, sire’s and dam’s along with their siblings at the Ranch or a small display at the Olds WHC shows July 16 to 18, 2012 You can find us 240 miles (384 KM) north of Great Falls, Mont. on your way to Calgary or 100 miles (160 KM) south of Calgary International Airport, just a few miles off number 2 Hwy

LBH 195Z by 39T

LBH 207Z by 105X

LBH 212Z by 39T

LBH 216Z by 53W

LBH 224Z by 20J

LBH 229Z by 53W

LBH 233Z by 66T

LBH 243Z by 53W

LBH 256Z by 397W

LBH 258Z by 40W

LBH 278Z by 40W

LBH 280Z by 198T

LBH 281Z by 40W

LBH 325Z by 162W

LBH 335Z by 40W

LBH 361Z by 47X

LBH 371Z by 53W

LBH 388Z by 198T

LBHD 183Z by 87M

LBHM 347Z by 147W

Please check our website at www.lilybrookherefords.com for more info, or refer to the Herefords The Next Generation 2012 Semen Directory for info on AI Sires LBHM 352Z by 47X

LBHR 112Z by 66T

LBHR 345Z by 47X

Andy & Margaret Schuepbach Hans Ulrich Ruth, Michelle and Daniel Phone: (403) 625-4693 Cell: (403) 625-6316 Fax: (403) 625-1500

Email: andy@lilybrookherefords.com

(403) 625-2237

Box 2044, Claresholm, AB T0L 0T0 - 10 miles (16 km) East of Claresholm to sign, then 4 1/2 miles (7.2 km) North

www.lilybrookherefords.com

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Open Show Judge - Tuesday July 17, 2012 DAVE DURIE JR. is a partner in his family’s beef and grain operation – Duralta Farms Inc., near Vegreville, Alberta. He works with his wife Denise, two sons, Dalton and Dane, and his brother Dwayne and his parents Pat and Dave. The Duries breed 250 black and red Angus females annually and grain farm 3,000 acres. They host an annual bull sale on the third Friday of March. Dave grew up with his family raising Shorthorn cattle. In 1977, the herd was dispersed and his parents purchased polled Hereford cattle. Dave was involved in the Junior Hereford program and enjoyed showing and fitting cattle. After finishing school, Dave worked for Kilmorlie Farms, Ponderosa Ranch and Beartooth Ranch, primarily preparing cattle for shows and sales. During these years, Dave ran a custom fitting service, showing many champions. In 2003, Duralta Farms dispersed its Hereford Herd and the operation has since raised Angus cattle. Dave has judged many shows at local fairs and many 4-H shows. He has also judged some large breed shows at Agribition, Farmfair and Toronto’s Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. The Duries are tremendously well-respected Canadian cattle breeders. Dave is no different. He is a man who stands behind his choices, gives his word and sticks to it and a hand shake can seal a deal.

Junior Show Judge - Monday July 16, 2012 LANCE LEACHMAN, along with his parents Buddy and Frances and brother Tyler, owns and operates Big Gully Farm, near Maidstone, Saskatchewan. The Leachman family has raised cattle in the same area for four generations, initially with commercial cattle and then purebred Hereford cattle since 1967. Lance graduated from Dodge City Community College in Kansas, with an Associate of Arts Degree in Agriculture in 2005. In 2007, he graduated from Kansas State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Sciences and Industry. Later, he obtained a Master’s of Science Degree in Animal Breeding and Genetics in 2010 from Virginia Tech in Virginia. Though Lance has primarily gained experience at his home operation, he spent time working as Student Farm Manager at Dodge City and with Colyer Herefords during the National Western Stock Show. Lance competed on Livestock Judging Teams at Dodge City and K-State and then coached two teams at Virginia Tech. He has judged cattle, swine, sheep and goat shows in nine states and three provinces, with the most notable so far being the World Beef Expo and Canadian Western Agribition. The Leachman operation is comprised of 150 head of de-horned and polled Hereford cattle. Lance selects and mates cattle based on phenotypic appearance and expected progeny differences, rather than on multi-generation pedigrees or on dollar values associated with specific livestock. Reporting performance data, ultrasound, pregnancy testing and assessing carcass merit via ultrasound are routine management practices. Lance says the role of a livestock judge should be to honestly and professionally evaluate every entry with equal rigour. He believes it is critical to ensure exhibitors receive a fair evaluation, considering the years, dedication and expense involved in showing animals. “Since no two classes are the same, in my opinion, establishing a certain pattern, frame size or weight isn’t nearly as important as finding the high-quality, complete cattle in each class,” says Lance. “Being asked to judge beef cattle, particularly junior events, is extremely enjoyable for me, but is a responsibility I take very seriously and try to improve upon each time.” “Thank you to the young Hereford enthusiasts for inviting me to officiate your 2012 Bonanza event.”

Rancher Day Judges - Wednesday July 18, 2012 PEGGY HERMAN has never moved far from her original home. She ranches just 30 miles (48 kms) from where she grew up on a horse ranch, near Bindloss, Alberta. She and her late husband Bill started running cattle on shares after they married in 1962 and eventually built up their own commercial herd. They also acquired some purebred cow families from the dispersals of two noted breeders. She regularly took bulls to the Medicine Hat bull sale and through the years has attempted to keep straight Canadian Hereford bloodlines. Peggy has three sons. Tom and his wife Vianne farm and ranch about 30 miles away. Allen is a professor at the University of Regina. He is married to Gwen. “J.J.” and Ronnilee, have a drilling bit business and live in Medicine Hat. Peggy has eight grandchildren in total, whose activities she enjoys taking part in. Since her husband Bill passed away in 2006, Peggy has kept the operation going with some hired help. She dispersed the purebred herd in 2006 but still has her commercial Hereford and Hereford-cross herd of 150 cows. She sells the largest steers and keeps the rest, adding them to a total of about 200 yearlings on grass through the summer months. Peggy looks for long-sided, easy-fleshing cattle with lots of hair and bone. She is also very particular in her selection for sound feet and udders. Peggy has judged 4-H shows for over 30 years. She has judged at bull sales and she recently judged the Hardisty Bull Calf Futurity. She has ridden in community pastures and still ropes and drags calves to brandings for neighbours, for fun, at branding time. Simply put, she enjoys being anywhere near cows. 74


CLINTON BROST

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is a quintessential cowboy. He was raised on a cattle ranch in southwestern Saskatchewan. After grade school he started working on the family ranch where he and his family still run a cow/calf to yearling operation with a cow base of straight Hereford cows. Located on the south side of the Cypress Hills, winters are sometimes harsh, so Clinton appreciates cattle with substantial hair, bone and thickness to help them survive the winters and hills. Clinton’s judging experience comes from bull sales where he has been buying bulls for many years.

MAXINE BELL is a well-respected Hereford breeder based west of Houston, British Columbia, on Hungry Hill – about 200 miles (320 kms) northwest of Prince George. You could say that roots grow when you plant your feet in the same place for a long time. Sixty-three-yearold Maxine resides on the place that her maternal great grandparents settled in the 1800s. In later years, her father would acquire a soldier’s settlement next to her mother’s family’s land and the rest is history. The first Herefords were purchased on the ranch in 1952 and that Hereford herd remains, along with a few Angus cows. Maxine studied to become an airline stewardess and later, a dental assistant but since she married, and through a later divorce, she has worked the ranch along with her two sons. Wayne works from home, while Noah lives at the adjoining ranch and partners with his mom in part of the cowherd. The ranch currently runs 200 commercial cows, of which about 50 are purebred. One of Maxine’s granddaughters is an active Junior Hereford member. Another is involved with horses and Angus cattle. Maxine supports their interests and has transferred ownership of several of her cows to her granddaughters. Maxine has judged 4-H cattle shows at local fairs for years. Her own cattle run in rugged country with its share of predators, so Maxine appreciates cattle with mothering ability that can withstand the sometimes harsh environment. LEE ROWORTH runs 725 cows in a commercial ranching operation south of Czar, Alberta, that has been

in the family since 1898. While they no longer finish their own cattle, they still background the calves. The herd is comprised of 50 per cent Hereford and 50 per cent Black Angus cows. Lee partners with his father Jack and Jack’s two cousins, Dave and Jim Cameron in the operation; thus the name, Roworth and Cameron Ranch. He also works with his wife Margy, his son Dayton and his daughters, Jamie and Nicole. Jack once owned a livestock trucking company for which Lee did some driving but that business has since been retired. The Roworths run a traditional ranch on which all work is done on horseback. Lee has been through the 4-H program. He enjoys being part of the cattle business because of the integrity and honesty of the people in it. He attends many bull sales in east-central Alberta and Calgary and appreciates good quality cattle. Sought-after qualities in a good animal, according to Lee, include depth, length and butt and hair coat. He appreciates that every breed has its own qualities but believes that Herefords bring more desirable traits together than any other breed.

KARI RAE JOHNER At 25 years young, Kari Rae is the “junior” on the Rancher Day judging panel and is

honoured to be included. A graduate of the Ranch and Stock Management program at Lakeland College, Kari- Rae grew up on a ranch north of Maidstone, in western Saskatchewan. She has always displayed and shared her passion for cattle. Kari-Rae has recently moved home to the family ranch and is very excited to grow her own business in the beef industry. She and her family now farm 1,700 acres and run about 100 cows on the North Saskatchewan River. It is a commercial cow/calf operation that is Angus and Hereford-based. She manages the cowherd and horses and trains colts through the winter months. Over the years, Kari-Rae has ridden on a lot of ranches and provincial pastures. She has also shown cattle for many years and still raises club calves. She is often asked to clip bulls for winter bull sales and has worked for several purebred breeders. Kari-Rae judged Saskatchewan’s Northwest field day this past summer and has done a lot of 4-H judging. As a judge, Kari-Rae is committed to keeping the functionality in beef cattle. She is not necessarily looking for the fanciest in the breed but rather, seeks those that are structurally sound, productive and display overall balance.

STAN JACOBS’ journey took him from the world of horses to the world of cattle in a very large way. Raised in Alberta, Stan had no family background in the beef business but now ably manages Canada’s largest commercial cattle ranch, where Herefords figure prominently, near Douglas Lake, British Columbia. After high school, Stan spent a couple years working at an A.I. unit where he learned what the beef industry deemed worthy of being there. He moved from there to working for an embryo transplant centre, managing recipient cows. From the mechanics of the elite world of purebred genetics, Stan moved to British Columbia to try his hand at cowboying for some of the larger ranches there. From that perspective, he “learned what kind of cow it took to produce in a large, low maintenance environment,” in his own words. Stan moved to Douglas Lake Cattle Company in 1987 with his wife Shirley and his two children, Megan and Cameron and has been there ever since. He became the cowboss in 1989 and has since been responsible for 6,500 to 7,000 mother cows. He buys all the bulls for the herd, sets up the breeding program and manages the grazing rotations. Stan has judged the Armstrong IPE, Medicine Hat Bull Show and Sale, and the Bull Congress in Camrose. What motivates him is “being involved in something as unique as Douglas Lake, where the cattle, horses and the people all work together to convert grass into beef.” 75


Hirsche Herefords & Angus Ltd.

Welcome All Visitors to the WHC 2012

9 Some of our New Stars 9 WARNING

T h i s Nu g g e t m a y b e too big for some: BUT if you want muscle, power, performance & correctness, this Nugget will “Shine”. (He will be shown at the WHC)

EPDs BW 5.7 WW 53.0 YW 85.1

Owned with Bruce Sharp & Star Lake Cattle Ranch

MILK 16.2

GH ADAMS GOLD NUGGET 387W

Introducing one of the best breeding herd bulls ever

TM 42.7 REA 0.47 MARB 0.05

7101 2 yr old to show at WHC

SIRING: Pigment, Muscling, Hair and Daughters with Outstanding Udders

J J J

Daug

hter

272X

Will show at WHC Owed with Wyatt Hanson.

Heifer, From 7101’s Full Brother EPDs BW 3.4 WW 65.2 YW 110.8 MILK 12.4 TM 45.0

UPS JT NEON 7101 1ET

REA 0.90 MARB 0.12

We only live 20 minutes south of Calgary and will be happy to shuttle anyone who wishes to visit our ranch. Contact Grant Hirsche: (403) 652-8254 Annette Hirsche: (403) 652-0456 Or visit with us at the Conference 76

2012 D aught er

365X

Will show at WHC

3Z


ww.h irsche Hirsche Herefords & Angus Ltd. 9 for .co w more

m inform ation We Specialize in International Semen & Embryos

9

253W with her first calf, MVP.

MVP will have semen 9already qualified for EU. He will be at the WHC.9

253W EPDs BW 1.8

MVP EPDs BW 3.2

WW 55.1

WW 55.2

YW 86.4

YW 90.3

MILK 24.8

MILK 22.5

TM 52.4 REA 0.25 MARB 0.22

TM 50.1

*+$'$066'20$10,66:Â&#x2021;*+093<

REA 0.23 MARB 0.21

13Z

253Wâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 calf will show at the WHC.

Introducing New 2012 Herd Sires Owned with MJT Herefords

UPS UPTOWN 0342 ET

MJT TOTAL ET 311W

He will show at the WHC - To see his 2012 calves, His first time to town will be at the WHC. Owned with WSV Farms, Calhan, Colorado & come to our ranch 20 miles from Calgary or MJTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Edgerton, Alberta. Upstream Ranch, Taylor, Nebraska. U.S. EPDs: BW: 2.6 WW: 54 YW: 83 Milk: 20 REA: 0.55 MARB: 0.19

GH ADAMS NITRO DESIGN ET 377X Maybe the thickest Hereford ever. EPDs: BW: 4.9 WW: 61.6 YW: 103.3 Milk: 20.4 TM: 51.2 REA: 0.62 MARB: -0.07

EPDs: BW: 5.2 WW: 61.1 YW: 96.9 Milk:16.9 TM: 47.5 REA: 0.43 MARB: 0.02

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock Solidâ&#x20AC;? 5Z 2012 Top Herd Bull Prospect

Maternal Brother To DESIGN Sire - 7101 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the best we have ever raisedâ&#x20AC;?

Grant & Annette Hirsche Mailing Address: #4-34 Southridge Drive, Okotoks, AB T1S 2G5

Phone: (403) 652-1173 (403) 652-8254 Corb Wilson: (918) 214-4134 Email: owners@hirsche.com Directions to Ranch: 20 miles south of Calgary or 8 miles north of High River on Hwy 2, directly east of Highwood Auction Mart 77


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WHC Junior Show

Monday, July 16, 2012

By Gordon and Cathy Klein

The World Hereford Conference (WHC) Junior Show is patterned after the successful and long running (30+ years) Canadian Junior Hereford Bonanza Show. The Canadian Junior Hereford Association (CJHA) itself, is the oldest junior purebred cattle association in Canada. The annual Bonanza is normally a four-day event but this year’s junior show will be pared down to one day, as it coincides with the WHC. The Junior WHC program will, however, allow juniors the option of attending the conference technical program or the Rafter Six Ranch Resort for a day of adventure. The Junior Cattle Show is eligible for recognition under the Mark of Excellence (MOE) awards program and is open to Canadian and

All juniors may also enter a Photography Competition with the theme “Herefords in my Country”. Event organizers are hoping this competition will produce some interesting photographs from around the world. The junior show will also feature a Show Team Judging demonstration – an event that is normally part of the annual Bonanza show. Country Reports from juniors from around the world, similar to the adult country reports, will allow Canadian juniors to learn more about the Junior programs from other countries. A junior association fund-raising Silent Auction will be very interesting with participation and contributions from other nations. The Junior show day is a fun-filled and highly anticipated show with

Something unique about the Canadian Junior Hereford show experience is that juniors must be the only ones who prepare their animals for the exhibition and show ring. International Juniors in age groups from Pee Wee (8 years old and under) to Senior (17 to 21 years of age). Along with the cattle show, there will be a showmanship competition in which all juniors have the option of participating. For the final showmanship class, International Juniors will be allowed to wear show apparel that they would normally wear in their home countries. International juniors are encouraged to participate in all junior show activities. Many of our Canadian breeders are offering animals to international junior guests, for use during the junior show competitions. For more information, please see the Canadian Hereford Association website – www.hereford.ca - or contact Jeff Hyatt, Breed Development Coordinator at the CHA office. 78

top-quality cattle from the herds of some very enthusiastic juniors. Something unique about the Canadian Junior Hereford show experience is that juniors must be the only ones who prepare their animals for the exhibition and show ring. Juniors may assist each other but parents, adults or professional fitters are not permitted to work with their animals prior to or during the show, while attending the event. This gives our juniors a great sense of pride and accomplishment in their efforts and ensures that it is a tremendous learning experience. Come see our junior cattle folk in action, at the World Hereford Conference at Olds, Alberta, on Monday, July 16th, or any other year, in the month of July, at their annual Bonanza show, held in a different Canadian province every year.


