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Zanaja Newsome February 6, 2018

Hate Crimes Keeps Increasing Since Trump’s Presidential Win In 2016 and The Matthew Shepard Law Why have hate crimes increased over the years? Since the 2016 election, U.S hate crimes have gone up by 20 percent. New York has reported the greatest number of hate crimes. 24 percent increased in 2015, and Washington, D.C has the largest percentage rise at 62 percent to 107 incidents. All of this information can be found in Britannica. There have been about 1,037 incidents, and 23.3 percent increase from the previous year in the nine areas researched: New York, Washington, Chicago, Philadelphia, and many more cities. Since Trump won the 2016 election, fears of heightened bigotry and hate crimes have turned into reality for some Americans. The list of incidents keeps growing. The most common form of hate crime that everyone has probably seen on the social media platform Twitter, is called Racist Graffiti. Two days ago on February 4, 2018, a car in Kendall Yards was tagged with some racial slurs. The vehicle is apparently parked in a 90-minute space and at some point had a wheel lock clamp fastened to its rear left tire. Not only this kind of behavior is happening on the streets, but it’s also happening in schools. An example of this is back in 2017 a black student wrote racist messages against the other black students in his school. This kind of behavior that we see in the media everyday, makes children believe that throwing around racial slurs is okay. This also happens to anyone that’s considered part of the LGBT community. Back on October 12, 1998, a college student named Matthew Shepard was brutal beating and left to die in the cold. Because of this, back in 2009 U.S. President Barack Obama signed the Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

The main question is; Is the law against hate crimes working?


Zanaja Newsome February 6, 2018

Who knows? All states have different laws against the crime. For example, the perpetrators in both cases were slapped with severe punishments--life sentences for Shepard's killers, and two death sentences and one life sentence for Byrd's. Sadly, some laws could take a long time to get past, like the Matthew Shepard Law. The Matthew Shepard Law was a 10-year fight to pass federal hate crimes legislation to protect LGBT people. (socialistworker.org/2009/08/10/do-hate-crime-laws-work) It’s unfair that LGBT people have to wait a year maybe even longer just for a law to protect them to be passed. In other words, human rights groups are trying to lobby for tougher sentencing ​may believe that, despite all its ugly dimensions, the criminal justice system can be used for more noble ends, to force bigoted elements within society to change and to protect vulnerable communities.

Zanaja newsome feature article rough draft  
Zanaja newsome feature article rough draft  
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