Page 1

Wasteland

2

FEATURE:

Wasteland

Urban Mobilities

3


Introduction CURRENT SYSTEM

75%

Every year, eight million inhabitants in New York City produce almost six millions tons of residential and commercial waste. This waste flows through an essential, yet largely invisible system, across many different scales - from household to transfer station to landfill. The waste management system is heavily dependent on landfill disposal in distant locations, and is therefore inefficient due to the amount of truck miles traveled, as well as missed opportunities to retrieve valuable resources from it. In the new and ambitious OneNYC plan, Mayor Bill de Blasio presents his vision of sending zero waste to landfills by 2030. In order to achieve this goal, New York City needs to drastically reinvent its current waste system by moving away from disposing its waste in the backyards of communities near and far, and design more localized, equitable, and resilient waste strategies.

10%

15%

Several preferred waste tactics that focus on diversion, re-use and prevention already exist in NYC and other cities, It is imperative to explore how such tactics can complement each other and trigger a paradigm shift towards a visible, equitable and tenable waste system in NYC.

4

FEATURE:

Wasteland

Urban Mobilities

5


New Yorker City’s waste collection system ensures that it remains out of sight and out of mind. Most people have no idea how to find out what happens to their trash once it is collected.

1

New York City hosts more than thirty waste transfer stations that hold the waste until it can be shipped via truck, rail or barge. These stations are obscure to the average citizen. Again, the amount of information available publicly on the source of the waste and its final destination varies widely.

5

4

The DSNY collection system is able to collect more than 10,000 tons of trash per day. There are over 200 licensed commercial haulers that take care of everything else, but have limited public records on where this waste ends up.

FEATURE:

Wasteland

6

6

5 Several co-existing waste tactics that focus on diversion, reuse and prevention already exist in NYC, such as Sure We Can (Image 1, 2) & BK Rot (Image 3, 4, 5). It is imperative to explore how such tactics can complement each other and trigger a paradigm shift alongside DSNY’s residential waste programs (Image 6).

Preferable waste management systems in NYC are used to their capacity, but not used to their full potential

10

33

2

Parallel NYC waste diversions programs, such as Sure We Can, BK Rot and Lower East Side Ecology Center play a vital role in environmental and social waste management practices at the neighborhood scale. Sure We Can supports 315 Canners who have earned a total of half a million dollars by collecting 7 million containers in 1 year. BK Rot in Bushwick processes a small amount of organic waste, 5.66 tons/year, and employs local youth in Bushwick who transport organic waste via bike. Lower Eastside Ecology Center processes 200 tons of organic matter/year and is diverting organics from landfill by utilizing designated NYC Park space. Although these organizations cover a smaller waste collection area than DSNY, their social and environmental capacities are not utilized to significantly respond to the city’s massive waste stream volume.

Urban Mobilities

11


m

po

st

pa ca per rd & bo ar d

co

Trash is too valuable to be wasted and its monetary, energetic and use value must be extracted.

ab

le

glass containers met

refuse

sti

al

cb

ot

Currently 83% of NYC waste goes to landfill. This is a costly system that mixes and buries materials and does not generate any economic, energetic or use value. Alternatively, more than 60% of NYC’s household waste could be diverted to composting and recycling and the remaining 40% could be processed into energy. Adopting these processes would not only avoid expenditures with landfilling, but also generate revenues.

tle

s

energy potential value

pla

compost

ON THE MOVE MOBILE WORKFORCE

HOUSEHOLD

RESTAURANT

1978 tons/day 1500 tons/day

1370 tons/day

7000 tons/day

3280 tons/day 3550 tons/day

Subway Waste 40 tons/day

Street Waste 380 tons/day

Commercial Waste 8,500 tons/day

1000 tons of food scarps out of 3348 tons is consumed by pests every day

12

FEATURE:

The effects of living in a fast-paced city like New York, has allowed a mobile workforce to flourish, which in turn has contributed to NYC’s mass “throw-away” society. Henceforth, the city produces around 20,000 metric tons of waste every year, of which 55% is residential waste and 45% is commercial waste. Most of the trash is poorly handled and maintained, which only results in 50% proper recycling. Also, the NYC curbside organic trash offers a perfect habitat for “pests”.

Wasteland

current loss

organics

Residential Waste 11,500 tons/day

more recycling + 5 ¢ bottle redemption

landfill refuse

$ 320 million/year spent on transport and disposal of waste to landfills

recyclables

5 ¢ bottles

paper & cardboard

50% of all recyclables go to landfills

679000 metric tons/year of greenhouse gases

Urban Mobilities

13


“Twenty-six of the city’s 38 private transfer stations are located in four community districts. Together, they handle 70% of the trash processed in New York City.” —Antonio Reynoso, Chairperson

CT PA OH

NJ

VA

KY

SC

New York City’s waste system is composed by a complex array of actors, facilities and infrastructures, and is heavily dependent on long-distance export.