H E R E F O R D

THR THOR 4029

JDH 15 WRANGLER 25L THR MISS THOR 0266

SHF PROGRESS T138

SHF PROGRESS P20 SHF MISS M326 R130

U.S. EPDs

C A N A D I A N

D I G E S T

CE BW WW YW Milk M&G

 2.3 54 82 21 48

Box 158, Imperial, SK S0G 2J0 +RZDUG 6KDURQaÂ&#x2021;+RZDUG&HOOa Gordon & Shirley ~ 306.963.2662 Fax: 306.963.2493 h.s.crittenden@sasktel.net

P.O.  Box  120,  Ashmont,  AB

Winston  (Win)  Stothert 604-­922-­9652 wstothert@shaw.ca

Cattle Since 1909 and Polled Herefords Since 1975

GHC  C5  DOMINATOR  29Y  GHC  VOLUME  III  ET  139S    DXB  3K  TRACI  63P  

RU  20X  BOULDER  57G WALPOLE  PHILIS  13F DXB  7C  BLOCKBUSTER  3K MAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  TRICIA  926Y  307D

We  selected   Dominator   from   the   Crittenden   Bros.   herd  last  fall.    He  is  a  dark  red-­necked  son  of  GHC   Volume  III  139S.    He  has  a  great  big  hip  and  spring   of  rib  out  of  their  63  cow  that  is  now  in  their  embryo   program.    We  own  full  possession  and  one-­half  semen   interest  with  GHC  retaining  one-­half  semen  interest. EPDS

CE

BW

WW

YW

MM

TM

MCE

SC

CW

Stay

MPI

FMI

FAT

REA

MARB

+0.6

+3.1

+54.0

+89.1

+19.1

+46.1

+1.3

+0.8

+107.4

-­1.8

+150.0

+108.3

+0.033

+0.37

+0.04

+3.6

+44.4

+72.6

+17.0

+39.3

+0.9

+0.7

+86.9

-­0.2

+139.8

+123.2

+0.001

+0.25

+0.04

Breed  Avg.   +0.4 EPDs for  2010  Born  Calves

Watch  for  DOMINATOR  at  the  World  Hereford  Conference.  We  look  forward  to  using  him  in  our  herd.

79


Pahl Livestock  is  a  family  operated  cattle  ranch  located  

Â

Â

Â

west  of  Medicine  Hat  in  southern  Alberta,  Canada.  We  run  120   registered  Horned  Hereford  cows,  180  registered  Black  Angus  cows   and  a  300+  head  commercial  cow-­calf  program.  AI,   Embryo  Transfer  and  the  selection  of  the  best  walking   EXOOVZHFDQ¿QGDUHDOZD\VLQWKHIRUHIURQWRIRXU program  as  we  continually  strive  to  raise  better  cattle     for  our  customers  and  ourselves.

Each  year  80-­100  Hereford  and  Angus  bulls  and  a  group  of  elite  commercial  bred  heifers  are  sold  via  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The   Amigosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Production  Sale  with  XTC  Herefords  and  at  the  Medicine  Hat  Bull  Sale.   We  feel  our  success  as  both  seedstock  producers  and  commercial  cattlemen  may  be  attributed  to  our  commitment   to  the  cattle  industry  and  our  efforts  as  a  family. Our  cattle  are  bred  using  a  proven  program  selected  for  the  progressive  cattlemen.  This  program  is  tailor  made   to  give  you  more  value  through  generations  of  economically  important  traits  that  guarantee  performance  and   SURÂżWDELOLW\7KHERWWRPOLQHLVLI\RXZDQWPRUHPRQH\IRU\RXUFDOIEULQJPRUHFDOIWRWKHULQJ

We  are  on  target  for  meeting  future  industry  demands.  Ask  us  what  we  can   do  for  your  program  today.

Pahl  Livestock  Commercial  Cows  &  Calves

126  Pahl  Livestock  steer  calves  selling  in   one  draft

Our commercial program  continues  to  progress  as  strict  culling  and  the  use  of   home  raised  sons  from  our  purebred  sires  moves  our  cowherd  forward.  We  are  at  the  top  of  the   market  each  fall  with  strong  demand  for  our  cattle  from  many  Southern  Alberta  cattle  buyers.    

80


2 0 1 2 NEW

F REST EASY 105

LCI 159T KING STANMORE 81W

H E R D S I R E S

FE 18S ASTER LAD 37W

BBSF 46P TROOPER 207T

Our annual Amigos Bull Sale, held every  November  at  the  

ranch, is  now  on  it’s  14th  year.  The  Templeton  family  continue  to  be  our  sale   partners  and  the  two  families  working  together  have  made  this  sale  one  of  the   strongest  ranch  bull  production  sales  in  western  Canada 2008   76  Bulls  Sold  $3,260 2010   77  Bulls  Sold  $3,475 2009   72  Bulls  Sold  $3,385 2011   80  Bulls  Sold  $4,350

Scott Pahl 403-548-2356 403-580-9908 pahl.livestock@xplornet.com

Dan Pahl 403-548-8112 403-548-1614 dan@pahl-livestock.com

LeRay Pahl 403-548-6626 403-580-9906

Box 245, Medicine Hat T1A 7E9 81


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feature story

Good Cattle. Good People. + 150 years of Herefords in Canada Adapted from an article which first appeared in the January 2010 issue of the Canadian Hereford Digest, commemorating the 150th anniversary of Herefords in Canada.

By Catherine A. Brown T his is t he st or y of people. It’s the story of great cowboys and breed promoters and ranches. It’s the story behind shows like Agribition, world class bull sales and a strong youth organization. But most of all, it’s the story of a breed of cattle that has persisted through the generations. This rugged, thick-hided, white-faced breed is the one you can see on windy hillsides on cold, winter days, that is still out there foraging. It is perfectly suited to the Nor th Amer ican

A S S O CIAT E ED ITO R

best of all,” says young Saskatchewan breeder Murray Andrews. How they got here is another story. “The English claim they sent Hereford cattle here over 200 years ago,” says Norma Dunn, a former CHA employee. However, as 94-year-old Charles Scranton, Order of Canada and former CHA president, points out in a written history of the breed, North American associations were not in existence at the time, so a lot of the information on early importations has been lost. At the time of Frederick William

and the Red Cross and Salvation Army organizations were founded; the U.S. Department of Agriculture was created along with the first cattle importation laws; the flush toilet, moving pictures, pasteurization, the machine gun, roller skates, the fire extinguisher, the coffee maker and the first colour photographs were invented. So were the first pro golf tournaments played with the British Golf Open and the first pro golf tournament in Scotland. The Ontario Veterinary College was established in 1862. The 1800s also

Over the years, the breed’s primary strengths have prevailed. It is foremost the maternal breed. High fertility and efficiency have earned Herefords their permanence. But so has temperament. continent. Yet it thrives in diverse climates. Stories of 20th century cattlemen walking their cattle 10 to 20 miles or more to livestock shows or to the trains that would take them there, in the days before trucks and trailers serve as a metaphor to the breed’s walk through pastures, rock, meadows and mountains from the Atlantic to the Pacific, through 150 years. “The feet on Hereford cattle are

82

Stone’s official importations of Herefords into Canada in 1860 and 1861, the country had yet to enter into Confederation. Within a few years of that historical date, Abraham Lincoln was elected President of the United States, then re-elected, before his demise in 1865. U.S. and Britain agreed to suppress the slave trade and serfdom was abolished in Russia; The U.S. Civil War raged; the Toronto Stock Exchange was created

ushered in the advent of agricultural fairs in Canada. Stone’s herd, based at Guelph, Ontario, produced Herefords that influenced the breed across North America. The University of Guelph and beef cattle research station are located on the property once owned by Mr. Stone, the recipient of many agricultural awards. Stone’s foresight to import only top quality stock available from


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

Square-­D Herefords Jim & Lori Duke

RR #2 Langbank, SK S0G 2X0 Phone: 306-538-4556 Cell: 306-736-7921 Email: square.d@yourlink.ca Website: square-dpolledherefords.com

Where Quality Runs Generations Deep........

top quality females and herd sire prospects, embryos and semen to build your herd around.

Production Sale October 22, 2012 Britain proved advantageous to the proliferation of the breed in North America. Over the years, the breed’s primary strengths have prevailed. It is foremost the maternal breed. High fertility and efficiency have earned Herefords their permanence. But so has temperament. “They are so easy to get along with,” says Ray VanSteinburg, of Pine Butte Ranch. “It’s important to me to enjoy whatever you’re working with, particularly when you ca n pro duce a top saleable product.” Herefords on pasture are “happy to see you”, he says. And they are easy on fences. “ Her eford s a r e lo w in maintenance and labour inputs,” says Saskatchewan breeder Spence Sutter, whose family has been in the breed for 100 years. “One guy and one horse can handle 100 head, whereas 10 0 exot ics would take three to four guys on horses.” “It’s the little things that make the big differences,” says VanSteinburg. “It’s not what you get in the sale ring; it’s the cost of getting them in there that counts.” It t o o k t h e b r e e d promoters to prove those facts – the likes of Wib Donaldson, Jonathan Fox , L ou i s L at i mer, Walter Blume, Jim Hole, Doris and Stuart Fenton, Vern and Louise Croy, the Warnycas, Joe and Dave Hasson, Grant Hirsche, and Gil Henderson; Gene Hanson, Charlie Jones and the Powleslands. These were among the pioneers; the legendary builders of the breed in Canada. Many have since taken their hands

out of the water, as Latimer says, but the ripples still remain. From the 19th century, Quebec breeder and renowned cattle judge H.D. Smith would later become President and secretary-manager for the CHA. He was the first to tattoo his cattle and had tattoos adopted by the CHA. Ontario’s Mossom Boyd follows F.W.

Stone as a pioneer breeder, having introduced and developed polled Herefords in Canada. Another early breeder, Senator M.H. Cochrane of Quebec, started a Hereford herd in 1865. In partnership w it h his son James, he later established the Cochrane Ranch west

of Calgary and sold many foundation animals to Canadian and American breeders. By the mid 1970’s Latimer and Blume joined a CHA excursion to England and did well selling the “modern” Canadian Hereford. Six bulls were taken for display at the Royal show and sold there, says former CHA general manager Perry Wilkes. “That was the beginning of really good exports to the UK.” Many long-time breeders are too numerous to list. By the 1960s, Saskatchewan breeders outnumbered all other provinces. By the 1980s, more than 40 per cent of Canadian breeders were Albertan. Hereford herds tended to be larger and longer-lived in British Columbia, according to Scranton. The inf luence of the Douglas Lake Cattle Ranch and other commercial ranches were “of great value to the cattle breeders, not only because of the large number of breeding sires purchased but a l s o b e c au s e t he y stressed utilit y and thus discouraged the following of fads by breeders,” says Dave Andrew, CHA general manager from 1942 to 1959, in his history of the breed entitled The Hereford in Canada 1860-1960. Notable breeders, of course, produced notable bulls, far too many to mention. But some “old boys” cannot be forgotten. Mossom Boyd’s “Bullion the 4th” was a record-breaking, top selling polled Hereford at $2,025 in 1914. The bull was resold by its American owners at seven years of

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Bullion the 4th

Ned 452E

Stanmore 43K

age, bringing $9,500, and breaking a new world record. His descendents commanded top prices for years to follow and many polled Herefords reportedly go back to this sire. The Latimers talk about Four Square Leonard 25L as being the most influential in the Remitall herd. Four Square Modern Tone 42M developed another line that led to breeding Remitall Crusader 33C and the beginning of the Enforcer 107 line. The 42M bull and Remitall Leonard 38L left a lot of good females, the latter of which was one of Remitall’s top selling A.I. sires, according to Gary Latimer. Ned 425E, Justa Banner and Predominant put Ponderosa Ranch on the map according to Don Jarrett, as WTK Bond 75A and his son, Continental 66F did for the W-T-K herd. Jim Hole’s Standard Lad 55C was Calgary Bull Sale Reserve Champion in 1973 and sold to Bar Pipe Farms where he became a foundation herdsire. Standard Lad 93J, Standard Lad 95J and especially Stanmore 43K were among Hole’s most influential sires. Burt & Marion Powesland of Rusticana Herefords, Alberta, and members of the Hereford Hall of Fame, built their cowherd

bull and female over time in commercial circles while Herefords also gained notoriety through specific events. Canadian Herefords were put in the spotlight when Canada hosted the World Hereford Conference of 1976. “A large international crowd representing over 20 countries was amazed at the quality of Canadian cattle and this was the start of major international exports,” says former CHA general manager, Duncan Porteous. “Working together to host the conference really jelled the breed.” The conference in Banff was followed by a 900-head Hereford show at Calgary. Herefords have also been the main breed of cattle featured for years at the Calgary Bull Sale, the oldest continuously held consignment sale in North America, according to Joanne Hole, wife of the late Jim Hole and author of the sale’s written history. “It has been the benchmark sale for horned Herefords in Canada for many years,” she says. Edward Jupp, former fieldman for the Canadian Hereford Digest, attended the Calgary Bull sale for 25 years. He says the sale is an education for everybody in attendance.

Herefords have also been showcased for years at the Canadian Western Agribition, a show created by Hereford breeders. Canadian Western Agribition, 1971

Jonathan Fox, judging the 2nd Canadian Western Agribition

Regina Bull Sale

1983 Calgary Bull Sale 84

on a bull called Ardmore C Domino 560, purchased at the Calgary bull sale. This bull also sired a number of bulls sold at subsequent sales. Pr ince Domino 9th was behind the extensively used Silver Standard bull, says Ron Hanson. Hanson Ranches opened up some international trading opportunities with their BB Domino 1087 bull, the top growth performance bull in the world at the time. And LCI High Voltage 80S, bred by Doenz Ranches, is considered the granddaddy of many Canadian Herefords today and has been used worldwide. The Remitall Keynote 20X and resulting Boomer 46B and CS Boomer 29F bulls are legendary in the breed’s most recent history, as is Remitall Governor 236G. Remitall Online 122L is another of the breed’s most prolific sires and is the only Canadian bull to achieve National Champion Bull honours in both Canada and the U.S. He was, in fact, a twotime U.S. National Champion. The majority of American Hereford pedigrees are believed to go back to these sires. The baldies and buckskins of North America have promoted the value of the Hereford

But it used to run for three to four days and is now reduced to three or four hours. “The big city bull sales have all come down in size and significance,” says former Canadian Hereford Digest owner, Kurt Gilmore. This includes the Regina Bull Sale, which was once the largest halter-led bull sale in the world, according to former CHA general manager, Perry Wilkes. Current CHA General Manager Gordon Stephenson’s fondest memories of the breed involve the Regina Bull Sale where 300 to 400 Hereford bulls sold. Herefords have also been showcased for years at the Canadian Western Agribition, a show created by Hereford breeders. This internationally renowned national livestock event was established in 1970, in large part, due to the efforts of Spence Sutter’s father, Chris. Inspired by the U.S. stock show at Denver, Sutter wanted a major livestock show on the prairies. He and Jim Lethwaite, Tom Lees and what would be the show’s first general manager, Bill Blacklock, lobbied government, the exhibition boards and other cattle breeds. They also attracted Labatts and Chrysler who


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came on board as the show’s first sponsors. In the first show, Herefords outnumbered all other breeds, three-to-one. Gary Minish judged, followed by Jonathan Fox the next year, who judged on horseback in the old auditorium. “Agribition had a major impact on exports and getting breeders together to collectively promote the breed,” says Porteous. Breed promotion and maintaining the

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development of the Canadian Junior Hereford Council. The World Hereford Conference in Alberta was the catalyst to a lot of junior excitement and that year, the CHA recognized the need for more organization within the junior organization, appointing a coordinator and adding junior provincial associations to the CHA. The first national junior show was held

The Canadian Junior Hereford Association was the first national junior cattle breed organization and it has grown to be one of the leading beef breed youth groups in the world. integrity of Hereford pedigrees has been the domain of the Canadian Hereford Association since 1890. The CHA currently comprises about 1,500 annual, life and junior members across Canada and registers about 15,000 Herefords annually. Its current offices in Calgary were built in 1980 when registrations numbered over 45,000. “The Canadian Hereford Association has been an active supporter and participant in the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC), its organizational structure, evolution and programs for a long time,” says former CBBC General Manager, Herb McLane. “This clearly indicates the recognition of the Hereford industry of the needs of the overall purebred cattle industry…..[such as] genetic improvement and genomics, international market development, risk management tools and the national information system, to name a few.” And what better way to ensure the survival of the breed than through the next generation. Herefords have “the characteristics that lend themselves well to youth,” says former member Sarah Hasson in a recent Ontario

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in 1978 at the University of Manitoba. The first Bonanza, a national junior event that rotates to a different province each year, was organized by Marion Powesland, Stu Fenton and Ed Newton, and was held at Red Deer, Alberta in 1980. What Hereford breeders and the breed itself have endured, to-date, is impressive. The most obvious trend the Hereford breed has withstood is that of frame size adjustments. The earliest of the English breed were up to seven feet tall. Bulls and females of the 1700’s were up to 3,000 or 4,000 pounds, respectively. These Herefords were primarily used as oxen to pull implements. The 1940s and 1950s witnessed the proliferation of “baby beef” and “belt buckle” cattle, which reflected the desire for smaller cuts and earlier maturing cattle. It resulted in a lot of single-trait selection, leading to genetic mutations which have since been eliminated. The ‘70s and ‘80s manifested a new trend toward taller, leaner genetics to compete with newly imported exotic breeds. The breed has since recovered to idealize a more moderate beast between the extremes.

