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Zack Lofton Urban Planning & Design

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ABOUT ME: I am a great proponent of cities and everything they encompass. In my opinion, the idea of the city is among the most fascinating concepts from humanity. I have always been interested in cities but my passion was truly catalyzed while traveling as a kid with my family. After studying business in college and working in the area of affordable urban housing, I knew I had to press into this passion and grow my career in the direction of cities. I then earned my masters degree in community & regional planning at the University of Texas and further developed my skill set in design. Throughout my time in school and work, I have sought to integrate design into all of my projects to make them engaging for everyone. Thank you for taking a look, and I hope you enjoy my work!

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CONTENTS: Chapter I: Bicycle Infrastructure Improvement Study & Implementation Plan,

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Urban Information Lab

Chapter II:

Designing an Active Transportation System in Hankou, Wuhan City, China

Chapter III:

Transit Oriented Development in Leander, TX

Chapter IV:

Langston Hughes Cultural Arts Center and Neighborhood Study

Chapter V:

Bike Austin: Re-envisioning East Riverside Drive

Chapter VI:

People-oriented Redesign of Wickersham Drive, Austin, TX

Chapter VII:

Pedestrian Amenity Analysis in Seattle, WA

Chapter VIII:

Protected Bike Corridor Design in Austin, TX

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BICYCLE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT STUDY AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Busiest Campus Streets

Dean Keeton St. Speedway Guadalupe St.

This heat map was created for my research on campus bicycling and used a large Strava Metro dataset to convey the busiest street segments at UT Austin. Managing this data enabled me to stratify streets for improvements based on the volume of bike commutes with primary streets being Guadalupe St., San Jacinto Blvd., Speedway, and Dean Keeton St.

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Plan of Redesigned Protected Intersection at Speedway & Dean Keeton

Speedway

Building

Dean Keeton St.

Speedway

Building

Building

This is a plan view of my redesign for the intersection at Speedway and Dean Keeton St. The red markings show the new extruded curbs separating bikes from motor traffic. I created this plan in AutoCAD. The image in the upper right corner of the diagram displays the physical model I built for this project.

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Bike Infras tru ed t c c e t

Bo lla r

lity

Historic Buildings within Active Transport Network

I designed this active transportation network to be consistent with local vernacular for my summer urban design studio in Wuhan, China. The Hankou historic neighborhood was in need of a connected system for bicycles and pedestrians. The map on the top shows the network for the various modes. The map on the bottom shows the accessibility of historic buildings with the network; over 90% of the historic buildings are accessible with my design.

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Neighbo rh o

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HANKOU, WUHAN, CHINA URBAN DESIGN STUDIO


Before

This project was also part of the Wuhan urban design studio. The rendering below was designed for Nanjing Road, one of the main corridors in the Hankou bike/ped network plan. Nanjing Road was designed as an active transport neighborhood thoroughfare.

After

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LEANDER, TX TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

Leander, Texas: A Transit Oriented Community O p e n

STREETSCAPE AT HUMAN SCALE 6 5

ALLOWING EYES ON THE STREET

Roughly 1:1 Ratio for Building Height to Street Width This streetscape incorporates infrastructure for active transportation without excluding cars. It also shows that appropriate scale of buildings with soft private/public transitions enables a more interesting and comfortable space for everyone, including passersby and people in the buildings. Finally, this design communicates the economic virtue of permeable and engaging ground floors that draw people in.

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The rendering above was designed for a plan for a future transit oriented development in Leander, TX (northern suburb of Austin). The buildings and street scape were designed in 3D using SketchUp and polished with landscaping and street life using Photoshop. The map layers on the bottom left convey the comprehensive transportation system designed for the future site. The goal was to layout a new connected street network, integrate the current transit system with new bus routes, and develop trails for active transportation and recreation. The street section on the bottom right was designed to prescribe ideal development densities and streetscapes in the TOD.

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LANGSTON HUGHES CULTURAL ARTS CENTER NEIGHBORHOOD STUDY

This project was a geo-spatial study of the built environment and public services within the neighborhood of the Langston Hughes Cultural Arts Center. Although the area is well served by bus transit, more provision of transit routes in the area would create a better connected neighborhood and boost the transit equity in this historically lowincome, minority neighborhood. A greater integration of diverse land uses would also benefit the area with other services.

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BIKE AUSTIN: RE-ENVISIONING EAST RIVERSIDE DR AUSTIN, TX

Before

This rendering was designed for Bike Austin, a local bicycle advocacy organization, and distributed in their monthly newsletter. The image is of East Riverside Drive in a low income area of Austin. The design was intended to help residents envision the possibilities of a safer street and safer bicycle facilities on East Riverside Drive.

After

A Safer and More Accessible Neighborhood Corridor

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PEOPLE-ORIENTED REDESIGN OF EAST RIVERSIDE/ WICKERSHAM NODE AUSTIN, TX

A New East Riverside Node at Wickersham Drive Comprehensive Transportation System

This project was planned and designed to make the East Riverside/ Wickersham Drive node a more hospitable place for all users of the space. Scalable concepts were created in order to increase the livability of the entire neighborhood and boost economic development in the area. Transportation was one of the main factors considered for knitting the disparate sections of the neighborhood together. In this plan, a complete transportation system was designed with streetscapes that correlate to a people-oriented community.

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SEATTLE, WA: PEDESTRIAN AMENITY ANALYSIS

City of Seattle Neighborhood Centers and Sidewalk Density

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This project entailed an analysis of some of Seattle’s most densely navigated pedestrian areas. The map shows the number of sidewalks per square mile in each of the neighrbohood centers. Unsurprisingly, the greatest density of pedestrian infrastructure is in the urban core. We can conclude that transportation equity would be greatly improved by scaling the pedestrian infrastructure further into the urban periphery.

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The Future Heartbeat of Austin:

AUSTIN, TX: PROTECTED BIKE CORRIDOR DESIGN

A New Protected Bike Corridor

This map conveys a protected bike route with 1 mile buffers that I designed for a project on active transportation improvements in the City of Austin. The protected portion of the route travels through multiple neighboorhoods and commercial districts while the painted portion of the route continues through the UT Austin campus where speeds are slow and traffic is much safer.

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The End Contact zlofton1217@gmail.com 337-884-0246

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Zack Lofton's Portfolio