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aa program program of of community community design design center center of of pittsburgh pittsburgh www.cdcp.org www.cdcp.org


RenPlanŽ is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh The Community Design Center of Pittsburgh (CDCP) is a non-profit organization that improves quality of life through design of the built environment. By 2015, our vision is to establish Pittsburgh as a recognized place for design of the built environment. To learn more about the CDCP visit www.cdcp.org 938 Penn Avenue Sixth Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 391-4144 (412) 391-1282 (fax) info@cdcp.org www.cdcp.org Copyright Š2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh All Rights Reserved


Table of Contents Your Consultation 1 • Who we are • What we do • About the consultants • About the resource guide • Sample action plan Getting Started 3 • Considerations • Assessing your project • Accessibility • Green design • Hiring a design professional • Budgeting your project • Working with a contractor • Contract information • Permits • Twenty questions for interviewing an architect • Budgeting worksheet Organizations and Services 7 • List of programs and agencies in the Pittsburgh region • Community-based organizations • Municipal Services • County Resources • Financial institutions Resources and Suppliers 13 • Contact information by category Renovation Fact Sheets 21 • Fact Sheet #1 Your Home • Fact Sheet #2 Your Roof • Fact Sheet #3 Your Windows • Fact Sheet #4 Your Walls • Fact Sheet #5 Your Porch Pittsburgh House Styles 31 • Information on house styles commonly found in Pittsburgh Advertising 35 Please note: the businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlan® program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh


Acknowledgements* RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh (CDCP), a non-profit organization that improves quality of life through design of the built environment. By 2015, our vision is to establish Pittsburgh as a recognized place for design of the built environment. We would like to thank the following supporters of the RenPlan® program. Supporters Barry Friedman, Metz Lewis LLC Heinz Endowments PNC Bank Foundation Richard King Mellon Foundation

Volunteer Consultants Alicia Rowe Alan Hunninen Amanda Bell Amy Maceyko, AIA Andrew Novak R.A. Anna Carina Guinto, LEED® AP Annie Smith, LEED® AP Annie Weidman Arthur Lubetz, AIA Buddy Pribish, AIA Caroline Chaddad Colleen Ramsay Hoesch, AIA David Leicht, AIA Eliza Furedy, ASLA Elizabeth James, AIA, LEED® AP Emily Dritz Eric Fisher, AIA Erik Fritzberg Erin Roberts Fred M. Fargotstein, R.A. Fred Swiss Frederick Watts, AIA, LEED® AP, NCARB George Rieke Gerard Schmidt, LEED® AP Glenn Gilbert, AIA Heather Wildman-Figley James O’Shaughnessy, LEED® AP Jason Morris, AIA

Jason Roth Jennifer Bubnash Askey Jennifer Lucchino, AIA Jennifer Rogers Jody Schurman R.A., LEED® AP Joel Perkovich John Cleary, AIA Jonathan Hoag Jonathan Lusin Julie Wagner, LEED® AP Katelyn Shearer Kathy Hrabovsky, AIA Kento Ohmori, AIA Kirsten Hoelmer Lauren Merski Lee Calisti, AIA Lindsay Reed Lisa Whitney, AIA Lori Claus, ASID Lori Kreke Mark Bastaja Mark Hoffman Mark McKenzie Martin Knox, LEED® AP Mary Cerrone, AIA Mary Olliffe, IIDA Matt Bovee Matthew Johnson, AIA Matthew Manzo

Max Mavrovic, AIA Max Waldron, LEED® AP Megan O’Hara Melissa Smallwood Michael Clark, AIA Michael Dwyer, RA Mimi Jong, AIA Nancy Hoff Barsotti, NCDIQ, ASID Nicole Oeler, RLA Page Thomas, LEED® AP, NOMA Paul Palko Paul Rosenblatt, AIA Peter Margittai, AIA Richard Freeman, AIA Richard Liberto, APLD Richard Sabeh Robert Thompson Ruth Anderson, LEED® AP Ryan Bostic Sara Thompson Sarah Forbes, LEED® AP Scott Frederick Shannon Ashmore Stacy Little, LEED® AP Suzanne Sekula, LEED,® AP, IIDA, NCDIQ Trisha Kerstetter Vera Denton

*Additional support for the RenPlan®program and other CDCP program is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the“Our Supporters” section of the CDCP’s website.


your consultation


Your Consultation Who We Are

About the Consultants

RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh (CDCP), a non-profit organization that improves quality of life through design of the built environment. Through the RenPlan® program, property owners can meet with architects, landscape architects and interior designers for one-on-one, on-location design consultations. Over 100 design professionals volunteer to participate in our program, which has provided more than 1600 property owners with design consultations since 1996.

Our consultants are architects, landscape architects and interior designers who participate as volunteers to help local property owners by providing advice on improvement projects. In order to participate in the program, our consultants must hold a degree in their respective design field. In addition, each consultant must attend an orientation session to become acquainted with the process and priorities of the RenPlan® program. Our current pool of consultants includes more than 100 design professionals, the majority of whom are working as professionals in their field. See our section on Hiring a Design Professional for more information.

What We Do The RenPlan® program provides affordable consultations between property owners and design professionals to discuss renovation plans. For an affordable fee, participants in the RenPlan® program meet with trained consultants for on-location consultations. At the end of the consultation, property owners receive a completed Action Plan (see reverse), outlining issues discussed during the consultation. The RenPlan® program consultant can help with: • Clarifying project goals and priorities • Identifying the renovation options • Understanding terminology that may be useful in communicating with a contractor

About the Resource Guide Your consultation will help you determine what the next steps in your improvement process should be. The information in this packet will help you implement those next steps. The Getting Started pages outline the key elements of evaluating your project and hiring a professional. The Organizations and Services pages list important local agencies that may be of use to you during your project. The Resources and Suppliers section will help you locate outlets where you can purchase supplies and materials, and provides a list of available service professionals.

• Identifying significant design elements and how to maintain those when making improvements Because the consultant isn’t under a professional service contract, he or she cannot: • Provide more than a general range of probable cost • Advise on which contractor to use • Advise whether or not to sign a contract with a contractor • Arbitrate between the property owner and the contractor • Provide a written scope of work or drawings If you require any of these services, consider hiring an architect, landscape architect or interior designer to assist you with your project.

A design professional can oversee the contractor’s work and ensure that it is completed according to the plans and specifications, and act as an owner’s representative during the construction process.

Your Consultation

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Action Plan Please use this form to outline the topics discussed between property owner and consultant during the visit. Date of Consultation: ______________ Consultant: ________________________________ Property Owner: ____________________________

What are the major exterior design issues, and how can they be addressed? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What are the major interior design issues, and how can these issues be addressed? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What are the next steps?

(Please be specific)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Are there any other maintenance, code, or permit issues? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please list any outstanding questions the property owner has, as well as an answer source to those questions. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ White – Property Owner

Yellow – CDCP © 2009 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh. All Rights Reserved

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Your Consultation

Pink – Consultant


getting started


Getting Started Considerations There are many factors to take into account when planning your project. The RenPlan® program is an affordable, personalized resource that empowers property owners by identifying professional design options. RenPlan® consultants can also help you consider “accessibility” and “green design” improvements. See the sidebar for more information about how you can enhance the livability, energy efficiency, and marketability of your property. Assessing Your Project For most property owners, the first step in renovating is deciding where to begin. Meeting with a RenPlan® program design professional to discuss your plans may help you to better understand the scope of work that lies ahead, and can help you meet your renovation goals more quickly and efficiently. Hiring a Design Professional The Community Design Center of Pittsburgh recommends that you consider hiring a design professional for your project. An architect, landscape architect or interior designer can prepare a set of plans and specifications for your project. These are measured drawings of the area to be renovated, with improvements shown to scale, usually accompanied by detailed specifications outlining materials and processes that the contractor is to use. A design professional can guide you through the process of selecting contractors and soliciting proposals to perform the construction work. They can also review the contractor’s work to ensure that it is completed according to the plans and specifications, and act as the owner’s representative during the construction process. Hiring an Architect Architects work with clients to develop designs for buildings ranging in scale from houses, to skyscrapers, to urban design, integrating aesthetics with technical issues. During your renovation, architects can be especially helpful for interior and exterior building improvements relating to: interior spaceplanning and design, structural modifications, new additions or garages, as well as modifications to the building shell (windows, doors, roof, walls, and foundation) and to electrical or mechanical systems. They can also help with site design and planning projects. Architects participating in the RenPlan® program have received a degree in their field. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) regulates professional degree programs in the United States. After college, graduates typically complete a practice-based internship period, followed by professional examinations and licensure. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is the leading professional membership association for licensed architects, emerging professionals and allied partners.

Getting Started

Accessibility Whether your home was built at the turn of the century or the dawn of a more recent decade, strong consideration should be given to preserving the integrity of its design features. But traditional stairways, doorway clearances, and bathroom facilities can sometimes become obstacles to aging and mobility-impaired individuals. Features such as ramps, widened doorways, accessible ground floor bathrooms and lifts can be integrated into your home in such a way that they complement your house and lifestyle. RenPlan® consultants can help you identify improvements that would make your home more accommodating for you and your visitors.

Green Design Environmentally sound design principles can be incorporated into any renovation process, from the earliest planning stages to project implementation. Green design helps you save energy, money and natural resources through actions such as: selecting energy efficient appliances, installing a backyard rain barrel and using recycled building materials. It is important, however, to balance energy-savings with other design considerations in order to maintain the architectural integrity of your home. For example, replacement windows should match the size and appearance of the original elements. RenPlan® consultants can help identify ways to make your home and your renovation process more “green.”