Frederick William Stone

Morton Lodge Plaque, the home of Frederick Stone

Mossom Boyd

It is estimated that well over 30 per cent of the beef cow population in Canada carries Hereford breeding. Memoir of the breed. The Canadian Junior Hereford Association was the first national junior cattle breed organization and it has grown to be one of the leading beef breed youth groups in the world. The CHA introduced the first junior memberships in 1963 for members under 21 years of age. In 1967, Dr. Bob Watson and Philip Schleihauf of Ontario pioneered the

Among the breed’s challenges, over time, are disease, a decline in agriculture and a corresponding decline in memberships; increased costs of production, the loss of income tax incentives to many producers, high interest rates of the 1980s, a grading system change which favoured the growth of the Angus beef brand, Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) in the U.S., oil patch wages of $60-$70/hour, stagnant prices and most

Depiction of Ancient Hereford

C. 1950’s 85


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notably, BSE. Still, the breed has persisted. It is estimated that well over 30 per cent of the beef cow population in Canada carries Hereford breeding. Technology c h a n g e s i n c o m mu n i c at i o n , transportation and data recording has helped support and give new life to the breed. And Pan American EPDs have opened new market opportunities. H e r efor d s h av e e x plo de d i n

popularity in Canadian and U.S. commercial herds over the past few years and that trend continues to gain momentum. For the many breeds that systematically “went black”, it turns out that nothing is more complimentary than hybrid vigour in the form of a white-faced cross. Porteous says the emphasis on environmental responsibility and the increased need to cut cowherd costs, also indicates a strong future

for Herefords. He is hopeful that the World Hereford Conference, along with the Branded Hereford Beef program, will generate yet more “enthusiasm among the troops.”

Canadian Hereford Association Report Herefords are one of Canada’s top three beef cattle breeds and Hereford popularity is surging, despite consolidation in the North American beef cattle business. CHA registrations and membership are significantly down from what they were 25 years ago. But registrations are now trending upward. Hereford bull sales have been up substantially, year over year, for the past four years, in both numbers sold and in terms of selling prices and this upward trend shows promise of continuing. Black bull batteries in many Canadian commercial herds are being replaced by Hereford bulls. Hereford females are also in huge demand in Canadian commercial cowherds – so much so that there are not enough in the marketplace to satisfy demand. The resurgence in the popularity of Herefords “has a lot to do with temperament,” according to Brad Dubeau, Communications Manager for the Canadian Hereford Association (CHA). But modern genetics have also manifested more efficient body types and improved udders. Herefords have also made huge strides in carcass quality, according to Dubeau. They also continue to be appreciated for good feet and legs. CHA-backed Breed Improvement programs are always on the go. This includes the Total Herd Enrolment program (THE), on which nearly 80 per cent of our registrations are enrolled for the collection of performance data for EPDs (expected progeny differences). A program beginning this fall involves over 300 Hereford bulls in a feed efficiency research project. A Fed Hereford Project is also ongoing in conjunction

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with Feedlot Health Management Services, which returns carcass data to the original owners and to the CHA for use in genetic evaluations. The CHA is working with the American Hereford Association (AHA) to develop a Hereford 50K SNP DNA panel. Along with the AHA, the CHA also encourages breeders to screen registered animals for genet ic abnor malit ies. All the animals DNA profiled are also tested for three genetic abnormalities – Hypotrichosis, Diluter and Idiopathic Epilepsy. DNA profiling is mandatory for all walking bulls, A.I. sires, embryo transplant calves and donor dams. Every 500th bull and every 1,000th female is also DNA profiled as part of a spot check process. The CHA purchased its official

national publication, the Canadian Hereford Digest from the Gilmore family in 20 09, which is now published in-house three times a year and is growing annually. In 2010, the Canadian Hereford Association celebrated its 150th anniversary. While live cattle exports to the U.S. remain strong, about 3,000 head were exported to Russia and Kazahkstan in 2011. Semen and embryo exports to the U.S., the European Union, Australia and New Zealand are also strong, with growing markets into South America and South Africa. The CHA board of directors is comprised of 12 directors and has special committees to oversee pedigrees, marketing, shows and breed improvement

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Your Visit is Always Welcomed and Appreciated Doug & Wanda Mann Box 1256 Swift Current, SK S9H 3X4

P: 306.773.7136 C: 306.741.1265 W: 306.773.4121 E: w_mann@xplornet.ca

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Thursday, July 19, 2012

The Simmie Hutterite Colony of Saskatchewan

Photos by: Lenita Waldner and Kelly Hofer from www.hutterites.org 88

Visitors to the Simmie Hutterite colony, near Swift Current, Saskatchewn, can expect to see a full-fledged large-scale and diversified farming operation. The operation consists, in part, of a 250-cow commercial beef herd of Hereford and Hereford-influence females, which run on 4,000 of the colony’s 22,000 acres, as well as on PFRA (Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration) lands. All calves are backgrounded and sold as yearlings at local auction marts. Also part of the Simmie colony is a 70-cow dairy operation, a 160-sow farrow to finish operation, 4,000 layers, as well as turkeys, ducks and geese. The Simmies are also grain farmers, putting up crops of canola, durhum, wheat, barley and oats. Forages are also produced to sustain the cattle herd through the winter months. Both the Mennonites and the Hutterites trace their origins to the Swiss Anabaptist movements of the 16th Century. Both groups immigrated, directly or indirectly, to the Canadian prairies from German colonies in South Russia, similar to most of the German Catholics. The groups were subject to repeated persecution and were driven from one country to another. Joseph Hutter himself was burned at the stake in 1536. After an unsettled existence in Europe, all of them moved to South Dakota in the United States in 1874, in order to escape the repeal of their military exemption by the Russian government. World War I hastened the exodus of two sects of those colonies from the U.S. to Alberta and Manitoba, Canada. Prior to 1949, there were no Hutterite colonies in Saskatchewan. Since then, more than 50 colonies have been established, primarily in the western regions of Saskatchewan. The Simmie colony was established in 1961. Each Hutterite colony averages about 100 men, women and

children. Hutterites have tended to have a high, but recently declining, birth rate and a large family size. When a colony’s population grows well beyond the average, new “daughter” colonies are founded, usually about every fifteen years. The Hutterite population as a whole and the number of colonies have grown quite rapidly. All Hutterites continue to live in their own colonies, which are small in population yet often control extensive farmland. Although they sell their produce (grain, livestock, poultry, vegetable crops) on the public market, they live within sequestered colonies where strict conformity is ensured in unique dress, religious education (together with limited “public education” from on outside teacher at the colony school), language (they converse in an archaic German dialect), authority (each colony is headed by a male boss), occupational specificity (male and female jobs are assigned even before adulthood), holding property in common and an orderly lifestyle (i.e. preparing meals and dining together; buildings arranged in rectangular order). Because Hutterites own their farmland and machinery in common, their farming is usually a profitable venture. However, the rapid expansion of Hutterites’ territorial acquisitions has resulted in contested legislation in the prairie provinces, restricting concentration and expansion of the colonies. Hutterites have traditionally tended to be non-political, to buy farm machinery on a wholesale rather than localized basis and to claim tax exemptions as a religious organization, which has further caused problems in their relations with neighbouring local communities. Today, however, Hutterites are respected as prosperous farmers and as an interesting part of Saskatchewan’s rural population.


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DLR  41S  STANDARD  72X

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BIG-­GULLY  KS  BOUNTY  894X C  88T  EXPLICIT  10X

BIG-­GULLY  8151  MONUMENT  217Y

Charlie & Joan Â&#x2021;)D[ Â&#x2021;&HOO

Steven and Lorraine Â&#x2021;Bradley, Ashley & Lisa Â&#x2021;&HOO

(PDLOFMZKLWH#WHOXVSODQHWQHWÂ&#x2021;%R[6LWH55%HDYHUORGJH$%7+& /RFDWHGNPVRXWKRI%HDYHUORGJHRQWR+DOFRXUWFRUQHUWKHQNPZHVWRQWRZQVKLSURDG NPVRXWKRQ55

Agribition  Reserve  Grand  National  Champion  Bull  2010   &  Champion  Senior  Bull  Calf  2009

EPDs BW 4.5 WW 62.4 YW 97.3 Milk  23.2 TM 54.4

 Kairuru  Aberdeen  030047 Harvie  Traveler  69T   Harvie  Pearl  129P   Remitall  Keynote  20X Blair-­Athol  20  Gretchen  ET  36R     MHR  35A  Hazel  54A  18D

See  our  sale  offerings  at  the   River  Valley  Genetics  By  Design  VIII  Sale   September  14,  2012

Visit  our  display  at  the  Orangville  Showcase  during  the  WHC  Post  Tour  on  July  23.

Burt  &  Nancy  Grundy

2932  Mackey  Rd.,  North  Gower,  ON  K0A  2T0 H:  613.489.3136  C:  613.791.7505    E:  nbghereford@xplornet.com    W:  www.nbgpolledherefords.com  

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Friday, July 20, 2012

RCMP Heritage Centre The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) have been an integral part of Canada’s historical and cultural landscape, helping to form and protect the nation and playing a significant role in shaping the Canadian identity for the past 136 years. The RCMP Heritage Centre opened on May 23rd, 2007, to share the RCMP story with the world. That story includes the Force’s role in settling the west and the development of Canada; the role of the RCMP in policing over 200 communities across Canada; the challenges of serving as Canada’s Federal Police Force and the role the RCMP plays internationally. Visitors will come to understand how the Force has changed and adapted to meet the needs of Canadians in the last century and how the modern-day RCMP works here at home and in countries around the world. While the centre is a major tourism attraction for Regina and Saskatchewan, its primary mission and purpose is to serve as an education centre for Canadians about the historic and modern role of the RCMP. Located on the grounds of the RCMP Academy’s Depot Division, the story

of the RCMP is appropriately told where Cadets are trained and where the story begins. Housed in an environmentallyfriendly, breathtaking stone, glass and concrete building designed by world-renowned architect Arthur Erickson and Nick Milkovich Architects Inc. of Vancouver, the RCMP Heritage Centre tells the story of the RCMP using 10,000 square feet of exhibits, a multimedia show, a temporary exhibit gallery, a community room and engaging programming and tours. The architectural design team received the Premier’s Award of Excellence in Architecture in 2007 for its work on the RCMP Heritage Centre. The centre is developed and operated by a non-profit organization, the Mounted Police Heritage Centre. It is not owned and/or operated by the Federal Government or the RCMP. Neither does the RCMP Heritage Centre receive annual operational funding from any level of government or from the RCMP. It relies on admissions, gift shop sales and facility rental revenues to support operations, as well as on donations. It’s a great Canadian story. A story that is still being written.

QUICK FACTS:

The North-West Mounted Police (NWMP), created by an Act of Parliament in 1873, was formed to establish friendly relations with the Indigenous peoples, enforce Canadian authority, pave the way for settlers and maintain law and order on the frontier. Sir John A. MacDonald, Canada’s first Prime Minister, modeled the NWMP on the Royal Irish Constabulary, a military police force famed for its competence and its fairness. MacDonald was also inspired by the U.S. Army’s mounted rifle troops.

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Marvel 120S

Wonder W18

Game Day 74Y

Advanced 21Y

Zachary, Isaac, Emily, Bryan & Annette

Bryan &  Annette  Latimer Box  16  Site  2  RR  4      Olds  AB  T4H  1T8       P:  403  556  0301                            F:  403  556  3160       ablatimer@xplornet.ca

www.remitallwest.com

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Friday, July 20, 2012

Crittenden Brothers Polled Herefords The “basics of the beef business” is the focus at Crittenden Brothers Polled Herefords. The Crittenden program is based on herd bulls walking the pastures. The family’s ultimate goal is to produce look-alikes that work under their environmental conditions. The Crittenden operation is located in the rolling land just west of Imperial, Saskatchewan. Howard and Gordon’s grandparents homesteaded the farm in 1913 when they also started the commercial cattle operation. Crittenden Brothers Polled Herefords began in 1977 when Howard and Gordon purchased their first registered females. The farm is a mixed operation with cereal grains, oilseeds and pulse crops. The operation owns and rents about 9,000 acres, of which 6,000 acres are cropland. The remainder is pasture. Over the past several years, the Crittendens have been very successful with herd sires such as GHC Volume III ET 139S, GHCTaboo Coalition 52U and BBSF 101N Wrangler 29W. You can sometimes find Crittenden cattle at Agribition and periodically at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Colorado. But the family’s intent is not to raise cattle for the show ring. If they win, it is a bonus. In many cases, Crittenden cattle are shown by their new owners. Rancher bulls that create return customers are their main focus. The cowherd consists of 200 purebred cows that are run on dry land and native pasture with a 90day breeding period. “We do not have time during seeding and harvesting periods to pamper calves. Therefore, only the hardiest females become replacements,” says Howard. “Bulls are marketed mainly off the farm by private treaty sale. Sale day is every day at GHC.”

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To maintain cowherd strength and expand strong cow families, the Crittendens have chosen to have an auction sale only every second year. “In this manner, we can maintain our genetic strength and yet offer some of the finest we can produce,” says Howard. The Crittenden program has marketed semen and embryos to the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Kazhkstan, Russia and Bulgaria. They are enrolled in the Canadian Hereford Association’s THE (Total Herd Evaluation) program. This gives them the opportunity to compare and evaluate their animals against industry benchmarks. More and more customers, including commercial cattlemen, are requesting performance and genetic data. The Crittendens continue to work hard to offer the best genetics possible. In the third week of February they were extremely pleased to top the Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan auction market prices for that day, selling 43 Hereford steers which averaged 841 pounds (382 kgs), giving them an average of $1,193 per head. This was a major “coup”, as Hereford cattle have historically been under pressure in the commercial sale ring. The Crittenden operation is under the day-to-day management of Howard and Sharon and Gordon and Shirley. Howard and Sharon’s sons, Jim and Grant and Gordon and Shirley’s son Spencer also play key roles on the farm. “We started in this business because it’s a people business and now we know people all over the world,” says Howard. “Some of my best friends are 1,000 miles away or more.”

For more information or to enter cattle for display, please contact: Howard Crittenden at (306) 963-2414 or h.s.crittenden@sasktel.net


Genetics International Qualified Semen & Embryos of World Class

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The  Genetics  You  need!  For  The  Cattle  You  Want!  

Sheldon & Shannon Archibald

Irma, AB (780) 754-2850 XXXTTDBUUMFDBtTTDBUUMF!UFMVTOFU

Stop By and See Our Champion British Breeds Bull Pen

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2010 Bull Congress All Breeds Champion SSA 44U - One of Our Great AI Sires Represented in Our Bull Pen 93


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RSK Farms

RSK Farms is a family-run Polled Hereford operation, which started in 1984. Owned by Rae and Stephanie Kopeechuk and family, the farm is located just east of Brandon, Manitoba, along the Trans-Canada Highway. The breeding operation consists of about 50 registered Hereford females and 45 commercial Hereford-Angus females. The rest of the farm consists of 3.5 sections of both owned and rented crop land, hay fields and pastureland. (The Dominion Land Survey was used in the time of settlement to divide most of Western Canada into square mile sections. Hence the term “sections”. A square mile or section of land consists of 640 acres) Feed efficiency and docility are two very important traits which the Kopeechuks look for in their Hereford cattle. Good structure, muscling, carcass and pigment are also sought-after traits. In their own words, they say, “The cattle must be functional and marketable and at the end of the day, they need to work.” The purebred Herefords start calving in January and calves are weaned by the end of September. The cows are wintered on hay only. As well as walking numerous bulls, the farm uses AI and ET technology to acquire desirable traits and improve genetic response through predictability and repeatability over large numbers of progeny. RSK is enrolled in the THE (Total Herd Evaluation) program of the Canadian Hereford Association because the collection of data helps them evaluate their own cattle against other breeding programs. They also collect carcass data on all registered animals through CUP (Centralized Ultrasound Processing). “It’s a tool to help you improve and develop your herd,” says Stephanie, who is also the Manitoba Hereford Association’s secretary. RSK Farms’ cattle are consigned to several Manitoba sales and are also

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Saturday, July 21, 2012

sold by private treaty. The operation has also taken part in many cattle shows in Manitoba and at Saskatchewan’s Canadian Western Agribition, for several years. Progeny and genetics from their breeding program have been sold to Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Russia, Kazahkstan, the USA and Canada. The herdsire RSK 707B Harrison 24H had a great deal of influence within their herd, breeding strong replacement females. More recently, they have used Traveler 69T, who has also sired strong females which have been added to the herd as replacements. Bulls sired by Traveler 69T, Tailor Made 7W and RSK Stinger 17S have also been popular and have been sold privately or by public auction. The most recent bull introduced to the herd is RSK 030047 Down Under 6U, who is showing real promise, according to Stephanie. Two new junior sires will also be used, RSK 204P Player ET 37Y and Rhinno 48Y. All three of Rae and Stephanie’s children are active on the operation. Andrew, who is employed with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as a research technician. He’s also President of the Manitoba Hereford Association. His wife Tiara, a landscape designer, helps with the management and breeding of the RSK beef herd. Stephen, who is employed with Miller Farm Equipment as a heavy duty mechanic, takes an active part in the farm’s crop and forage production. His fiancée Lindsay, is currently in the insurance business. Sarah Kopeechuk is pursuing a nursing career and still helps out on the farm as time permits. RSK Farms is very proud to be hosting the 2012 MHA Field Day, and looks forward to meeting everyone that attends. It is our way to showcase what Manitoba has to offer, as well as make new friends. Please join us on July 21, 2012 at the farm.

