PORTFOLIO: detailed explorations

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PORTFOLIO:

detailed explorations Zachary Torres Masters of Architecture Candidate Boston Architectural College 17 December 2019

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CONTENTS ResumĂŠ 4 Reflection 5 Part I: Academic Work I. Production + Consumption 8 II. Detailed Explorations I 32 III. Culture + Sustainability 38 IV. New Hermetics 48 V. Mint 68 VI. Dr/Hive 76 VII. Detailed Explorations II 102 Part II: Professional Work I. Centrepoint Architects 110 II. Community + Modernism 114 III. Timothy Burke Architects 118

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RESUMÉ education 2017 pres.

boston architectural college masters of architecture

summer 2019

écoles d’art américaine de fontainebleau

2013 2017

boston university b.a. architectural studies minors: french, visual arts kilachand honors college

summer 2016

columbia university introduction to architecture

2015

study abroad paris internship

summer 2014

study abroad london + paris: architecture + urbanism

undergrad thesis work:

kilachand honors college keystone project the american dormitory: its history + application at boston university

work

sep. 2019 present

april 2018 june 2019

architectural designer timothy burke architects (boston, ma) -propose schematic designs + develop designs -building information modeling -prepare construction documents architectural designer centrepoint architects (somerville, ma) -propose schematic designs + develop designs -existing conditions + code reviews -prepare construction documents

competitions + awards 2019

2017

gregory hudson alumni award for writing excellence in the humanities -awarded for the essay “materiality + sacred space in eero saarinen’s kresge chapel” photographic resource center student exhibition -exhibit photographic work entitled heterotopia

2016

makebetter syria: postwar housing competition -group project to develop long-term housing in postwar syria

autumn 2017 - designer gateway project: spring 2018 designing for dignity (boston, ma) -generation of public space -research + site analysis -design resource pathways winter 2015

intern nelson wilmotte architectes (paris, france) -design residential fit-outs -create 3D models -prepare client presentations -research materials + furnishings

prix du jury: école d’art américaine de fontainebleau -second place prize for group’s final installation laka design competition - dr/hive poems of a modern day architect -“american architect” little libraries, roslindale

skills + languages

english (native) french (tcf c2) portuguese (conversant) sketchup 5/5 autocad 5/5 photoshop 4/5 indesign 4/5 illustrator 4/5 revit 4/5 rhino 3/5 microsoft suite photography archival research

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REFLECTION The last two years have been ones of tremendous personal and professional growth. I believe my studio work best exhibits my creative maturation, merging complex programs and difficult sites with novel design solutions and attention to details, structure, and materiality. Not only have I grown as a designer, but also as an “architect.” This is shown in building systems coursework and my professional experience where I begin to understand and integrate systems beyond the merely aesthetic to generate a complete and functional design. The lessons I have learned in the classroom have carried over into my professional life. I have learned to skillfully navigate client needs, construction methods, and code regulations. My professional experience has primarily dealt with residential

work, and I have consequently developed a deep understanding of what it means to create a home. Conversely, I have also managed to blend the financial restrictions of development work with solid design that will lend itself to becoming a home. ` As I prepare for thesis, I reflect on all I have learned and gained from my time at the BAC and how these lessons and skills will be implemented into a cohesive architecture. Yet, there is one experience that has stuck with me the most from the last two years. This summer, I had the opportunity to participate in the Fontainebleau École américaine des beauxarts summer program. Here, I collaborated with peers from around the world, forging lifelong friendships and developing a new set of design skills based in the program’s fast-paced and historical setting. It was at Fontainebleau, while designing a public installation in one of the castle’s courtyards, that I finally felt an inner voice confirming that this is what I was intended to do. While I take deep pleasure in

working through construction details and visiting job sites, this summer exposed me to a different facet of architecture rooted more in concept and academic theory. It is this facet that I wish to explore more in my remaining time at the BAC and very possibly the duration of my career. I feel inspired to pursue a professional practice based in exhibition, installation, and pavilion architecture, as well as in teaching and theoretical writing. The BAC has equipped me with the necessary skills to understand architecture at all its levels, from concept to construction administration. Now, I can utilize these skills to ground my designs, whether they be single-family homes, developments, or small pavilion installations, in a practicality that can only elevate their theoretical concepts.

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PART I: ACADEMIC WORK

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I. Production + Consumption Arch Studio II Ruben Segovia Autumn 2018


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[01 Initial Concept Sketch] Working with a different grid system that took the form of rays originiating from the site’s triangular tip, the thick planes followed the rays, while initial volumes filled the interstitial voids.

[02 Concept Sketch] The grid evolved to make the site’s topographic lines its basis. Planes with interior ramps were angled across the site, while intersecting a supsended volume to create more intimate and dynamic spaces, each of various heights. Meanwhile, the site itself was regularized by isolating the non-orthonogal edge as a separate green space, as indicated by the dotted pochÊ.

[03 1/4-Scale Sectional Model] Returning to the initial sketch, this 1/4-scale model studies the possibility of breaking the rectilinearity of the volume by treating each space as defined by the intersecting planes as a unique volume, with unique proportions. Thus, each space is of a different height to create more diverse spatial experiences.

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PARTI Confronted with an irregular and sloping site in Mission Hill, the initial concept conscripted the site’s topographic lines as the basis of a grid, which provides the framework for angled walls to serve as circulation to and through a suspended geometric volume. The thick walls with internal ramps also serve to divide the interior space into a series of varied and dynamic spaces. Within the unique geometries generated by the angled walls, three levels overlap with views into each other, creating a series of single-, double-, and triple-height spaces. Meanwhile, on the ground plane, the walls encourage movement along the site’s long axis, while also filtering passage and views across its width. The ground plane, like the interior space, possesses unique smaller spaces, as well as more open plazas underneath the volume. Thus, three types of spaces are formed: the interior space, the circulation space within the walls, and the outdoor space under the volume.

[04 Final Parti Diagram]

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[01 Concept + Site Analysis Sketch] Site analysis discovered many angles across the greater site that were also the result of topographic variations. For example, streets often intersected at triangular points, rather than rectilinear ones. The residential districts developed along these angled streets. Thus, this residential, angled, and interrupted grid would be used to determine the angle and position of the planes spanning the site.

[02 Site Analysis Study Model] This model evaluated the angles and steepness of the surronding streets in an attempt to undersand their intersections and abutting developments. Also present are early attempts to map the topographic interruptions that occur across the greater site, where the topography did not permit regular development, such as in the park across the street. These interuptions are organic insertions into the orthogonal grids that often disrupt the streets’ regularity. The wire mesh canopy begins to analyze light across the site, which throughout the day, only falls along the southern half, dividing the site in two.

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SITE ANLYSIS Five elements emerge in the greater analysis that are overlaid on the site: intersections, light, topographic interruptions, density, and scale. These latter two are expressed as a dense grid of planes that grow in height as one progresses down the site. Planes surrounding intersections are also shorter because major intersections were often single story commercial spaces. This is indicative of the greater site, which transforms from three-story residential development to large campuses and towers. This grid is twice interrupted. Firstly, by the street intersections. Numerous pathways in the greater site come to a triangular point, which results in variations in the development. Here, these intersections push the planes to wrap around them at various angles. Paths also cut through the development, resulting in variations in the planes’ widths. Secondly, at three specific points in the greater site, the topography was too steep to allow development, which resulted in organic cuts through the site. These are represented as an amorphous mesh that rises above the planes, and again, interrupts their grid.

[03 Site Analysis Diagram]

13 02-SITE ANALYSIS


Finally, light is represented as lines that cut across the site, tying themselves to planes and to the intersections. However, where there are more lines connecting at an intersection indicates that such an intersection is more trafficked. All of these elements together begin to generate spatial variation across the site, with the light strings serving as a type of undulating canopy.

[01 Detail: Light + Planes] [02 Detail: Amorphous Interruptions] [03 Detail: Light + Intersections]

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[04: Site Analysis Model] The site analysis model is a complex organization of planes, lines, intersections, and organic forms. The planes mimic the dense residential development of Mission Hill and respond to the circular intersections by angling around them. The light canopy is inidicated by the strings, which root themselves to the site at intersections. These connections would also influence the project’s structural qualities. Meanwhile, the gold wire mesh’s amorphous qualities contradict the regularity and orthogonality of the other elements, serving to create more organic spatial moments.

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ceramics : 2 050 sq ft digital fabrication : 300 sq ft woodshop : 1 300 sq ft metallurgy : 3 350 sq ft glasswork : 1 400 sq ft

galleries : 3 500 sq ft cafĂŠ : 5 00 sq ft shop : 500 sq ft mechanical : 2 700 sq ft

administration: 200 sq ft reception : 1 000 sq ft sculpture garden : 950 sq ft

garden : 8 700 sq ft [01sculpture Program Diagram I] The program scope called for spaces of storage : 3 700 sq ft production and consumption, or workshop and gallery spaces that would house metalwork, ceramics, pottery, glassblowing, and digital program diagram fabrication. The initial programmatic layout divided the site into +three community workshops galleries volumes, each of which, respectively, would contain the workshops, total : 25 000 sq ft galleries, and administrative spaces . footprint : 6 500 sq ft

[02 Programmatic Sketch] The division of the volumes occured where the amorphous voids left by the topography cut through the site. Meanwhile, the angled planes divided the interior spaces into smaller workshops and galleries. [03 Ground Plane Sketch] The ground plane was activated as a sunken public plaza, with smaller scupture gardens located under each volume

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[04 Program Model] Ultimately, the program was reduced to two volumes, separating workshops based on their use of fire, with firedependent workshops, like metallurgy, being housed in the large volume, and woodwork, which is fire-indepnedent, in the smaller volume. The angled planes were enlargened to become volumes in their own right, which housed gallery spaces. Likewise, the amorphous mesh evolved into a physical atrium separating the two programs.

[05 1/4-Scale Gallery Model] The triangular volumes functioned as the galleries for their adjacent workshops, and the floor levels were offset from those of the primary voids so as to provide double-height views into each other. The original planes still functioned as thick walls with internal staircases uniting the levels.

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[01 Program Study Model] This model generated a wide array of spatial qualities, such as the double- and triple-height spaces of the intersecting galleries, as well as more open and airy spaces, and smaller more confinded ones between the undulating vertical planes.

[02 Program Model] The site’s original slope is inverted so that the top and widest end remains flush with the street level, while its triangular point has been built up to provide an urban wall to house the administrative offices. From this vantage point atop the sculpture garden, visitors can observe the urban setting of the street while also looking down into narrow passageways that cut through the site.

[03 Program Model] Here, the central dividing atrium is still a physical object uniting the two volumes. However, it would evolve into a void that intersected the volumes’ pure geometries

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PROGRAM The final program provided for four workshops, two galleries, a café, and a richly activated ground level of sculpture gardens and public plazas. The primary volumes were divided via an atrium, harkening back to the greater site’s topographical voids. Rather than intersecting galleries, the final program called for galleries that functioned as mezzanines overlooking workshop spaces. The consequent double- and triple-height spaces permit large machinery and artworks, as well as for the business and culture of the workshops to permeate the galleries. All service areas are regulated to the interior of the thick walls. Meanwhile, the ground plane, as is evident in the plans, is sculpted into a series of gardens for outdoor artwork. A large central plaza serves as a community meeting place, and two smaller entrances on either end funnel visitors along pathways ­– reminiscent of works by James Turrell – through the site.