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Hiring a Landscape Architect

Budgeting Your Project

Landscape architects work with clients to design, maintain and manage natural and built outdoor environments. Their work ranges from residential gardens and arboreta, to parks, monuments, college campuses and urban design. Experts in creative and technical issues relating to plants, trees and outdoor building materials; landscape architects can help you with outdoor projects involving your garden, front and back yards, sidewalks, pathways and site access, retaining walls and driveway. They can also help you creatively address issues related to storm water and drainage on your property. Landscape architects participating in the RenPlan速 program have received a degree in their field. The Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) regulates professional degree programs in the United States. Landscape architects become licensed after completing a practice-based internship period and passing professional examinations. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is the national professional association representing landscape architects.

Once you have determined your renovation goals, you will need to establish a budget, priorities and a project timeline. Labor costs, materials and permit fees will all need to be taken into account when determining a budget. Plan ahead and consider setting aside 10-20% of the project budget for contingencies; necessary but unexpected changes are typical in construction projects. A design professional can help you estimate the amount of materials and labor involved in your project. You can also contact manufacturers and retail outlets to get an idea of the range of costs. The Resources and Suppliers section of this Resource Guide can be used to identify local sources for this type of information. Working with a Contractor

Hiring an Interior Designer Interior designers work with clients to develop designs for indoor environments that are coordinated within the shell of a building. They work on a wide range of projects, from homes and apartments, to schools, hospitals, and corporate headquarters. Interior designers have specialized knowledge related to the selection and specification of furniture, finish materials and colors, fixtures, equipment, millwork, lighting and art placement. Interior designers participating in the RenPlan速 program have received a degree in their field. The Foundation for Interior Design Education Research (FIDER) accredits interior design programs in the United States. Interior designers may become professional members of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) after completing an accredited degree and/or requisite work experience, and passing an exam administered by the National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ). Though many states have licensure requirements or title acts for interior designers, Pennsylvania currently does not.

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Choosing the right contractor is an important step in the renovation process. Design professionals often recommend contractors but you may also ask friends, family, neighbors and local retailers for recommendations. Always request and check references, and look at examples of their work (if possible) when considering hiring a contractor. It is also important to verify that they are properly licensed and insured for the type of work that will be required. Contact the Bureau of Building Inspection or the Better Business Bureau, which can be found in the Organizations and Services section of this Guide, to find information on contractor licenses. The next step in the process is obtaining estimates from more than one contractor. When soliciting estimates, be sure to clearly state your goals and describe the project. The contractor will typically provide labor and material costs. Negotiate the project cost and choose the estimate that best addresses your budget and your timeline. Contract Information When considering a proposal prepared by a contractor, it is important to review it carefully. The proposal provided can represent the legal agreement between you and the contractor if both parties sign it; this is sufficient for small projects. For large projects, a more formal and detailed contract is necessary. Consider having an architect and an attorney review the contract before signing.

Getting Started


Contract Information, Ct’d. Look for these key elements when reviewing a proposal or contract: • A detailed Scope of Work. Make sure the components of the project are described in detail, including the brand, make, model, and color of each material to be used • The project length and date of completion • The cost of work • A payment schedule • A clear definition of the contractor’s role and responsibility • A signature section for both the contractor and the property owner • The contractor’s name, mailing address and phone number Permits When planning your renovation project, you should contact your municipality to find out what permits and approvals your project calls for, and whether your job will require an inspection. Your contractor should be responsible for securing all necessary permits for your project. However, you, the property owner, will pay the associated fees. See the Organizations and Services section of this Guide for information on how to contact your local building inspection and zoning offices. Be sure to get a copy of all permits from your contractor. The Home Improvement Consumer Protection Law As of July 1, 2009, the Home Improvement Consumer Protection Law requires all home improvement contractors to register with the Bureau of Consumer Protection. The Bureau will provide the contractor with a registration number that must be included in all advertisements and displayed on all contracts, estimates, and proposals. A home improvement contract must be in a legible writing, include the registration number, and be signed by the owner and contractor or the contractor’s salesperson. The contract must include the toll-free number by which the owner can determine whether his contractor is truly registered with the Bureau. The contract shall contain a description of the work to be performed, the material to be used, and a set of specifications that cannot be changed without a written change order.

20 Questions for Interviewing an Architect 1. Do you have a specific design style? Can you show me examples of your past design work? 2. What distinguishes you from other architects? 3. Can you provide a list of past clients? 4. How busy are you? How many other projects are you still working on? 5. Will I be dealing directly with you or someone else in your firm? Who will be designing my project? 6. How interested are you in my project? 7.

How will you gather information about my needs and goals?

8. What do you expect me to provide in order for you to begin work on my project? 9. What do you see as my project’s important issues or considerations? What are its challenges? 10. How will you establish priorities and make decisions about my project? 11. How do you organize the design process? 12. What are the steps in the design process? 13. What will you show me along the way to explain the project? Will I see models, drawings or sketches? 14. How long do you anticipate it will take you to complete your portion of the project? 15. How do you establish fees? When will you expect payment? 16. What do you anticipate your fee will be for this project? 17. What is your experience and track record with cost estimating? 18. If the scope of the project changes later, will there be additional fees? How will those fees be justified? 19. If the contractors’ bids exceed my budget, will you revise the design? Is there an additional fee for that? 20. What services do you provide during construction? From How to Work with an Architect by Gerald Lee Morosco, photographs by Ed Massery. Copyright 2006 by Gerald Lee Morosco, AIA. Reprinted with permission of Gibbs Smith, Publisher. Adapted by Gerald Lee Morosco with permission of www. architects.org. Material first published by Boston Society of Architects.

Getting Started

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Budget Worksheet* This worksheet may help you plan ahead for your home improvement project

Land and Building Acquisition

Furnishings

Cost of buying land Cost of buying a house Title Report Real estate appraisal Financing costs, loan fees Bonds and assessments Legal fees (re-zoning, variances, and so on) Topographic and boundary survey Soils/geotechnical analysis/report Subtotal $_________________

Specialty finishes Flooring, carpeting, rugs Interior furnishings and upholstery Outdoor furnishings and accessories Window coverings Appliances Fine art and decorative objects Subtotal $_________________

Design

Architect’s Fees Basic Services Existing conditions survey/documents Reimbursable expenses Additional services Models, 3-D renderings Professional engineering fees Professional landscape design fees Interior design fees Special engineering fees (solar, acoustical, and so on) Subtotal $______________

Other

Construction contingency for variances in estimating and unforseen expenses Client contingency (to cover changes you make) Adjustment for inflation Cost of temporary lodging (if required) Cost of temporary storage (if required) Cost of delays Subtotal $___________________ Total $_____________________

* From How to Work with an Architect by Gerald Lee Morosco, photographs by Ed Massery. Copyright 2006 by Gerald Lee Morosco, AIA. Reprinted with permission of Gibbs Smith, Publisher.

Construction

Detailed cost estimating Site work Grading Utilities Road, driveway, paving Building construction Landscaping, planting, irrigation Recreation features, (swimming pool, tennis court) Permit/fees/construction taxes reqired by various public agencies Insurance (builder’s or owner’s risk) Materials testing and inspection Built-in furniture and cabinetry Audio, visual, computer equipment and wiring Security system Subtotal $__________________

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Getting Started


organizations and services


Organizations and Services The following is a list of non-profit, community, or governmental agencies that may be of use during your renovation project. 3 Rivers Wet Weather 3 Rivers Wet Weather is a non-profit environmental organization charged with helping Allegheny County municipalities address the sewage and storm water overflow issue. During nearly every rainfall or snow melt, excess storm water gets into municipal sewer systems causing untreated sewage to overflow into Pittsburgh’s rivers, which is the County’s main source of drinking water. Homeowners play a key role in helping to solve the problem. Educational materials, including a Homeowner’s Guide, can be found on the 3 Rivers Wet Weather Website. Phone: 412-578-8375 Web: www.3riverswetweather.org American Institute of Architects (AIA) AIA Pittsburgh, a chapter of the American Institute of Architects, has been advancing the value of architects and architecture for more than 150 years through AIA member resources and as the collective voice of the profession. Its mission is to improve, for society, the quality of the built environment by further raising the standards of architectural education, training and practice, fostering design excellence and promoting the value of architectural services to the public. Phone 412-471-9548 Web: www.aiapgh.org American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) ASID members are educated, tested and have the experience to manage all the details of an interior project. An analytical problem-solving approach is used to create spaces that satisfy functional needs, are aesthetically pleasing and meet regulations and codes for a safe and healthy environment. From consultation to planning, through construction or renovation to adding the finishing touches, interior designers can create unique environments that enhance client requests and add value to the budget. Phone: 412-882-4424 Web: www.asidpawest.org

American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Landscape architects plan and design traditional places such as parks, residential developments, campuses, gardens, commercial centers, resorts, transportation facilities and the restoration of natural places. Landscape architects also have a great appreciation for historic and cultural resources which enables them to undertake preservation planning projects for historic sites and areas. The purpose of the Chapter is the advancement of knowledge, education, and skill in the art and science of landscape architecture as an instrument of service in the public welfare. Please visit the ASLA website for more information or to find a landscape architect for your design needs. Web: www.landscapearchitects.org Conservation Consultants, Inc. (CCI) CCI offers a wide range of energy consulting services to improve energy effeciency and comfort in new and existing buildings, including businesses, schools, homes and places of worship. The programs available include: Utility Services (energy-saving education), Energy Education Programs (teaching the next generation the value of energy) and Esmart3 Energy Audits (residential energy audits). Visit the CCI Center at 64 South 14th Street on the South Side. Phone: 412-431-4449 Web: www.ccicenter.org Construction Junction Construction Junction is Western Pennsylvania’s first non-profit retail store for used surplus building materials. Its mission is to promote conservation through the reuse of building materials. Phone: 412-243-5025 Web: www.constructionjunction.org Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest is an environmental non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the City’s vitality by restoring and protecting the urban forest through community tree maintenance, planting, education and advocacy. Maintaining and growing the urban forest will ensure that all Pittsburgh residents experience the full environmental, economic, public health and safety benefits that trees provide. Phone: 412-362-6360 Web: www.pittsburghforest.org