CartoDB attribution ©OpenStreetMap contributors ©CartoDB

14

FEATURE:

Wasteland

Urban Mobilities

15


CIVIC WASTE CENTERS A Place with a System that Sorts, Transports, and Processes Waste at the Neighborhood Level

Current Coexisting Collection Systems Diesel powered trucks

Heavy loads Mixed materials

Unionized city work force

$307/ton for collection

Earns aprox. $103 per day

$124/ton for disposal

$393 millions spent per year to export waste to landfills

Our strategy responds to the three waste matters that we have identified as key insights:

Example of DSNY Collection Shed

Long distance tranportation to centralized facilities

Waste Transfer Station receiving wate from this collection shed

(1) three Community Districts are handling 70% of New York City’s Waste. This demonstrates a massive & unjust concentration of where waste is being processed;

Estimated DNSY truck trips Out of sight out of mind waste tranportation

6886 sanitation street workers

Example of Parallel Systems Collection Shed Approx. 700 Canners in NYC

Into sight into mind organic waste transportation

Stimulates & educates household organic waste separation

Canners humanpowered trips

Diverting materials away from landfills

Non-recognized city waste work force

Human-powered carts

(3) there are already successful social and environmental waste management systems in NYC whose impact are not being used to their full potential. They utilize human powered carts that carry micro loads of recyclables & organic waste to micro facilities.

Sure We Can (SWC) redemption center

Hauling micro-loads of recyclables & organic waste to micro-facilities

Depositing 2000 five cent bottles is an earning of $100/day

Example of distributer truck trip

BK ROT compost collection center

Human-powered carts can haul Approx. 130 lb of food scraps per trip Creates more living-wage jobs

(2) door­-to-­door DSNY truck collection travels all throughout neighborhoods. This emits 1.7 million metric tons of greenhouse gas per year, which is a huge environmental justice concern for the communities that take on this burden;

Cyclers humanpowered trips

-

20

FEATURE:

Wasteland

Urban Mobilities

21


Sure We Can Canners cover a 1.5 mile radius

distributed over 59 community districts

NYC needs arounds 60 Sure We Cans

distributed over 59 community districts

t!

hif mS

ig

d Para

NYC’s distributed Civic over 59 Waste community Centers districts

We are proposing Civic Waste Centers (CWC) for each community district on city-owned land to receive residential waste. Rather than large centralized waste facilities concentrated in a single community district and trucks moving all throughout neighborhoods, hyper-local waste diversion facilities across the city, distribute waste more evenly and creates a critical proximity to the waste a community generates. Imagine a CWC, which is not only a waste processing facility, but an economic, environmental, and social resource shared with you, your neighbors, your community and the city of New York.

Framework to implement The Framework to Implement One Civic Waste Center Community the(CWC) Civic per Waste Centers District on City-Owned Land

Year 1-2

Challenges of the CWCs

contract between DSNY & CWC

Stage 1: Gov’t Policy & Recognition

1- The shift from city-wide programs to city-wide laws and the time factor this entails 2- Bringing a variety of actors together from different scales 3- Community Outreach 4- Changing behavior 5- City-owned land availability 6- Acceptance of close proximity to waste in parks 7- Mechanics of collection 8- Seasonal Considerations 9- Shifting DSNY operating dynamics 10- Designing efficient humanpowered transportation modes

The 5 Bin Program Canners Recognized

Year 3-4

Canners Legalized

Stage 2: Transitioning Gov’t Policy into Law & Exapdning DSNY’s Role

The 5 Bin buffer period human powered paper pick-up

Year 5 +

Stage 3: Legal Implementation & CWC’s Expansion with DSNY

Environmentally Friendly Vehicle Transporting all Household Waste

CWC Officially Registered with DSNY

ECO-FRIENDLY

The 5 Bin Law

22

FEATURE:

Wasteland

Urban Mobilities

23


The pamphlet addresses the challenge of community outreach within our strategy. Currently DSNY’s outreach material is scattered and uses different languages due to the shifting of DSNY’s ongoing developments in household waste management.

Our pamphlet is a skeleton to outline an all inclusive tool that explains what goes into each of the 5 bins. This tool would facilitate the process of household sorting.

Pilot Area: CD 7 Sunset Park

STEP 1

60kg per load

2.6g of organics per household

300 in

63

in

63 in

The All Inclusive Pamphlet

2.2 tons of organics

STEP 2

2

Manhattan

1

3 2

1 Brooklyn

3

6

3.9

8 9

7

Sunset Park

10

12

sq miles

126,000

*

residents

37.7 tons of organics/day

14

11 Population concentration

To exemplify our strategy as a whole, we chose to test it in Community District 7, which is Sunset Park. This is our way of responding to the challenges of the mechanics of collection, while exploring the possibility of locating and defining the Civic Waste Centers on city-owned land.