For more information or to enter cattle for display, please contact: Stephanie and Rae Kopeechuk at (204) 763-4459 or stephan1@mts.net or Andrew Kopeechuk at (204) 573-9529


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Sunday, July 22, 2011

Manitoba Research Station The Brandon Research Centre (BRC) is part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s (AAFC) national network of 19 research centres. The Centre is located in the Parkland region of the Canadian Prairies in the city of Brandon and is one of the original five experimental farms established by the Federal Government in 1886, under The Experimental Farm Stations Act. The BRC conducts research on crop production, including fertilization requirements of crops, ecology and control of weeds, and biology and management of crop diseases. Scientists also conduct research on the genetics and breeding of barley, management of pastures and cattle, land resource management and impacts of agriculture on the environment. Results of these research areas produce knowledge, technologies and management practices that enable agricultural producers of the Parkland region to produce safe and healthy food and fibre products demanded by national and international consumers; to improve their husbandry practices in order to enhance the environmental and economic sustainability of their land and water resources; to improve the efficient use of inputs and resources; and to increase their economic and market competitiveness in domestic and international markets.

Areas of Research

Researchers at the BRC conduct research on a vast array of agroecological processes that determine the sustainability of agricultural production and the impact of crop and animal production on the quality of the environment, including land, water and air resources. BRC scientists plan and develop research projects within AAFC’s framework of research priorities, 96

while addressing regional needs of producers and agro-industry, and enabling new discoveries and knowledge to foster sector innovation.

Environmental Stewardship Initiatives

› Conducting research on manure management methods, including composting and rates of application to land that permit producers to capture its beneficial nutrient properties as a fertilizer material, while avoiding, or minimizing, both nutrient losses from the soil and greenhouse gas emissions. › Searching for innovative fertilizer management techniques that enable agricultural producers to avoid nutrient losses to the environment and maximize the efficient use of nutrients by crops. › Advancing knowledge on soil processes, particularly those that control emission of greenhouse gases, sequestration of carbon in soil organic matter, replenishment of exhausted nutrient supplying capacity and improvement of soil physical properties and tilth. › Improving knowledge and understanding the effects of crop rotations and crop succession on carbon sequestration, of legume crop contributions to soil N accumulation and ecology of weed communities and plant diseases. › Studying the impact of cattle production on land water and air quality

Farm Profitability Through Innovative Systems

› Barley breeding and research on new varieties for western Canada that are more resistant to disease have higher yield, better malting quality and


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post conference tour higher nutritive value for cattle and human consumption. â&#x20AC;ş Studying systems for improving efficient use of land and water resources, including crop rotations, nutrient application (commercial fertilizers, animal wastes and other sources) to soils, weather conditions within the crop canopy (micrometeorology) and plant biochemistry and physiology. Knowledge developed in these studies forms the basis of management practices that minimize production cost, minimize risks and stabilize returns at the farm gate.

â&#x20AC;ş Researching crop management methods that minimize the adverse effect of crop diseases through the adoption of crop rotations and determining strategies to improve the efficient use of fungicides or similar farm inputs â&#x20AC;ş Developing beef production systems that take into account cattle characteristics (performance, reproduction, growth and finishing) and the availability and quality of feed and pasture resources in order to maximize returns and minimize production risks.

Quick Facts s s s s s

A total staff of 74 including 14 research scientists Greenhouse and phytotron facilities Land base of 890 hectares plus 445 hectares leased pasture Beef herd of over 800 cattle and overwintering facilities for 1,000 head Facilities and equipment for grain drying and handling

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post conference tour

Monday, July 23, 2012

Ontario Tour The rolling hills and rich lands north of Toronto in central Ontario are the features of one of the final destinations on the post-conference tour of the 2012 World Hereford Conference. Dufferin County is a mixed farming area which is rich in beef cattle production and horses, as well as some dairy and cash crop operations. One of the area’s biggest challenges is keeping the balance between its rich arable lands in farming communities and the influx of non-urban residents moving north of Toronto. On April 23rd, tour guests will arrive at the Orangeville Agricultural Society’s fairgrounds, welcomed by many of Ontario’s Hereford breeders and some of their cattle on display. Purebred calves and yearlings and some Herefordinfluence commercial cattle will be on display in pens. This venue will also feature a local craft display, lunch and good old fashioned country entertainment with music and dance. Meet Ontario tour organizer and Orangeville Hereford breeder and past CHA President, Wally Pugh and his wife Fern, of Lian Mor Polled Herefords, along with Ontario Hereford Association secretarymanagers, Ron and Nadine Wells. A mid-day tour of a local feedlot is planned at Schaus Land and Cattle

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Company in the nearby town of Mono, followed by a visit to the Dufferin County Museam. Schaus Land and Cattle Company, owned by Wally and Ken Schaus, is one of Ontario’s largest feedlot operations. They feed over 3,500 head at their Alliston location, in slatted floor barns, and up to 20,000 cattle at other locations. There is significant Hereford influence in many of the cattle they feed in lots and on grass. The Schauss operation features its own feed mill at the Alliston site, with steam flaked corn being a large part of the feed ration. They own and manage pasture lands throughout Bruce and Grey counties. Enjoy coffee and refreshments while touring the Dufferin County Museum. This tour stop features indoor and outdoor exhibits, local historical buildings, agricultural artifacts and beautiful gardens featuring heritage flowers, plants and shrubs native to the area. A special presentation will be given to conference tour visitors about the history of Herefords in Dufferin County. Ontario and eastern Canadian breeders welcome visitors to their beautiful part of the country and wish everyone well on their journeys home. A Canadian Hereford Association dinner will round out the evening’s social events at the host hotel in Toronto.

For more information or to enter cattle please contact: Wally Pugh at (519) 941-8515 or lianmor@sympatico.ca


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post conference tour

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Niagara Straddling the CanadaUnited States border and both in the province of Ontario and the State of New York, Niagara Falls attracts some 12 million tourists to her majestic, awesome beauty each year. Niagara Falls is the second largest falls on earth, next to Victoria Falls in southern Africa. One fifth of all the fresh water in the world lies in the four Upper Great Lakes – Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Superior and Lake Erie. All the outflow empties into the Niagara river and eventually cascades over the falls. At the bottom of the falls, the water travels 15 miles (24 kilometres) over many gorges, until it reaches the fifth Great Lake: Lake Ontario. The land between the lakes does not slope at an even grade but forms a spectacular drop, which is approximately the same height as a 20-storey building and this is known as the “Niagara Escarpment”. The Niagara River, along with the entire Great Lakes Basin, is a legacy of the last Ice Age. About 18,000 years ago, southern Ontario was covered by ice sheets two to three kilometers thick. As they advanced southward, the ice sheets gouged out the basins of the Great Lakes. As they melted northward for the last time, they released vast quantities of meltwater into these basins. Our water is “fossil water”. Less than one per cent of it is renewable on an annual basis. The rest is leftover from the ice sheets. There is still water in the Great Lakes because they rely on replenishment from precipitation and groundwater. There were originally five spillways from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario. Eventually, these were reduced to one, the original Niagara Falls. From there, the falls began their steady erosion through the bedrock. Niagara, Canada is minutes from

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the American city of Buffalo, New York, joined by four international bridges. It is within a 1.5 hour drive from Toronto

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Maid of the Mist

The Maid of the Mist is believed to be North America’s oldest tourist attraction. Two 600-passenger boats, each 80-feet (24 metres) in length, carry passengers in close proximity to the bottom of the falls, to experience the power of the falls. The powerful diesel-engined boats push against the powerful current, taking passengers from the Canadian docks past the base of the American Falls, then into the basin of the magnificent Canadian Horseshoe Falls. A recyclable souvenir raincoat is provided free with admission to help keep you dry from the mist and spray. The Maid of the Mist Steamship Company is privately owned and leases the land for its Canadian operations from The Niagara Parks Commission. At the end of the boat tour, passengers will enter the Maid of the Mist Plaza, which includes gift shops, a quick serve food outlet, a Welcome Centre and the ticket office. A two-level outdoor Marketplace features live entertainment daily thought the summer, shopping and the choice of many snack items. The Maid of the Mist Plaza was built in 1991. It is set into the gorge wall, with all buildings below ground level. The large brown stone tower, covered in split brick mosaic carvings of vines, features four high-speed elevators that take passengers down to the docks at the river’s edge. Taking a few steps up to the top of the tower provides a wonderful panoramic view of Niagara Falls and is a very popular location for photographers

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post conference tour Skylon Tower Restaurant

Guests of the post-conference tour of the World Hereford Conference will eat lunch at the Skylon Tower Restaurant while visiting Niagara Falls. This is a revolving restaurant, giving patrons a view of the Falls and the surrounding area at the rate of one rotation per hour. The dining room sits 775 feet (236 metres) above the Falls. It offers award-winning continental cuisine. The Skylon Tower was first opened in the autumn of 1964. It is the tallest structure in Niagara. Take the â&#x20AC;&#x153;yellow bugâ&#x20AC;? (exterior glass encased elevator) to the Observation Deck, the Revolving Skylon Tower Dining Room or the Summit Suite Buffet dining room. On a clear day, visitors can see over 80 miles (129 kilometers). The circular design and provision of three separate and complete levels make it possible for all visitors to enjoy an unobstructed view. Viewing conditions are further enhanced through the use of a special grey glass in the windows to diffuse sunlight and reduce glare. International shopping is available on the lower level, which also includes the Skylon Fun Centre, Niagaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest indoor arcade with over 100 games, a four-outlet food court and a great new 4-D theatre

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Quick Facts

s The word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Niagaraâ&#x20AC;? is derived from the Iroquois Indian word â&#x20AC;&#x153;onguiaahraâ&#x20AC;?, meaning, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the straitâ&#x20AC;?. s The Niagara River is about 36 miles (58 kilometers) in length and is the natural outlet from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario. It is 54 metres (176 feet) in height. s About 550 other waterfalls in the world are â&#x20AC;&#x153;tallerâ&#x20AC;? than Niagara Falls. The Angel Falls in Venzuela is tallest at 979 metres (3,212 feet). However, some of the tallest falls in the world have very little water flowing over them. It is the combination of height and volume that makes Niagara Falls so unique and beautiful. s Niagara Falls has moved back seven miles in 12,500 years

and may be the fastest moving waterfalls in the world. The falls will continue to erode. However, the rate has been greatly reduced due to flow control and diversion for hydro-power generation. The current rate of erosion is estimated at one foot per year and could possibly be reduced to one foot per 10 years.

Our  CHARM   cow   family   is   our   oldest,   originating  in  1973  with  a  heifer  calf  purchased   from   Bagrie   Bros   at   Penhold:   Britisher   D   Lady   23E.   Her   grand-­daughter,   Prairie-­Rose   &KDUPH : ZDV RXU ÂżUVW UHJLVWHUHG SROOHG IHPDOH 7KLV IDPLO\ H[HPSOLÂżHV RXU PXOWLWUDLW VHOHFWLRQ FULWHULD HIÂżFLHQW SHUIRUPDQFH ZLWK HDV\Ă&#x20AC;HVKLQJ DELOLW\ VRXQG IHHW JRRG XGGHUV FDOYLQJHDVHTXLHWGLVSRVLWLRQVORQJHYLW\DQG pigmentation.  We  are  very  pleased  with  169Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   offspring  -­  watch  for  her  son  269Y  at  the  WHC!

We welcome your visit to appraise our program

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Tha nk

to all of the

You

World Hereford Conference Sponsors

$10,000+ Sponsor Government of Alberta

Alberta Hereford Association

ALMA

Alta Genetics

Balog Auction

Canada Beef

CBBC

CIBC

Copper Creek Ranch

MNP

UFA

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Custom Service Program

Programs built on a tradition of excellence, experience and quality service!

Alta Genetics is proud to be a sponsor of the 2012 World Hereford Conference in Canada. S Custom Collection S Private Storage S Complete A.I. Supplies S Internet Sire Display

Hereford Semen available thru Alta: AGA 13G GENERAL 114L AGA 20J STANMORE 21M BBSF 52U ALTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S UNION 5X F-R 8020 LAD 33H J-BAR-B 1S MR UNIVERSE 3U MCCOY 25M RENAISSANCE 53W REMITALL SLEEP EASY 68U SQUARE-D PF TIMELINE 237W TLELL 29F RED CEDAR 80N VIKING 254 LAD ET 22L Terry White or Dawn Wood 4EL    s &AX    Email: twhite@altagenetics.com Email: dawn.wood@altagenetics.com   2ANGE 2OAD  2OCKY 6IEW #OUNTY !" 4" 4 www.altabeef.com

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Offering every option and service related to: LIVESTOCK - LAND - MACHINERY MARKETING - REAL ESTATE

Call any member of the Balog team to discuss your marketing needs

Call us at 1-877-320-1988

R.C. “Bob” Balog

Louis Balog

or (403) 320-1980 Fax (403) 320-2660 Email: sold@balogauction.com Box 786, Lethbridge, AB T1J 3Z6

Darwin Balog

Brad Balog

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Thank You

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to all of the World Hereford Conference Sponsors $5,000 Sponsor Bar Pipe Hereford Ranch

Les & Marg Gilmour

Little Fort Herefords

Maxxam

Merck

Semex

$3,500 Sponsor

Master Feeds

H.S. Knill Co. Ltd.

H.S. Knill Co. Ltd.

Farm Credit Corporation

Southern Alberta Hereford Club

Simpson Ranching

Central Alberta Hereford Club

Thompson Longhorn

Church Ranch

Feedlot Health Management Services

Agribition

Dr. Roger Davis

Livestock Markets Association of Canada

$2,500 Sponsor Farmfair

$2,000 Sponsor Cattlemen The Beef Magazine

$1,500 Sponsor $1,000 Sponsor Capri Insurance

Pem Brand

Compass Animal Health

Coulee Crest Herefords

$500 Sponsor Charlie Dallas

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BRETON We’re Proud Of WEST HEREFORDS Our Cows Since 1974

Bulls, Females,   US   Exportable   Semen   on   Proven   Sires,   and  Flushes  Always  For  Sale

See www.bretonwestherefords.com  for  information Visitors  welcome 2011  Northern  Alberta  Hereford  Club  Breeder  Of  The  Year

Eugene, Norma, and Leonard Poholka Ph: (780) 696-3878 Box 325, Breton, AB TOC OPO Leonard’s Cell: (780) 898-9590 Email: bretonwest@gmail.com Fax: (780) 696-3777 bretonwestherefords.com 5 mi. W. of Breton on #616, 2 mi. S. on Rge Rd. #50, 1 mi. W. on #474, 1 1/2 mi. S. on Rge. Rd. #51, 1/2 mi. W.

glenrose@syban.net Camrose, AB

Ken Prichard & Family (780) 608-6080 Jonathan Prichard (780) 781-5137 Steven Prichard (780) 678-4770

East of Camrose to Highway #56, 1.5 miles south and .5 miles west

These Herd Sires are taking us into 2012

EPDs:

FCC 40U SPRINT 6Xr

BW WW YW MILK TM

5.1 51.6 86.8 17.9 43.7

EPDs:

GLENROSE 17T AXEMAN 101X

BW WW YW MILK TM

6.1 53.8 88.1 13.5 40.4

Owned with Flewelling Cattle Co.

We wish a warm welcome to all of the visitors at the World Hereford Conference 114


A sampling of the cattle we will be showing at the World Hereford Conference in Olds, AB

CHURCHILL BRONX 902W EPDs

CE +2.4

BW +2.1

WW +62.8

YW +89.8

BCD 602U VICTOR 164Y

Milk +22.7

TM +54.1

CE +0.4

EPDs

BW +3.3

WW +47.6

YW +75.7

Milk +18.0

TM +41.8

Sired by GH ADAMS MATCH POINT ET 602U

BCD 902W KARBELLE 103Y

Sired by CHURCHILL BRONX 902W

EPDs

CE +0.4

BW +3.3

WW +59.5

YW +85.5

Milk +22.5

TM +52.3

BCD 902W WAPEKA LASS 115Y Sired by CHURCHILL BRONX 902W

EPDs

CE -1.1

BW +4.3

WW +55.3

YW +80.1

Milk +18.2

TM +45.9

BCD 323S SUNNY 126Y

Sired By REMITALL SHATNER 323S

EPDs

CE -3.2

BW +3.2

WW +38.6

YW +64.3

Milk +22.1

TM +41.4

Welcome everyone to Olds, Alberta for the World Hereford Conference. Visit our stall at the Conference or stop by the farm. Bulls & Heifers For Sale By Private Treaty At All Times. Now breeding Horned and Polled Herefords. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right on Hwy #2!

Brad, Kathy, Karleen & Dawson Dallas Phone: 403-224-2162 Cell 403-896-2162 Fax 403-224-2738 Email: bdallas@xplornet.com Box 89, Bowden, Alberta T0M 0K0 Website: www.dallasfarms.com 115


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*OHQYDOH Polled  Herefords

Jayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Polled Herefords Owned by Jason & Alyssa Thorne

Owned  by  Philip  &  Shelley  Thorne

.DOOH\(PLO\ -DFRE 5WH+DYHORFN1HZ%UXQVZLFN 3KRQH + Â&#x2021; & 

353  Baseline  Rd.  Glenvale,  New  Brunswick Phone:  (H)  506-­756-­3649Â&#x2021;(C)  506-­756-­0766

Thank You to Clay Enterprises for their purchase at the Downeast Hereford Sale 2011

Thank You to Triara and BNC Herefords for their purchases at the Downeast Hereford Sale

OUR 2012 CALF CROP WILL BE SIRED BY: MVF 56E STD DOM LAD 404P AGA 114L GENERAL 28S AGA 114L GENERAL 128S STR STANDARD 162N SILVER 1S

C 4R TRANSFORMER 33T BIG-­GULLY 47R STANMORE 753W YV 232N SILVER EDITION ET 943W

Thank you to all the buyers and bidders for making the Midwest Horned Hereford Sale such a tremendous success. DAVID & MAXINE

BERNICE

DONNIE & KERRY

Phone (306) 893-­2838 e-­mail riverbridge @ sasktel.net

(306) 893-­2846

Phone (306) 893-­2548

MAIDSTONE, SASKATCHEWAN

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8 mi. S. Junction 16 & 21, ½ m W., ½ m S


Watch for our cattle on display at Olds during the Conference, or better yet, come tour our herd after the Conference.