Organizations and Services

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Green Building Alliance (GBA) The Green Building Alliance is a non-profit organization that advances economic prosperity and human wellbeing in Western Pennsylvania by driving market demand for green buildings and green building products. Visit the Green Building Alliance website for ideas on greening your home, school, or business. Information is available on renewable energy, green products and service providers, case studies, and local contact information to ensure you receive the benefits of living green in Western Pennsylvania. Phone: 412-431-0709 Web: www.gbapgh.org GTECH Strategies GTECH Strategies is dedicated to building community, reducing blight and growing the green economy. GTECH Strategies work with communities to turn environmental liabilities into opportunities. Turning vacant spaces into productive green spaces, connecting people to green career ladders, and providing communities with the tools to “go green” are all pieces we put in place to grow the green economy. Phone: 412-241-1013 Web: www.gtechstrategies.org Grow Pittsburgh Are you interested in starting a community garden in your neighborhood? Grow Pittsburgh, an organization dedicated to supporting urban agriculture in the Pittsburgh region, offers technical assistance to nonprofits, neighborhood groups, or a team of individuals interested in starting a community garden. If you are interested in working with and experienced farmer to learn how to grow your own fruits, vegetables and herbs, please contact Grow Pittsburgh for detailed information about our rates and services. Phone: 412-362-GROW Web: www.growpittsburgh.org Habitat for Humanity of Greater Pittsburgh Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit housing ministry which is committed to eliminating poverty housing worldwide. As part of this organization, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Pittsburgh works in partnership with volunteers and low-income families across Allegheny County to build and renovate homes, which are then purchased by those same families in need through no-interest mortgages. Call and learn how you can help to ensure that everyone, everywhere has a decent place to live. Phone: 412.466.6710 Web: www.pittsburghhabitat.org 8

The Hill House Association The Hill House Association is a comprehensive community service provider and facilitator that meets the needs of Hill District residents and diverse constituents in the Greater Pittsburgh Region. The Hill House Association offers high-quality progams and services for our clients, creating a model agency that inspires and informs other community-based organizations throughout the nation. With diversified funding and a solid financial base, we foster innovative thinking in response to unmet community needs while maintaining safe, accessible, and inviting facilities. Phone: 412-392-4400 Web: www.hillhouse.org National Trust for Historic Preservation The National Trust for Historic Preservation provides leadership, education, advocacy and resources to save America’s diverse historic places and revitalize our communities. The National Trust for Historic Preservation offers resources for homeowners as well as national conferences and trainings. Web: www.preservationnation.org Neighborhood Safety Program Administered by Pittsburgh Community Services Inc., this program provides and installs “free of charge” home security and safety items which include deadbolt locks, dooknobs, door peepholes, smoke & carbon monoxide detectors, house numbers and life-lites. These services are available to City of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County residents who meet the neccessary income guidelines. Call to request an application or to inquire about income eligibility. Phone: 412-392-6467 Web: www.pghcsi.org NeighborWorks Western Pennsylvania By offering a variety of free education programs, one-on-one financial counseling and affordable loan programs, NeighborWorks HomeOwnership Center provides neighbors with a one-stop-shop for achieving home ownership and/or maintaining a home. NeighborWorks lending program can assist home buyers with financial assistance for down payments, closing costs and home improvements. Homebuyer Education classes and Pre-Purchase Counseling services enable clients to better understand the home buying process and be prepared for the home purchase transaction. Phone: 412-281-9773 Web: www.nwwpa.org

Organizations and Services


Nine Mile Run Watershed Association The Nine Mile Run Wathershed Association (NMRWA) is a non-profit, environmental organization whose mission is to ensure the restoration and protection of the Nine Mile Run Watershed through citizen engagement, demonstration projects and advocacy. NMRWA is dedicated to educating citizens about stormwater runoff issues in the region, and programs, including the Nine Mile Run Rain Barrel Initiative, GreenLinks and Urban Ecosteward programs, give citizens the tools and information they need to create positive change in their watershed. Phone: 412-371-8779 Web: www.ninemilerun.org North Hills Community Outreach (NHCO) NHCO addresses the basic human needs of local people in poverty, hardship and crisis. Services include two food pantries, utility assistance, emergency financial help, disaster relief, help for senior citizens, Community Auto transportation program and more. NHCO’s primary service area is northern Allegheny County. All services are provided free of charge; most have income requirements. Phone: 412-487-6316 Web: www.nhco.org PA Home Energy With today’s energy prices, lowering utility bills is a top priority. If you own an existing home, Home Performance with ENERGY STAR delivers costeffective home improvements that will make your home more comfortable and energy efficient. Or if you are thinking of building or buying new, ENERGY STAR Qualified Homes are significantly more energy efficient than standard homes. You’ll also be helping to save the environment - and that’s a savings we can all enjoy. Web: www.pahomeenergy.org Pennsylvania Resources Council (PRC) PRC is one of the oldest non-profit environmental organizations in the Commonwealth. We offer programs, assistance and consulting services to homeowners on the following topics: recycling / waste minimization, composting (backyard and vermi), rain barrels and rain gardens, hard to recycle materials and household hazardous wastes and chemicals. Let us help you have the greenest house on the block! Call or visit the website for more information or to discuss your individual needs. Phone: 412-488-7490 Web: www.prc.org

Pittsburgh Housing Development Associates (PHDA) PHDA, Inc. is a non-profit organization established to educate low and moderate income first-time homebuyers through Free Home Buyer Workshops. In cooperation with local lending institutions, PHDA offers a comprehensive first-time homebuyer credit enhancement program, low cost mortgage options, and down payment and closing costs assistance. This program makes the home ownership process easier to qualify for a mortgage. Phone: 412-687-1197 Web: www.phdainc.org Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group (PCRG) The Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group is a consortium of community leaders working for economic justice, equitable investment practices and sufficient financial resources to revitalize communities throughout Allegheny County. Since 1988, PCRG has worked with Pittsburgh’s major lending institutions and public agencies to develop innovative reinvestment programs targeted to Pittsburgh’s low- and moderateincome neighborhoods. These programs primarily include homeownership protection, the Vacant Property Working Group, Safe Neighborhoods, and community development training. Phone: 412-391-6732 Web: www.pcrg.org Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership (PDP) Since 1994, the PDP has been marketing Downtown as the premier location to live, work, shop, dine, play and visit. Formed by Downtown businesses, professionals, civic organizations, foundations and residents, the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership fosters a clean, safe, accessible and vibrant Downtown through a wide range of strategies and advocacy for actions that will strengthen the city, enhance its beauty and vitality and make it a better place for business and pleasure. Phone: 412-566-4190 Web: www.downtownpittsburgh.com

Organizations and Services

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Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation (PHLF) Founded in 1964, headquartered at Station Square and at work throughout the Pittsburgh region, the PHLF identifies and saves historically significant places, revitalizes historic neighborhoods, towns and urban areas, preserves historic farms and historic designed landscapes and educates people about the Pittsburgh region’s rich architectural heritage. Contact the PHLF to learn about preservation services, including loans and technical assistance, educational programs, and membership and volunteer opportunities. Join PHLF in protecting the places that make Pittsburgh home. Phone: 412-471-5808 Web: www.phlf.org Pittsburgh Partnership for Neighborhood Development (PPND) PPND’s vision for Pittsburgh’s future is of a city that builds upon th eassets of its unique neighborhoods - a vibrant city with engaged citizens where everyone has access to excellent education, good jobs, affordable health care, quality housing, convenient transportation, varied cultural resources and ample green spaces. Whatever the shape of a neighborhood’s skyline, streets, storefronts, it can improve through hard work, smart planning, and finally, private investment. PPND helps to set the stage so this can happen. Phone: 412-471-3727 Web: www.ppnd.org Western Pennsylvania Craftmen’s Guild Finding good tradesmen can be tricky. To enjoy your renovation, you need good people who are easy to work with and reliable. The Guild represents only the highest skilled craftsmen, most averaging 20 years of experience. Sensitivity to existing architecture, and the customer’s needs, are essential to Guild Members, who are often considered the bright spot in a renovation. The extended Guild network includes most of the restoration trades. Give us a call, or visit us on the web. Phone: 412-784-8015 Web: www.westpenncraftguild.com

Community-Based Organizations The following is a list of several of the communitybased organizations (CBO’s) in the Pittsburgh region. CBO’ s work on a local level, planning, managing and implemeting development initiatives. Contact your CBO to learn more about the programs and services available in your neighborhood. Bloomfield - Garfield Corporation 5749 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15224 Phone: 412-441-6950 Web: www.bloomfield-garfield.org Brightwood Civic Group 3127 Brighton Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 Phone: 412-732-8152 East Liberty Development, Inc. 6101 Penn Ave., Suite 201 Pittsburgh, PA 15206 Phone: 412-361-8061 Web: www.eastlibertypost.com Fineview Citizens Council 1327 Federal St. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 Phone: 412-231-0330 Web: www.fineviewpittsburgh.com Friendship Development Associates 5530 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 Phone: 412-441-6147 Web: www.friendship-pgh.org Greater Park Place Neighborhood Association P.O. Box 8750 Pittsburgh, PA 15221-2151 Web: www.parkplaceblog.com Hazelwood Initiative 5344 2nd Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15207 Phone: 412-421-7234 Web: www.hazelwoodhomepage.com Hilltop Alliance 150 Brownsville Rd. Mt. Oliver PA 15210 Phone: 412-608-9911 Web: www.pghhilltopalliance.com Lawrenceville Corporation Ice House Studios 100 43rd Street Suite 114 Pittsburgh, PA 15201 Phone: 412-621-1616 Web: www.lawrencevillecorp.com

