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Dictionary of Received Ideas


DICTIONARY OF RECEIVED IDEAS The “Public Poche” is a concept derived from the conflict between the city and the cultural institution. A museum, like most other cultural institutions, lacks a certain level of accessibility, which hinders its potential for continuous vitality and use. In addition, the need to constantly transform and/or expand decreases the amount of public domain, thus enhancing this hindrance. We begin to integrate both dichotomies into a cohesive system, where both buildings allow for transformation within and through out. They in a sense, behave in a manner of an urban quarter. The two buildings designed negotiate public space through the Poche. The act of carving away to generate space is the protocol that links them both. The buildings have twenty four hours of accessibility to the public, thus simulating an internal street. The origin of the architectural design is a derivative of a “received idea”. A received idea no longer possesses its functionality, only performing as ornamental move, being classified as a cliche. It was copied from a building that utilized the design extensively, now only to be a secondary move after form and function have been negotiated. A series


Dictionary of Received Ideas


of architectural rules are created as a manual to synthesize the recreation of the “cliche�. From those rules, a new design is manifested, reinstalling the purpose to the geometry, guided by the program.

Surface of type that will be uncovered by spikes

The coined cliche, Matryoshka and Porcupine, are used to generate the design of these two buildings. The Matryoshka is a museum, library, and a media center located on eight avenue between fifty fifth and fifty fourth. The Porcupine is solely a museum that is situated in the same location. A partner project including Lauren Hickman, Ryan Lovett, and Jing Xie. Surfaces of an unrolled type- Ratio of surface are that will be uncovered by spikes

PORCUPINE 80% RULE

The 80 percent rule states 80 percent of the surface area of a volume must be covered in spikes. This rule is utilized at three different levels within the building scale. Each level is essentially a hierarchy that organizes the building. This rule allows egress to be feasible.

Circulatory usage of uncovered surface for each type


Volume strategies Cluster strategies Building strategies Dictionary of Received Ideas


SPIKES At each scale, the spikes take on a different programmatic function that aids in the success of the entire building.

Sound

M.E.P


M.E.P

Structure

Light Dictionary of Received Ideas


FORM/FUNCTION Due to the compactness of a series of discrete volumes, the composition starts to guides the architectural configuration of the circulation, both within the volumes and between the clusters.. This rule allows egress to be feasible.

4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike 4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike 4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike The main circulation feeds people into open plazas, where they then can enter into the interior spaces. Secondary circulation takes people straight to the top.


4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike 4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike

4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike

4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike

4’-0” x 8” x 8” spike

The main circulation feeds people into open plazas, where they then can enter into the interior spaces. Secondary circulation takes people straight to the top.

The monocoque performs and reads as a wall poche, dictating the path of circulation.

Dictionary of Received Ideas


Building Spikes

INTEGRATION The sectional perspective illustrates the various systems working together to produce a working museum

Interior Corridor

Interior Circulation

Galleries


Cluster Spikes

Auditorium

Building Spikes

Interior Plaza

Audio/Visual

Natural Light Apertures Dictionary of Received Ideas


A. Axonametric set of plan B. Site plan


Dictionary of Received Ideas


A. An explosion of volumes and clusters from the entire building, illustrating all the kid of parts. B. A sectional perspective of the building, cutting through, cutting through key programmatic components of the building.

A.


B. Dictionary of Received Ideas


25%

50%

MATRYOSHKA BOXES

An illustration to demonstrate that the scaling and placement of the matryoshka boxes are in accordance with the rules. Also the structural system design to work with the designated placement.

100%


1

2

3

4

1

2

3

4

Dictionary of Received Ideas


Media Lab Temporary Gallery

Media Gallery Temporary Gallery

PROGRAM ORGANIZATION The distribution of program in relation to the path of circulation. Each path has a particular trajectory through the building.