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gallery

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gla

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l digita ion at c i r work fab wood

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re u t ulp sc rden ga

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at

e ur t p ul sc rden ga

Fire Dependent Workshop Fire Independent Workshop Services/Structure

[04 Program Diagram]

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-1

[-2

1. Administration 2. Restroom 3. Cooperative Shop 4. Sculpture Garden 5. Plaza 6. Gallery 7. Metalwork 8. Glassblowing 9. Woodwork Mechanical Basement] 10. Digital Fabrication (mez 1) 11. Café 12. Kitchen 13. Storage 14. Mechanical

-1

[-1 Administration]

04-Plans 1/32” = 1’

ground

[0 Ground]

1. Administration 2. Restroom 3. Cooperative Shop 4. Sculpture Garden 5. Plaza 6. Gallery 7. Metalwork 8. Glassblowing 9. Woodwork 10. Digital Fabrication (mez 1) 11. Café 12. Kitchen 13. Storage 14. Mechanical

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Administration Restroom Cooperative Shop Sculpture Garden Plaza Gallery Metalwork Workshop Glassblowing Workshop Woodwork Workshop

10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Digital Fabrication Workshop CafĂŠ Kitchen Storage Mechanical

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6

9 2

8

2

2

2

2

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22 22 2

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13 12

13 7

[1 Fire-Dependent 1]

roof

[2 Fire-Independent 1]

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2 11

2

2

12

13 137

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1

2

3

[3 Fire-Dependent 2]

mezzanine 2roof

[4 Fire-Independent 2]

1

3

[4 Fire-Dependent 3]

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[01 Interior Wall + Stairway Rendering] The vertical planes which cut across the site at diagonals serve as thick structural concrete walls, between which the truss system is bridged. However, they also serve as the service and circulation space, housing the stairways, elevators, kitchen, restrooms, and storage and mechanical areas. The concrete though is not solid, rather it is perforated by various patterns unique to each wall that permit light to enter their deep voids. These perforations generate an interesting play of light and shadow that render these service spaces exciting experiences in their own right.

[02 Tension Cable Sketch] The exterior balconies and stairways of the atrium are supported via tension cables strung through them and attached to the concrete walls. [03 Structure Sketch] The steel truss system is joined to the concrete wall via steel plates, and the walls themselves have deep concrete footings.

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STRUCTURE The gallery and workshops’ structural system is a complex resulting, like the program, from site analysis. The vertical concrete planes are derived from those planes that indicated residential density across the greater site, while the paddleford truss system’s triangles are a nod to the site’s overall form in plan. The truss system acts very much like a bridge as it spans the spaces between the concrete planes whose footings are rooted deep in the ground. Where the two volumes intersect, the larger of the two gives way to the smaller, so that it’s structure extends slightly further past the void. The paddleford truss though also serves as the design’s façade. Meanwhile, tension cables, which also recall the site analysis’s study of light and topographic voids, tie the balconies and stairways of the concrete walls.

[04 Structural Diagram]

05-STRUCTURAL AXONOMETRIC 1/16” = 1’

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The structure itself is a reflection on the site analysis. A paddleford truss system is composed of a modular of four triangles measuring ten feet across whose angles speak to those of the concrete walls. Furthermore, the central atrium’s balconies and stairwys are supported via steel cables that extend from the interrupted truss to the concrete walls, resembling the rays of light as they fall across the site.

[01 Detail: Truss] [02 Detail: Truss + Concrete] [03 Detail: Tension Cable]

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[04: Structure Analysis Model] The volume on the right’s structure extends beyond the left and the central void to create a more intimate space overlooking the larger volume with a view out along the southern edge.

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[01 Sculpture Garden Perspective] In this perspective, a visitor emerges from one of the passageways that cut through the site and into the public plaza. Here, they are faced with the choice of ascending the ramp to one of the gardenes, taking the stairs, or enjoying a moment of pause and urban theatre.

[02 Situational Model Birdseye View] Due to the street’s slope, the sculpture gardens were built up to also serve as a viewing plafrom over the neighborhood. The administrative area, located under one of the gardens, posseses a large aperture along the street edge to permit light to penetrate the ground plane while also engaging passerby with views of otherwise unseen and unthought of spaces.

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INHABITATION While the program is primarily divided between gallery and workshop spaces, there are in effect, three primary types of space. Firstly, there is the ground plane, activated by a public plaza and sculpture gardens. Secondly, there is the workshop and gallery space itself, which dominates the program and the site. These spaces are essentially an open plan, divided into smaller workshops and galeries by the angles of the concrete planes, which, on gallery levels, also determine where the floor plates terminate to look down into the workshops. The workshop and gallery spaces are defined by the exposed truss, behind which is a translucent skin, permitting the galleries and workshops to be flooded with light. Thirdly, there is the space between the concrete planes, housing tighter, more transitory spaces like the stairways.

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[03 Sectional Perspective] 06-SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1/4� = 1’

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2 6 13

2

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[01: Longitudinal Section]


Just as the void separates the two volumes into fire-dependent and fire-independent galleries and workshops, so too does the public plaza cut the site in two so as to generate two sculpture gardens. Ramps and stairs (which also serve as public seating) unite the plaza to the gardens. The plaza itself takes on the qualities of an amphitheatre; with surrounding stepped seating, it is possible to host live performances and community gatherings. Meanwhile, the façade is a rich composition of patterns reflecting both the structure and the interior program. Each of the concrete planes possesses a unique pattern of light apertures that point to their adjacent uses, such that the plane by the digital fabrication workshop is perforated with a zigzag pattern reminiscent of machine paths, the woodshop by a woodgrain, the café by triangles for coffee mugs, while glassblowing’s circular perorations and the metalshop’s slashes recall conventional hatching patterns for these materials.

[01 Detail: Plaza + Exterior Stairway] [02 West Façade] [03 Southeast View]

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[04: Situational Model: Approach]

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II. Detailed Explorations I Building Systems Abigail Jones Spring 2019



C

B

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[01 Structural Plan] Three column grids are overlaid on a system of concrete walls: the two regular grids of each primary volume, and the radial grid of columns that support the exterior balconies.

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34'-4"

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16°

17'-6"

16'-10"

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16'-10"

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8'-8"

16'-

24'4"

10"

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1" 17'-

1"

3

17'-

1" 17'-

1"

A

B

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E

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G

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I 10a

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14'-2"

14'-9"

7'-3"

7'-6"

25'-3" GARDEN 36'-4"

D2

10'-7"

PLAZA 29'-0"

7'-4"

17'-9"

FIRST A 54'-1"

6'-10"

FIRST B 61'-3"

D3

14'

SECOND A 68'-1"

[02 Structural Section] While the trusses serve an æsthetic purpose, they also provide lateral bracing.

7'-2"

SECOND B 75'-4"

N

D4

ROOF 104'-1'

THIRD A 83'-10"

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K

11a

SUB LEVEL 18'-5" D1

17'-6"

16'-10"

16'-10"

16'-10"

16'-10"

17'-1"

17'-1"

17'-1"

17'-1"

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STRUCTURE + ENCLOSURE

PREFAB CONCRETE PANEL SEALANT

Working off of the galleries and workshops design for Studio II, I further explored possible structural and enclosure systems. The structural system calls for monolithic pre-fabricated insulated concrete panels that support a paddleford truss sytem built of steel. The X-shaped trusses and concrete walls provide rigidity against lateral forces, while steel columns carry their loads into the concrete walls and down into the earth. The enclosure system employs frosted channel glass panels that function as a curtain wall that ties into the steel frame. This permits maximum natural light to flood the workshop and gallery spaces.

[03 Detail 2: Wall Assembly] Prefabricated concrete panels are manufactured with rigid insulation and structural mesh. [04 Detail 1: Foundation] A poured-inplace matt slab foundation supports the structural concrete walls.

2 IN. HD XPS INSULATION CORE STRUCTURAL MESH 1 IN. WEEP CAVITY CONTINUOUS METAL FLASHING AVB GEOTEXTILE

PREFAB INSULATED CONCRETE PANEL AVB PREFAB INSULATED CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

CONCRETE MAT SLAB FOUNDATION

WIRE MESH

STRUCTURAL REBAR GRAVEL BED

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PREFAB CONCRETE PANEL 2 IN. HD XPS INSULATION CORE STRUCTURAL MESH

DOUBLE LAYER 20 IN. LOW- E COATED PICCOLO CHANNEL GLASS W/ THERMAL INSULATION

1 IN. WEEP CAVITY

SEALANT

12 IN. STEEL GIRDER

24 IN. STEEL GIRDER

CAVITY ANCHOR BOLT STEEL CORBEL

[01 Detail 3: Steel + Concrete Joint] The concrete panel walls support the steel joists and girders. The steel is supported by a continuous corbel. Where the concrete interrupts the regular grid, so too is the steel interrupted rather than run through the panels.

STEEL COLUMN

12 IN. STEEL JOIST

[02 Detail 4: Roof Assembly] Bendheim’s frosted channel glass system functions as the building’s skin. The frosted glass permits natural sunlight to flood the work spaces while not revealing the interior contents to passerby. At night, the building would glow, serving as a beacon for the community. The glass is painted with a low-E coating that improves its thermal performance and brings the R-value up to 5.26.

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TRUSS 12 IN. STEEL GIRDER 24 IN. FLOOR JOIST WEEP CAVITY 24 IN. STEEL COLUMN CLIP BELOW SILL BOLTED TO STEEL COLUMN DOUBLE LAYER 20 IN. LOW- E COATED PICCOLO CHANNEL GLASS W/ THERMAL INSULATION SILICONE SEAL JOINT MULLION

PREFAB CONCRETE PANEL 2 IN. HD XPS INSULATION CORE STRUCTURAL MESH 1 IN. WEEP CAVITY

SEALANT BOLTS

[03 Detail 5: Faรงade Plan] The frosted glass curtain wall is set into the concrete panels to provide a smooth material transition. This method is also another precaution against water and heat transfer.

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III. Culture + Sustainability Sustainable Systems Emil Cuevas-Melendez Autumn 2018



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A SITE B PALESTINIAN CULTURAL CENTER C ENGLISH LANGUAGE SCHOOL D TURKISH CULTURAL CENTER

66 BUS ROUTE B LINE

[01 Site + Culture Map]

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CULTURE

PORTUGUESE 1 080 KOREAN 1 426

The site for a zero-net water and energy building in Allston was chosen for its unique position as Boston’s youngest and most diverse neighborhood. The average population age is between 18 and 24, with students and graduates predominating. However, there are many ethnic populations, and many languages spoken, such as Chinese, Spanish, Portuguese, and Russian. As a result, many educational and cultural centers can be found in Allston, such as myriad ethnic restaurants, Orthodox churces, and Middle Eastern cultural centers. Therefore, the intervention sought to create a new multi-ethnic cultural center with artisan workshops and retail spaces to draw the diverse population together to share their art, culture, and languages. Students will be drawn to the arts and performances. A shared CVS and BSC parking lot was chosen for its central location and easy access on the Green line and bus routes.

FRENCH 1 484

SPANISH 10 660

RUSSIAN 3 093 CHINESE 8 549 80

60

40 70% 48% 20

[02 Neighborhood Languages Graph] [03 Neighborhood Age Distribution Graph]

HINDI 913

47%

13% 0

18-24

25-34

35-64

65+

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ALLSTON CULTURAL CENTER

+ ARTISTS WORKSHOPS

NATIVE VEGETATION

EXISTING STRUCTURE (CVS)

SLOPED LANDSCAPE

CISTERN:

500 000 GALLONS GRAVEL

CHARCOAL SAND GRAVEL

PUMP

HVAC

UV FILTERS

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AIR + WATER

CERAMIC PLATE

In order to acheive zero-net water, a large cistern wil occupy the center of the site and become a focal piece of a new parklett. The parklett will slope down toward the cistern in order to help increase the flow of rainwater into it. Likewise, the main structure is elevated and its roof is sloped in order to increase rain and water flow around it. The cistern employs a natural filtering system of layered charcoal, gravel, and sand, before passing through a UV filter and up into the builidng. It is capable of holding 500,000 gallons of water, out of the 1,031,194.5 gallons that fall on the site per year. Of this, the building only requires 61,005 gallons, and the rest can be used for landscaping or be sold to neighbors.

68 F

19 F

19 F

14 F

63 F

14 F

PARKING LOT

Meanwhile, the air is refreshed via an energy recovery vent, whose ceramic plate traps and expels hot air in order to passively regulate the interior temperature and air quality.

CISTERN FUTURE BUILDING

BRAINERD ROAD

[02 Energy Recovery Vent] [03 Proposed Site Plan]

68 F

63 F

SLOPED PARKLET

CVS

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A B C D E F G H I J K

[01 Ground Floor Plan] The first floor is a large open plan assembly hall that can be used for dinners, parties, performances, and gallery shows. It wraps aorund the cistern to offer views of the parklett as well as to break up the assembly space into two smaller volumes. Along the secondary road are three artisan shops. There is also a kitchen and an office.