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Organizations and Services


Community-Based Organizations, Ct’d

Municipal Services

Lawrenceville United 4825 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 Phone: 412-802-7220 Web: www.lunited.org

Bureau of Building Inspection The Bureau of Building Inspection regulates the construction, demolition and occupancy of all buildings and structures within the City of Pittsburgh. Phone: 412-255-2175 Web: www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/BBI

Mount Washington CDC 301 Shiloh St. Pittsburgh, PA 15211 Phone: 412-481-3220 Web: www.mwcdc.org Neighbors in the Strip 1212 Smallman St. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Phone: 412-201-4774 Web: www.neighborsinthestrip.com North Side Leadership Conference 4 Allegheny Center Suite 601 Pittsburgh, PA 15212 Phone: 412-330-2558 Web: www.pittsburghnorthside.com Oakland Planning and Development Corporation

235 Atwood St. Pittsburgh ,PA 15213 Phone: 412-621-7863 Web: www.oaklandplanning.com Penn Avenue Arts Initiative 5530 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15206 Phone: 412-441-6147 Web: www.pennavenuearts.org

South Side Local Development Company 1505 East Carson St., Suite 300 Pittsburgh ,PA 15203 Phone: 412-481-0651 Web: www.southsidepgh.com Troy Hill Citizens Council 1619 Lowrie St. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 Phone: 412-321-2852 Web: www.troyhill.wordpress.com Uptown Partners of Pittsburgh 710 Fifth Ave., Suite 1000 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Phone: 412-325-2723 Web: www.uptownpartners.org West Pittsburgh Partnership 37 Wabash St. Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Phone: 412-922-2740 Web: www.wevillage.org

Department of City Planning The Department of City Planning sets the framework for the City’s development through policy and development review by the Planning Commission and administering of the Zoning ordinance. The Planning Department also offers maps of neighborhoods as well as other information that may be useful when applying for building permits. Phone: 412-255-2200 Web: www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/cp Historic Review Commission (HRC) The Historic Review Commission protects and maintains historically and architecturally significant buildings and neighborhoods in the City. It provides design guidelines for City historic districts, as well as issue-related guidelines such as ADA or façade lighting. Phone: 412-255-2243 Web: www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/cp/html/historic_ review_commission.html PGHSNAP The City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning has launched PGHSNAP and PGHGIS as the latest tools for community development in Pittsburgh. PGHSNAP is a comprehensive source for a variety of facts and figures about Pittsburgh neighborhoods including demographics, locations of community assets like public art, historic buildings and parks, and land use data. Web: www.pghsnap.com. Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (URA) The URA can help City of Pittsburgh residents buy a home or improve their existing home through a wide array of mortgage and home improvement products that vary in features and eligibility, such as, no equity home repair term loans with rates as low as 0%; loans with no income limits; grants for down payment and closing costs assistance; and emergency repair programs for low income homeowners. Special 0% deferred mortgages are also available to buyers of URA sponsored homes. Phone: 412-255-6600 Web: www.ura.org

Organizations and Services

11


County Resources

Financial Institutions, Ct’d.

Your county government has information on how to contact your local municipality. The county can provide you with information about the services it provides as well as its comprehensive plan. Municipalities can provide you with information on permits and other renovation-related requirements.

Fidelity Bank PA www.fidelitybk.com 1-800-242-2500

Allegheny County www.county.allegheny.pa.us Armstrong County www.co.armstrong.pa.us Beaver County www.co.beaver.pa.us Butler County www.co.butler.pa.us Washington County www.co.washington.pa.us Westmoreland County www.co.westmoreland.pa.us

Financial Institutions

The following is a list of financial institutions you may wish to contact regarding loan products for your improvement projects. 5/3 Bank www.53.com 1-866-53-LOANS (1-866-535-6267) Allegheny County U.S. Government Employees Federal Credit Union www.federalcu.org 412-642-2875

First National Bank www.fnb-online.com 1-800-555-5455 First Commonwealth www.fcbanking.com 412-690-3901 Huntington National Bank www.huntington.com 1-800-480-BANK (1-800-480-2265) Neighborhood Housing Services www.nhswpa.org 412-281-9773 PNC Bank www.pnc.com 1-888-PNC-BANK (1-888-762-2265) Slovak Savings Bank 412-322-9023 Urban Redevelopment Authority www.ura.org 412-255-6600 United-American Savings Bank www.uasb.com 412-431-9191 Westview Savings Bank www.wvsbank.com 412-931-1622 or 724-935-7400

Allegheny Valley Bank of Pittsburgh www.avbpgh.com 412-781-0318 Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania www.citizensbank.com 1-800-340-5626 Dollar Bank FSB www.dollarbank.com 412-261-7550 ESB Bank www.esbbank.com 1-800-533-4193

There are many resources available in the Pittsburgh region to help you with your property improvement project.

Eureka Bank www.eurekabancorp.com 412-681-8400 12

Organizations and Services


resources and suppliers


Resources and Suppliers The following is a list of businesses who serve the Pittsburgh region and may be of use to you during your renovation project. The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlan速 program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Architecture 15 Building Materials 15 General Contracting 16

Historic Preservation 16 Interiors & Interior Design 16 Ironwork 17 Landscaping & Landscape Architecture 18 Painting 18 Plumbing/HVAC 18 Windows & Doors 18 Woodwork 19 Other 19

Resources and Suppliers

13


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlanÂŽ program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Architecture

Architecture, Ct’d.

Andrew Novak Architect 708 College Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15232 412-365-0563 an.arch@verizon.net

Lami Grubb Architects, LP 100 E. Swissvale Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15218 412-243-3430 slami@lamigrubb.com www.lamigrubb.com

ellermeyersmith 126 First St. Aspinwall, PA 15215 412-874-1656 www.ellermeyersmith.com Green Friends Development Company 118 Richbarn Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 info@greenfriends.biz www.greenfriends.biz guintostudio LLC an architecture + design workshop 5 Concord Dr. McKeesport, PA 15135 412-580-6605 info@guintostudio.com www.guintostudio.com inter*Architecture 4915 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15224 412-661-1729 info@interarchitecture.com www.interarchitecture.com

lee CALISTI architecture + design 24 Cypress Ave. Greensburg, PA 15601 724-832-7030 lee@leecalisti.com www.leecalisti.com Mary Cerrone, AIA Architecture and Interiors 1056 S. Negley Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-362-0768 mc@marycerrone.com www.marycerrone.com mossArchitects 6101 Penn Ave. Suite 102 Pittsburgh, PA 15143 412-441-6400 andrew@mossarc.com www.mossarc.com

Building Materials

Jason M. Roth ARCHITECT 233 Amber St. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-951-7495 jasonmroth@mac.com

Artemis Environmental 3708 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-353-0197 info@artemisenvironmental.com

KAH Architects 300 Mt. Lebanon Blvd. Suite 227 Pittsburgh, PA 15234 412-531-2646 kathy@kah-architects.com www.kah-architects.com

Construction Junction 214 N. Lexington St. Pittsburgh, PA 15208 412-243-5025 www.constructionjunction.org

Lab | 8 Designs, Inc. 2100 Mary St. Space 103 Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-586-7081 info@lab8designs.com www.lab8designs.com

Tile & Designs 229 Spahr St. Pittsburgh, PA 15232 412-362-8454 nfo@tileanddesigns.com www.tileanddesigns.com

Resources and Suppliers

15


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlan® program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

General Contracting

Historic Preservation, Ct’d.

David Kelly Custom Furniture Owner: David Kelly 529 Virginia Ave. Oakmont, PA 15139 412-820-9287 customcarp1@yahoo.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/carpentry

McClelland Plastering Owner: Dan McClelland 342 Jackson Dr. Apollo, PA 15613 724-327-5746 mcclelplastering@aol.com www.westpenncraftguild.com

Horn Corp 304 Park Hill Rd. Baden, PA 15005-2439 724-242-0040 info@horncorp.net www.horncorp.net

West Penn Craftsmen’s Guild 5255 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-784-1772 info@westpenncraftguild.com www.westpenncraftguild.com

Master Remodelers Inc. 3630 Elm Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15234 412-341-6585 inquiries@masterremodelersinc.com www.masterremodelersinc.com

Wilson & McCracken Owners: Jerry Wilson & Vicki McCracken 5255 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-784-1772 info@wilsonandmccracken.com www.wilsonandmccracken.com

Whitney Construction, Inc. 416 Bessemer Ave. East Pittsburgh, PA 15112 412-823-3880 whitneyconstruct@comcast.net www.whitneyconstructioncompany.com

Historic Preservation

Interiors & Interior Design Artemis Environmental 3708 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-353-0197 info@artemisenviornmental.com www.artemisenvironmental.com

Gilding Atelier of Pennsylvania Owner: Youss Kadri 2928 Beechwood Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-2263 gildingkadri@aol.com www.gildingatelier.com

David Kelly Custom Furniture Owner: David Kelly 529 Virginia Ave. Oakmont, PA 15139 412-820-9287 customcarp1@yahoo.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/carpentry

Jason M. Roth ARCHITECT 233 Amber St. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-951-7495 jasonmroth@mac.com

guintostudio LLC an architecture + design workshop 5 Concord Dr. McKeesport, PA 15135 412-580-6605 info@guintostudio.com www.guintostudio.com

Kelly Art Glass Owner: John Kelly 28 Beckert St. Pittsburgh, PA 15209 412-821-4449 kellyartglass@verizon.net www.kellyartglass.com

16

IKEA Pittsburgh 2001 Park Manor Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-747-0747 www.IKEAPittsburgh.com

Resources and Suppliers


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlan® program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Interiors & Interior Design, Ct’d.