24

FEATURE:

We began by dividing sunset into 24 manageable sections and zoomed into one area where we figured out volumes, routes and the dynamic between CWC and DSNY.

Wasteland

First, the collection process begins with DSNY workers picking-up residential organic twice/ week. Each section needs 5 workers who would transport 6 loads per day via human powered mobility.

Second, each section has 2 drop off-sites where workers place the collected organic waste, which will later be picked up by DSNY trucks that will transport it to the CWC.

Urban Mobilities

25


STAGE 1: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles YEAR 1-2

STAGE 2: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper YEARCivic 3-4 Waste Center (CWC) The GATHERING SPACE

COMMUNITY GARDEN + COMPOSTING

STAGE 1: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles

COMPOSTING

YEAR 1-2 STAGE 1: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles YEAR 1-2

COMMUNITY GARDEN

STAGE 2: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper YEAR 3-4

GATHERING SPACE

GATHERING GATHERING SPACE

SPACE

COMMUNITY GARDEN + COMPOSTING

COMMUNITY GARDEN + COMPOSTING

COMPOSTING

GATHERING SPACE

STAGE 2: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper YEAR 3-4

COMMUNITY GARDEN

COMPOSTING

STAGE 2: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper YEAR 3-4 COMMUNITY

STAGE 3: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper + GARDEN Recyclables + Refuse YEAR 5+ GATHERING SPACE

GATHERING SPACE

COMPOSTING

SECTION A

YEAR 5+

COMPOSTING

SECTION A

COMMUNITY GARDEN

COMMUNITY GARDEN

COMPOSTING

STAGE 3: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + PaperGARDEN + Recyclables + Refuse YEAR 5+ GARDEN EXTENSION

SECTION A

OFFICE

OFFICE

OFFICE

RECYCLING PROCESSING RECYCLING FACILITY

OFFICE

PROCESSING FACILITY

STORAGE

CANNER STORAGE

RECYCLABLE STORAGE

0

50

0

50

100

100

SECTION AA SECTION

OPEN SPACE

RECYCLABLES RECYCLABLES STORAGE

STORAGE

200

RECYCLABLE OFFICE STORAGE WORKSHOP/

GATHERING SPACE OFFICE

OFFICE GATHERING SPACE OFFICE

RECYCLING PROCESSING 0 FACILITY

SECTION A

RECYCLABLES STORAGE

OPEN SPACE

200 In the case of Community District 7 we decided to locate the CWC in city owned land close to the newly opened Bush Terminal park. This demonstrates how the CWC will grow over years from collecting residential organic matter and 5 cent bottles to being the preferred destination for sorting and processing all household waste.

FEATURE:

SECTION A

CANNER STORAGE

RECYCLABLES STORAGE

50

100

WORKSHOPWORKSHOP OPEN KITCHEN COMPOSTING SPACE KITCHEN SPACE SPACE

200

RECYCLABLE STORAGE

WORKSHOP KITCHEN SPACE

RECYCLING PROCESSING FACILITY

OFFICE

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP/ GARDEN

0

5 10

SPACE

OFFICE

KITCHEN

20

50

0

PAPER STORAGE

5 10

20

50

COMMUNITY GARDEN

OFFICE

RECYCLABLE STORAGE

PAPER STORAGE WORKSHOP OPEN

COMMUNITY GARDEN

LEARNING SPACE

COMPOSTING

CANNER STORAGE

SPACE

COMMUNITY GARDEN

LEARNING SPACE

OFFICE

200

COMMUNITY GARDEN

PAPER STORAGE

CANNER PAPER STORAGE

GARDEN EXTENSION

GARDEN EXTENSION

COMPOSTING

GATHERING SPACE GATHERING SPACE

COMMUNITY

GARDEN EXTENSION

SECTION A

26

COMPOSTING

STAGE 3: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper + Recyclables + Refuse YEAR 5+ STAGE 3: ORGANICS + 5 c Bottles + Paper + Recyclables + Refuse

WORKSHOP/ LEARNING SPACE

COMPOSTING

COMMUNITY GARDEN 0 5 10 20

50

WORKSHOP/ LEARNING SPACE

COMPOSTING

0

5 10

20

What is significant about the CWC is that it is a place that redefines how we live with our waste: (1) it encourages citizens to think more critically about how much they are throwing away because of the close proximity of the Waste center to their own homes; (2) it transforms waste into a social and environmental community resource; (3) the Civic Waste Center becomes space where people in the neighborhood can come meet, gather, learn and even cook.

Wasteland

50

This strategy creates a more intimate relationship with our household waste while simultaneously bringing numerous protagonists together, including: DSNY, Department of Parks, waste diversion organizations as well as individual urban citizens in relation to each other. We strongly believe that the feasibility of the CWC as a place with a system that sorts, transports, and processes waste at the neighborhood scale needs to be integrated within DSNY’s formal waste management structure.

Urban Mobilities

27

Wasteland  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you