[02 Mezzanine Level] The mezzanine level overlooks the assembly space and houses semi-open studies for the artists below. The building measures a total of 20,000 square feet.

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MATERIALITY

oak floor 3/8�

Materials with low embodied energies were chosen where possible. Oak is one of the most sustainably grown woods and was choosen for interior finishes. While glass has the highest embodied energy of all the materials, it is triple insulated to ensure a prime indoor air quality and insulation.

underfloor air circulation

MATERIAL EMBODIED ENERGY GLASS (RECYCLED) 4.75-88.2 MJ/SQ. FT. WOOD STUD

2.4-4.5 MJ/LF

CONCRETE 1.03 MJ/KG GYPSUM TYPE X

2.9-5.4 MJ/SQ. FT.

HARDWOOD WALL PANELS

1.39-2.57 MJ/SQ. FT.

HARDWOOD FLOOR

1.6-2.9 MJ/SQ. FT.

HOLLOW WOOD DOORS

168.6 MJ/SQ. FT.

[03 Floor + Air Circulation Detail] [04 Exterior Wall Detail]

triple insulating glass

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SOLAR ARRAY ON SLOPED ROOF

PARKING LOT

CISTERN

BRAINERD ROAD

FUTURE BUILDING

SLOPED PARKLET CVS

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SUN + ENERGY In order to acheive zero-net energy, a solar panel array will be placed on the building’s roof. Energy calculations show that the new Allston Cultural Center would employ an approximate 502,693.16 kWH per year. However, based on adjacent structures’ sun exposure, an array measuring 3,800 square feet would only be capable of producing about 6% of the required energy, or 85,693 kWH/yr. Therefore, alternative systems, such as geothermal energy, must be employed to account for this.

[01 Solar Energy Diagram] [02 Adjacent CVS’s Solar Output Map]* *Allston, MA. Map. Mapdwell. Web. 15 November 2018.

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IV. New Hermetics Arch Studio III Justin Kollar + Min Seok Yeo Spring 2019



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PROTOTYPING New Hermetics emerged as a new prototype housing typology rooted in communal and sustainable living. Initially tasked with developing new housing for the United States Naval Air Station in Corpus Christi, Texas, New Hermetics evolved via two primary design forces: rapid prototype development and precedent analysis. The first phase of design involved the former. As can be seen in the Prototype Matrix, varied compositions, based in one or two primary geometric forms, resulted in unique masssings. All prototypes sought the generation of a communal living space. In the first row, for example, the rectangles’ points of overlap generate geometrically distinctive spaces. These planar views would later turn sectional, with the communal overlaps expanding upward as well. Likewise, precedent analysis of the Barbican Housing Estate, Beaulieu Monastery, and the Parthenon, helped to inform the formal relation of spaces to each other; for example, living/working/gathering spaces in the monastery influenced the arrangement of bedrooms and living spaces.

[01 Prototype Matrix] [02 Parti Diagram] [03 Precedent: Beaulieu Monastery] [04 Program Diagram]

dormitory

PARTI SCALESS

work

religious exterior

bath bed

family studio communal living

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1:25000

[01 Regional Map] The city of Corpus Christi nestles the Bays of Corpus Christi and Oso, as well as the Gulf of Mexico. The Naval Air Station sits at the tip of the peninsula.There are roads connecting the base to the rest of the city, but there is little in terms of public transport. New Hermetics generates new housing for the military base’s noncombattant personnel and their families who may prefer to live on-base rather than commute from the city-proper.

1:500

[02 Site Map] As can be seen here, the land is relatively flat, and the human eye could view both bodies of water while standing on the site. The base’s existing housing straddles the site to the southest, with rows of traditional suburban houses following loosely planned and curvaceous streets. New Hermetics rejects the singularity of the traditonal American suburban home, in favor of a more cooperative and sustainable approach to living, working, and learning together.

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SITE ANALYSIS While communal living informed the massing and interior layout, sustainable communal living informed the design’s relationship to the greater site. The naval base sits at the tip of the Corpus Christi peninsula, separated from the rest of the city by a bay and highway. The land is relatively flat, with clear views out toward the bay and Gulf of Mexico, and there is little greenery besides a sprawling golf course and the front yards of neighboring homes. Looking to the Parthenon’s relationship to the city of Athens as a separate, sanctified space elevated above the rest of the city, New Hermetics likewise is raised up on a series of garden terraces to distinguish it from the rest of the base and city. This served two goals: firstly, to provide agricultural area for self-sustenance farming, and secondly, to literally elevate the new housing typology above the surrounding traditional homes. By raising the site, it draws attention to itself as a beacon of new cooperative living.

22.03 12:00 ALT. 54.5° AZIMUTH: 135°

22.09 15:00 ALT. 54° AZIMUTH: 225°

21.12 10:00 ALT. 18.5° AZIMUTH: 130.5°

21.06 18:00 ALT. 28.5° AZIMUTH: 283°

SOLAR DIAGRAM 18:00 SUMMER SOLTICE

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[03 Sun Diagram] [04 Precedent: The Parthenon] [05 Views Diagram] [06 Wind Diagram]

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WIND DIAGRAM CROSS VENTILATION


[01 Step 1: Geometric Overlaps] The first step to generate the massing was to layout a series of different plans, each with two communal spaces and bedrooms at each end of the rectangle. There are different numbers of bedrooms and bedroom-adjacencies to accomodate a wide range of family types, from traditional two-parent/ two-children to three single people living togehter.

2 Bedroom 1 Private Bedroom Master Suite Communal Living Secondary Living

2 Bedroom Master Suite Family Studio Communal Dining Secondary Living

2 Bedroom Master Suite Family Studio Communal Dining Communal Living

3 Private Bedroom Communal Dining Secondary Living

2 Private Bedroom Master Suite Communal Living Secondary Living

[02 Step 2: Geometric Warping] The communal spaces were mapped and overlaid on each other to replicate the matrix’s third iteration. Next, the rectangles were warped so that these communal spaces formed right angles with each other in section.

2 Bedroom 1 Private Bedroom Master Suite Communal Living Secondary Living

2 Bedroom Master Suite Family Studio Communal Dining Secondary Living

2 Bedroom Master Suite Family Studio Communal Dining Communal Living

3 Private Bedroom Communal Dining Secondary Living

2 Bedroom 1 Private Bedroom Master Suite Family Studio Communal Living Secondary Living

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FORM + SITE In earlier iterations, the site was planned to be walled off, like a monastery. This was to separate it from the rest of the base. Overtime, the wall gradually broke down, transforming into more of an intentional ruin punctured by the housing proper and other various apertures that look out over the base. As notions of sustainability emerged, the wall served more to differentiate between outdoor agricultural and leisure space. A reservoir and rain-garden were placed in the center of the site to help cool the courtyard while also providing water for the irrigation and indoor plumbing. The raised entry court is accessed via a long, narrow staircase at the site’s northeastern border. Meanwhile, in order to generate the actual massing, the matrix’s third iteration was chosen for its four separate communal spaces. Two of these would be large living/dining spaces uniting all three levels, while the other two would be smaller living spaces and studios.

[03 Site Sketch]

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Desert Willow chilopsis linearis.

Tomatoes solanum lycopersicum

Asparagus asparagus officinalis

Trailing Lantana lantana montevidensis

Verbena verbena spp. ‘

Century Plant agave americana

Kale brassica oeleracea

[01 Landscape Digram] Native or already-introduced species were chosen for the landscaping. In the courtyard and rain garden, trees, shrubs, and flowering bushes were chosen to bring in soft colors that compliment the housing’s brick façade. Desert willows, trailing lantana, and verbena are some examples. Meanwhile, the agricultural terraces are planted with vegetables and fruits that grow well in Corpus Christi’s humid subtropical climate, such as kale and tomatoes.

LANDSCAPE DIAGRAM Scaless

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[02 Perspective] This perspective shows the original landscape strategy, with a retaining wall holding back a sloping terrain through which the structure emerges. A more functional approach was later chosen that would make use of this slope as terrace farming.

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SOLDIER BOND AT HEAD

HARDWOOD HEAD

CONTINUOUS METAL FLASHING

OPERABLE GLAZING

HARDWOOD SILL

ROMAN BRICK FAÇADE, RUNNING BOND SOLDIER BOND AT SILL CONCRETE PAVERS

HARDWOOD FLOORING

SOLDIER BOND AT PARAPET

CONCRETE ROOF DECK

DENSDECK

1 IN. CAVITY RIGID INSULATION CONTINUOUS AVB CMU

CONCRETE CEILING TILES

CONCRETE BEAM

HARDWOOD HEAD

SOLDIER BOND AT HEAD CONTINUOUS METAL FLASHING

HARDWOOD STEP FINISHED CONCRETE FLOOR

GRAVEL BED BELOW SLAB

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[01 Wall Section] This detail highlights a typical unit threshold: a concrete step welcomes the inhabitant before landing them on a concrete floor at grade. The bedroom above is set back from this threshold, providing space for a balcony with plantings, letting natural daylight into the room. A brick veneer is imposed on a CMU wall assembly. [02 Final Model]

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BEDROOM DOUBLE BEDROOM BATHROOM CLOSET LAUNDRY FAMILY STUDIO COMMUNAL LIVING COMMUNAL DINING KITCHENETTE COMMUNAL KITCHEN MULTI-RURPOSE ROOM GAME ROOM TERRACE 2 13 SITTING ROOM MIDSIZE DINING LIBRARY/ WORK SPACE STORAGE RAIN GARDEN ENTRY COURT COURTYARD CROP TERRACE ELEVATOR

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LEVEL TWO: UNITS 4 + 5


COMMUNAL LIVING In general, bedrooms are regulated to the ends of each of the five units to ensure views over the base and bodies of water. While there are formally five units, there are no private kitchen, dining, or living spaces. All five “families” share these spaces, and there are a multitude of different sized spaces to accommodate varying groups. A nuclear family, for example, has the option of having dinner in one of the smaller dining spaces. Likewise, all 22 residents could also dine together in the large ground floor dining room. Two patios also extend the large ground floor spaces to the exterior, and there are five uniquely sized exterior courtyards and leisure terraces. All communal spaces are highlighted in red in both section and plan to communicate these spaces’ dominance in the design.

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Meanwhile, the “family studio,” – a small living space overlooking larger communal spaces – was introduced as a gathering spot for nuclear families to nourish their bonds.

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[01 First Floor Plan] [02 Second Floor Plan] [03 Ground Floor Plan]

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ROOF 54’-6”

LEVEL II 42’-6”

LEVEL II 30’-6”

COURTYARD 20’-0”

LEVEL I 21’-6”

TERRACE III 15’-0” TERRACE II 10’-0”

TERRACE I/ MECHANICAL 5’-0” GRADE 0’-0”

ROOF 54’-6”

LEVEL II 42’-6”

LEVEL II 30’-6”

COURTYARD 20’-0”

LEVEL I 21’-6”

TERRACE III 15’-0” TERRACE II 10’-0” TERRACE I 5’-0” GRADE 0’-0”

SC1

SP1

[01 Section A] [02 Section B]

SC2

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[03 Study Model] This model generated a wide array of spatial qualities, such as the double- and triple-height spaces of the overlapping living spaces. In this study, for example, two larger communal spaces stradle a smaller one that eventually transformed into a family studio.

[04 Study Model] This detail photo shows how the massing revelas itself through the encompassing wall so that bedrooms and balconies can have views of the gulf and bay, while also bringing in more light.

[05 Sectional Model] This sectional model shows the layering of communal spaces. Different vantage points offer views both up and down into other spaces so that no space is visually or physically cut off from another, encouraging interaction.

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[01: Perspective Section] This section displays some of the varied activities that occur in each space. It also revelas the submerged cistern that waters the gardens and connects to the plumbing.

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[01 Bedroom Perspective] Brick was chosen for its resilience and thermal insulating qualities. Here, you can see the floor-to-ceiling windows that bring in light and often bleed out onto the balconies. Each double bedroom has a balcony.