Interiors & Interior Design, Ct’d.

KAH Architects 300 Mt. Lebanon Blvd. Suite 227 Pittsburgh, PA 15234 412-531-2646 kathy@kah-architects.com www.kah-architects.com Lami Grubb Architects, LP 100 E. Swissvale Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15218 412-243-3430 slami@lamigrubb.com www.lamigrubb.com

Red Clay Tile Works Owner: Andy Anderson 75 Meade Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-734-2222 redclay@city-net.com www.redclaytileworks.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/handmadetile

Lucas Markantone Painting Owner: Lucas Markantone 35 Hamilton Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 paintpro@alltel.net www.westpenncraftguild.com/painting

Starz Interior Restoration Owner: George Starz 5152 Coral St. Pittsburgh, PA 15224 412-441-0666 starzgeo@msn.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/strippingrefinishing

Mary Cerrone, AIA Architecture and Interiors 1056 S. Negley Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-362-0768 mc@marycerrone.com www.marycerrone.com Master Remodelers, Inc. 3630 Elm Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15234 412-341-6585 inquiries@masterremodelersinc.com www.masterremodelersinc.com McClelland Plastering Owner: Dan McClelland 342 Jackson Dr. Apollo, PA 15613 724-327-5746 mcclelplastering@aol.com www.westpenncraftguild.com

Soccio Rodriguez Design 715 West Main St. Monongahela, PA 15063 724-344-4174 judy@socciorodriguezdesign.com

West Penn Craftsmen’s Guild Owner: Jerry Wilson 5255 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-784-1772 info@westpenncraftguild.com www.westpenncraftguild.com

Ironwork Weaver Ironworks 319 Colton St. Pittsburgh, PA 15209 412-475-2117 weaverironworks@yahoo.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/ornamentaliron

moss Architects 6101 Penn Avenue, Suite 102 Pittsburgh PA 15143 412-441-6400 andrew@mossarc.com www.mossarc.com

Resources and Suppliers

17


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlan速 program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Landscaping & Landscape Architecture

Windows & Doors

Eisler Landscapes 1031 Newcastle Rd. Prospect, PA 16052 1-800-420-8733 eric@eislerlandscapes.com www.eislerlandscapes.com

Advanced Window & Door Inc. 103 Enterprise St. Elizabeth, PA 15037 412-751-1001 awdinc@comcast.net

Landscape Architectural Services, Inc. 412-243-7214 las-inc@verizon.net www.mark-mackenzie.com Liberto Landscape Design & Horticulture Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-321-4427 Libertodesign@comcast.net The Urban Gardener 1901 Brighton Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-323-GROW info@urbangardenerpgh.com www.urbangardenerpgh.com

Painting Lucas Markantone Painting 35 Hamilton Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 paintpro@alltel.net www.westpenncraftguild.com/painting Take it for Granite 228 East Fulton St. Butler, PA 16001 724-287-1057 takeitforgranite@zoominternet.net http://westpenncraftguild.com/murals

Plumbing / HVAC

Allegheny Millwork 1001 Muriel St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-4224 tom@alleghenymillwork.com www.alleghenymillwork.com Kelly Art Glass Owner: John Kelly 28 Beckert St. Pittsburgh, PA 15209 412-821-4449 kellyartglass@verizon.net www.kellyartglass.com Soccio Rodriguez Design 715 West Main St. Monongahela, PA 15063 724-344-4174 judy@socciorodriguezdesign.com Wilson & McCracken Owners: Jerry Wilson & Vicki McCracken 5255 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-784-1772 info@wilsonandmccracken.com www.wilsonandmccracken.com Window Installation Specialsts of Pittsburgh 1968 Mars Hill Rd. Irwin, PA 15642 724-446-0275 kish@icubed.com www.windowinstallation.com

Crescent Baths & Kitchens 6301 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-782-3300 zbaker@crescent-supply.com www.crescentbathsandkitchens.com Meyers Plumbing 2127 5th Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-471-0772 www.meyersplumbingsupply.com 18

Resources and Suppliers


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlanÂŽ program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Woodwork

Other, C’td.

Advanced Window & Door Inc. 103 Enterprise St. Elizabeth, PA 15037 412-751-1001 awdinc@comcast.net

Gilding Atelier of Pennsylvania Owner: Youss Kadri Gilding and Faux Finishing 2928 Beechwood Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-2263 gildingkadri@aol.com www.gildingatelier.com Green@Home Sustainable / Green Consulting 300 Mt. Lebanon Blvd. Suite 227 Pittsburgh, PA 15234 412-531-2646 kathy@greenathomeconsulting.com www.greenathomeconsulting.com

Allegheny Millwork 1001 Muriel St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-4224 tom@alleghenymillwork.com www.alleghenymillwork.com Jackson Cabinet Shop Owner: Keck Jackson 2879 Wildwood Rd. Extension Alison Park, PA 15101 412-487-1291 keckjackson@verizon.net Starz Interior Restoration Owner: George Starz 5152 Coral St. Pittsburgh, PA 15224 412-441-0666 starzgeo@msn.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/strippingrefinishing Wilson & McCracken Owners: Jerry Wilson & Vickie McCracken 5255 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-784-1772 info@wilsonandmccracken.com www.wilsonandmccracken.com

Other Blystone Upholstery Owner: William Blystone Upholstery, Cane and Rush Seats 2132 Delaware Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15218 412-371-3511 bsbooks@comcast.net http://westpenncraftguild.com/upholstering Crescent Baths & Kitchens Baths and Kitchens 6301 Butler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-782-3300 zbaker@crescent-supply.com www.crescentbathsandkitchens.com

Horn Corp Home Improvements 304 Park Hill Rd. Baden, PA 15005-2439 724-242-0040 info@horncorp.net www.horncorp.net IKEA Pittsburgh Kitchens 2001 Park Manor Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-747-0747 www.IKEAPittsburgh.com Jackson Cabinet Shop Owner: Keck Jackson 18th Century Reproduction Furniture 2879 Wildwood Rd. Extension Alison Park, PA 15101 412-487-1291 keckjackson@verizon.net Olde Lang Signs Owner: Jeff Lang Transom Lettering, Gold Leaf on Glass 8280 Ohio River Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-732-9999 oldelangsigns@msn.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/carvedandglasssigns/

Resources and Suppliers

19


The businesses listed in these documents are not endorsed or qualified by the RenPlanÂŽ program or the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

Other, Ct’d. Red Clay Tile Works Owner: Andy Anderson Hand-made Ceramic Tile and Site Specific Design 75 Meade Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-734-2222 redclay@city-net.com www.redclaytileworks.com http://westpenncraftguild.com/handmadetile Take it for Granite Owner: Paul Means Murals and Custom Painting 228 East Fulton St. Butler, PA 16001 724-287-1057 takeitforgranite@zoominternet.net http://westpenncraftguild.com/murals/ The Urban Gardener Garden Consultations 1901 Brighton Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-323-GROW info@urbangardenerpgh.com www.urbangardenerpgh.com USA Insulation Insulation 820 Chestnut Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-431-7283 www.usainsulation.net Whitney Construction Roofing 416 Bessemer Ave. East Pittsburgh, PA 15112 412-823-3880 whitneyconstruct@comcast.net www.whitneyconstructioncompany.com

20

Finding the right materials can turn an outdated space into a fresh, welcoming one.

Resources and Suppliers


renovation fact sheets


R e n o v a t i n g

t o

R e t a i n

C h a r a c t e r

Unless you live on a desert island, anything you do to the outside of your home affects the whole neighborhood. If you strip away your home’s character and value when you renovate, the community loses those assets, too. And if neighbors follow your example, the unique personality of your street will soon be gone for good! This fact sheet offers an alternative approach that helps your home and neighborhood retain value. Included are:

• • • •

Preserve a Great Face — and Great Equity Which Home is Yours? Keep Up the Good Work: A Home Maintenance Checklist Reap the Rewards: The Benefits of Sensitive Renovation

Preserve a Great Face — and Great Equity Sensitive renovation of your home’s exterior is like preserving the great face you were born with. Remove an original feature or replace it with one of a different size or shape, and the whole thing looks out of whack. Your home loses value because the features no longer fit the face and the face no longer fits the architectural family of homes around it. On the other hand, renovation with respect for the past protects the equity you’re building for the future. And while keeping the original character of your home intact, you also can save money and energy. Here are some renovation guidelines for preserving your home’s most valuable assets:

Consistency is the key

Your home is more likely to hold its value when you maintain original size, shape, color and detail of each feature you renovate. Use original materials where possible, such as wood, brick, tile, slate and glass. Otherwise, select from the many excellent reproductions on the market. Concentrate on what shows

Benefit yourself and your neighborhood by concentrating your most careful renovation efforts where your house faces the street. For example, if replacement siding is necessary, limit it to the sides and back and stick with original siding on the facade. Double that plan if you live on a corner lot. Little things mean a lot

Every renovation decision is important to retaining your home’s value and character, even the minor ones. Remove a tiny bit of trim there; change the shape of a

Original design preserved

Original design distorted

doorway over here; replace that wooden porch rail with wrought iron, and before you realize it, you’ve got an unappealing patchwork of mismatched parts. On the other hand, following your home’s original architectural plan in even the smallest ways offers a big return. Think small

Renovation is more rewarding when you don’t try to do it all at once. Make a long and short term plan. This protects you from “renovation burn-out” — a dangerous condition that tempts people to compromise on design quality just to get the job done.