COULEE CREST Herefords

“Breeding Quality Hereford Cattle Since 1944”

CC

H

Coulee Crest genetics have proven themselves worldwide. Our program features moderate birthweights, excellent growth, pigment and outstanding feet and udders. We have bred a calving ease line for generations. Our “Easy” bulls have a proven track record of success in commercial and purebred herds.

Box 1, Site 10, R.R. 1, Bowden, Alberta T0M 0K0 From Bowden underpass, Randy & Sandra Radau Ph (403) 227-2259 7 mi. East, 2 mi. South, 1/2 mi. East Fax (403) 227-5278 Randy’s Cell (403) 588-6160 Web site: couleecrest.ca Frank & Nancy Radau Ph (403) 224-2292 Email: couleecrestfarm@gmail.com 117


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feature story

Fields of Diversity An Overview of Canadian Agriculture

By Catherine A. Brown The story of Canadian agriculture is expansive, rich and diverse. Canada is one of t he largest agricultural producers and exporters in the world. We are cowboys, shepherds, farmers, v intners, hor ticulturalists, egg producers, foresters and fishermen. We are scientists, consultants and env ironmental specialists. We subscribe to sustainable agricultural production, and we are proud of our heritage. In a nation that is barely 150 years young, we are not long descendent from our groundbreaking founding ancestors. We are enterprising survivors. From the small craft harbours of Canada’s fishing villages to its sprawling prairie canola fields, forests, pasturelands and coastal regions, Canada is nothing, if not diverse. Canada’s five main agricultural sectors are grains and oilseeds (34%), red meats (27%), dairy (12%), horticulture (9%) and poultry and eggs (8%), the first two sectors of which are both domestic and exportdependent. The latter three are produced primarily for domestic markets. Agricultural reg ions in Canada

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A S S O CIAT E ED ITO R

include the Canadian Maritimes, the St. Lawrence Basin of Quebec and Ontario, the Canadian prairies and the lower mainland and interior plateau of British Columbia. Canada’s main crops include canola, oats, wheat, corn, barley, sugar beets and peas in the prairies; beans and corn in western Ontario; oats and potatoes in the Maritimes; fruit and vegetables are grown primarily in the Annapolis Valley of Nova Scotia, southwestern Ontario, the Golden Horseshoe region of Ontario, along the south coast of Georgian Bay and in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia. Cattle, sheep and hogs are raised in the valleys of British Columbia, on the prairies and throughout Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes. There are significant dairy regions in central Nova Scotia, southern New Brunswick, the St. Lawrence Valley, northeastern Ontario and southwestern Ontario, the Red River valley of Manitoba and the valleys of eastern British Columbia, on Vancouver Island and the Lower mainland.

The Maritimes

The Canadian Maritime provinces include New Br unsw ick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and

Newfoundland and Labrador. Nearly half of the agricultural lands of Atlantic Canada are put into crops. Potatoes are the most plentiful crop in the Maritimes. Livestock, however, account for 50 per cent of all cash receipts in that region. Its dairy, poultry and beef industries are largest.

Quebec

Quebec is Canada’s largest blueberry and maple syrup producer and is one of the top fruit producing provinces in Canada. Quebec also boasts the largest number of ewes, dairy cows and pigs of any province in Canada.

Ontario

Ontario’s largest agricultural sector is grains and oilseeds, followed by beef cattle, then dairy and poultry. Boasting the largest population of any Canadian province, it is strategically located near diverse markets. Ontario has over half of the Class 1 (highest quality) land in Canada. It is also one of Canada’s top wine regions.

Manitoba

Manitoba’s largest ag r icultural commodit y is hogs, making it Canada’s second largest pig producing province. It is also Canada’s second largest producer of potatoes. Yet


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almost three-quarters of Manitoba Farms are classified predominantly wheat, other grains and oilseeds or cattle farms.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan contains 41 per cent of Canada’s arable land. In the heart of the prairies, Saskatchewan is a leader in cereal crop production, supplying five per cent of the world’s total exported wheat. It is Canada’s most important grain region and is the second largest beef producing province in Canada, next to Alberta.

Alberta

Beef production remains Alberta’s largest agricultural sector, though it is also a top producer of barley, canola and other grains and oilseeds. While Alberta boasts strong dairy, hog and poultry industries, these are largely overshadowed by beef production in the province.

British Columbia

And finally, on Canada’s west coast, British Columbia (BC) produces a diverse variety of crops and animal products – a reflection of its diverse geography and climate reg ions throughout the province. It’s top ten sectors in terms of farm sales are dairy, poultry, greenhouse vegetables, floriculture, beef, field vegetables and mushrooms, nursery, berries and grapes, eggs, and tree fruits. BC accounts for over 90 per cent of Canadian production of cranberries and the Abbotsford area is one of the world’s most important areas for raspberry production. BC also produces 95 per cent of the highbush blueberries cultivated in Canada and is the third largest producer of highbush blueberries in the world. The province also boasts some of the largest ranches in North America. BC’s cattle ranches occupy over five million acres of private land and another 21 million hectares of government-owned range land that is tenured for grazing, providing the ranching industry with a unique advantage – BC’s beef cattle spend the majority of their lives on grass.

Over the past 25 years, the amount of land in farm use in BC has increased and only BC, amongst all other provinces, has had an increase in the number of farms during this period.

T he province of Ontario boasts the

largest number of farms, followed by Alberta, Saskatchewan, Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia. But western Canadian farms tend to be larger than eastern farm operations, on average. There has been a 7.1 per cent decrease in the number of farms at the national level over the past five years. As with other developed nations, the proportion of the population devoted to agriculture has fallen dramatically over the past century, while average farm size increases. According to Census data, more than 25% of Canadian farmers are in the beef cattle business. The Beef Business Beef production takes place in every province in Canada, with a total of 13 million head of cattle and calves.

The industry is built primarily on British and European continental breeds, known for their superior meat quality. The most popular breeds here are Angus, Hereford, Charolais and Simmental, which perform well in Canada’s temperate climate. Canada has millions of acres of wide-open grassland and millions more acres for grain production. Both of these factors contribute to the production of high quality beef cattle. Most Canadian cattle finish in feedlots where they receive the optimal amount of grain to produce beef products that consistently meet consumer expectations. Canada has 26 federally inspected cattle slaughter plants, most of which are in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. The Canadian meat grading system has quality grade standards that ensure the highest grades are free from quality deficiencies such as dark cutters, yellow fat cover or poor muscle texture. An accredited third party, the Canadian Beef Grading Agency ( CBGA), independently

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verifies the national beef grading system. Canadian beef products are among the safest in the world. Canada’s mandator y Nat iona l Cat t le Identification System, animal disease prevention practices and surveillance programs ensure that any potential

hazards are minimized. Any problems can be quickly identified and traced to the source for immediate corrective action. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency monitors the entire supply chain to make sure that all products comply with Canada’s stringent safety regulations.

Canadian ranchers and farmers take pride in caring for their animals and their land. Their practices are underpinned by an industry code of practices that defines the standards of care for cattle handling, feeding, housing and transportation.

Canadian Agriculture Facts & Figures Just over half of Canada’s land base is covered in forest. About 5% of Canada’s land area is arable. Permanent pastures cover 3% of Canada’s land area. Canada is the world leader in maple syrup production, accounting for 85% of the world’s maple syrup supply. The province of Quebec produces over 90 per cent of Canada’s maple syrup. Brewery Industry – Comprises two large national beer producing companies: Labatt Breweries of Canada and Molson Canada Breweries Fish and Seafood – The world’s fourth largest exporter of fish is Canada, from the Atlantic fishery, Pacific fishery and aquaculture sector. Grains & Oilseeds – Wheat, barley and oats are Canada’s grain exports. Canola, soybean and flaxseed are the main oilseed exports. Canada grows more canola than any other country. It is Canada’s famous yellow flower and was originally developed here in the 1970s, bred from rapeseed, at the University of Manitoba. The name “Canola” is derived from “Canadian oil, low acid”. Pulse Industry – This industry comprises beans, chickpeas, faba beans, and lentils. Canada is the world’s largest pulse exporter. Soybean production has increased eight-fold in 30 years. It is the second most popular field crop in Ontario, next to corn. We have peaches, pears and plums. The 65-kilometre-long Niagara fruit belt is a rich fruit producing area and the home of one of Canada’s sweetest and most famous exports – ice wine. Wine industry – Canadian wines are garnering international awards and recognition. The grape hybrid from native Canadian species bred with wine producing grapes results in a grape for a shorter, cooler growing season, and a quality not found elsewhere. The Canadian dairy industry is famous for the outstanding genetic quality of its cattle herd as well as its dairy genetic programs. Canada represents 41% of the global export market for live purebred breeding cattle and embryos as of 2008. The Holstein breed is the most common dairy breed, comprising 92% of the dairy herd. The typical Canadian dairy farm has 72 cows. The Canadian dairy sector has operated under a supply management system based on planned domestic production, administered pricing and dairy product import controls, since the early 1970s. The egg, chicken and turkey industries are also supply managed. There is an increasing number of farms diversifying production, producing niche products such as organics, adopting environmentally-friendly production methods and producing non-traditional products and services such as agrotourism. In 2010, Canada was the fifth largest exporter and sixth largest importer of agriculture and agri-food products in the world [if the EU is treated as a bloc]. Guelph, Ontario, home of Canada’s first Hereford imports, is also home of the Ontario Veterinary College, the oldest school of veterinary medicine in the Western hemisphere.

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SFL 86M ROBIN 99R

CH 82H NASDAQ 101N

These bulls  sired  our  2012  Calgary  Bull  Sale  consignment,  which  included  the:  

‡ Junior Champion  Bull

‡ Reserve Group   of  Three  Bulls

‡ Reserve Intermediate   Champion  Bull

‡ Reserve Group   of  Five  Bulls

6 bulls  sold  for  an  average  of  just  over  $7,000

CGC 99R YELLOWSTONE 17Y

CGC 101N SILVER BRIT LAD 30X

Sired by   99R.   2011   Farmfair   Reserve   Bull   Calf   Champion.  Look  for  him  at  the  WHC  in  Olds.  We  will   also  have  full  sibling  embryos  to  17Y  available  by  July.

Sired by   101N.   2012   Calgary   Bull   Sale   Reserve   Intermediate   Champion   Bull   and   3rd   high   seller   at   $17,500  to  Texas  Stardance  Cattle,  Hamilton,  TX

Come visit  us  during  the  World  Hereford  Conference;;  either  at  the  stall  in  Olds  or   at  the  ranch.  We’re  only  15  minutes  from  the  Conference  hotel  and  directly  across   Hwy  2  from  CrossIron  Mills  Mall

Gordon & Rosemary

Neal & Joelle (403) 567-0998 Cell: (403) 618-8824 Email: joe_neal@telus.net

Ranch location:  1  km  west  of  Hwy  2  at  Balzac New  mailing  address:  16450  15  St  NE  Calgary,  AB  T4B  2T3  

(403) 226-0606 Cell: (403) 852-9274 121


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NCX Stop by the stall & see our consignments as well as our feature bull sired by Beyond Phone: (780) 657-2270 Cell: (780) 603-1079 Fax: (780) 657-2778 Email: ncx@xplornet.ca Box 102, Brosseau, AB T0B 0P0

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BARE MR YOU TUBE 4Y

was shown last summer and fall and came home with quite a few champion titles at local and national levels. His dam, NCX MISS WHIPLASH 3W is a many time champion cow that is very well known among Hereford breeders. Because of all the interest in You Tube, he will be for sale in the near future so keep your eyes open for details. His 2012 maternal brother out of Tlell 29F Red Cedar 8N will be for sale private treaty at the World Hereford Conference.

Look for You Tube, his dam and maternal brother at the WHC!

Larissa Lupul Foisy AB.

780-645-5858 barefoot@mcsnet.ca

   

PDHR  3X  STANDARD  LAD  63A   Sire:  MVF  63A  STANDARD  LAD  229L   MVF  656  STANDARD  LASS  250E  

   

LO  114J  STD  LAD  37N   Sire:  WINDIMUIR  37N  LAD  4S     WINDIMUIR  HELMA  84L  

HZ 229L  STAN  LAD  22T  

HZ 4S  STD  LAD  20U

   

   

MN  64F  MR  STAN  022J Dam:  MVF  022J  STAN  DOM  LASS  31R     MVF  175F  STD  DOM  LASS  33K

PINE-­BUTTE  DOM  STD  LAD  33E   Dam:  MVF  33E  STD  DOM  LASS  45L     MVF  11X  RIVER  STAND  LASS  15A

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The World Hereford Council By Jan Wills

S EC R E TA RY G EN ER A L , WO R LD H ER EFO R D CO U N CI L

The World Hereford Council is now in its 61st year and I am confident that if the members of the first meeting of delegates were able to be present in Canada for the 16th World Hereford Conference, they would be proud of the way the Council has administered the international registry of pure bred Herefords. In 1951 there was concern that some Herefords being traded between countries were not directly traceable to the English herd book. Captain R.S. de Quincey chaired a meeting of delegates from nine countries and the plan was to form a permanent council of world Hereford breed societies and associations. The purpose of that council was to agree on an international pedigree Hereford registration which would be accepted by all members. The proposals were not ratified at that initial conference and delegates were asked to present the thoughts of that meeting to their own societies and associations. In 1956 the second meeting was held with the rules and regulations agreed upon and the herd book closed at Volume 13. At that time it was assumed that the Secretary of the Hereford Herd Book Society would act as the Secretary of the World Hereford Council and any expenses incurred would be paid by member countries. At succeeding conferences the role of the Secretary altered and the title for the position became Secretary General of the World Hereford Council. Mr Tony Morrison was the first Secretary General and his counsel on Hereford matters was greatly respected by Hereford breeders from all parts of

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the world. The number of member countries more than doubled over the years but the original aims of the council have altered very little. In 1968 the rule regarding the location of the headquarters of the council was altered to read “that the registered offices shall be situated with the Hereford Herd Book Society or wherever deemed necessary” and the significance of that rule change became apparent in 1988 when after 22 years as Secretary General Mr Morrison resigned. Mr Duncan Porteous was appointed to the position and all the historic records were shipped to Canada. For the next 18 years Duncan handled a dual role, combining his position as General Manager of Canadian Herefords with that of Secretary General of the World Hereford Council. His contribution to Herefords in Canada and to Herefords around the world was immense. Volumes of conference minutes and proceedings have been carefully bound and kept for prosperity. In 2004 Mrs Jan Wills was elected as the new Secretary General and the records were shipped to New Zealand where they are now stored. The rule pertaining to the appointment of the Secretary General was added in 2004 to read “that the Secretary General shall be appointed by the World Hereford Council at each subsequent World Hereford Conference. The Secretary General position shall be subject to process of reappointment every four years with a maximum of two terms.” Electronic communication has enabled a Secretary General to carry out most of the Council duties from almost any location and a

frequently updated web site is an easy medium for members to use for Hereford news and research articles of interest. The function of the Secretary General has changed over the years and although still a keeper of the records, communication, promotion and being a representative of the breed is now the role of the Secretary General. Over the past 60 years the emphasis for the Council activities has moved away from rules and regulations to matters of more economic value for Herefords. Hereford marketing, promotion and research projects that have economic benefits for Herefords are now of interest to Hereford breeders and World Conferences provide the medium to update members with new developments and ideas. The purity of the breed has never been compromised by the Council but genetic trends and industry pressures have changed the profile of the Hereford breed and this was clearly demonstrated in 1996 by the Colorado State University in Fort Collins at the 12th World conference when semen from bulls from the 1950s, 1970s and 1990s was used to demonstrate 40 years of genetic change within the breed. Selection for increased frame size and growth in Herefords resulted in a steady increase in daily gain and weight (both live and carcass)


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at a desired level of finish. The increased carcass weight produced a difference on return/per head of $145.45 between the 1990s cattle and the 1950s cattle. In New Zealand the introduction of scanning produced an amazing change in the conformation of sires at the annual National bull sale. Hereford breeders began selecting sires with less fat and more muscle and although the average weight actually changed very little over that period of five years, the proportion of fat to muscle improved quite dramatically as the scanning results of young bulls at the sale clearly show in this graph.