[02 Communal Space Perspective] While each of the spaces has a specific function, this perspective focused rather on each space as a viewport into adjacent spaces. While gathering occurs in the foreground, a family watches from the doorway to their family studio, while solitary moments can also be seen beyond.

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ACTIVITY Medieval monastic culture was not an isolated lifestyle as so often perceived. Rather, it was rich in shared living and work. Monks and nuns shared duties and often tended to small sustenance farms. All aspects of life were shared. In the modern world, New Hermetics seeks to break the stereotype of the isolated monk and bring individuals and families into contact with each other. It is not just about communal and shared living, but about the sustainable aspect of sharing resources and of cultivating those resources together. While the terrace farming and cistern accomplish part of this, studio workspaces and a library also stimulate the sharing of intellectual resources. The noncombattant residents, often engineers and researchers, not only share their physical resources, but also their ideas and discoveries, leading to even more breakthroughs.

[03 Activity Axonometric] The axonometric drawing maps some of the activities that can take place through the lens of Medieval and early Renaissance artworks depicting similar activities. Some examples are monks farming (the terraces), the Holy Family sitting together (the family studios), monks illuminating manuscripts (the work spaces), and a couple in bed (the double bedroom).

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V. Mint École amÊricaine de beaux-arts de Fontainebleau Summer 2019



TEAM: Will Fu

Ellen Wood

Salisha Ali

Allan Chong

Mengfei Wang

Zachary Torres

Sam Yulsman, composer

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“PALETTE CLEANSER”

“We invite the audience to be silent,” was all the installation’s program description read. Having opted to go last in the order of performances, our group sought to create a “palette cleanser,” a gentle but profound sensorial experience of space and sound after an afternoon of more performative installations by the other groups. Entitled Mint, we sought to engage the public in a temporal and intimidate space, to participate in a meditative and voyeuristic experience that hovered on the threshold of audio-visual perception. We collaborated closely with a composer, who in effect, helped to design the installation. Conceptually, it was simple: three walls fabricated out of white fabric and supported on bamboo form an intimate space. Mint harvested from the gardens covers the ground, while two cellists sit within the space, playing a single note so softly it is only audible within the space. Meanwhile, the courtyard’s acoustic qualities are employed, and three pianos inside the castle, but on different ends of the courtyard, each play the same note as the cellists, allowing the notes to float through the air and mingle with the audience’s footsteps crushing the mint as they pass between the cellists.

[01 Constructing the Walls] Photo [02 Sketches] [03 Beginning of Performance] [04 Audience Entering the Cour Ovale] Video Still

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In terms of choreography: the audience entered the courtyard silently to three performers slowly pacing around the installation while the pianos play. Eerily, one wall disengages, and one performer slowly walks through the space; the cellists begin playing. Once out, she gestures to the audience to likewise move through the space, to experience the sensory surprises of mint and cellists. Once the entire audience has passed through, the wall reengages with the others; the cellists stop playing. Then the two far walls disengage, and process with the cellists between them to the opposite gate; the cellists leave the court, and the walls form a corridor. The audience follows, and the final wall heards them out.

[01 Constructing the Walls] [02 Constructing the Walls] Photo [03 Final Choreography] Sketch [04 Choreography Sketch] [05 Choreography Sketch [06 Audience Exiting the Space] Video Still

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Mint won the Prix du Jury, the second place

for all the installations. Audience members equally described it as a “dry baptism” and a funeral. Overall, there was a sense of joy on the audience’s faces as they entered the space, and of meditation upon exiting.

[01 Experience at Ground with Mint and Seated Cellists] Video Still

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VI.Dr/Hive Arch Studio IV Samuel Maddox Autumn 2019



[01 Concept Sketch: Distribution] [02 Concept Sketch: Apiary] [03 Concept Sketch: Dronecote] These conceptual sketches seek to capture the theatrics of distribution in public space. Trucks ascend into a Distribution Chamber via a hydraulic lift to be loaded with fruits and vegetables that are then distributed in Boston’s neighbhorhoods. Likewise, the Apiary and Dronecote are located on elevated public platforms, mingling the public and the building’s productive functions. [04 Mapping of Boston Food Access]

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FOOD NETWORKS Boston is hungry. Its neighborhoods inadequately furnished with grocery stores and markets. Agriculture invades the cit; assuming the guise of urban industry, it plants itself in the city center, adjacent to historic distribution networks. Seen from the River, it is a new shipyard, floating above the highway, producing food for the city which it seeks to both nourish and destroy. The Urban Agricultural College is an organic machine, feeding and being fed by the city. It absorbs bees into its skin, harvesting their natural products to fund the growing of food in order to nourish an impoverished urban landscape, merging capitalist means with socialist ends. It is performative, enticing passerby to journey into its skin, indoctrinating them with knowledge of aeroponics and melittology via the theatrics of distribution in the form of drones and a hydraulic lift, trapping them in trendy late-capitalist venues and boutiques, like a mead bar and cosmetics shop.

Boston is facing a food crisis. As the grocery store mapping indicates, many neighborhoods are not sufficinetly supplied with healthy food options. The worst of these food deserts are in Charlestown and East Boston, with only one supermarket each. Further, many of the supermarkets in lowerincome neighborhoods, like Dorchester and Roxbury, are located along major roads and highways, rendering them inaccessible to those who rely solely on public transport. As the above narrative indicates, the project for an Urban Agricultural College seeks to supply these neighborhoods with on-site grown food distributed out to the neighbhorhoods via trucks and drones.

Supermarkets Farmers’ Markets “Box� Stores

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Via professors, it takes in knowledge. Students distribute it. Via bees, it takes in pollen. Vegetables consume it. Via vegetables, it takes in nutrients. Drones and trucks distribute them. The public watches.The public learns. The public eats.

The Urban Agricultural College is a machine for distribution. It comprises three primary systems that negotiate the boundary between urban theatre, industrial functionality, and public education. These systmes are the Apiary, the Dronecote, and the Hanging Aeroponics Garden. These three systmes are loated on interstitial spaces between the college’s formal programmed spaces. From these semi-enclosed spaces, bees and drones are free to flow in and out of the building, transporting the nutrients of pollen for plants, and plants for human consumption. As the public tranverses the site, they pass through these three spaces, interacting with, observing, and learning from the active systems. [01 Distribution Chamber Perspective] This perspective illustrates the industrial aesthetic of the college. The hydraulic lift punctures the floor, allowing for the loading of fruits and vegetables produced on-site to be distributed out to the city. [02 Distribution + Intake Mapping] The interstial semi-enclosed spaces serve as platforms for the buildings’ distribution systems. Here, bees buzz in and out of the Apiary, collecting pollen from the Esplanade and Public Garden, while drones dart around, deliverying packages to the neighbrhoods.

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PROGRAM + STREET Travelling along the urban street that links two park systems, passerby are affronted with the bustling of students attending to hanging plants, the buzzing of bees, the overhead darting to and fro of drones transporting crates of vegetables and fruit to the outer neighborhoods.

The program negotiates the typical needs of a college and its social functions. In plan, the program is divided into three parts: the library and distribution center, which also welcomes the public with its front façade; the lecture hall, laboratories, and classrooms, the latter of which are visually joined to the openplan laboratories; and the private area of dormitories and administration, which are the only programs not accessible to the public. The education spaces span over Storrow Drive, offering views across the river and toward the West End. As vehicules pass under the structure, they glimpse the busininess of the program, which culminates during morning rush hour as students make their way to class, joggers follow the ramp, and the drones explode out into the sky to deliver the day’s first packages. [01 Level 3] [02 Model Photograph] [03 Skin Puncture Studies] These models were a study in how the extruding classrooms puncture the envelopping screen and where the screen should terminate.

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1. LIFT/ MARKET PARVIS 2. CAF´E 3. KITCHEN 4. ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 5. DORMITORY 5A. ADA COMPLIANT SINGLE ROOM 5B. PRIVATE ROOM 6. BATHROOM 7. STUDENT KITCHEN/ LAUNDRY 8. DISTRIBUTION CHAMBER 9. LIBRARY 10. DIRECTOR’S SUITE 11. GROUND GARDEN/ COURT 12. LOBBY 13. LECTURE HALL 14. SOUND BOOTH 15. DRONECOTE 16. APIARY 17. DISTILLATION LAB 18. AQUAPONICS LAB 19. CLASSROOM 20. TERRACE 21. SEMINAR ROOM 22. WASHROOM 23. MECHANICAL CLOSET 24. COSMETICS LAB 25. MEAD BAR 26. COSMETICS BOUTIQUE 27.CANDLES BOUTIQUE 28. PRODUCE BOUTIQUE 29. SUCCULENTS ROOF GARDEN

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[01 Ground Level] [02 Level 2] [03 LEVEL 4 + MEZZANINE]

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UP

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As can be seen in the sections, the Apiary and Dronecote inhabit the interstitial spaces between the standard program. Classrooms hover over the open-plan laboratory, and two seminar rooms extrude from the Distribution Chamber. The laboratories themselves are subdivided into different disciplines: distillation of mead, aeroponics, and cosmetics research. All of this is enclosed in a metal mesh screen that blurs the boundary of interior and exterior. At points along the path, it gives way, affording views of the city and river. It serves to confine the path, reminding pedestrians that they inhabit the interiority of a closed-system machine, of the invading agriculture which dons the mask of industry. [01 Section A] [02 Section B] [03 Section C] [04 Section D] [05 Dog-eared Section]

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The ramp that connects the street to the Esplanade wraps and winds its way around the programmed space. With the introduction of a secondary program comprising boutiques for the sale of cosmetics and candles produced by the bees, a mead bar, a cafÊ, and a produce bodega, the ramp transcends itself to become a street in and of itself. Pedestrians and students mingle in the hustle; consumers window shop; graduate students and neighbors chat about the vegetaion in the mead bar. Thus, the architecture manifests as a consumerist playground, a social experiment gathering the city’s many publics, whose purpose is the sale of goods to fund the growing of nutritious food for the same city.

COSMETICS BOUTIQUE

[01 Mapping Consumerism along the Path]

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CANDLE BOUTIQUE

CAFÉ MEAD BAR

PRODUCE BODEGA

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WATER + NUTRIENT PUMP TO SUPPLY MIST EVERY 3-5 MINUTES FOR 3-5 SECONDS CONTINUOUUS AVB

(2) PERFORATED ALUMINUM SCREEN

MISTER SUPPLY MISTERS 18” O.C.

METAL FASTNER PER MANUFACTORER 3/4” EXTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM

14” DUCT CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING

1/2” CONCRETE PANEL FINISH 5/8” GWB

1/2” FINISHED BLEACHED OAK PANEL CEILING AIR RETURN

SECONDARY SEALANT WITH WEEP HOLES AT 14” O.C.

HANGING STRIP LIGHT 2”TRIPANE GLAZING WITH ARGON GAS INSULATION

CEILING-MOUNTED ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT DESK LAMP

PRIMARY SEALANT 2X BLOCKING BLEACHED OAK SILL

3” X 3” STEEL ANGLE 6” CONCRETE ON METAL DECK

1/4” GAUGE PERFORATED STEEL GRATE, 1/8” DIAMETER PERFROATIONS 3/8” O.C.

1/2” POLISHED CONCRETE FINISH FLOOR 2” RIGID ROCK INSULATION 5/8”GWB 3 5/8” STEEL STUD

14” STEEL BEAM

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AEROPONICS Aeroponics is an efficient agricultural method that employs 95% less water than conventional farming methods. Vegetables are proven to grow almost twice as fast and twice as large. This phenonemon is due to their increased exposure to oxygen. The plants are suspended with their roots exposed, which are sprayed for 5-10 seconds about every 5 minutes.1 In an urban context, aeroponics is a spacesaving and fruitful production method. In the Urban Agricultural College, the aeroponics garden is suspended over the path and student rooftop gathering spaces, generating a canopy effect for pedestrians and students. The screen wraps up to form a double-layered roof from which the plants and misters hang. 1 Brian Barth, “How Do Aeroponics Work,” Modern Farmer (26 July 2018); Len Calderone, “Growing with Hydroponics, Aeroponics, and Aquaponics,” Agritech Tomorrow (26 December 2018).