Copyright © 2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Renovation Fact Sheets

21


Which Home is Yours? Pittsburgh is known for its “hybrid houses” compatible architectural styles that fit together well in a neighborhood. Maybe your home looks like one of these.

Craftsman

Colonial Revival

Second Empire

Queen Anne

Italianate

Keep Up the Good Work

Reap the Rewards

Old or new, every house requires maintenance. Sensitive renovations increase the value of your home and a good maintenance plan protects that investment. These fundamentals of exterior maintenance are your first line of defense against major, costly repairs:

Sensitive renovation of your home delivers immediate payback in pride of ownership. But you also can count on some material rewards.

Roof

Lock out moisture. Check twice a year for loose or missing materials, leaks, signs of interior dampness or peeling paint. Walls

Prevent wood-rot and decay. Check each spring for peeling paint, loose bricks or mortar and gaps in siding. Windows

Don’t throw your money out the window. Check for drafts at window and frame at the beginning of each heating and cooling season. Porch

Check for rotting wood, wobbly railings, and floor areas that collect water. Touch up paint as needed. Make sure roof and gutters are working properly to keep your porch dry.

Doors

Check for gaps around door and frame. Replace weather stripping as needed. Overall

Hire contractors who specialize in working with original materials. Otherwise, unnecessary and costly replacements may be recommended. If you’re unsure what to do, consider getting professional design advice. Note: If your house was built before

1978, lead-based paint, which can be harmful to children and pregnant women, may have been used in and around your home. Only trained professionals should remove lead-based paint. For assistance, please call the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh at (412) 255-6666.

Energy Savings

Sensitive renovation can be energy efficient. You can often achieve the same energy savings at less cost by fixing what you have. Because energy savings can mean so much to your budget over time, consider spending just a little now for an energy audit.* Added Value

With a national trend toward valuing historic character, homes that preserve trim, detailing and other original design features are sought after and more attractive to buyers.

* Visit www.pahomeenergy.com for more information on reducing home energy use. RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

®

Call the RenPlan Program for a consultation with a Design Professional.

(412) 391- 4333 22

®

Support for RenPlan and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved” sections of the CDCP’s website. www.cdcp.org

Renovation Fact Sheets

www.cdcp.org


R e n o v a t i n g

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R e t a i n

C h a r a c t e r

A good roof system keeps your home dry, saves energy and visually tops off your home. But if you renovate a roof and gutters with materials that conflict with the original architecture, it actually can detract from your home’s appearance. Your investment won’t look so great either, if your roof renovation makes your home less attractive to a buyer. This fact sheet offers an alternative approach that includes the following:

• • • •

An Original Roof is Better than New Typical Pittsburgh Roof System Keep Up the Good Work: A Roof Maintenance Checklist Reap the Rewards: The Benefits of Sensitive Renovation

An Original Roof is Better Than New Staying warm, dry and protected from the elements requires a solid roof — not necessarily a new roof. And if your original roof is basically sound, smart money says to keep it where it is. For a costeffective renovation plan that saves energy too, remember these basics: Invest in the original

If you’re lucky enough to have an original metal, tile or slate roof, hang onto it! Those materials last three or four times longer than the best asphalt or fiberglass shingles. You’re better off to repair as needed. The cost of replacing broken tiles or slates from time to time is negligible compared to what you would spend on roof replacement. Repair to match the past

Your home retains charm and value when you repair, replace or repaint any part of your roof system by matching original materials, styles and colors. That includes important trim features such as cornices, brackets and mouldings, as well as gutters and

downspouts that work with the roofing material to repel water and carry it away from your home. For example, concealed Original design Original design (box) gutters should distorted preserved never be replaced by exposed (hanging) gutters. Instead, paint or replace Replace only in a pinch rotten wood and metal lining You can retain valuable design leaving the concealed gutter intact. features even if you must replace your roof entirely. (Total replacement makes sense only if Insulate to save your roof, or the wood beneath In many homes, energy dollars are it, is seriously damaged.) If your going through the roof — one of budget allows only for fiberglass the most critical areas of heat loss or asphalt shingles, choose colors and gain. You can save energy and all the expense of roof replacement, to match original color schemes and that recall natural slate and just by insulating and air sealing tiles. Dark greys, reds and black the roof you have. Ventilating the are often good choices. Better yet, attic for proper air flow will also remove and save original slate or save on energy bills. Consult an energy specialist* as to the type and tiles, repair wood and put back the original roofing, purchasing some thickness of insulation you need, new material as required. and where it should be placed.

* Visit www.pahomeenergy.com for information on reducing home energy use.

Copyright © 2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Renovation Fact Sheets

23


Typical Pittsburgh Roof System In Pittsburgh’s hilly terrain, roofs are especially visible. Our city’s unique roof-scape is defined by choice of materials and shape of chimneys, dormers, cornices, gutters, brackets, mouldings, fascia and overhangs. Typically, sloping roofs were covered by slate shingles or a variety of clay tiles or shingles. Recent replacements include asphalt or fiberglass shingles and roll roofing tarred at the seams. Metal gutters that carry away water are usually built-in and concealed by wood trim. Some architects used the trim as opportunities to ornament homes with gargoyle water spouts or other carved details. This sketch of a typical Pittsburgh roof system may help you discuss your renovation project with a design professional.

Hip roof, low slope Built-in concealed gutter (box gutter)

Chimney

Cricket Mansard (dual pitched, hipped roof)

Cornice with brackets below

Dormer

Gable or wing

Keep Up the Good Work

Reap the Rewards

Original slate or clay tile in good condition will last indefinitely with routine maintenance. All roofing types will provide longer, more reliable service with regular inspection and maintenance.

What you spend to preserve and maintain your roofline pays you back in cash and comforts.

• Inspect roof once or twice a year

to see that it is watertight. Note that most roof problems occur at edges and intersections, rather than in the roofing material itself. • Do necessary repairs immediately before water can penetrate to entire structure beneath the roof. Replace broken or loose tiles or slates. Paint, repair or replace metal flashings as needed. • Clean gutters and downspouts each spring and late fall.

Energy Savings

Your home loses most of its heat through the roof. Properly insulating and air sealing your attic will help reduce your energy bills. Attics are often one of the easiest places in a house to insulate, especially if you want to add to existing insulation. Proper moisture control and ventilation strategies will help improve the effectiveness of your air sealing and insulation efforts. Loose-fill (blown) or batt (roll) insulation is typically installed in an attic. Although insultation costs may vary, loose-fill insulation is usually less expensive to install than batt insulation. Energy-saving tip: In Pittsburgh,

cold days outnumber warm ones,

so use dark colors on your roof to absorb heat. Comforts of Home

Roof insulation that leaves an airspace between attic and roof makes for cooler rooms in the summer and cozier ones in the winter. Ventilation prevents excessive heat buildup and reduces moisture. Added Value

When the roofline of your home looks the same as the day it was built, your home investment also continues to look good. Homes with slate or clay tile roofs in good condition draw buyers who recognize the quality and charm of original materials. * U.S. Department of Energy RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

®

Call the RenPlan Program for a consultation with a Design Professional.

(412) 391- 4333 24

®

Support for RenPlan and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved” sections of the CDCP’s website. www.cdcp.org

Renovation Fact Sheets

www.cdcp.org


R e n o v a t i n g

t o

R e t a i n

C h a r a c t e r

When contractors recommend window replacements that reduce window size or strip away original design features, the new windows can clash with your home’s architecture and reduce its value. This fact sheet offers an alternative approach that can help save energy and your home’s fine architectural qualities. It includes:

• • • •

Solve the Problem and Keep the Character Which Window is Yours? Keep Up the Good Work: A Window Maintenance Checklist Reap the Rewards: The Benefits of Sensitive Renovation

Solve the Problem and Keep the Character You don’t have to sacrifice original design — or spend a fortune — to save energy and make your windows work better. Here are some pointers to help keep your windows in harmony with your home and your home in harmony with your neighborhood: It pays to repair

If your windows are basically sound, repairing them is usually more cost-effective than replacement. Restoring as many of the original windows as possible also preserves the look of your home. With older windows of unusual sizes and shapes, repair can be especially cost effective. Repair or replace in kind

Old photos or discussions with an architect can help determine how your windows originally looked. Following your original window design in every respect is the best rule of thumb for retaining value and saving energy. For example: Maintain the original size, shape, style, color, and number and arrangement of glass panes for each window you repair or replace.

Don’t reduce the size or number of existing window openings. This can actually increase your energy bills by decreasing the quality and quantity of natural light and ventilation. Replace only windows that are absolutely unsalvageable and repair the rest. If window sashes are beyond repair but frames are intact, replace only the sash, matching it to the original as closely as possible. Several small window shops in Pittsburgh do this work at a reasonable cost.

Original design preserved

Select paint and materials that match the color and style of the original window. Wood is most appropriate, but you may prefer to avoid the periodic expense of repainting. Wood clad in aluminum or vinyl can be an acceptable, lowmaintenance alternative, although color choices are limited. If you must replace a window, choose new “Low-E” windows for maximum comfort and energy efficiency.*

Original design distorted

Retain the details

Stripping windows of original trim is like shaving your eyebrows - the result looks both odd and unfinished. Retain or replicate original wood trim and detailing and avoid replacement windows with extra wide frames that cover surrounding ornamentation. Save the energy

You can save nearly as much energy with interior or exterior storm windows and weatherstripping as you can with new windows. And at far less cost! Before rushing out to replace your windows, consider installing wood, aluminum or vinyl storms. Be sure to match exterior storm windows to the color of the window frame. If your windows are divided, the storms should line up with the rail of the sash behind.