Temporary Gallery Museum Admin


Public reading room

Media Lab

Sculpture Gallery Auditorium

Public Plaza Dictionary of Received Ideas


INTEGRATION The sectional perspective illustrates the various systems working together to produce a working multi cultural center.


Dictionary of Received Ideas


A. Axonametric set of plan B. Site plan

B.

A.


Dictionary of Received Ideas


A series of sectional axonametric of the building


Dictionary of Received Ideas


PROJECT: RESUSCITATION The world has reached the brink of catastrophe. Waste is pouring out of landfills, no space for the doubling population, and living organisms are deteriorating as a result of human apathy to the world they live in. Land, water, and air animals are becoming extinct, if they have not already. The air is filled with pollutants, making it hard for humans to even live without the expectance of disease or death. At this point, how do we start to reverse, or rather mend, the damage done? The proposed method of managing this situation is to temporary relocate residents from a previously inhospitable environment while officials work to rehabilitate the zone. While people are relocated, there are facilities focused on mining, research and agriculture. These facilities are intended to provide new technologies to avoid further damage, manufacture vegetation for the human population and the earth itself, as well as providing novel locations for human inhabitants. The existing neighborhood is the original site to be quarantined, where the native inhabitants are relocated, allowing for full reconstruction. Local vegetation and other living organisms are revitalized with the help of trained professionals. Once the area is deemed acceptable for reintroduc


Clima[x] Extreme Environments


tion, people can then return home. Both of humans and vegetations are transported to separate facilities. The arctic site is designed to be a greenhouse, where it can nurse and regrow the local vegetation for each particular site that is being quarantined. It has a housing facility as well as research labs for the people that work there. The deep sea base is where people are to be relocated. This locations is chosen to minimize the amount of damage people can do to their surroundings, especially without it affecting themselves. By implementing a system that will force people to be more conscious of their actions, they, over time, will begin to restructure their daily activities autonomously. Therefore, when they are reintroduced into their original homes, they will live a modified version of their previous lives, one that implements a sustainable way of living. The interior of this facility is structured to replicated the environment of a neighborhood, in relation to spatial organization and size. In order for people to assimilate, one must reconstruct the closest iteration of their previous settlements. Lastly, the Lunar site is used to developed new technologies and modes of life to be integrated into daily living. The moon is abundant is He3, an element found in the soil of the human and has great potential or energy production. By transporting this element back to earth, other forms of unsustainable energy can be replaced. The energy produced at this site will bed used to power both the Arctic and Deep sea facilities and then the rest of the world. This facility houses research laboratories as well as living quarters for the occupants.


Clima[x] Extreme Environments


Porosity = 0%

Porosity = 50%


Porosity = 75%

Porosity = 93%

Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Interior Space


SITE: ANTARCTIC The South Pole in Antarctica is the chosen site for the Arctic Base. The elevation of the site is more or less flat, allowing for straight horizontal development. This region of Antarctica received a long period of sunlight, which is a component necessary for the greenhouse program to function. It is also located a distance from the native ecosystem present on this continent. Animals inhabit the perimeter of the continent, leaving the interior mostly untouched. This site is also distanced from the melted of the ice, a condition targeted along the continent’s perimeter. By locating this facility in an isolated zone, it frees itself from these issues.


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Antarctic


Points of Access

A.

Bedroom

Public Space

Bedroom

High elevation

Bedroom

Upper Level Unit A

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom edroom

Bedroom Bed om

Greenhouse reenhouse

Bedroom

Unit B

Unit A

Public Space

A.

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Public Space

Bedroom

Low Elevation

Unit A

Unit B

Unit B

Unit A

Unit B

Unit B

Unit A

Public Space

Moveable Unit Stationary Unit

A.

Lab Entry

Greenhouse

Lab

Lab

Lab

Entry

Entry

Lab

Lab

Facility

Entry

Facility

Greenhouse

Facility

Facility

Entry

Facility

Greenhouse

Facility

Lower Level Unit A

Lab Entry

Greenhouse

A.