[01 Aeroponics + Ramp Detaiil] The ramp is constructed of a 1/4” gauge perforated steel grate reminiscient of a catwalk. Between the dorms and administrative offices, the aeroponics system hangs, creating an urban canopy under which pedestrians walk, brushing aside and sampling the plants, being misted and cooled with them. [02 Student Rooftop + Aeroponics Perspective] [03 Model Detail Photo: Inhabiting Skin] [04 Model Detail Photo: Administration Façade] [05 Dog-eared Section]

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6” CONCRETE ON METAL DECK

CONTINUOUS AVB 3/4” EXTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM 3/4” EXTERIOR ZINC ROOF PANEL SYSTEM 7/16” PT PLYWOOD 24” STEEL TRUSS

3 5/8” STEEL STUD

1/2” CONCRETE PANEL FINISH 5/8” GWB

2”TRIPANE GLAZING WITH ARGON GAS INSULATION

1/2” FINISHED BLEACHED OAK PANEL CEILING AIR RETURN

CEILING-MOUNTED ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT DESK LAMP

SPRINKLER

1/16” THERMO-BRACE 2” RIGID ROCK INSULATION 2” BEE ACCESS PASSAGE, METAL TUBE

2” TRIPANE GLAZING WITH ARGON GAS INSULATION

SPRINKLER SUPPLY

2X BLOCKING PRIMARY SEALANT

HONEYCOMB TRAY, PLYWOO + ZINC-FACED, ON METAL TRACK 2”TRIPANE GLAZING WITH ARGON GAS INSULATION

PRIMARY SEALANT 2X BLOCKING BLEACHED OAK SILL

ATED

SECONDARY SEALANT WITH WEEP HOLES AT 14” O.C.

2X WOOD SILL WRAPPED IN PLEATED ZINC

METAL FASTENER PER MANUFACTORER

MECHANICAL + PLUMBING CONDUITS

IONS

CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING

[01 Apiary Wall Section Detail] [02 Dronecote Wall Section Detail] 14” STEEL BEAM 14” STEEL BEAM

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Y

THE WALL The wall becomes inhabited by bees and drones, furthering the architecture’s performative functions. These walls frame interstitial spaces; baptized Apiary and Dronecote, these porches become new privileged points of view over the bituminous highway, confusing the hum of traffic and bees, redirecting attention to the spectacle of Nature. Observed from the highway by morning commuters, the architecture functions as an alarm clock for the city; it awakens as the bees buzz out to collect pollen for the aeroponics system; the drones explode from their slumber, filling the morning sky in a cloud of scintillating metal.

The wall thickens to house the systems of the Apiary and Dronecote. For the former, a glass wall faces the public, encouraging them to approach, to hear the buzzing and see the bees dartig about their hives, producing the honeycomb that will be extracted into the mead, candles, and cosmetics sold along the street. From the interior, students studying mellitology can access the honeycomb via pull-out drawers (removeable combs being a Boston City Ordinance). Vertical tunnels are provided for the bees to come and go as they please. Similarly, the Dronecote evokes and derives its name from vernacular dovecotes. Drones, which are capable of carrying up to 40lbs, are housed in cubbies equipped with charging docks.

6” CONCRETE ON METAL DECK

CONTINUOUUS AVB 3/4” EXTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM METAL FASTNER PER MANUFACTORER

7/16” PT PLYWOOD 24” STEEL TRUSS

2” RIGID ROCK INSULATION

1/16” THERMO-BRACE

CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING 3 5/8” STEEL STUD

HANGING STRIP LIGHT 3 5/8” STEEL STUD 3/4” INTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM METAL FASTNER PER MANUFACTORER 7/16” PT PLYWOOD 5/8” GWB

1/4” PLEATED SHEET ZINC

WIRELESS CHARGING PAD

MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL + PLUMBING CONDUITS ELECTRICAL SUPPLY TO CHARGING PADS

93 14” STEEL BEAM


[01 Dronecote Perspective] The cafĂŠ overlooks the Dronecote, affording patrons views of the pedestrians and of the drones delivering their packages. [02 Mead Bar Perspective] [03 Distillation Labatory Perspective] The classrooms overlook the labatories and are connected via catwalks. Students can watch and learn from each other in the various labatories.

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[01 Structural Axonometric] The structure is Type II-A construction employing steel trusses. The trusses are located in the walls of the cantilevering spaces, and are exposed at the roof level in the public spaces and laboratories. Crane-like towers support the spaces hovering over the highway, as well as the long cantilever at the Distrubution Chamber. Tension cables resist the moment incurred by the building on the “cranes.�

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STRUCTURE + DETAILS Agriculture appropriates the urban-industrial aesthetic, an aesthetic whose distributary and productive functions are best exhibited in shipyard infrastructure. The structure therefore takes the industrial shipyard as precedent, with crane-like towers supporting the cantilevers and spaces hovering over the highway. Thus, the building’s form takes on the language of crates being lifted by cranes. Large steel trusses within the walls connect to the steel “cranes” via a trus system at the roof. The “cranes,” located on the medians, are likewise tied back with tension cables whose angles are calculted such that vehicules may pass under unobstructed. As for materiality, a white zinc paneling system clads the exterior, contrasting heavily with the black metal mesh screen, highlighting the extruding volumes. Much of the interior is exposed concrete and steel structure, with similar white panel zinc walls. The dormitories’ interiors are softer, with a white oak. Meanwhile, the boutiques are clad in a darker walnut, inviting pedestrians inside with their warmer materiality and atmospheres.

48” STEEL TRUSS 60” X 84”CONCRETE FOOTING

[02 Model Photograp: Birds’ Eye View] [03 “Crane Footing Detail] [04 Model Photograph: “Cranes Support Cantilevers]

1” DIAMETER THREADED ROD CONTINUOUS AVB

#10 REBAR 12” CRUSHED STONE BED

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BUILDING CODE #10 REBAR REIVEW 12” CRUSHED

PROJECT LOCATION: STONE BED Back Bay, Boston, MA Air rights over Storrow Drive

OCCUPANCY: A-2 (restaurants) A-3 (lecture halls, greenhouses, libraries) B (laboratories, educational) M (markets, greenhouses for sale of plants) R-2 (dormitories for more than 16 occupants) S-2 (low-hazard food storage)

CONSTRUCTION TYPE:

TYPE II-A (protected, non- combustible: 1 hr exterior walls, structural frame, floor/ceiling protection)

MAXIMUM BUILDING AREA: A-2: 46,500 sqft A-3: 46,500 sqft B: 112,500 sqft M: 65,500 sqft R-2: 72,000 sqft S-2: 156,000 sqft MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT: A-2: 4/ 85ft A-3: 4/ 85ft B: 6/ 85ft M: 5/ 85ft R-2: 5/ 85ft S-2: 6/85ft

BOLT + WELD AT SIDES 48” STEEL TRUSS BLOCK + SHIM

7/16” PT PLYWOOD

CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING

5/8” DENSDECK 3” ROOF DECK HD COVERBOARD

CONTINUOUUS AVB

26” STEEL TRUSS FULLY ADHERED MEMBRANE, SINGLE PLY 6” XPS

3/4” EXTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM BOLT + WELD AT SIDES

METAL FASTNER PER MANUFACTORER 2” RIGID ROCK INSULATION

3/4” INTERIOR ZINC PANEL SYSTEM 7/16” PT PLYWOOD

PROPOSED BUILDING HEIGHT: 4.5/ 65 ft EGRESS: Ceiling height: 7ft 6in Stairways: 0.3 x Occ. Load Stairway headroom: 80in Ramps: not steeper than 1:12, 30in rise OCCUPANCY LOAD: Assembly w/o fixed seats: 7 Business: 150 Dormitories: 50 Classroom: 20 Commercial kitchens: 200 Library reading room: 50 Library stacks: 100 Mercantile: 60 Storage: 300

5/8” GWB

98


COMMON PATH OF TRAVEL: A/M (49 occupant load):75ft B/S (49 occupant load): 100ft R-2 (20 occupant load): 125ft MAXIMUM TRAVEL DISTANCE: A/M/R/S: 250ft B: 300ft MINIMUM SEPARATION OF EXITS: 1/3 the diagonal of the total length of the building or area served FIRES SUPPRESSION: Automatic Sprinkler SEPARATION OF OCCUPANCIES: A-R: 1hr A-B/M: 1hr R-B/M:1hr Laundry rooms over 100 sq ft: 1hr or sprinkler Exterior exit stairways shall have a separation of at least 10ft from the lot lines, building, and other buildings FIRE RATINGS: Labs: Floor, horizontal assembly and structure of 1hr

[01 “Crane” Truss to Roof Detail] [02 Sectional Axonometric] This axonometric highlights the Distribution Chamber, with its cut-through floor and hydraulic lift. The library and seminar spaces are also visible, as well as the structural connection betwwen “crane” and roof. Chilled beams can also be seen, which were used for heating and cooling public spaces, while the dorms rely on conventional ductwork. Plumbing and electrical conduits are exposed, as can be seen here and in the wall sections, and between the Distribution Chamber and library, the pipes descend to form a screen between the two spaces.

99


50 FT

45 FT

45 FT 23 FT

60 FT

50 FT 23 FT

OCCUPANCY: RESIDENTIAL-2 (DORMITORY) COMMON PATH MAX: 125 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 250 ft

60 FT

OCCUPANCY: BUSINESS (ADMINISTRATION) COMMON PATH MAX:100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 300 ft

46 FT

100 FT

OCCUPANCY: STORAGE (DISTRIBUTION CHAMBER) COMMON PATH MAX: 100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 250 ft

GROUND FLOOR

45 FT

50 FT

SECOND FLOOR

23 FT

68 FT

OCCUPANCY: ASSEMBLY-3 (LECTURE HALL) COMMON PATH MAX: 75ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 250 ft

16 FT

22 FT

45 FT

50 FT 23 FT

OCCUPANCY: BUSINESS (CLASSROOM) COMMON PATH MAX: 100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 300 ft

67 FT 74 FT

66 FT

42 FT 34 FT 22 FT

25 FT

12 FT 97 FT 64 FT

88 FT

25 FT

36 FT

38 FT

OCCUPANCY: BUSINESS (LABORATORY) COMMON PATH MAX: 100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 300 ft OCCUPANCY: BUSINESS (LIBRARY) COMMON PATH MAX:100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 300 ft

25 FT

100 FT

OCCUPANCY: BUSINESS (SEMINAR ROOM) COMMON PATH MAX:100 ft MAX TRAVEL DISTANCE: 300 ft

MEZANNINE THIRD FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR

100


LIFE SAFETY + ACCESSIBILITY

1" 15'-02 3'

6'-43 4"

5'

4'

3'

2'-6"

2'-6"

1'-6"

2'-6"

1'-6" 3'-6" 6" 3'-6"

16'-4"

2'-6"

4'

3'-6"

5'

2'-6"

4'

3'-6"

1'-5"

8'-0 "

1'

1" 6'-02

3'-2"

2'-6"

16'-4"

16'-4"

2'-6"

3' 6�

3'

2'-6"

2'-1"

4'

[01 Egress Diagrams] [02 Student Bathroom ADA-Compliant Plan] [03 Gender Neutral Private Washroom ADA-Complaint Plan] [04 ADA-Complaint Student Dormitory Plan] [05 Student Kitchen ADA-Compliant Plan]

1'-5"

4'

3'-0"

The Urban Agricultural College, in line with its mission to welcome, engage, and educate the public, is fully accessible. Furthermore, it is compliant with emergency egress regulations. The latter of these was a difficult task to accomplish due to the nature of the site spanning over an active highway. In order to acheive necessary travel distances, one egress stair tower required touching the ground at the large central median at the onramp. Negotiations with the city will demand an emergency stop ligth, which would be required anyway for the safety of automobiliss should the building catch fire or there be another emergency. Ensuring the path was ADA- and code-compliant was also a challenging task. The solution was to wrap the ramp around the Distribution Chamber and library to attain the height needed to clear the highway, and then to allow it to slope back down between the dormitories and administrative offices. In this way, all members of the public can participate in the college’s educative and consumerist activities.