* Information available from the non-profit Conservation Consultants, Inc., www.ccicenter.org.

Copyright © 2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Renovation Fact Sheets

25


Which Window is Yours? The most common Pittsburgh window is the rectangular, double-hung wood, in which the sashes slide up and down. Double-hung But Pittsburgh windows come in a great variety of styles, sizes and shapes, arranged singly or in pairs, with trim of all kinds. These sketches may help you discuss your renovation project with a design professional.

Hopper Casement Second Empire

Awning Bay

Italianate Craftsman

Keep Up the Good Work

Reap the Rewards

Windows require modest attention to operate smoothly and deliver the energy savings you expect, year after year. At the beginning of each heating and cooling season:

Sensitive renovation of your windows delivers immediate payback in pride of ownership. But you also can count on some material rewards.

• Check for poorly sealed windows that can admit

Save up to 10% annually by caulking and weatherstripping windows.*

• • • •

Energy Savings

drafts and moisture or allow heat or cooled air to escape. Install weatherstripping and caulk around window and frame, both inside and out. Repair broken or cracked glass and glazing compound that holds glass to the frame. Restore any loose or broken hardware so windows can close tightly. Replace rotted or broken sash cords and reattach weights to restore full opening operation of double hung windows. For help, seek a contractor who specializes in repairs.

Storm windows can reduce heat loss through windows by 25%-50%.* Added Value

The number and condition of windows in a home are a major part of its market appeal. Buyers prize sunlit, airy rooms with attractive views. And homes with windows that match the original architecture typically show better and sell more quickly (and often at higher prices) than homes with fewer or mismatched windows.

Note: If your home was built before 1978, lead-based paint,

which can be harmful to children and pregnant women, may have been used in and around your windows. Only trained professionals should remove lead-based paint. For assistance, please call the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh at (412) 255-6666. *U.S. Department of Energy RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh. ®

Call the RenPlan Program for a consultation with a Design Professional.

(412) 391- 4333 26

®

Support for RenPlan and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved” sections of the CDCP’s website. www.cdcp.org

Renovation Fact Sheets

www.cdcp.org


R e n o v a t i n g

t o

R e t a i n

C h a r a c t e r

Covering original exterior walls with siding can cost you now and cost you later! Siding may hide imperfections, but it can also conceal character, which can lower the value of your home. In addition, no material is maintenance-free. Aluminum or vinyl siding can break, dent, rust or discolor and require cleaning, repair or replacement. This fact sheet offers an alternative approach that includes:

• • • •

Original Walls are a Wise Investment Typical Pittsburgh facades Keep Up the Good Work: A Walls Maintenance Checklist Reap the Rewards: The Benefits of Sensitive Renovation

Original Walls are a Wise Investment Original wood, brick, stucco or stone walls are valuable assets that display your home’s history. Preserving them, or revealing them, gives your home an appealing unity with all of its features set off against an authentic backdrop. Remember these tips when you’re ready to renovate: Preserve the personality

Over the life of a home, it’s typically less expensive to repair or restore original exteriors than it is to install new siding that still must be repainted or replaced down the road. The ideal plan is to renovate your exterior walls using materials that closely match the original size, style and finish. Let the individual personality of your home shine through by preserving original siding width and details such as window trim, cornice, brackets, sill board and cornerboard. Replace individual pieces of wood siding, as needed, with matching materials. Fasten loose or warped siding. Before repainting wood, fill nail holes, caulk joints, windows and door surrounds and scrape

loose paint from the walls. Brick may need to be repointed, which means removing old mortar from deteriorating joints and replacing it. This is necessary because moisture can enter your home through bad mortar joints and ruin your interior walls. Be sure to match new mortar to the original color. Consult an architect or engineer to find the cause of any widespread surface cracking or joint separation. A little advice now can save major repairs later. Finally, try to minimize penetration of the original building shell. If you must penetrate the shell, be sure to vent, air seal and insulate afterwards. Reveal the quality

The true quality of your exterior walls may be hidden just beneath the surface. Consult an architect, then remove any materials that cover original walls and details and fix the problem beneath. Use gel-type paint stripper to remove existing paint from a brick surface.

Original design preserved

Original design distorted

Never sandblast brick. The face of the brick will deteriorate and let in unwanted moisture. Replace selectively

You can still retain architectural value, even if extreme deterioration makes restoration too costly. Replace wood siding with hardboard, vinyl or aluminum alternatives that match the shape, color and texture of original materials. Avoid wide, rough rusticstyle siding. Narrow clapboard is more typical of the Pittsburgh area. Be sure to vent the covered area to avoid moisture buildup on the inside. A tasteful compromise: If original siding is in good condition on the sides or back of your home, move it to the front wall and replace the less visible areas with a carefully selected alternative.

Copyright © 2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Renovation Fact Sheets

27


Typical Pittsburgh Facades Most older Pittsburgh homes are finished in brick or wood siding, used separately or in combinations. Some qualify as irreplaceable antiques with intricately crafted details and trim that give our city its unique streetscape. The facade of your home may look like one of these. These sketches may help you discuss your renovation project with a design professional.

Wood cornice & gable Concealed gutter Wood frame windows with wood brick molding.

Cornice Decorative wood bracket

Decorative wood bracket

Smooth stone lintel Siding resembles original clapboard

Brick or stone

Window trim Smooth stone sill plate

Corner board Sill board

Stone base

Keep Up the Good Work

Reap the Rewards

Keeping up with small repairs is the best way to avoid an expensive overhaul. Here are the basics for maintaining original exterior walls:

What you spend to preserve the original exterior finish of your home pays off many times in pride of ownership and sustained value.

• Wood that is dry and well-maintained will last a

Energy Savings

lifetime. Each spring, check walls for cracks, chips, soft spots, evidence of termites, or open joints at windows and entries. Repair as needed. • Brick is the most maintenance-free of all exterior surfaces. Each spring, check for cracked bricks and loose or deep mortar joints. If you see deterioration of joints or notice mossy brick in only certain areas, look for a water source that could be causing it. Repair as needed. • Repaint previously painted brick or wood every 5 to 10 years.

Properly insulated exterior walls in your house will not only increase comfort but also help you save on heating and cooling costs. You’ll find many types of insulation for walls. However, for adding insulation to existing finished walls, you might first consider using either loose-fill or sprayed foam insulation. These two types of insulation can be added without much disturbance to the finished areas of your home.* Added Value

When original wall finishes remain intact, so does the value of your home and the streetscape of your neighborhood. Homes with original facades typically sell more quickly (and often at higher prices) than homes where original finishes have been covered inappropriately. * U.S. Department of Energy RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.

®

Call the RenPlan Program for a consultation with a Design Professional.

(412) 391- 4333 28

®

Support for RenPlan and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved” sections of the CDCP’s website. www.cdcp.org

Renovation Fact Sheets

www.cdcp.org


R e n o v a t i n g

t o

R e t a i n

C h a r a c t e r

Downsizing or “modernizing” an original porch or door can rob your home of its most unique and inviting qualities and reduce your home’s value. This fact sheet offers alternatives to help you save energy, keep up with maintenance and make the most of your home’s “welcome area.” Included are:

• • • •

It Pays to Make an Entrance Which Porch is Yours? Keep Up the Good Work: A Porch and Door Maintenance Checklist Reap the Rewards: The Benefits of Sensitive Renovation

It Pays to Make an Entrance Your effort to preserve the original features of your porch pays off in the pleasure of having additional living space for you and your family three seasons a year. Prospective buyers value extra space, too — especially when it includes an original porch that frames a front door from the same era. So, before you renovate an aging porch or drafty door, remember this: Stick with the plan

The original architect of your home designed all parts of the entry area in one style to suit our climate. An old photo of your home or discussions with an architect can guide you when you renovate. Following original design guidelines is one way to keep the value of your home intact. For example: Porch details such as spindles and wood trim are valuable features to preserve because they are becoming rare. Restore rather than replace features whenever possible, especially trim that is hard to replicate around porch, doors, steps, columns and handrails.

Keep the existing size and shape of your doorway and porch. Avoid closing in sidelights or transoms when you repair your door. Use hardware that closely resembles the originals.

Original design preserved

If you want more light in front rooms, keep the porch and add lowprofile skylights to the porch roof. Replace with the past in mind

You can still preserve value even if you have to replace an entire door or major components of your porch. Ask an architect to sketch an alternative that fills the same space sensitively. The architect can also suggest appropriate replacement materials. You may not be able to find an exact match for your door, but try to find one of the same size and style with similar trim and details. You often can order a near match from a specialty store. This is not a cheap solution, but it is a onetime, long term investment in the value of your home.

Original design distorted

Weatherproof wisely

Your best bet for saving on energy bills and the expense of a new door is simply to weatherstrip and caulk original doors to improve the seal and eliminate drafts. If you decide to add storm or screen doors, match the size, shape and color of the existing door. If your door has a glass transom above it, select a storm door that has a glass transom, too. Custom storm doors with narrow wood frames are available to create a more delicate appearance than mass-produced storms.

Copyright © 2010 Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Renovation Fact Sheets

29


Which Porch Is Yours? The porches and doors of Pittsburgh homes offer a delightful assortment of sidelights, transoms, columns, railings, balustrades, cornices, trim and detailing. These sketches may help you discuss your renovation project with a design professional.