Lab

Unit B

Unit A

Unit B

Facility

Facility

Facility

Facility

Entry

Entry

Facility

Greenhouse Facility

Greenhouse

Unit B

Lab Lab Entry

Greenhouse

Arctic Site Unit A

Lab

Bedroom

Lab

Bedroom

Entry

Entry

Entry

Lab

Lab

Lab

Bedroom Greenhouse

Bedroom

Clima[x] Extreme Environments:Lab Antarctic

Unit B


Variations of the accordion fold led to the development of spatial capabilities that could hold all scales of program. Because the fold has a level of repetitiveness, It is sectioned off and used as individual spatial conditions, thus defined as a module. Aggregation parameters are defined for the module component based on a programmatic study and site conditions. The size of the module doesn’t change, however their arrangement can. Two types of modules are creates, on which is nested in the ground, and the later which rest on top, allowing for operability. An arrangement rule set is developed to negotiates the cross circulation from one module to another. The population of the modules over an extent of land generates a network of connectivity and porosity. The result is a developed community.

A. First accordion fold line B. Second accordion fold line

B.

A


Movable Modules

Stationary Modules

Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Antarctic


Section through the Antarctic Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Antarctic


SITE: DEEP SEA The continental slope along the Philippines is the site chosen for the deep sea base. It is chosen, for one, for its future capabilities of growth. The deep sea infrastructure can grow into the Pacific ocean without the need of land adjacency. Secondly. It carries the importance of having land access to land when necessary, yet staying clear of land masses, in an attempt to minimize future destruction of the land. It proximity to the Philippines is seems as an “emergency exit� from the deep sea facility. The Bathypelgic Zone is the area within the deep sea to be used for this facility. Although natural light cannot penetrate to this depth, it can be filters through fiber optic cable, along the slope, down to the base.


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Deep Sea


Entry

Bedroom Bedroom

Low Elevation

Bedroom Entry

Public Space

Public Space

High elevation

Bedroom

Bedroom Public Space

Points of Access

Entry

Facility

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Entry

Facility

Public Space

Entry

Entry

Facility

Bedroom

Bedroom Bedroom Entry

Public Space

Public Space

Bedroom

Public Space

Bedroom

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Entry

Facility

Public Space

Entry

Entry

Facility

Bedroom

Bedroom Bedroom Entry

Public Space

Facility

Public Space

Bedroom

Bedroom Public Space

The lunar base divides up the living and working units into separate quarters, similar to the other two locations. The units are designed to be flexible in site situation, meaning that they are capable of accommodating to varying site conditions.

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Entry


A.

Entry

Public Space

Public Space

Bedroom

Bedroom Bedroom

Bedroom

Entry

Bedroom

Facility

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Entry

Public

Public Space

Public Space

Facility

A.

Facility

Public Space

Public Space

Public Space

Public Space

Public

Public Space

Bedroom

Public Space

Bedroom

Entry

Facility

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom

Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Deep Sea


Interior public space in Deep Sea Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Deep Sea


The arrangement of the form is along a mirrored, tilted sine curve. A series of programmatic points are designated to identify the location of living and public spaces. This distribution of program allows for a gradual change between different privacy levels.


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Deep Sea


Windows

Window Reinforcement

Base Skeleton

Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Deep Sea


SITE: LUNAR In order to located an appropriate site for the lunar base, an understanding has to be achieved of the orbital system and where sunlight touched the moon. Half of the moon is in constant sunlight and the second half is in constant darkness. In an attempt to synthesize the period of a natural earth day, the site is located along the midpoint line of constant day and night. In other words, half of the site is subjects to sunlight all day, and the other to constant darkness. Within this zone, the actual site is located on a consistently uniform elevation, not including changes produced by the craters.