3'-6"

2'-6"

1'

1'-3" 10'

1'-3"

12'

101


VII.Detailed Explorations II

A

45'-812"

22'-10"

Detailing + Construction Documents Johnny Osband Spring 2019

22'-1012"

B

C

1

GROUND FL SCALE: 1/8"=1'-0"

102


z'ATELIER Principal: Zachary Torres

1

2

3

350 Newbury Street Boston, MA 02215 +1 (508)-965-9896 zachary.torres@the-bac.edu www.zacharygtorres.com

45'-8" 22'-10"

7'-7"

OFFICE

6'-4"

7'-2" LIFT

4'-1"

8'-10"

1 A4.1

104

22'-1"

7'-8"

8'-1"

RESTROOM

TWO-STORY COMMERCIAL Owner: Joe Poe

101

103

6"

MECHANICAL ROOM/ STORAGE

PROJECT

"

'-0

Ø5

3'-6"

5'-1012"

22'-10"

100 Boston Avenue Boston, MA 02314

CONSULTANTS

37'-812"

31'-712"

36'-312"

FFE=100.00'

PHASE

1 A4.2 RETAIL 102

2

BATHROOM PLAN, TYP. SCALE: 1/4"=1'-0"

Preliminary

DATE 13.02.2019

Design Development

13.03.2019

Final Set

10.05.2019

UP ENTRY 100 SHEET TITLE

PLANS

1 A4.0

LOOR PLAN

SHEET NUMBER

1 A3.0

1 A2.0

A1.0 HW NUMBER

FINAL

103


z'ATELIER

1

T.O. PARAPET

BLOCKING + SHIM

CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING

Principal: Zachary Torres

2 IN. RIGID ROCK 350 Newbury Street Boston, MA 02215 WOOL INSULATION

SPRAY POLYURETHANE FOAM IN CAVITY

14 IN. STL BEAM 3 IN. ROOF DECK

7 16

IN. PRESSURE-TREATED PLYWOOD

PORCELANOSA PORCELAIN TILE WALL SYSTEM: 24 x 48 IN. TILES

5 8

+1 (508)-965-9896 5 zachary.torres@the-bac.edu 8 IN. GLASS www.zacharygtorres.com

SHEATHING

HD COVERBOARD

IN. DENSDECK 6 IN. XPS MIN.

1

MAT

SPRAY PROJECT POLYURETHANE FOAM IN CAVITY

FULLY ADHERED MEMBRANE, SINGLY PLY

CONTINUOUS

3 58 IN. STL STUD

TWO-STORY AVB COMMERCIAL PORCELANOSA

PORCELAIN TILE SYSTEM: x 48 IN. TILES

Owner: Joe Poe WALL

2x BLOCKING

24 100 Boston Avenue Boston, MA 02314

1 IN. CAVITY

METAL FASTENER, PER CONSULTANTS MANUFACTURER

2 IN. RIGID ROCK WOOL INSULATION

SECONDARY SEALANT PRIMARY SEALANT

PORCELENOSA POWDER BLACK ALUMINUM PANEL, PER MANUFACTURER

METAL FASTENER, PER MANUFACTURER

1 41" TrRIPANE GLASS + MULLION, MARVIN INTEGRITY MODERN E-SERIES HDF, PER MANUFACTURER

CONTINUOUS METAL FLASHING W/ DRIP EDGE

CONTINUOUS AVB 5 8

IN. GLASS MAT SHEATHING

SECONDARY SEALANT WITH WEEP HOLES AT 14 DATE IN O.C.

PHASE Preliminary

PRIMARY SEALANT

13.02.2019

CONTINUOUS 13.03.2019 AVB

Design Development

10.05.2019

Final Set

SOLID WALNUT SILL

CONTINUOUS BRAKE METAL FLASHING W/ DRIP EDGE 5 8

SPRAY POLYURETHANE FOAM IN CAVITY

RECESSED LIGHTING

IN. GWB, TYP. X

2 IN. DROP CEILING BUTT INTO INTERIOR FINISH

PARAPETPORCELANOSA DETAIL

1

SCALE: 1-1/2"=1'-0"PORCELAIN TILE WALL SYSTEM: 24 x 48 IN. TILES

A5.1

Principal: Zachary Torres

Head + Sill Detail SCALE: 3" = 1'

350 Newbury Street Boston, MA 02215

+1 (508)-965-9896 zachary.torres@the-bac.edu HW NUMBER www.zacharygtorres.com

FINAL

PROJECT

1 IN. CAVITY

TWO-STORY COMMERCIAL

2 IN. RIGID ROCK WOOL INSULATION

Owner: Joe Poe 100 Boston Avenue Boston, MA 02314

CLOSED CELL SPRAY POLYURETHANE FOAM IN CAVITY 5 8

BRACING TO DECK AS REQUIRED

IN. GWB, TYP. X

METAL FASTENER, PER MANUFACTURER

3 58 IN. STL STUD

CONTINUOUS SHEET METAL FLASHING

6 IN. SLAB ON GRADE

LED STRIP LIGHT PHASE

$

4"

Preliminary

2 A1.2

T C

712"

5 8 IN. GLASS MAT SHEATHING

P

CONSULTANTS

3"

DATE 13.02.2019

Design Development

13.03.2019

Final Set

10.05.2019

512"

CONTINUOUS AVB

5 8 IN. GWB, TYP. X SKIP TROWEL FINSIH

C 7 16

1'-0"

IN. PLYWOOD

2 21 IN. STL STUD

B

10"

8 IN. THICK CRUSHED STONE BED

$$

SHEET TITLE

'-0"

CONCRETE FOOTING

SHEET NUMBER

z'ATELIER

AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER

3/8"

1

WALL DETAILS

10 IN. DUCT 5 8

IN. GWB, TYP. X

SHEET TITLE

6"

3 58 IN. STL STUD

2x BLOCKING

WALL DETAILS SHEET NUMBER

2

SUSPENDED SOFFIT DETAIL 104

P

SCALE: 1 1/2"=1'-0"

De


INDUSTRIAL-CHIC RETAIL SPACE

z'ATEL

Principal: Zachary T

350 Newbury Stree Boston, MA 02215

1

2

PROJECT

45'-8" 22'-10"

TWO-STO COMMER

22'-10"

103 HAVWOOD RECM4310 BOREAS RUSTIC OAK PARQUET FLOORING

Owner: Joe Poe

5'-1012"

OFFICE

8'-1"

A

MECHANICAL ROOM/ STORAGE

7'-7"

100 Boston Avenue Boston, MA 02314

LIFT

101

PORCELANOSA HOPS CALACATA SILVER MATT NERO

RESTROOM

CONSULTANT

104

RETAIL 102 PHASE

2'-6"

B

8'-1"

PORCELNOSA KRION CONTINUOUS SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105, MAKE CONTINUOUS WITH FLOOR SURFACE

Preliminary

1 A6.1

Design Development Final Set

7'-3"

5'-912"

2 A6.1

7'-3"

CHECK OUT COUNTER

14'-3"

This project is an exploration in construction detailing. The building is a comprehensive retail space with an “industrial-chic” aesthetic. The details, some of which are highlighted here, enhance the space’s function as a retail showroom while ensuring life safety, building code, and ADA standards. Thus, while it is a typical commercial two-story construction, it takes on a unique character. Neutral materials were chosen, from exterior white Porcelanosa panelling, to exposed concrete floors. Interior walls are also detailed with accent marble tiles.

+1 (508)-965-9896 zachary.torres@the www.zacharygtorre

3

99 VOLTE 809U4R FANGO OPACO NAT. RET.

PORCELANOSA CALACATA SILVER 100137735

99VOLTE FANGO OPACO

UP ENTRY

PORCELANOSA CALACATA SILVER

100

SHEET TITLE

FINISH SCHEDU

C

SHEET NUMB

1

A6

GROUND FLOOR FINISH PLAN

HW NUMBER

SCALE: 1/8"=1'-0"

FINAL

14'-1012"

[01 Wall to Roof Detail] [02 Wall to Foundation Detail] [03 Window Header + Sill Detail] [04 Suspended Soffit + Cove Lighting Detail] [05 Finish Plan and Samples] [06 Interior Elevation]

2'-6"

HOPS MATT NERO 5X15 IN. TILE

1

14'-3"

PORCELANOSA CALACATA SILVER 100137735, 24x24 IN TILE

INTERIOR WALL ELEVATION SCALE: 1/4"=1'-0"

CONCRETE

SLAB ON 105 GRADE


1 1

WIRES BEYOND WIRES BEYOND

PORCELNOSA KRION CONTINUOUS SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105, MAKE PORCELNOSA CONTINUOUS CONTINUOUSKRION WITH FLOOR SURFACE SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105, MAKE CONTINUOUS WITH FLOOR SURFACE

2'-6" 2'-6"

3'-0" 3'-0"

STAINLESS STEEL WORK STAINLESS SURFACE STEEL WORK SURFACE

COUNTER WORK ELEVATION SCALE: 1/2" = 1' COUNTER WORK ELEVATION

1

SCALE: 1/2" = 1'

1

WIRES

PORCELNOSA KRION CONTINUOUS SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105, MAKE PORCELNOSA CONTINUOUS CONTINUOUSKRION WITH FLOOR SURFACE SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105, MAKE CONTINUOUS WITH FLOOR SURFACE

R3 '-9R3 " '-9

2'-6" 2'-6"

4"

4" 3'-0" 3'-0"

"

R3'

-R 4"3'4

"

WIRES

5'-912" 5'-912" 17'-10"

2

COUNTER SERVICE ELEVATION SCALE: 1/2" = 1' COUNTER SERVICE ELEVATION

17'-10"

106


1

COUNTER PLAN 2 A5.4

GROMMET HOLE 1 2 IN. PORCELNOSA KRION CONTINUOUS SURFACE CARRARA DARK L105

(2) 34 IN. MDF

2"

(2) 34 IN. MDF HANGING SALVAGED WIRES ADHERED TO MDF

1 4

IN. STAINLESS STEEL

3'-0" 2'-6"

The retail space’s feature is a custom service counter that blends an elegant curving marble with the industrial aesthetic of wires. It appears as though the floor itself is being peeled away with all its interior wiring and structure being pulled out with it. The millwork itself is composed of MDF with a custom-ordered Porcelanosa continuous surface that is the same material as a strip of floor tiles that breaks the continuity of the finished concrete slab. The wires are all recycled from scraps from the construction process.

CHECK OUT COUNTER

SCALE: 1/2" = 1'

212"

CUSTOMIZED MILLWORK

5'-912"

2

COUNTER SECTION SCALE: 1" = 1'

5"

FINISH FLOOR PORCELNASOSA CARRARA BLANCO NATURAL TILE EXPOSED UNFINISHED FLOOR

[01 Service Side Elevation] [02 Counter Side Elevation] [03 Section] [04 Rendered View]

107 COUNTER RENDER


PART II: PROFESSIONAL WORK

108


109


I. Centrepoint Architects Employment: 04.2018 - 06.2019 Principal + Supervisor: Cindy Larson 560 Windsor Street, Somerville, MA

110


111


DAVIS SQUARE RESIDENCE

PATIO

GARAGE

Taken from schematic design through permitting, this residential remodel underwent significant alterations throughout the design process. Initially, the clients sought an extensive exterior remodeling with a contemporary look before deciding to focus on the interior layout. While the modern faรงade was set aside in favor of a more traditional aesthetic, the conversion from a twofamily to a single-family, as well as the addition and expansion of dormers, proved challenging in face of zoning regulations. The clients, avid illustrators, needed to expand their entertaining space, while also aquiring two new studio spaces in the expanded third-story.