Italianate Craftsman Queen Anne

Colonial Revival

Italianate Stoop

Keep Up the Good Work

Reap the Rewards

With basic maintenance, your entry area can be an inviting space for years to come.

Enjoy an original entry and a smart investment, too.

• Once a year, check the entry area for leaks by

The $10 or $15 you spend to weatherstrip your original exterior door can return far more in energy savings, certainly enough to cover the costs of preserving a door that’s truly right for your home. For added energy efficiency, install an appropriate, well-constructed and caulked storm door.

• • • • •

Energy Savings*

holding up tissue paper in front of potentially leaky joints. Caulk all cracks between wood and metal parts. Re-secure weatherstripping around the door. Repaint or reseal exposed wood on your porch every 5 to 10 years. Inspect porch wood once a year for decay since it is exposed to all weather conditions. Check porch roof periodically for leaks. Water buildup can damage your porch floor. Repaint or restain porch floor when wood is exposed. Use nontoxic materials such as bees wax or linseed oil when refinishing wood surfaces. If replacement materials are necessary, work with an architect and consider maintenance-free, recycled plastic lumber.

If your entrance has a series of two doors, weatherstrip both. The area in between will act as an air lock, keeping warm or cold air out of the house. Preserving your original porch roof also shades ground floor windows, reducing the cooling load on living rooms and entryways. Added Value

Your entry areas create the strongest first impression of your home. When authentically renovated, they can be a powerful draw for prospective buyers. A porch is especially prized because it provides rare, outdoor relaxation space in an urban setting. And you’ll enjoy it, too, for as long as you live in your home.

Note: If your home was built before 1978, lead-based paint,

which can be harmful to children and pregnant women, may have been used in and around your porch. Only trained professionals should remove lead-based paint. For assistance, please call the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh at (412) 255-6666.

*Visit www.pahomeenergy.com for more information on reducing home energy use. RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh. ®

Call the RenPlan Program for a consultation with a Design Professional.

(412) 391- 4333 30

®

Support for RenPlan and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved” sections of the CDCP’s website. www.cdcp.org

Renovation Fact Sheets

www.cdcp.org


pittsburgh house style sheets


p i t t sbur g h

h o us e

s t yl e s

Most buildings in the Pittsburgh region and throughout the United States are built in vernacular styles; their design imitates “high style� architecture using local methods and materials. Gothic Revivial

1840-1880

The Gothic style has been commonly used for churches since the Middle Ages. In the nineteenth century, however, Gothic was used for a brief period for houses and schools in England and America. Common features of your Gothic Revival house: - Roof: steeply sloping gables - Windows: pointed arches, leaded glass - Walls: stone, wood decoration, asymmetrical with towers and wings - Porch: often covered

Italianate

1850-1890

The Italianate style was originally developed in England and is an interpretation of the Italian country villas of the Renaissance that became very popular in America. Common features of your Italianate house: - Roof: overhanging eaves supported by large, decorative brackets - Windows: tall and narrow, often with arched tops and window ornament - Walls: usually brick or wood siding, and usually with a symmetrical facade - Porch: where found, they are usually small with square posts

Second Empire

1860-1875

Second Empire or Mansard houses, are generally tall and narrow. This style is modeled after the architecture of Paris during the reign of Napoleon III (1852-1870). Common features of your Second Empire house: - Roof: mansard roof, decorative slate - Windows: ornate dormers are common - Walls: usually brick with wood trim - Porch: small with square posts with varied detailing

Shingle

1880-1910

Shingle style homes feature simpler, more rustic detailing. Natural colors and informal compositions were used to suggest the homes of New England settlers. Common features of your Shingle house: - Roof: multi-gabled with shallow pitch or gambrel - Windows: recessed bay windows, multiple panes - Walls: uniform shingle siding in natural colors - Porch: wide and shady

Pittsburgh House Styles

31


p i t t sbur g h

h o us e

s t yl e s

Many houses in Pittsburgh are Victorian. However, the term “Victorian� describes a period in history, rather than a specific style. Houses built between 1840 and 1900 are considered to be Victorian houses. Richardsonian Romanesque

1885-1910

This style was popularized by American architect Henry Hobson Richardson. The buildings, based on 11th-century Romanesque design, have the aesthetic of smaller castles. Common features of your Richardsonian Romanesque house: - Roof: expansive planes, high pitched gables, conical towers - Windows: some rounded arches, varied in size and shape - Walls: usually heavy, rough-cut, random stone, belt courses, sense of mass - Porch: sometimes enclosed by arches, little sculptural ornamentation

Queen Anne

1880-1910

Popular during the late 19thcentury, the Queen Anne style house is asymmetrical and displays a variety of pre-cut detailing. Common features of your Queen Anne house: - Roof: steeply pitched, irregular, multiple gables - Windows: stained glass is common - Walls: elaborate style using a variety of colors, textures, shapes and details - Porch: sometimes turn posts and trim, sometimes classical columns

Colonial Revival

1895-1940

Reflecting American traditions and a desire for simplicity, the Colonial Revival house style was based loosely on the Federal and Georgian styles. Common features of your Colonial Revival house: - Roof: hipped, gabled or gambrel style, dormers - Windows: double-hung, sometimes found in pairs, symmetrical - Walls: usually brick or wood with simple, classic detailing - Porch: pillars and classical columns

Foursquare

1895-1930

The Foursquare type of house is often detailed in the Craftsman and Colonial Revival styles. Foursquares are characterized by their simple floor plans, divided into four rectangular areas. Common features of your Foursquare house: - Roof: pyramid-shaped roof - Windows: large central dormer - Walls: brick, stone or wood siding - Porch: full-width or wrap-around porch

32

Pittsburgh House Styles


p i t t sbur g h

h o us e

s t yl e s

The majority of houses in Pittsburgh were built during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The growth of the city during that period can be attributed to the expansion of the railroad system and the rise of the steel, glass and oil industries. Tudor Revival

1900-1940

Drawing from Medeival architecture as well as English architecture from the early 16th-century, the Tudor style is versatile and can apply either to a cottage or a mansion in size and formality. Common features of your Tudor house: - Roof: steeply pitched, front facing gables - Windows: narrow windows, often with diamond panes - Walls: stucco, brick or stone veneer, half-timbered decorations, elaborate chimneys

Beaux Arts

1890-1930

While often used for public buildings, the Beaux Arts style was adapted for homes during the Gilded Age. It combines classical architecture from Greece and Rome with rich, opulent detailing. Common features of your Beaux Arts house: - Roof: flat roof - Windows: symmetrical on facade - Walls: often stone with classical ornamentation and large arches, monumental - Porch: columns and pediments with grand, showy details

Craftsman / Bungalow

1900-1930

The Craftsman style’s many features consist of roomy interiors with simple floor plans, many built-in shelves and fireplaces. Bungalow-type houses are often detailed in the Craftsman style. Common features of your Craftsman / Bungalow house: - Roof: low-hipped roof with deep overhanging and exposed rafter ends - Walls: brick, stone, or wood shingle siding - Porch: full-width or wrap-around porch with square taper columns, often tucked under roof

Modern

1940-1970

Classic Modern house styles range from the International style to the modern ranch popular throughout the United States in both urban and suburban settings Common features of your Modern house: - Roof: flat or broad, low-pitched roof - Windows: large windows - Walls: asymmetrical brick or wood exterior - Porch: simple, lack of decoration

Pittsburgh House Styles

33


p i t t sbur g h

h o us e

s t yl e s

Glossary Balustrade

A rail and the row of balusters (spindles) or posts that support it.

Bay Window

A large window or series of windows projecting from the outer wall of a building and forming a recess within.

Belt Course

A molding or projecting course running horizontally along the face of a building.

Bracket

A decorative or weight-bearing structural unit, two sides of which form a right angle with one arm flush against a wall and the other flush beneath a projecting surface, such as eaves or a bay window.

Capital

The top part of a pillar or column.

Cornice

A horizontal molded projection that crowns or completes a building or wall.

Dormer

A window set vertically into a small gable projecting from a sloping roof.

Eaves

The projecting overhang at the lower edge of a roof.

Facade

The face of a building, especially the principal face.

Gable

The generally triangular section of wall at the end of a pitched roof, occupying the space between the two slopes of the roof.

Gambrel roof

A two-sided roof with a double slope on each side, the lower slope having the steeper pitch.

Half-timbered

Having a wooden framework, often exposed, with plaser, brick, stone, or other masonry filling the spaces.

Hipped roof

A four-sided roof having sloping ends and sides.

Mansard roof

A four-sided roof having a double slope on all sides, with the lower slope much steeper than the upper, attributed to French architect Francois Mansard (1598-1666).

Palladian

Of or characteristic of the Renaissance architectural style of Andrea Palladio (1508-1580).

Pediment

A wide, low-pitched gable surmounting the facade of a building in the Grecian style.

Sidelight

A long, thin window next to a door.

Transom

A small wondow above a door or another window.

Veneer

A decorative facing.

Resources Landmark Architecture: Pittsburgh and Allegheny County by Walter C. Kidney A Field Guide to American Houses by Virginia McAlester et al For more information, visit the “Property Owner Resources” section of the CDCP’s website Call the RenPlan® program for a consultation with a design professional

(412) 391-4333

Support for the RenPlan® program and other CDCP programs is provided by generous individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. For more information, visit the “Supporters” and “Get Involved”section of the CDCP’s website www.cdcp.org

Editorial assistance for the Pittsburgh House Style sheets provided by the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation www.phlf.org

34

Pittsburgh House Styles

RenPlan® is a program of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh

www.cdcp.org


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Homeowners Resource Guide 2010