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


Labs

Low Elevation

Entry Large Equipment Storage

Labs

Labs

Labs

Labs

Restrooms

Restrooms

Bedroom

Bedroom

Rest Area

Facility

Labs

Bedroom

Rest Area

Kitchen

High elevation

Common Area

Bedroom

Points of Access

Entry

Entry

Bedroom Kitchen Entry

Common Area Facility

Labs Entry Rest Area Labs Labs Restrooms

Large Equipment Storage

Rest Area Labs

Labs

Labs Restrooms

Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom


Large

Labs

Labs

Labs

Restrooms

Restrooms

Rest Area

Entry

Entry

Labs

Large Equipment Storage

Bedroom

Bedroom Entry

A.

Rest Area

B.

B.

Facility

Labs

Entry

Bedroom

Rest Area

Common Area

Labs

Labs

Kitchen

Rest Area

Bedroom

A.

Labs

Labs

Labs

Facility

Facility

A-A Entry

Bedroom Bedroom

Bedroom Common Area B-B

Kitchen

Facility

Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


Clima[x] Extreme Environments: Lunar Base


SECRET CITY Polemic Statement: “The city only exists to those who know its there”. Only a portion of the city is exposed, referring to the level of openness. These areas consist of high density, visibility, accessibility and movement. These particular areas can be defined as travel destinations, monumental zones, and business districts. The city that is hidden is within the shadows of the previous typologies. They hold as much significance and charge as these high profile areas, however, they lack attention and space. With this in mind, I plan to propose a secondary infrastructure that “bring out” the inner city. It exposes these targeted zones, while simultaneously intensifying its charge. By creating this type of condition, it reorganizes the different layers of the city. In order to identify the architectural characteristics that define an ideal city of deployment, an analysis was done in London that validates the polemic. Tokyo was chosen based on the urban conditions in which my system was built off of. It is a metropolis with a range of building elevations, modes of transportation, and a range in activities. A cognitive map was generated to identify locations of architectural constructs. Then, the initial design phase deals


Super Model City III


with the process of extrusion. Because masses were created in this step, the deletion of other masses will achieve a balance in the level of change that is occurring on the site, which is the second step. The third step is bridging. Physical bridges are created amongst forms of similar kind and amongst different kinds. This process of spatial generation happens over a period time. The proposed conditions is a scenario of what this portion of the city may transform into. The social structures that effects the cities and its growth are the secondary inputs that drive the system. The objective of this new infrastructure is to invert the city, where what is nested would be brought out. As a result, what is being extruded produces an interior atmosphere along the street and the interior spaces are being connected more to the exterior city. By exposing areas that are nested behind large building and commercial zones, we can provide a higher level of accessibility. The process of this experiment has created an awareness with regards to exposure level. Though it maybe true that widening the scope of accessibility will in a sense open up the activities that are forced behind walls, it also exposes other activities, like illicit activities, that provides the neighborhood with another level of activity necessary for its current vitality. The proposed infrastructure meets the needs of both conditions. It opens up these tight confined spaces while providing more secluded, hidden areas to replace those that were lost. It, in a sense, provides more of a balance to these two conditions than the current infrastructure.


Super Model City III


EVENT LOCATION

T=0.50

T=0.0

T=0.67

T=0.25

T=0.75


Emerged spaces within field

T=0.33

Events within the field

The residual field

Areas of spatial exploration T=1.00 Super Model City III


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Lowest building elevations A gradient is used to create a value of buildings heights that are suitable to deploy the system.

The shortest buildings are designated as starting points, where the designed system is deployed.


Locations of floor extrusions

Locations of floor deletion

The second layer of the system is activated, identifying the locations where masses are generated.

The third layer of the system is activated, identifying the locations where entire floors are to be deleted. Super Model City III


STEP ONE: EXTRUSION

An illustration of the system working within an area of Shinjuku, step by step.

STEP TWO: DE


ELETION

STEP THREE: BRIDGING

Super Model City III


Portion of the infrastructure branching between multiple buildings


Super Model City III


Super Model City III


B.