DN

REF

KITCHEN

DW

MUD. DN

PANTRY

UP

DINING DN

BATH

LIVING ENTRY

DN

STUDIO

dn

BATH

[01 Schematic: Proposed Front Elevation] [02 Proposed Ground Floor + Site Plan] [03 Proposed Third Floor Studios Plan]`

STUDIO

112


CIVIC ACCESSIBILITY A small Massachusetts town sought a more accessible entrance to their townhall. The historic building proved challenging though, especially as the neo-Classical exteriors needed to be preserved. A lift was added to a side entrance, to connect the assembly hall and recreational basement. The sloping side required reworking the grade and adding a handicap parking spot so that the site could meet the accessibility code. Finally, a small roof was added above the new accesible entrance that would compliment the traditioanl elevation. EXISTING WINDOW FLASHING SHEATHING NEW SHINGLES FLASHING ROOF RAFTER

2X4 BRACING

[01 Proposed Ground Floor Plan] [02 Awning Roof Detail] [03 Proposed Accessible Entry Elevation]

113


II.Community + Modernism Little Libraries Competition Advised by Mark Rukamathu Spring 2019



1'-11"

1'-1"

1" 92

6"

3"

1'

A

1'

1'-1"

7"

1'

1'

1'

1'

1" 82

5"

5"

11"

92"

PLAN 1'-1"2 1-1/2” = 1’ 1'

1' 10"

1'

9"

[01 Plans, Iteration I] The initial design layout called for three staggered levels of boxes, offset from each other on the X-axis. Doors opened playfully in various directions to force borrowers to consider their relation to the boxes and the books they contain.

11"

11"

PLAN 11'-11" 1-1/2” = 1’ 1

6"

3" 1'

1'

1'-1"

7"

10"

7"

9"

6" 1'

PLAN 3 1-1/2” = 1’ 1'-1"

[02 Plans, Iteration II] The boxes were reduced to two levels, and only one becomes inset from the others. This was to account for the weather-proofing to ensure that snow and rain would not build up on the flat roofs. Doors are also simplified for constructibility purposes, being as carpenter apprentices will be responsible for construction.

METAL FLASHING CAP AWNING TOP

[03 Section, Iteration II] The boxes on the top level will have a slightly pitched roof for weather-proofing. Acrylic-inlaid panels will serve as the doors and are inset slightly so that the roof protects them from rain. ZACHARY TORRES 3 4

HARDWOOD SILL (1) LEVEL TWO WEATHER RESISTANT SECTION SCALE: 3" =1'

IN. PLYWOOD

LITTLE LIBRARIES ROSLINDALE, MA A9 SECTION 25.03.2019

[04 Render, Iteration I]

116


ITERATIVE CONSTRUCTION The community of Roslindale issued a call for a Little Library to be used while their local public library branch undergoes renovations. The inspiration behind this modular design was two-fold. I looked primarily toward Mondrian’s grid paintings, which utilized three primary colors against fields of white and black. Secondarily, the modularity of the modernist painter’s works guided me to design a modular system whose individual boxes are based on standard book publishing sizes. Upon presenting the initial design to the jury, I was tasked with re-working the drawings to account for constructibility and weatherproofing. This resulted in re-arranging the boxes in such a manner as to prevent rain and snow build-up.

FRONT ELEVATION FRONT ELEVATION 1-1/2” = 1’ 1-1/2” = 1’

SIDE ELEVATION SIDE ELEVATION 1-1/2” = 1’ 1-1/2” = 1’

[05-06 Elevations, Iteration I] [07 Render, Iteration I] [08 Elevation, Iteration II] [09 Alternative Elevation, Iteration II] An alternative elevation re-introduces the tri-level organization while maintaining a central void, reminiscent of Mondrian’s use of white space. [10 Paint Chips] Primary colors from SherwinWilliams were selected to paint the boxes. Mondrian uniquely employed primary colors, and they will brighten the community.

117


III. TIMOTHY BURKE ARCHITECTS Employment: 09.2019 - CURRENT Principal + Supervisor: TIMOTHY BURKE 142 BERKELEY STREET BOSTON, MA

118


119


S P

PHOTOELECTRIC SMOKE DETECTOR HARDWIRED

GFI

NEW GROUND FAULT INTERRUPTER DUPLEX OUTLET

S PI

PHOTOELECTRIC / IONIZATION SMOKE DETECTOR HARDWIRED

WP

NEW DUPLEX OUTLET

NEW WATER PROOF DUPLEX OUTLET

C

CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR HARDWIRED

NEW DUPLEX OUTLET TO WALL SWITCH (1/2)

PHOTOELECTRIC SMOKE / CARBON DIOXIDE DETECTOR

NEW QUAD OUTLET NEW FLOOR OUTLET

4" RECESSED IC FIXTURE

NEW SWITCH

VANITY WALL MOUNTED FIXTURE

NEW SWITCH WITH DIMMER

WALL MOUNTED FIXTURE

NEW 3-WAY SWITCH

CEILING MOUNTED FIXTURE

NEW JAMB SWITCH

HANGING FIXTURE

DOOR BELL

CHANDELIER

G

GARAGE DOOR BUTTON

E1 3 A1

LED LIGHT STRIP 1/2" PLYWOOD SHEATHING

E1

EXHAUST FAN

4 A1

A1

A1

A1

A1

BITUMINUOUS ROOFING A1 A1 UNDERLAYMENT

3 C3

F1

5/8" ZIP TECH SHEATHING

E1

SECOND FLOOR 108'-6"

4 C3

2X10 LEDGER

A1

A1

A1

CONNECT TO LIGHTING ABOVE

C3

C3 3 A1

FIRE RATED CEILING ASSEMBLY

G

C3 A1

UP

C3

FASCIA BOARD

DN

A1

3/4" SHEATHING C3

A1

E1

-

C3

C3

C3

C3

C3

C2

THIRD FLOOR 118'-8"

C2

C2

C3

1'-0" TYP.

5/8" GWB TAPED AND PAINTED

3 A1

DN

2X10 BRACE

C3

C3

2X10 RAFTER

4 C3 3 E1 C2 A1

E1

(3) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL BEAMS

C3

CONNECT TO LIGHTING ABOVE

14" TJIS A

A1

E1

E1

(2) "TYPE X" 5/8" GWB, TAPED AND PAINTED 5/8" GWB, TAPED AND PAINTED 2X4 STUD

A1

ASPHALT SHINGLES

E1

CEILING FAN

EXHAUST FAN WITH LIGHT

A1

F1

DATA / CABLE OUTLET

4'-0"

E1

3 A1

LIGHT FIXTURE FINISHEDFLUORESCENT SURFACE 8 1/4" 2X4 BEAM

E1

3 C3

FLOOD LIGHT 2X4 JOIST

JUNCTION BOX

WP

UTILITY METER

4 A1

TV F

WP E1

SEAT BACK BEYOND UNDER CABINET LIGHTS

TELEPHONE OUTLET

F

REMARKS

WP

M

G

F1

E1

E1

EAVE   F1

5

1" = 1'-0"

C3

C3

E1

G

E1

NOTES - STRUCT

C3

INFO - MASS. STRETCH CODE REQUIREMENTS

SEE ORDER OF CONDITIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

THIS CODE APPLIES TO :

E1

- NEW RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AND EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS WHEN UNDERGOIING A LARGE ADDITION OR A MAJOR RENOVATION. - NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OVER 5,000 SQUARE FEET.

G E1

E1

- EXISTING BUILDINGS THAT ARE LARGE ENOUGH TO REQUIRE FULL CODE COMPLIANCE ARE REQUIRED TO MEET THE STRETCH CODE.

4 C3

A development in Brighton sought to create a two-unit townhouse with a basement garage. The zoning regulations demanded we maintain a front façade whose fenestration heights did not align with the floor plates. This required unique detailing at both the garage and first floor levels. In the first instance, wood-framed floor sits just above a concrete slab at the entries. At the first floor, a buil-in seat was designed to stop the floor joists short of hitting the front windows.

LAMP LED=50W PAR 20

HEAT DETECTOR

H

B

D

TRIM 993W

11 1/2"

a 3

MANUFACTURER MODEL HALO H99ICT

2'-0 1/2"

a D

DESCRIPTION 4"Ø Recessed Can Light, IC Housing, With Dimmer Vanity Fixture Ceiling Mounted Pendant Light Ceiling Surface Mounted Fixture Ceiling Surface Mounted Fixture, garage Wall Sconce, Exterior Location LED Strip Light Low-Voltage Linear Task Lighting, Undercabinet

4 A1

a

COUNT 115 6 8 14 17 16 10

3 A1

TOWNHOUSE DEVELOPMENT

TYPE MARK A1 B1 C1 C2 C3 E1 F1 T1

- ALL EXTERIOR WALLS TO BE CONSTRUC ACCORDANCE WITH 780 CMR BRACED WAL CONSTRUCTION METHOD #3 (5602.10.3)

E1

- STRUCTURAL PANEL SHEATHING TO BE C AROUND ALL NEW CONSTRUCTION AND/OR

- COMMERCIAL RENOVATIONS AND HISTORCI BUILDINGS ARE EXEMPT FROM THE STRETCH CODE.

- ALL EXTERIOR WALL STUD SPACING TO B UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

BUILDERS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT DOCUMENTATION SHOWING COMPLIANCE THROUGH A HERS RATING SYSTEM AND THERMAL BYPASS CHECKLIST. THIS IS ACCOMPLISHED BY HAVING THE STRUCTURE REVIEWED AND THE ENVELOPE DESIGNED BY A CERTIFIED HERS RATER. THE RATER WILL PRODUCE A REPORT DETAILING THE ENERGY SYSTEMS IN THE BUILDING AND PROVIDE A HERS INDEX SCORE. THESE DOCUMENTS WILL BE SUBMITTED WITH THE PERMIT APPLICATION FOR THE BUILDING INSPECTORS REVIEW. THE BUILDING WILL THEN BE BUILT AS PER THE DESIGN AND A FINAL HERS TEST SHALL BE CONDUCTED WHEN THE PROJECT IS COMPLETED TO VERIFY ITS PERFORMANCE. INSULATION

FIRST FLOOR ELECTRICAL

1

- UNFINISHED BASEMENT CEILINGS INSTALL R30 FIBERGLAS BATTS OR EQUIVALENT. MUST BE IN CONTACT WITH THE SUBFLOOR ABOVE.

- ALL JOIST AND RAFTER SPACING TO BE 1 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

1/4" = 1'-0"

- ALL STRUCTURAL PANELS TO BE FASTEN ACCORDANCE WITH 780 CMR TABLE 5602.3

- EXTERIOR WALLS INSTALL R21 FIBERGLASS BATTS OR EQUIVALENT

AIR SEALING

SECOND FLOOR AT WINDOW

- TUBS OR SHOWERS ON OUTSIDE WALLS REQUIRE A COMPLETE AIR BARRIER IN ADDITION TO THE INSULATION BEFORE THE INSTALLATION OF THE UNIT. THIS CAN BE HOUSE WRAP, RIGID INSULATION OR SPRAY FOAM INSULATION.

MECHANICALS

5'-1 1/8"

19'-7"

24'-0"

- ALL SYSTEMS MUST MEET THE HIGH ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS AND COMPLY WITH THE DESIGN CRITERIA AS SPECIFIED BY THE HERS RATER - FURNACES MUST BE MINIMUM 95% AFUE.

20'-1"

- A/C CONDENSERS MUST BE AT LEAST SEER 13.

(2) 1 3/4" X 9 3/4" LVL

- ALL DUCTS MUST BE COMPLETELY SEALED AND INSULATED WITH MINIMUM R8.

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

- INSTALLATION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHT BULBS AND ENERGY STAR RATED KITCHEN APPLIANCES IS REQUIRED.

GARAGE SEPARATION

DN

RECESSED LIGHTING PLUMBING / WIRING SHOWER / TUB (ON EXTERIOR 4X4 POST DOWN WALLS) ELECTRICAL / PHONE BOX (ON EXTERIOR WALLS)

1

COMMON PARTITION WALL HVAC REGISTER BOOTS FIREPLACE

1

RAISED 2X10 WOOD FLOOR

2X10(2) WOOD 1 3/4"LANDING X 9 1/2" LVL BEAMS

4X4 POST UP

4X4 POST DOWN 2 1/2"

REINFORCED 12" CONCRETE WALL WITH FOOTING, TYP.

(3) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL

SHOWERS AND TUBS ON EXTERIOR WALLS HAVE INSULATION AN AN AIR BARRIER SEPARATING THEM FROM THE EXTERIOR WALL.