Murray &  Marge (403)  309-­1918     Cell:  403-­396-­0857

The adaptability of the Hereford breed has been well documented with the breed thriving in a variety of environments. Performance recording enables breeders and buyers to choose bulls with breeding values in traits best suited to their various farming practices. Herefords were the first breed to embark on an ambitious research project with the aim of finding an easy formula for global evaluation. The Pan American and Tasman groups are working well however the global evaluation has not produced an easy accurate formula for calculating performance data between countries as we had initially hoped. The 16th World Hereford Conference in Calgary will update breeders with recent developments in research projects in animal science. Once upon a time a person with “a good eye for a beast” enabled that breeder to reproduce animals of similar type but economic pressures and technology now require a more predictable outcome in breeding programs. DNA

Cody Stauffer RR#3  Eckville,  AB    T0M  0X0 2I¿FH  ‡)D[   (PDLOVWDXIIHUIDUPV#SHQWQHWQHW Located  20  minutes  West  of  Red  Deer

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is commonly used for parent verification and in future DNA may be able to confirm the presence of the required genes in a breeding program. Dr Dorian Garrick will inform members of the progress with DNA research during the conference. The maximum heterosis benefit in any cross breeding program depends on the purity of the breeds involved and the Hereford advantage in any farming operation will be covered at the conference by Dave Daley. Hereford crosses have performed well all around the world and studies have proved that hybrid vigour, generated from crossing Hereford and Angus can achieve gains of $50 -$80 per head on an annual basis. The World Hereford Council originated because there was a concern that the purity of the breed was being compromised and now after 61 years the Hereford breed has benefited from the wisdom of those members who formulated rules and regulations and a strategic plan to protect the Hereford breed

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Roxanne Carruthers Kaden  Wadham (403)  746-­5735

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World Hereford Conference

Biographies

Jan Wills World Hereford Council Secretary General Jan and husband Barrie have bred Herefords since 1968, and were involved with the South Auckland Hereford club since its inception. She was elected the first female councillor to the board of the New Zealand Hereford Association and went on to be the first female president of the association. She was also the first chairwoman (and only one to date) of the New Zealand Performance Beef Breeders and is currently a director of the successful company, Hereford Prime NZ Ltd. She is an accomplished cattle judge having been selected by her peers to evaluate cattle in her homeland of New Zealand as well as internationally. In earlier years, she was active in the New Zealand Pony Club where she won many championships. Jan is a school teacher by profession. Jan was elected in 2004 and re-elected in 2008 as World Hereford Council Secretary General. Jan has three goals for her second term as Secretary General. As Chairman of the Management Committee of the Hereford Global Evaluation research project, she is very keen to see the research reach a conclusion which will ultimately benefit all Hereford breeders. Jan’s other priorities will be to continue expanding the profile of the World Hereford Council and further the involvement of young Hereford breeders within the world organization.

Dr. Jay Cross – DVM, PhD

2012 World Hereford Conference Chairman Dr. Jay Cross and his wife Lucy, own and operate Bar Pipe Hereford Ranch of Okotoks, Alberta. The Cross family has been breeding Herefords since the 1930s and at the current location since 1953. Jay’s father, grandfather and great grandfather are all past Presidents of the World Famous Calgary Stampede. Jay’s great grandfather, A.E. Cross, was one of the original founders of the Calgary Stampede in 1912. In addition to his ranching interests, Jay is an Associate Vice President of Research and Professor of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Calgary. He is an expert in animal reproduction and molecular genetics; particularly in the areas of embryo implantation, placentation and pregnancy outcome.

Randy Radeau

Canadian Hereford Association President Randy Radau, President of the Canadian Hereford Association, in his second term, owns Coulee Crest Herefords with his family, near Bowden, Alberta. The family ranch operation was established in 1929, making Randy and his wife Sandra the third generation to carry on the family tradition. Their children, Miranda, Collette and Luke, represent the fourth generation of Radaus on the ranch. The ranch is comprised of 200 purebreds and 150 commercial Hereford commercial cows and 3,800 acres of pasture and cultivated land. The farming operation produces wheat, malt barley, canola and hay. Randy and Sandra were finalists in Alberta in 1999 for the Outstanding Young Farmer award. Randy has a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture, with honours, from the University of Alberta. He worked for three years after University in the Agricultural Consulting field with Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and also for AFC Agra Services Ltd.. Randy purchased his first Hereford cattle at the age of 11 and was very active in the Canadian Junior Hereford Association, cochairing the National Junior Hereford Bonanza in 1984. Coulee Crest Herefords has held 15 successful production sales on the ranch and has sold many prominent sires that have had a lasting impact on the purebred and commercial industry. Randy has judged numerous bull sale shows, including the Calgary Bull Sale. He has been an active member of both his club and provincial Hereford Associations as well as 4-H and community groups.

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World Hereford Conference

Committee Chairmen

Planning Committee: Jay Cross

Conference/Speakers: Neal Church

Cattle Show/Stabling: Blaine & Shannon Brost

Hosting/Tours: Judy Finseth

Rancher Day: Al Fenton

Junior Program: Gordon & Cathy Klein

Calgary Stampede: Janette McMillan Olds Ag Society: Tracy Lundago & Tami Fardner CHA: Sue Gatenby Display(Stampede Park): Carolyn Templeton

Facilities(Olds): Randy Radau

Conference Manager: Gordon Stephenson

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canadian hereford association staff Gordon Stephenson – General Manager

Gordon Stephenson joined the Canadian Hereford Association (CHA) in 2004 as General Manager, overseeing the day-to-day activities of the Association, implementing the CHA Board of Directors’ policies and representing the CHA on many cattle industry committees. Gordon is also the Project Manager of the World Hereford Conference. Gordon holds an undergraduate degree in Animal Science from the University of Saskatchewan and has spent 35 years working in livestock production, research and agri-business. He has served as Manager, Director and President of Canadian Western Agribition and served as Director of the Canadian Animal Health Institute, Western Beef Development Centre, Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association and the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association. Gordon also partnered for several years in Circle-T Ranch, a Saskatchewan-based purebred Hereford operation. Gordon was awarded Canadian Livestock Man of the Year in 1992 by the Record Stockman magazine in Denver, Colorado and in 2010, was inducted into the Saskatchewan Hall of Fame.

Sue Gatenby – Executive Assistant

Sue joined the Canadian Hereford Association in November 2011, filling the role as executive assistant. Currently, her main focus is on the World Hereford Conference. Following the World Hereford Conference, her role will be more centrally office focused. Sue is a Calgary native, now living southwest of the city with her daughter and husband. She has a diverse background of experience in business administration, having worked in the airline and oil and gas industries and having run her own business for seven years. She has a passion for the outdoors and spending time on horseback working cattle.

Brad Dubeau – Director of Communications

Brad joined the Canadian Hereford Association in 2009 after the purchase of the Canadian Hereford Digest by the Canadian Hereford Association. His main role is as editor of the Digest, traveling to Hereford sales, ad sales and representing the CHA at cattle functions across the country. Brad holds a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Business with a minor in economics from Montana State University. He was an agricultural account manager at TD Bank for two years before joining the Alberta Hereford Association as its general manager. Brad also worked as fieldman for Independent Breeders before joining the CHA. Brad’s family has a deep and well-respected history in Hereford circles. He owns a ranch near Medicine Hat - U Bar U Land Holdings Ltd. - where he grasses 700-plus Hereford and Herefordcross steers every summer.

Erin Zatylny – Communications Coordinator

Erin joined the Canadian Hereford Association in 2008 in the role of Communications Coordinator. Her main focus is layout and design of The Canadian Hereford Digest, sales catalogues and other printed material produced either for members or the Association. Erin has a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies from the University of Calgary and continues to live in Calgary. She is an avid horse enthusiast with a special interest in dressage. Erin also has a keen interest in photography.

Janice Barton – Accounts Receivable Clerk and Reception

Janice joined the Canadian Hereford Association almost 30 years ago in 1983, working in the accounting department, when the CHA originally assumed records from the Canadian National Livestock Records. She has seen many changes at the CHA over the years, including a downsizing from 20 employees to the current eight. Janice is the first to greet daily visitors to the CHA office and those who call the office, as the receptionist. She is also currently responsible for accounts receivable, invoicing and membership services. In her spare time, Janice enjoys dancing, travel and spending time with family and friends. Born and raised in Calgary, where she still resides, Janice has two grown children and two grandchildren, aged 12 and four. 128


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canadian hereford association staff Val Wells – Computer Operations and Performance Programs

Val joined the Canadian Hereford Association in 1990, starting in the mail room. Val is now responsible for Performance Data, Computer Operations, DNA, Exports and the Online Registry. She is the “go-to” person when it comes to computer operations at the CHA office. Val grew up in Saskatchewan on a mixed grain and beef operation and is a graduate of Briercrest College. She currently lives in Calgary and is an avid horse enthusiast.

Debbie Simpson – Registry

Debbie joined the Canadian Hereford Association in 1999, assisting in the registry department, and then became the Executive Assistant. In October 2011, Debbie moved into registry full time and handles the work that is mailed into the office. Debbie and her family of Hanson Ranches, have deep roots in the Hereford breed for over 60 years. Her father, Ron Hanson, is a past president of the Canadian Hereford Association. Debbie actively participated in 4-H and the Canadian Junior Hereford Association (CJHA), having attended the very first Bonanza event. She has two grown children, Colby and Justine, who were also very active in the CJHA and its leadership. Debbie worked for the Hereford Digest from 1980 to 1988. She currently lives on a ranch in Airdrie where she and Bill train rope/ranch Quarter Horses.

Jeff Hyatt – Breed Improvement Coordinator

Jeff joined the Canadian Hereford Association in December 2011 in the role as Hereford Breed Improvement Coordinator. His main responsibility is research and development of programs for the Hereford breed and is the CHA advisor to the Canadian Junior Hereford Association. Jeff grew up in the Rainy River District of Northwestern Ontario on a commercial cowcalf and backgrounding operation. He completed a Bachelor of Science in Animal Science at the University of Guelph where he also studied genetics. His past work experience is in sales and research in the beef industry for Cargill and Elanco. Jeff lives in Calgary.

Catherine Brown – Assistant Editor, Canadian Hereford Digest

Catherine joined the Canadian Hereford Association under contract in 2009 as the Assistant Editor of the Canadian Hereford Digest. Her main responsibilities are editing prior to publication, writing articles and providing guidance with magazine layout and design. Catherine has written for several Ontario and national livestock publications for the past 25 years. She holds an Honours Bachelor’s Degree in English and History from Trent University and a Journalism degree from Humber College. Herefords have figured prominently in her life growing up on a cow/calf and purebred operation and running cattle at home, along with a purebred cattle consulting business in Ontario with her husband, Phil. Catherine, her husband and daughter Cayley are now ranch managers at Copper Creek Ranch near Princeton, British Columbia.

Rita Ricioppo – Bookkeeper

Rita joined the Canadian Hereford Association in 2007 under contract to handle accounts payable and prepares monthly financial statements for the association as well as the CHA’s financial records, prior to its annual audit. Rita studied Business Administration, majoring in accounting at Mount Royal University. She has worked as an independent accountant for 16 years, working mainly with small business clients, most of whom are in Agriculture. She also does work for five other beef breed associations. Rita was born and raised in Calgary and she and her husband Michael have two daughters, Alyssa (13) and Emily (10). She enjoys cooking, reading, hiking and spending time with her family. 129


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LF TRACKER 7U

XTC 13S REGENT 17W

Grand Champion and High Seller at the 2010 Pride of the Prairie Bull Sale and is now working at the good home of Val-terra Herefords.

17W was purchased from XTC Herefords at the Medicine Hat Bull Sale. Semen will be available on 17W for the spring of 2013, call for more details.

Stan & Susan Lock

Box 215, Macklin, SK

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H: 1 (306) 753-2229 C: 1 (306) 753-7884 Email: lockfarms@xplornet.com


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Country Reports from World Hereford Council member countries

Australia

Herefords Contributing to Profitability in Australia

The Hereford breed, the ‘sleeping giant’ of the Australian cattle industry, is waking up and resuming a major role in improving productivity and profitability for Australian producers. In the latest reporting period, registrations jumped 7% and bull sales are attracting an ever-increasing number of commercial cattle producers looking for more growth, improved temperament and better fertility. Based on registrations and bull sales, the Hereford breed is Australia’s second largest breed and growing. Australian producers claim Herefordsired calves have a 20 kg (44 lb) advantage at weaning and can be “turned off” two or three months earlier than other breeds. To gain a pricing advantage, Australia’s Hereford breeders are becoming EU accredited meaning their steers bring premiums over other breeds. Australia’s share of the EU market, comprising HGP-free, grass-fed and short term grain-fed beef, is growing, while the traditional long-fed Japanese and Korean markets are softening. If there is one breed that fits the growing EU market perfectly it is the Hereford. No other breed in Australia has the numbers, the ability to finish quickly off grass and perform efficiently in the 100-day grain-fed EU regime. Australia exports 60% of its beef production and with unsettled international conditions, producers

are returning to the safe and stable options of reliable cattle that have good eating quality and can produce beef for all markets efficiently. The large Beef CRC cross-breeding trial involving seven sire breeds across Brahman cows, saw Herefordsired calves with the second highest carcass weight behind Charolais, but with superior eating quality. Here are some quotes from Australian commercial cattle producers: “.....Herefords are made for this country and long may it continue. They have the right pigment, are well muscled, and can cope with the heat and the drought....” -Larry Williams, who with his four brothers, run 20,000 Herefords across 22,000 square kms (8500 sq miles) in South Australia, where in a good year can turn off 500 kg (1100 lbs) milk tooth steers. At the 2011 Dubbo National, they bought 23 Hereford bulls.

the long term.” -Ian Bjorksten, Wandoo Wandong, Yeoval, NSW, whose family has been breeding Herefords for almost six decades, and who joined 1,100 breeders this year. Six decks of 16-17 month old steers weighing 601 kgs (1322 lbs) live dressed at 332 kgs (730 lbs). “When I started in this business, Herefords were on top and are about to take over again. No breed can put together close to 200 bulls exhibiting this weight for age.” -Auctioneer Andy McGeogh at the 2011 Wodonga National, where 180 bulls sold to $70,000 and averaged $7,543

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“...we’re heading for 6,000 breeders which will eventually be bred up to all Herefords...” -James Morgan, managing director, Mutooroo Pastoral Company, Mulyungarie and Quinyambie Stations, South Australia. “....we have always been Hereford breeders because they’ve always done well in the country we have...” -Noel Cook, Kindon Station, whose family runs 10,000 mostly Hereford cattle, including 3,000 Hereford breeders, on 65,000 ha (160,620 acres) at Goondiwindi, Qld. “ We don’t run Herefords just because we like them, but because they out-perform any other breed in

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Brazil

Brazilian Herefords are recognized by Certified Beef Program

Germany

The Brazilian Hereford and Braford Association (ABHB) has developed its certified beef program since 2001. Since then, the certified program called Carne Certificada Pampa® has been increasing each year and reached 38.109 certified carcasses last year. This number represents 77.7 % more than 2010 and made the slaughter industry invest in new brands. The program runs as a third part party where the ABHB is hired by the slaughter industry to perform the certified process inside the plant through contracted and welltrained inspectors. The inspectors classify the carcasses and select the ones that reach the standards to receive the “Carne Pampa Stamp”. The process continues at the deboning room where another ABHB inspector follows it in order to guarantee the liability of the labeling and packing process. Guilherme Dias, the certified beef program manager, said “we’ve had an impressive growth in 2011 and it will increase by least 20% in 2012.” The reason for this rapid growth is attributable to the premium received by producers which can reach 10%. Another reason is the excellent performance that the

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The federal h e i f e r champions auction “best of” in April is a big event for our German cattle breeders. Around 150 heifers from all the major breeds are brought together for auction. In 2011, the participating Hereford heifers achieved, with an average result of 2.400 euro per heifer, the best auction results in comparison to the other breeds. What a good and promising start into the new

Herefords have on grazing systems. On a commercial farm where the owner buys all kind of crossbreed animals for fattening, the Herefords always put more weight on and are the quickest fattening cattle. “Our program slaughters an average of 3,000 animals per month in five slaughter plants in Rio Grande do Sul State, which is the southeast state in Brazil. This year we are prepared to increase the slaughter, reaching other states such as São Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul (Central Brazil) where the cattle are finished in feedlots,” says Dias. The Brazilian Hereford and Braford Association is pleased with the Certified Beef Program results because it is increasing bull sales as the finishers are increasingly motivated by fat cattle sales. Because of the economic growth, Brazilian beef sales have increased and customers are learning how to identify the best product and understand why it is more expensive at the shelf. This important costumer feedback explains the market investment on certified beef sales which is increasing year by year in volume and value, especially at the big stores located in Porto Alegre and São Paulo, where the high value-added products are sold. With a consistent certified process and a good marketing effort, the ABHB believes that the program is ready to participate in the best markets in Brazil and it is starting to view market opportunities for the Brazilian Hereford Beef in the world

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season! In early summer 2011, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of our German Hereford Society which coincided with our Annual Breeders’ Meeting on the Niemeyer’s family farm in Heinade, Lower Saxony. The small community of Heinade, although just a few miles from a major motorway, was unchartered territory for most of our society members. As we drove closer to our destination, we were pleasantly surprised to see rolling hills, forest and lush green pastures. This was a sight for sore eyes after the very dry spring in most parts of Germany. The next morning, we visited the host’s herd. The guests were

presented with a well-balanced herd, with deep and well-muscled animals. The winner of the 2009 federal heifer champions auction is in the Niemeyer’s herd and her offspring are already showing great promise. In the afternoon, we had our 20th anniversary cattle show. The animals were judged by Johannes Röttger from ‘Masterrind’, who, besides his obvious skills as a judge, was able to entertain his audience with his descriptions and explanations. Even the sudden arrival of a nasty storm couldn’t dampen the spirit of the event. The championship winners in the bull category were:


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Hungary

Germany Continued

s Fenton from the Elbaue herd, in first place s Cliff from the Spechtmeyer herd, in second place. In the heifer category: s Bethany, from the Elbaue farm, came in first s Dallas from the Rautmann farm, in second place. The evening’s entertainment began in the farmyard barn with a short, but humorous opening speech by the society’s chairman and founding member of the society, Wolfgang Maschke. After honouring the founding, and still-present members of the society, and after speeches by our foreign neighbours from the Netherlands and Switzerland, the guests were presented with an entertaining and nostalgic journey of the past 20 years of the German Hereford Society. Later on in the year, just before harvesting time, the dry weather period came to an abrupt end and the race was on to get in the harvest and the hay. In the end, we were lucky that the poor yield was more