B.


Super Model City III


Towards the

Insignificant MIXED MEDIA An assortment of media works that illustrate a range of skill set that have evolved during the term of the MSAAD program at Columbia University.


Mixed Media


GRAPHIC DESIGN A series of works produced that graphically portray architectural ideas as well as fundamental graphic design concepts through diagrams and illustrations. Spanning over two semesters, the course deals with understanding the elements of graphic design and how to use them most strategically.

SECRET CITY G^W^hDDZϮϬϭϭ ZĂŬŝLJĂ&ƌĂŶŬůŝŶ

Behind the rows of tall buildings, there lies another city. One that consists of secrecy and private ŝŶƚĞƌĂĐƟŽŶƐ͘DŽƐƚƉĞŽƉůĞ͕ƌĞĨĞƌƌŝŶŐƚŽƚŽƵƌŝƐƚ͕ŬŶŽǁ not of this extremity. This mechanism exposes ƉŽƌƟŽŶƐ ŽĨ ƚŚĞƐĞ ŚŝĚĚĞŶ ƐƉĂĐĞƐ͕ ĂƐ Ă ŵĞĂŶƐ ŽĨ ĞĚƵĐĂƟŶŐƚŚĞƉƵďůŝĐĂƐƚŽƚŚĞ͞ƌĞĂů͟ŶĂƚƵƌĞŽĨƚŚĞĐŝƚLJ͘ To counterbalance this degree of exposure, more niches are created to replace the previous ones.


Mixed Media


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the whole

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not a

deeply

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part,

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the

whole


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CONTENT UTILIZATION

Page Occupancy

Mixed Media


NETWORK

Newspaper title Articles Elements of the article Page redirection


COMPARISON

February 01, 2012

February 02, 2012

February 03, 2012

February 01, 2012

February 02, 2012

February 03, 2012

Images

Text

In between

Mixed Media


GINA Pavilion: Interactive surface that supports itself and unveils moveable furniture, in which one can sit. It is to allow for continuous accessibility on all sides, as a means of filtering people.

Bottom of Panel

Extracted Panel: Two pieces from the pavilion surface that is fabricated in full scale Top of Panel


Assemblage Mixed Media


Pavilion Mixed Media


TECHNIQUES OF THE ULTRAREAL A course dealing with the production of photorealistic images, utilizing vray, Photoshop, and 3Ds Max. A scene is modeled, where custom materials are applied. Both artificial and image based lighting and backgrounds are used to create specific types of illumination for each particular render.


Artificial Environment - Vray Lighting Mixed Media


Artificial environment - V ray lighting


Image based lighting and background Mixed Media


DIGITAL CRAFT A course that deals with 3d modeling, physical model building, rendering, and animations. Following a series of exercises designed to develop modeling and rendering, a piece of architectural work is chosen to 3d model, fabricate a physical model, generate renderings, and to produce an animation.

Phantom Chair


Barcelona Chair Mixed Media


Free University Library- Norman Foster Mixed Media


LITERARY WORK Within a course called Metropolis, a series of building are choosen to construct an arguement to whether the architecture may be successful or not. With this argument, a detail description of the context, history, and architecture details must be included. This particular building is called the F40 by Petersen Architekten in Germany.