By Dr. Istvan Marton, General Manager, Hungarian Hereford, Angus and Galloway Association In Hungary, Hereford breeding started 42 years ago. The first import involved 110 heifers from Great Britain. Following that, many breeding heifers were imported from the USA and Canada. Nowadays, we import only semen and embryos from top bulls, from Canada, the USA and other countries. The imports have

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or less compensated by good markets. In autumn, many former eastern block countries were eager to buy Hereford cattle to build up their own homebased cattle industry, in order to be more self-sufficient. In 2011, we were able to export more than 200 heifers and 50 bulls and in 2012 it appears that this trend is set to continue. So, for the 90 members of the German Hereford society, 2011 ended as good as it started. … In 2012, we are optimistic that the situation will continue in this vein

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given us wide genetic variety for our breed, the results of which we are now enjoying. The Hungarian Hereford Association was founded in 1988 and today all the Hereford breeders are members of our Association. We currently register about 6,000 head of Hereford cattle, which is the basis of the Hungarian Hereford breeding herd. We started bull performance testing in 1989, with two farm test stations and one central association performance test station. Every year we test 40-50 Hereford bulls. The top bulls are eligible to go into the A.I. station. We have only one main annual show in Hungary, at the end of September, in Kaposvár. Hungary has a good health status and our breed is free from all TBC,

Brucellosis, Leucosis, Blue Tounge and IBR diseases. The association does its best in terms of ensuring classical breeding and it also helps the members with strong marketing, promotion, and trade activities, to help them sell breeding cattle as well as the cattle for fattening and slaughtering. In the last three years, we have exported more than 1,500 Hereford breeding cattle to Russia, Belorussia, Turkey and other countries. We hope the Hereford breed will be stable in Hungary in the future

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New Zealand

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Hereford Prime Earns Top Honours in 2011:

Hereford Prime NZ took out the most coveted title in the beef industry in 2011 – the Steak of Origin’s Supreme Champion Retail award. The Steak of Origin competition is held in conjunction with the Beef & Lamb NZ Beef Expo and is open to all NZ beef farmers, retailers and wholesalers. Hereford Prime processor, Bowmont Wholesale Meats in Invercargill entered the event with a Hereford Prime sirloin and took home top honours after being judged superior to more than 400 entries across all classes. To be eligible for the supreme award, Bowmonts first had to win their class, Best of Brand – Retail. Accepting the award, Stephen Flynn from Bowmonts said the award didn’t just recognise them as processors and retailers but he said it also highlights the pride and effort Hereford breeders take in their cattle and product. “This win reflects Hereford Prime’s dedication to quality,” said Stephen. The Bowmont team is renowned for its dedication to quality and prides itself on providing a consistent product to its clients. Hereford Prime chairman Laurie Paterson said “it’s a tremendous win and we (Hereford Prime) are extremely proud of Bowmont’s achievements.” Laurie said the win of the grand champion title this year reinforces the consistency of the Hereford Prime product, having been finalists or winners every year since the Steak of Origin began nine years ago. It also builds on the Best of Brand – Retail class win by Te Awamutu Hereford Prime retailer Magills

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Meats in the same competition last year. “It reinforces the fact that Hereford Prime and Hereford derived beef is a high end product offering true consistency and unrivalled quality,” said Laurie. Beef Expo – Hereford National Bull Sale 2011: An exceptionally solid sale best describes the 2011 NZ Herefords National Show and Sale held in conjunction with the Beef & Lamb NZ Beef Expo. Average price for the two-year-old bulls was $6,895 and the overall sale average (including the yearling bull and females) was $5,970. The average price from 2010 was $5346. The top price of $12,000, was made by Monymusk Eiffel Tower offered by Chris and Jayne Douglas of Te Anau. The sire was purchased by Laurie and Sharon Paterson of the Waikaka stud near Gore. The Douglas’ also offered a second bull, which sold for $9,500 to Peter and Christine Reeves, of the Mokairau stud near Gisborne. While the sale didn’t reach the heady heights in terms of price that it has done in past years, there was great consistency to the prices. Other price highlights were $11,000 made by Limehills Electra 266 which sold to the Kokonga Hereford Stud near Auckland. Merrylea 1467 fetched $10,000 selling to the syndicate of Lake Station and Martin Farming, Nelson. The single yearling bull entry offered by Kelly O’Neill of the Okahu Trust near Raetihi sold for $6,500 – a price realized by three other rising two year old bulls. The Okahu yearling was purchased by Bruce Masters of the Strathmoor stud in the King Country. Three pairs of in-calf heifers sold exceptionally well with two pairs offered by Clements Farms, Hikurangi, selling for a total of $6,200 a pair. The Anric stud heifer pair selling for a total of $4,000 to Simon Payne, Taranaki Farmers. In the show ring, Kevin and Jane McDonald’s Reporoa Kairuru stud dominated, taking out first and third place in the unled Impact sires class and going on to win the Supreme Champion Hereford. The success of the Kairuru entries saw the McDonalds awarded the RA Donald Trophy for the points prize

also. Mark McKenzie, Maungahina Herefords and Colin Gibson, Seadowns Herefords, Oamaru judged the national show. In their comments, they said structural soundness was the key to what they were looking for. This soundness combined with muscling, volume, capacity, and solid feet were key traits they targeting in their judging

.

A line up of Limehills heifers at the Pannetts field day.

Kairuru Garner, bred by Kevin and Jane McDonald was judged Supreme Champion Hereford at the National Show and Sale.

Stephen Flynn from Bowmont Wholesale M eat s a cce pt s th e title of Supre m e Champion Retail at the Steak of Origin awards evening.


South Africa

C A N A D I A N

The South African (SA) Hereford Breeder’s Society will celebrate its 95th Anniversary during 2012.

The first Hereford bulls were imported to SA during the 1890’s, specifically to improve the national herd. At the beginning of the 20th Century, further imports that included the first number of cows, took place. The growth of the breed in SA really took off with the importation of 27 females by the then Transvaal Government with the purpose to further improve the SA national cattle herd. Pedigree herds were established on Government farms, coupled with the infusion, year by year, of imported genetics from the best herds in England. The breed also quickly expanded into Southern Africa, which led to the formation of the Hereford Breeder’s Society of Southern Africa, responsible for the administration of all Herefords in Southern Africa, including those of Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Kenya at the time. With the onset of feedlots in SA, Hereford breeders also had to adapt to changing demands. The Herefords where challenged to change from an earlier maturing type to a breed more suited for

H E R E F O R D

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feedlot requirements. With the help Programme” has been initiated of semen that was imported mainly a while ago by the SA Hereford from the USA and Canada, the SA Breeder’s Society. The aim of this Hereford has done exceptionally programme is to make guaranteed well. quality Hereford and HerefordIn their 95th Anniversary year, type weaner calves available to SA Hereford breeders are excited the feedlot market and thereby about the future of their breed. They generate premiums for such believe that current Hereford traits calves. These calves must be at make them ideally suited to add least 50% Hereford, have certain value to the latest expectations of set performances, and must the SA cattle industry. have been raised under specific, In 2012, two prestigious interbreed defined management and health awards - the “SA Beef Herd of programs. We believe that such a the Year” (Kenrussmark, Russell program, instead of a “Branded Beef Clarke) and “SA Breedplan Bull of Program” where no premium in SA the Year” (Philip de Waal, Locheim is paid to weaner calve and feedlot Stud), went to Hereford breeders. producers (only Supermarkets), will This year’s National Champion rather stimulate the further use Bull (also interbreed champion at of Hereford Bulls in crossbreeding the Pietermaritzburg Royal show) programmes and Female were from the Locheim Stud and Bertus Mong (PP Mong Trust) respectively. A new SA record price has also been paid for a Hereford female by Vicedale Herefords (Köster family) to Locheim Stud. Herefords have further been the most fertile breed for a number of years now, compared to all the breeds affiliated with SA Studbook. 2011 SA National Champion Female from PP Mong Trust A growth of more than 10% has been achieved in the numbers of registered Hereford animals lately. This growth is indicative of the continued renewed interest in the breed. Currently there are 64 breeders with 5,507 registered females and 2,008 bulls. Finally, a branded 2011 SA National Champion Bull from Locheim Stud “Whiteface Weaner

.

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Uruguay

Switzerland

F r a n z D e n z l e r imported the first Hereford herd into Switzerland from Denmark 16 years ago. Since then, there have been regular imports which have mainly come from Denmark and Germany, with approximately 160 Herefords imported to Switzerland between 2008 and 2010. The Hereford population and number of farms with Herefords are constantly increasing. By the end of 2011, 800 Herefords were registered on 32 Herd-Bookregistered farms keeping 384 Herd Book cows and 39 bulls. For cows to be registered in the Herd Book they must have a linear description and the calves and must show the following daily growth rates: 950g (Female) and 1050g (Male).

Report of the Hereford Industry in Uruguay

2012 is a year of great expectations for the Uruguayan meat producer; we are closing now the analysis for 2011, one of the best years in the Uruguayan beef production history. According to the National Meat Institute of Uruguay our beef exports will be over US$ 1650 million and the Average Export Index for beef will be superior to countries like Brazil, Paraguay, New Zealand, Australia and the US. In November 2011 that

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The 2011 performance assessment showed an average 205-day weight of 287kg, which equals a daily growth rate of 1,215g. At 363 days, the Herefords have the shortest calving cycle of all registered beef breeds in Switzerland, with more than 100 animals. In January 2010, the Swiss Beef Herd Book was certified by the International Committee for Animal Recording (ICAR), meaning that the Swiss beef genetics are internationally recognized. Every 18 months, a national show is organised, alternating between spring and autumn. The most recent show was held this year in the Vianco Arena, Brunegg on the 13th and 14th of April. The breed club “Interessengemeinschaft Schweizer Herefordzüchter” was founded in 2002 and tasked with defining the breeding objectives as well as the parameters and weighting for the linear description, the height at the withers etc. Our web page provides further information for interested parties, as well as a market place. We also advertise at trade fairs, visit exhibitions and regularly meet at the various farms. Preparation has already started for the 14th European Hereford Conference to be held in Switzerland from the 3rd

to the 8th of September, 2014. We would like to thank the Canadian Hereford Association for the invitation to the World Hereford Conference. We are looking forward to both the conference and its interesting events. We, in turn, are looking forward to welcoming you to Switzerland in the future

Index reached its highest value with 4.333 US$/ton carcass weight. We are proud to say that the genetic basis of the Uruguayan beef cattle industry is Hereford; data from our National Traceability System indicated that almost 60% of the calves born in 2011 were straightbred Hereford and the majority of the remaining ones had a Hereford influence. In other words, the Hereford breed is well adapted to our production systems and had demonstrated that it can be highly efficient for the beef cattle business. We will like to share with you the experience of raising Hereford cattle in our country; and for that reason we are applying to host the 17th World Hereford Conference in 2016, if our

application is accepted, we will be honored to have you in Uruguay

.

.


United Kingdom

C A N A D I A N

The resurgence of the Hereford breed here in the U.K. over the last 10 years has been quite exceptional. Active Herd numbers have increased from an all-time low of 340 to the present level of very nearly 700 and then, as expected, the number of calves notified to the Society annually also increased from just under 3,000 to a level of 7,000. The number of registered animals recorded through the Society annually has also shown a marked increase over the same period from 400 to just a little short of 2,000. The demand for breeding females has been remarkable. The best bulls on the market are easily sold while average quality bulls continue to be more

difficult to sell. Nevertheless, this last 12 months has shown a marked upward trend in the prices for bulls sold, compared to the previous year. Prices were up 13% with a stronger demand evident from the commercial sector of our industry. The feedback filtering through from these commercial buyers suggests that they are mainly looking for the well-known breed traits of calving ease and quiet temperament, to provide them with easier management; two traits that should therefore be protected at all costs. On the Branded Hereford Beef front, we continue to receive the support of one of the country’s leading supermarket chains – Waitrose – which, through the beef processing company, Dovecote Park, markets Hereford beef throughout most of

its stores around the country. This association has lasted a period of nearly 15 years. The cattle processed for the scheme, around 15,000 per annum, have to be either purebred or half-bred, so long as they are by a registered Hereford Sire. A considerable premium is paid by the processors to the producers of these cattle. More recently, a second major Supermarket has introduced a British Native Beef Breed programme and is also paying a bonus for all cattle that are sired by a Native British Bred Sire, so again, an added value to finishing cattle that are by a Hereford. Our progress with the Breedplan Performance Recording Programme is still somewhat slow. It remains a constant battle getting breeders to commit themselves to the programme, despite the fact that our commercial buyers demand the performance data as a tool to select their stock bulls. The majority of UK Beef Breeds have now adopted the ABRI Breedplan System, since its introduction seven years ago. The Hereford Society, however, is the only one, so far, to absorb the cost of the program, allowing breeders to participate at no extra cost. While uptake has been disappointing, it is slowly improving. To encourage buyers to purchase better carcase producing sires, the Society’s Council agreed to the introduction of a “Superior Carcase Sire Scheme” a little over two years ago. Buyers of such bulls are paid a cash incentive on the first 100 calves born. The project is aimed at assisting commercial producers in the selection of sires able to transmit superior carcase traits to their progeny; a key element to the success of the Branded Beef Schemes mentioned earlier and improving the returns for both producers and processors of Hereford Beef. The Superior Carcase Sire Scheme also encourages participation in Breedplan recording of traits such as ultrasound scanning for muscle and fat depth. The more breeders participate, the more accurate the data being produced. For a sire to achieve eligibility, they must be weighed at birth and two other times, one of which must be

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D I G E S T

independently assessed. They must also be scanned. Resulting data results must then reflect a Retail Beef Yield EBV in the top 30% of the Breed and an Eye Muscle Area in the top 50%. The scheme selects for leaner, more muscular animals, so that Superior Carcase Sires, with a reasonable level of fat cover, should be heavier and yield more lean meat than progeny of a sire with a lower RBY, slaughtered at the same stage. This should allow more flexibility in management and go some way to reduce the problem of finished animals becoming over fat before having achieved satisfactory weight and muscle development. In addition, all Sires must fall in the top 50% of the Breed for the Terminal Sire Index so as to ensure that the improvement in carcase quality is not achieved at the expense of other important traits. On behalf of all UK breeders, I extend best wishes to all other Hereford enthusiasts around the world and would like to add that there will always be a warm welcome to all visitors to the original home of the famous white-faced breed

.

Normanton 1 Eastern Promise Poll Bull of the Year 2011

Horned Bull of the Year Free Town Fortune 137


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MISSION To support the unity of the Hereford breed locally, nationally and internationally. Emphasizing communication between breeders, their provincial and national associations and their customers.

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Doug Mann Box 1256 Swift Current, SK S9H 3X4 P/F: (306) 773-4121 w_mann@xplornet.ca Andy Schuepbach Box 2044, Claresholm, AB T0L 0T0 P: (403) 625-4693 F: (403) 625-1500 andy@lilybrookherefords.com Doug Finseth Site 6, Box 19, RR 2, Okotoks, AB T1S 1A2 P: (403) 938-7726 F: (403) 938-7163 finsethjudy@gmail.com Daryl Kirton 30018 Townshipline Rd. Abbotsford, BC V4X 1Z4 P: (604) 856-5755 F: (604) 855-2287 3-d-l@telus.net 138

Larry & Pat Ward, Middle Musquodoboit, NS Ph:902-384-2878 Email: larryward@xplornet.com

Hereford EPD Averages Spring 2012

CE (%)

BW (lbs)

WW (lbs)

YW (lbs)

Milk (lbs)

TM (lbs)

MCE (%)

SC (cm)

CW (lbs)

Stay (%)

MPI

FMI

REA (in2)

FAT (in)

MARB

Active Sires*

0.4

3.6

46.0

76.0

18.0

41.0

1.0

0.8

87.0

-0.2

142.1

125.9

0.28

0.003

0.05

Active Dams**

0.1

3.7

41.0

68.0

16.0

36.0

0.6

0.7

82.0

-0.3

134.8

119.9

0.19

0.001

0.02

Calves***

0.5

3.6

45.0

73.0

18.0

40.0

1.0

0.7

85.0

-0.2

139.8

123.2

0.25

0.002

0.04

CE- Calving Ease BW - Birth Weight WW - Weaning Weight YW - Yearling Weight MILK - Milk TM - Total Maternal (1/2 WW + Milk) MCE - Maternal Calving Ease SC - Scrotal CW - Cow Weight Stay - Stayability MPI - Maternal Productivity Index FMI - Feedlot Merit Index REA - Rib-Eye Area FAT - Back Fat MARB - Marbling Score *Active Sires: Those sires that have sired at least 1 calf in the last 2 years **Active Dams: Those dams that have had a calf reported in the last 2 years ***Please note that calf averages are for 2010 born calves only. These are the averages on the website Canadian Publications Agreement No.: 40006161 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Department Canadian Hereford Digest 5160 Skyline Way NE Calgary, AB T2E 6V1

Printed By PRINTWEST, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan The Canadian Hereford Digest is published three times per year. G.S.T. Registration No: R122019193

All Contents are the sole property of The Canadian Hereford Association. Any reproduction in whole or in part without express permission is strictly forbidden.


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COPPERTONE  FARMS  LTD.