Mixed Media


“What we are after is something more complex, and less geometric. We are more concerned with ‘flow” than with ‘measure’. We have to create architecture and town planning which, through built form, can make meaningful the change, the growth, the flow, the vitality of the community.” 1 The F40 Office Building on Friedrich Street in Berlin is a piece of architecture that is successful in altering the image of its community. This building is dynamic in the way that it mimics the language of the site and creates a signature for itself without the need for complex forms. This building is a resonance of its surroundings, relating to the idea of embracing the historical events that Berlin has experienced during and after WWII. The city was severely damaged after the war, effecting Friedrichstraße, a major shopping district in central Berlin. Reconstruction of this sector spanned from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. Throughout this redevelopment, the status of this district was rekindled, once again being designated as major shopping district. The way in which the architect chose to capture this idea was through the façade. The façade is the first element of a building that people see first. By indexing the characteristics of the façade throughout the years, one can identify the differentiations that occur. To illustrate these differentiations, the building calls for a façade that is flexible, one that has the ability to emulate all conditions. The front of the surrounding buildings has varying textures and levels of porosity. Some are flat; some have ridges, and so forth. The panels of the F40 building, that have the capability to move, according to the user, emulates the façade’s texture of the buildings that flank it. In other words, whenever these panels move, the profile that they create

resembles one of the buildings along the block. The façade of this building also produces depths that are visible when one looks at the building from an angle. Along the street, you see glass consuming the surface areas of the facades, which is something this building does as well. The color and materiality chosen is primarily native to the neighborhood. The only material that is novel is the tinted glass used for portions of the façade. This is the primary components that give the building its uniqueness. At night, the glass is illuminated, becoming the visual attractor of the block. In simple terms, the architect has developed a mechanism that works to integrate this new development into the community. There are some buildings that strive to be classified as Avant-garde, where they lose connection to the existing urban fabric. And on the other extreme, some projects are mundane, belittling the potential to be provocative and original. This building is able to accomplish a state of versatility with simple geometries and moves, while embracing it’s native culture. The rear façade is comprised of mostly glass and has a flat surface. It follows the same intent that the front does, which is carrying the language of its adjacent buildings. There isn’t as much depth to the rear façade as there is to the front, which is the reason why it reads as a curtain wall. There is a high ratio of glass to concrete. Looking at the rear façade in elevation, it may seem that there is too much openness for the building if its intent is to blend in with the other. However, there is this secondary system attached to the exterior, acting as protectors from the sun, decreases this level of translucency, making this argument more plausible. The texture and color of the sun screen is chosen to resemble the materiality of the adjacent buildings. Once again, the type of glass used


is the entity that sets this building apart from the others. In ancient Rome, the only part of a building that could be renovated is the interior, only if there are not any ruins amidst. The envelope of the buildings is what carries on the legacy of this city. The interiors are what vary, from a classical design to a contemporary approach. Also, one cannot always tell the program that the envelope houses until you enter the space. Returning back to the F40 building, it is evident that the façade carries a story that ties back to the community, however, the interior of the building takes on a completely different motive. The interior of a building is where self expression occurs, making it more intimate for the user. Being that his building is an office building; the floor plan is open to allow the users to utilize the space as they choose. It has a minimalist atmosphere through a contemporary design, comprising of three main materials. The interior sees a mix of glass, wood and textile; here city and garden is interwoven. The architect designed the surfaces of the seven upper floors as deeply as possible into the parcel because the floor surface resembled a large garden. Unlike Palladio, where you can analyze the building from looking at the floor plan, one cannot identify the ideology of this building from the floor plan. It resembles a typical office floor plan. From that fact alone, one can conclude that the plan is not interlaced with such strong ideologies as that of the façade. “Web is not primarily a circulation system, but an environmental one. It is a way to establish a large-scale order, which, by its existence, makes possible an individual expression at the smaller scale.”2 The architect utilizes the façade and the idea behind it to act as a member within the larger web. The legacy of Central Berlin is the main idea in which

this building is a component that makes this legacy stronger. Through the accomplishment of this task, the floor plan, on a micro scale, is used for individual expression. The F40 animates the project of the architect while simultaneously expressing individual creativity.

1 Alison and Peter Smithson “Cluster City: A New Shape for the community,” in Ordinariness and Light: Urban Theories 1952-1960 AND THEIR Application in a building Project 1963-1970 ( Cambridge, MA:The MIT Press, 1970) 2 Shadrach Woods, “WEB”, in Le Carre Bleu 3 (1962) Mixed Media


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