LITTLE RED DEER HEREFORD FARM â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legendary Hereford Progenyâ&#x20AC;?

Offering Worldwide Genetics Visitors Welcome Grant & Annette Hirsche

420  Short  Road   Abbotsford  B.C.  V2S  8A7 Tel:  604-­852-­4745  -­  Fax:  604-­852-­5060 Email:  coppertonefarms@shaw.ca

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Web site: www.hirsche.com

Box 5065, High River, AB T1V 1M3

2 mi. South, 4 1/2 mi. West, 1 mi. North of Innisfail

AIRDRIE, ALBERTA, CANADA T4A 0P7 Fax: (430) 226-4873 Gladys Allen & Shanna (403) 226-0055 (403) 226-0767 RR#3, Site 12, Comp 18 RR#3, Site 12, Comp 17 (PDLODVMRQHV#HĂ&#x20AC;UHKRVHQHW

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 TERI   MANNING  &  WOODY  KUMPULA Phone  (780)  623-­â&#x20AC;?7468        Cell  (780)  689-­â&#x20AC;?6606 Box  27,  Site  5,  Rich  Lake,  AB    T0A  2Z0 80  km  NW  of  St.  Paul  or  50  km  SE  of  Lac  La  Biche ALBERTA

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Gerry  Hutton Ph/Fax  (403)  631-­3734 Cell  (403)  566-­5222 Mack  Hutton Box  13,   Ph  (403)  631-­2410  (messages) Torrington,  AB Cell  (403)  507-­3018 T0M  2B0

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Brad & Kathy Dallas Ph.:(403) 224-2162 Fax: (403) 224-3738 Box 89, Bowden, Alta. T0M 0K0 1/4 mile East of Bowden underpass on #587

ULTON Â HEREFORDS Carstairs, Alberta

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John/Sharon Ph: 403-337-2095

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Yearling and two-year-old bulls for sale selected for carcass superiority.

Bill Lamport Brad Lamport 403-226-0345 403-226-0450 Balzac, AB www.lamportspolledherefords.com

Polled Herefords â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reg. Cattle Since 1952â&#x20AC;?

Evan Roberts Farm 780-349-2086 Cell 780-206-6802 Box 5279, Westlock, Alberta T7P 2P4 Located 1 mile North of Westlock on Hwy. 44

Do e nz Ranc h e s Annual Sale: November 15, 2012 E-mail: doenzranches@gmail.com www.doenzranches.net

Nelson & Paula Doenz: Phone: (403) 642-2380 Fax: (403) 642-2471 Brad & Veronica Doenz: (403) 642-7694 PO Box 362, Warner, AB T0K 2L0 3.2 km E of Warner on #504 & 3.2 km N on Rg #170

Dennis & Andrea Babiuk Phone: (780) 657-2270 Cell: (780) 603-1079 Box 102 Fax: (780) 657-2778 Brosseau, AB Email ncx@xplornet.ca T0B 0P0 Quality Cattle For Sale At All Times


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 S.  Jones  &  Sons J s

9  1/2  km  E.  of  Balzac  interchange  on  Hwy.  #2  &  1  km  N.

Box  25,  Landis,  SK  S0K  2K0 Email:  grltd@yourlink.ca Verne    (306)  658-­2022 Bill  &  Luke    (306)  658-­4750

Quality  Breeding  Stock 613-­623-­7948

Wes,  Bernie,  Dustin,  Cody  &  Austin Phone:  (306)  658-­4535 Cell:  (306)  948-­9663

Lyons Polled Herefords Horned  Hereford Black  Angus Black  Baldie  Heifers

ONTARIO

Balzac,  Alberta  T0M  0E0 (403)  226-­â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2018;0200                            (403)  226-­â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2018;0623

HerefordsThatWork.com

REGISTERED  COMMERCIAL  HORNED  HEREFORDS SASK ATCHEWAN

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herefordsâ&#x20AC;?

William & Audrey Lyons 10893 Mill Rd. RR7 St. Thomas, ON N5P 3T2 Phone: 519-764-9560 Cell: 519-639-8991

Web  Site:  www.lockfarms.com

Fax: 519-764-9615 Email: ablyons@amtelecom.net

Jim & Shirley Scott 3KRQH  Â&#x2021;)D[   R.R. #4, Red Deer, AB T4N 5E4 (PDLOVFRWDOWD#WHOXVQHWÂ&#x2021;ZZZKHUHIRUGEUHHGHUFRP

Wayne & Mary Skelton &Family

Nels (403) 948-5604 Rob (403) 948-2569 Scott (403) 948-5232 Fax (403) 948-3300 Paul (403) 935-4334

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance Tested Herefordsâ&#x20AC;? Hans Ulrich Peter Ulrich (403) 625-2237 Ph/Fax (403) 625-2434 Cell (403) 625-1036 Email: peter@ulrichherefords.com Web site: www.ulrichherefords.com Box 843, Claresholm, Alberta T0L 0T0 From Claresholm, 8 mi. (12.8 km) E., 4 mi. (6.4 km) N., 1/4 mi. E.

Come Visit Us

FERME QUEBEC

S. Nixdorff & Sons R.R. 2, Airdrie, Alta. T4B 2A4

HEREFORD  RANCH  INC.

Clearwater,  MB        (204)  873-­2430 REG.  BLACK  ANGUS  &  POLLED  HEREFORDS

Manitoba Hereford Assoc. Stephanie Kopeechuk Ph: (204) 763-4459 Fax: (204) 873-2242

Visitors Welcome Anytime

ULRICH Â

Don,  Diane  Guilford  &  Family

FOR QUALITY HEREFORD LIVESTOCK

MAHJAM



FARM

POLLED HEREFORDS ACĂ&#x2C6;RES 150, Route 220 Bonsecours, QC J0E 1H0

TĂŠlĂŠphone Ferme: (450) 535-6606 mahjam@cooptel.qc.ca

FAMILLE TĂ&#x2030;TREAULT - JEAN & ALAN

MARITIMES

 '       %#$  #$"# 

MANITOBA

%%%#$ $$ !& 

ONTARIO

ALBERTA

ScottPolled Alta Farms Herefords

Oulton Farm Victor & Novadawn Oulton

RR #1, Windsor, NS B0N 2T0 Phone/Fax: 902-798-4440 Email. oulton.farm@ns.sympatico.ca 141


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

auctioneers, consultants and

services index To place an ad in The Canadian Hereford Digest, call 1-888-836-7242 or visit our website at www.hereford.ca

G GRRAANNTT R ROOLLSSTTOONN PPHHOOTTOOGGRRAAPPHHYY LLTTDD Box 410 Coalhurst, Alberta T0L 0V0

Grant Ph: 403-593-2217 Craig Ph: 403-651-9441 Email: grantspix@gmail.com Web: www.grantspix.com

Heather  Barr

Balog Auction Service Ltd.

Canadian  Farm Insurance  Corp.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The complete auction serviceâ&#x20AC;? Box 786, Lethbridge, Alta. T1J 3Z6 Bus.: (403) 320-1980 Res.: (403) 327-1016 Fax : (403) 320-2660 Bob Balog, Auctioneer 067454

3rd)ORRU6W$OEHUW7UDLO(GPRQWRQ$%7/: KEDUU#FGQIDUPLQVFRPZZZFGQIDUPLQVFRP Commercial             Personal  Lines              Farm            Livestock

LLOYDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  CORRESPONDENT MARJORIE  BLACKLOCK R.R.  #4,  Box  277,  Site  412 Saskatoon,  SK    S7K  3J7 Ph:  306-­931-­0088     Fax:  306-­931-­8782 YOUR  LIVESTOCK  INSURANCE  SPECIALIST

JOHN B. BLACKLOCK AUCTIONEER 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH²   5HV²   0RELOH²   #105 - 71st Street Saskatoon, SK S7R 1B4

142

Phone/Fax  (403)  337-­0052 Cell  (780)  853-­7067 2I¿FH  


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

advertisers index To place an ad in The Canadian Hereford Digest, call 1-888-836-7242 or visit our website at www.hereford.ca

#

3-D-L Polled Herefords .........................................................140

a

Ace Herefords ........................................................................ 40 Alberta Hereford Association .............................................104 ALMA .....................................................................................105 Alta Genetics Inc. .........................................................106, 142 Anchor Polled Herefords........................................................97 Art Family Photography .......................................................142 Atkins Herefords ....................................................................37 A.X.A. Polled Herefords ........................................................ 141

b

Balog Auction ............................................................... 107, 142 Bar Pipe Hereford Ranch..................................................54-55 Barefoot Polled Herefords ................................................... 123 Bar-RZ Polled Herefords ........................................................ 15 Barr, Heather .........................................................................142 Big Gully Farm ......................................................................... 17 Bird’s Hill Farms ......................................................................58 Blacklock, John B. .................................................................142 Blair’s Ag .................................................................................95 Bradley Farms ....................................................................... 141 Braun Ranch ............................................................................38 Breton West Herefords ........................................................ 114

c

Canada Beef Inc. ...................................................................108 Canadian Beef Breeds Council ............................................109 Carlrams Ranching Ltd. ......................................................... 19 Chestermere Herefords .......................................................140 Church Ranch.........................................................................121 CIBC ....................................................................................... 110 Clay Enterprises .....................................................................67 Copper Creek Ranch.................................................................7 Copper-T Ranch ..................................................................... 40 Copper Tone Farms Ltd. ............................................... 140, IBC Corbiell Herefords ...................................................................11 Coulee Crest Herefords ........................................................117 Courtenay Herefords..............................................................59 Crittenden Bros. Polled Herefords ........................................79

d

Dallas Farms .................................................................. 115, 140 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd. .............................142 Delaney Herefords ..................................................................37 Doenz Ranches .................................................................5, 140 Dorbay Polled Herefords ...................................................... 141 Dorran, Ryan .........................................................................142

e

Earlybird Farm.........................................................................47 Elmbar Polled Herefords ...................................................... 141

f

Fenton Hereford Ranch Inc. ...................................................52 Fulton Herefords ...................................................................140

g

Garrett Ranch Ltd. .......................................................... 58, 141 Gillespie Hereford Ranch .......................................................10 Glenrose Polled Herefords & Angus ................................... 114 Glenvale Polled Herefords ................................................... 116 Goldstock Hereford Farm...................................................... 89 Government of Alberta ........................................................103 Grant Rolston Photography .................................................142 Guilford Hereford Ranch ...................................................... 141

h

H.S. Knill Co. Ltd. ................................................................... 68 Harvie Ranching .................................................................... 49 Haven Herefords .....................................................................23 Hawkeye Ranching ...............................................................145 HBM Polled Herefords .......................................................... 141 Hereford America ................................................................. 122 Herefordbreeder.net ............................................................ 114 Herefordsthatwork.com ...................................................... 141 Highmark Ranching Polled Herefords ................................140 Hills Galore Stock Farms ....................................................... 30 Hirsche Herefords and Angus Ltd. .......................... 76-77, 140 HZ Herefords ......................................................................... 123

j

Jay’s Polled Herefords .......................................................... 116 Jenkins Ranche ....................................................................... 12 Johner Stock Farm Ltd. ........................................................ 122 Jones Hereford Ranches ......................................................140 JoNomn Hereford Ranch ....................................................... 64 Justamere Ranches ................................................................57

143


C A N A D I A N

H E R E F O R D

D I G E S T

advertisers index To place an ad in The Canadian Hereford Digest, call 1-888-836-7242 or visit our website at www.hereford.ca

k

K-Cow Ranch .......................................................................... 69

l

Lakeford Polled Herefords ...................................................140 Lakes Ranch Polled Herefords...............................................79 Lamport’s Polled Herefords .......................................... 63, 140 Lehr Ranching ........................................................................ 20 Lilybrook Herefords.................................................. 72-73, 140 Little Red Deer Hereford Farm ............................................140 Lohner Herefords....................................................................39 Lock Farms .................................................................... 130, 141 Lone Pine Ranch ...................................................................130 Lost Lake Ranch ....................................................................140 Lyons Polled Herefords .................................................. 32, 141

m

Mahjam Farm ........................................................................ 141 Manitoba Hereford Association .......................................... 141 McCoy Cattle Co. ....................................................................33 Medonte Highlands Polled Herefords ..................................25 Middleswarth Hereford Ranch ..............................................43 Misty Valley Farms ................................................................ 68 MJT Cattle Co. Ltd. ................................................................. 41 MN Herefords.......................................................................... 21 MNP ........................................................................................ 111 Moccasin Flat Ranch ............................................................140 Myalta Farms ........................................................................140

Rainy Creek Herefords ...........................................................65 Ranch of the Vikings ............................................................ 141 Rednex Ranch ........................................................................ 69 Remitall West ......................................................................... 91 Richardson Ranch........................................................... 13, 140 River Bridge Ranch ............................................................... 116 River Valley Polled Herefords ................................................29 RSK Farms ...............................................................................53

s

S. Jones and Sons ................................................................. 141 Sampson’s Thunderbird Ranch Ltd. .................................... 141 Scott Alta Farms ............................................................. 68, 141 Skelton Cattle Co. ........................................................... 69, 141 SNS Herefords ..................................................................31, 141 Square-D Herefords................................................................83 SS Cattle Company Inc................................................... 93, 141 Standard Hill Polled Herefords ............................................130 Stauffer Farms Ltd................................................................ 125 Stith, Dale ..............................................................................142 Stockman’s Insurance ..........................................................142

t

Taboo Polled Herefords ...................................................71, 141 Thunderbrook Farms .............................................................. 51 Triple H Farm ......................................................................... 141

n

u

o

w

p

x

NCX Polled Herefords ...................................................122, 140 NBG Polled Herefords..................................................... 89, 141

Ogilvie Stock Ranch .............................................................. 86 Oulton Farm .......................................................................... 141 OVHF ..........................................................................................9

Pahl Livestock ................................................................... 80-81 Palsson Herefords ................................................................. BC Phantom Creek Livestock ......................................................87 Pine Butte Ranch ................................................................... 99 PK Herefords ...........................................................................28 Prairie Rose Stock Farms ..................................................... 101

144

r

UFA ..........................................................................................112 Ulrich Herefords ............................................................. 22, 141

Weetalabah Herefords .......................................................... 66 WLB Livestock ......................................................................146 Wyatt Farms ........................................................................... 45

XTC Hereford Farms .................................................................8

y

YV Ranch .................................................................................36


Polled and Horned Herefords Bulls, Bulls,Females Females and and Embryos Embryos for for sale sale at at all all times times

We look forward to visiting with everyone at Olds. Alberta during the World Hereford Conference (Pictured at 9 years of age)

This is an outstanding problem free cow that produces a good one every time. She has had my high selling bull three years in a row.

EPDs BW 4.9 WW 48.2 YW 83.4 MM 18.8 TM 42.9

Tremendous sons working for Many Islands Lake Grazing, Clint and Daryl Brost,Pipeline Grazing, and Len and Ross Stafford. Embryo’s are available out of 8N by ONLINE & ELI.

HAWKEYE 64K MISS KINGDOM 8N {DLF, IEF, HYF}

Sires in Use:

EPDs BW 5.4 WW 44.1 YW 45.8 MM 18.4 TM 40.5

Hawkeye 37R Tomahawk 1T SHF Wonder M326 W18 ET Bar-RZ 59T Wham 17W Remitall Shiraz ET 158S Remitall Alliance 503W K 64H Ribstone 157K Remitall Keynote 20X WLB Eli 10H 83T

JNHR STANDARD LASS 452S (DLF, IEF, HYF) (Pictured at 2 years of age) Owned with JoNomn Hereford Ranch

2008 Reserve National Champion Horned Female 452S is an extremely long cow that has clicked very well with the bulls we have flushed her to. Tremendous ET calves on the ground by ALLIANCE, ELI & 157K. Embryo’s still available by 157K.

Feel free to stop in anytime, we would love to show you around. Embryo enquiries welcome.

LEIF, MELISSA, EMMA & KOLT BROST Ph: 403-834-2632 Email: leif_brost@hotmail.com Cell: 403-928-5893 13228 Range Road 25, Cypress County, Alta. T1B 0L3 - Located north of Irvine 145


WLB  LEGO  83T  90X   70  lb  birth  weight,  1342  lb  365  day  wt.   Lego  leaves  his  mark!   Low  birth  wt,  great  vigor,  early  shape.

WLB  BINGO  50S  4002X

A  bull  with  a  great  heritage  providing  proven  calving   ease,  heavy  pigmentation,  and  loads  of  eye  appeal!

Bingo  goes  well  beyond  the  basics!

HI-­CLIFFE  WLB  SAMMY  13X 2011  Canadian  National  Reserve  Champion  Polled  Hereford  Bull. Sammyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  1/2  sister,  WLB  Fran  7M  82S  was  2009 Canadian  National  Grand  Champion  Polled  Hereford  Female. These  two  champions  are  sired  by  WLB  Fresh  035J  7M.

Championship  Genetics  For  The  World

,QWHUQDWLRQDOTXDOL¿HGVHPHQLVDYDLODEOHRQ/(*2%,1*2DQG6$00<  -­  Your  inquiries  are  welcome.

WLB LIVESTOCK

146

Bill  &  Nancy  Biglieni RUÂ&#x2021;ZOEOLYHVWRFN#LQHWOLQNFDÂ&#x2021;ZOEOLYHVWRFNFRP


The Canadian Hereford Digest 2012 Commemorative Edition  
The Canadian Hereford Digest 2012 Commemorative Edition  

2012 World Hereford Conference Commemorative Edition of The Canadian Hereford Digest

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