1

(2) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL

AIR BARRIER EXTENDS BEHIND BOXES OR AIR SEALED-TYPE BOXES ARE INSTALLED. AIR BARRIER IS INSTALLED IN COMMON WALL BETWEEN DWELLING UNITS.

6X6 POST WITH 12"X12"X8" FOOTING

STAIRWAY OPENING

4X4 POST DOWN

MASTER (2) 1 3/4"BEDROOM X 9 1/2" LVL BEAMS

- THAT PENETRATE BUILDING ENVELOPE ARE SEALED TO SUBFLOOR OR DRYWALL. HVAC REGISTER BOOTS

(2) 2X12 RIDGE

-

7"

6'-4 1/2"

6X6 POST WITH 12"X12"X8" FOOTING

STAINED HANDRAIL, 36" HIGH MIN.

315 EAVE SPACE

REINFORCED 10" CONCRETE WALL WITH FOOTING, TYP.

312

6'-6 1/2"

310

6'-4"

17'-11 1/2"

6X6 POST WITH DECORATIVE COVER

27'-1"

STAINED BALUSTERS SPACED 4" MIN.

24'-9"

6X6 POST WITH DECORATIVE COVER 26'-4"

1

ROOF FRAMING

1/4" = 1'-0"

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

CROWN MOULDING 1/8"

2 CLOSET

BATHROOM

1

THIRD FLO 118

FOUNDATION

120

6'8"

2

LIVING

41'-1"

4X4 POST FOUNDATION TO ROOF

- LVL BEAM 1 3/4" X 9 1/2" AT POSTS

11'-2"

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

4X4 POST WITH 12"X12"X8" FOOTING

dv

(3) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL

(3) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL

CROWN MOULDING

RO 129

1'-2"

4X4 POST UP

6" SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF REINFORCEMENT

FIREPLACE WALLS INCLUDE2x12 AN AIRRAFTERS BARRIER.

@ 1'-4" O.C.

1 3/4" X 9 1/2" LVL BEAM AT POST

6X6 POST WITH 12"X12"X8" (2) 1 3/4"FOOTING X 9 1/2" LVL BEAMS

RECESSED LIGHT FIXTURES ARE AIR TIGHT, IC RATED, AND SEALED TO DRYWALL. EXCEPTIONS-FIXTURES IN CONDITIONED SPACE. INSULATION IS PLACED BETWEEN OUTSIDE AND PIPES. BATT INSULATION IS CUT TO FIT AROUND WIRING AND PLUMBING, OR SPRAY/BLOWN INSULATION EXTENDS BEHIND PIPING AND WIRING.

1 3/4" X 9 1/2" LVL BEAM

4X4 POST

STAIRWAY WITH 12"X12"X8" FOOTING OPENING

40'-4"

7'-2 1/4"

(4) 1 3/4" X 11 7/8" LVL

DUCT SHAFTS, UTILITY PENETRATIONS, KNEE WALLS AND FLUE SHAFTS OPENING TO EXTERIOR OR UNCONDITIONED SPACE ARE SEALED.

4X4 POST UP

14" TJI @ 1'-4" O.C.

14'-0" 6'-4"

14'-0"

INSULATION IS PERMANENTLY ATTACHED TO WALLS. EXPOSED EARTH IS UNVENTED CRAWL SPACES IS WITH CLASS I VAPOR RETARDER WITH OVERLAPPING JOINTS, TAPED.

AIR SEALING IS PROVIDED BETWEEN THE GARAGE AND CONDITIONED SPACES.

6" SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF REINFORCEMENT

(2) 1 3/4" X 9 1/2" LVL BEAMS AT POST 7 3/4"

BATTS IN NARROW CAVITIES ARE CUT TO FIT, OR NARROW CAVITIES ARE FILLED BY SPRAY/BLOWN INSULATION.

4X4 POST DOWN

SIMILAR

2X10 LEDGER

SPACE BETWEEN WINDOW/DOOR JAMBS AND FRAMING IS SEALED.

(2) 1 3/4" X 9 1/2" LVL BEAMS

6X6 POST WITH 4X4 POST SECOND TO ROOF 12"X12"X8" FOOTING

5'-2"

NARROW CAVITIES

6" SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF REINFORCEMENT

RIM JOISTS ARE INSULATED AND INCLUDE AN AIR BARRIER. INSULATION IS INSTALLED TO MAINTAIN PERMANENT CONTACT WITH UNDERSIDE OF SUBFLOOR DECKING. AIR BARRIER IS INSTALLED AT ANY EXPOSED EDGE OF INSULATION.

4X4 POSTS WITH 28X12X8" FOOTING

1'-8 1/8"

CRAWLSPACE WALLS SHAFTS / PENETRATIONS

CORNERS AND HEADER ARE INSULATED. JUNCTION OF FOUNDATION AND SILL PLATE IS SEALED.

3"

3 A3.0

14" TJI @ 1'-4" O.C.

RIM JOISTS

AIR BARRIER IN ANY DROPPED CEILING/SOFFIT IS SUBSTANTIALLY ALIGNED WITH INSULATION AND ANY GAPS ARE SEALED. ATTIC ACCESS (EXCEPT UNVENTED ATTIC), KNEE WALL DOOR OR DROP DOWN STAIR IS SEALED.

2x10 JOISTS @ 1'-4" O.C.

WINDOWS / DOORS

FLOORS (INCLUDING GARAGE AND CANTILEVERED)

BREAKS OR JOINT IN THE AIR BARRIER ARE FILLED OR REPAIRED. AIR-PERMEABLE INSULATION IS NOT USED AS A SEALING MATERIAL. AIR-PERMEABLE INSULATION IS INSIDE OF AN AIR BARRIER.

8'-11 1/2" 27'-1"

WALLS

(2) 2X12 RIDGE EXTERIOR THERMAL ENVELOPE INSULATION FOR FRAMED WALLS IS INSULATED IN SUBSTANTIAL CONTACT AND CONTINUOUS ALIGNMENT WITH BUILDING ENVELOPE AIR BARRIER. 4X4 POST DOWN

7'-11 3/4"

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

CEILING / ATTIC

REINFORCED 10" CONCRETE WALL WITH FOOTING, TYP. 4" 0"

26'-4"

2X12 BEAM

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

AIR BARRIER AND THERMAL INSULATION

4X4 POST DOWN

(2) 2X12 RIDGE

3/4" X 14" LVL INFO - AIR BARRIER AND(3) 1INSULATION COMPONENTS

CRITERIA

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

COMPONENT

6X6 POSTS UP WITH 10" SONOTUBE WITH BIGFOOT, TYP.

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

2x10 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

(2) 2x12 BEAM AT DORMER

REINFORCED 10" CONCRETE 4X4 POST WALL WITH FOOTING, TYP. FOUNDATION TO ROOF

- WHERE DUCTED VENTILATION IS NOT PRESENT AN HRV SYSTEM OR ENERGY STAR RATED BATH FANS WOULD BE REQUIRED TO MEET MANDATORY VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS.

2X12 BEAM

2x10 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

6" SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF REINFORCEMENT

4X4 POST DOWN

(2) 2x12 BEAM AT DORMER

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

- PROVIDE BLOCKING / ADDITIONAL FRAMIN FOR ALL CABINETRY, LIGHT FIXTURES, TOW

- DOORS TO UNCONDITIONED BASEMENTS SHOULD BE SOLD CORE AND COMPLETELY WEATHER STRIPPED. - FIREPLACE BUMP OUTS MUST BE COMPLETELY INSULATED AND AIR SEALED BEFORE THE FIREPLACE UNIT IS INSTALLED. THIS CAN BE ACHIEVED BY INSTALLING SHEETROCK, RIGID INSULATION OF THERMO PLY. ALL EDGES MUST BE SEALED.

2x12 RAFTERS @ 1'-4" O.C.

- NOMINAL FOUR INCH WIDE SINGLE HEAD SUBSTITUTED FOR THE DOUBLE MEMBERS

24'-9"

- ATTIC ACCESS MUST BE WEATHER STRIPPED AND INSULATED TO MATCH THE R VALUE OF THE ADJACENT ATTIC.

1/2" = 1'-0"

[01 First Floor Framing + Bench Detail] [02 First Floor RCP] [03 Roof Framing Plan] [04 Foundation Plan] [05 Entry Step Detail] [06 Entry Floor Detail] [07 Post + Sonotube Detail] [08 Typical Footing Detail] [09 Section]

7'-9 1/8"

6'-0"

6

- SPANS ARE BASED ON NUMBER TWO OR GRADE LUMBER. NUMBER THREE GRADE L USED WITH APPROPRIATE DESIGN

6X6 POST UP WITH 10" SONOTUBE WITH BIGFOOT, 0" TYP.

- FLAT AND SLOPED CEILINGS USE R38 FIBERGLASS BATTS OR LOOSE BLOWN INSULATION WHERE STRAPPING IS USED. MUST ACHIEVE MINIMUM R38.

THIRD FLOOR   1/4" = 1'-0"


FIRST FLOOR 99'-2"

ANCHOR BOLT, 36" O.C.

(2) 2X10 LEDGER

ANCHOR BOLT, 36" O.C.

FINISHED STONE PAVERS

6X6 POST

FINISHED FLOOR

#5 REBAR TOP AND BOTTOM

POST BASE

2X10 JOIST FIRST FLOOR 99'-2"

#4 BAR @ 12" O.C. GARAGE 98'-0"

6" REINFORCED BASEMENT SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF 12"

STONE PAVERS 3" CONSTRUCTED SAND LEVELED AND PACKED GARAGE 98'-0"

4" MIN.

FINISHED STONE FACE

FIRST FLOOR 99'-2"

2X4 STUD WALL

PRE-MOLDD FILLER JOINT

PRE-MOLDED JOINT FILLER

0"

6" POURED IN PLACE CONCRETE SLAB

GARAGE 98'-0"

8 MIL VAPOR BARRIER 4 1/2" CONSTRUCTED SAND LEVELED AND PACKED

10"

4' MIN.

8 MIL VAPOR BARRIER, CONTINUOUS 3" RIGID INSULATION 6" CRUSHED STONE

CRUSHED STONE

FILTER FABRIC

TYPICAL FOOTING TO WALL ENTRY STEP   4 + 1STONE 1/2" = 1'-0"

UNDISTURBED EARTH FILTER FABRIC

3

SLAB TURNDOWN

10" SONOTUBE WITH BIGFOOT FOOTING

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

6X6 POST WITH SONOTUBE

2

2X10 LEDGER

PRE-MOLDED JOINT FILLER

PARTY WALL

#4 BAR @ 12" O.C.

FINISH FLOOR

ANCHOR BOLT @ 36" O.C.

1

6" REINFORCED BASEMENT SLAB WITH 6X6 WWF

2X10 JOIST

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

FIRST FLOOR 99'-2"

1'-0 3/8"

1 ROOF 129'-0"

GARAGE 98'-0"

G

MASTER BATHROOM

HALL

MASTER BEDROOM

3

2

1'-6"

CONTINUOUS DAMPPROOFING

8 MIL VAPOR BARRIER, EXTEND TO EXTERIOR OF FOUNDATION WALL BEHIND DAMPPROOFING

LINEN

313

5 A3.0

311

WALK IN CLOSET

2

2

THIRD FLOOR 118'-8"

6" CRUSHED STONE 3" RIGID INSULATION EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE

CROWN MOULDING

E 3 LINEN

KITCHEN 2" RIGID INSULATION

209

CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

HALL STUDY

210

FILTER FABRIC

UNDISTURBED SOIL

STAINED BALUSTERS SPACED 4" MIN. 10" TYP.

6 R @ 7 3/8"

3'-9"

1'-0"

REBAR IN WALL AND FOOTING

2A

4

SOFFIT

002

2A

SOFFIT GARAGE

GARAGE

SIMILAR

3

FIRST FLOOR 99'-2" GARAGE 98'-0"

1

1

2'-6"

FIRE RATED CEILING ASSEMBLY

1'-7 3/8"

ENTRY

CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOOTING

SECOND FLOOR 108'-6"

7'-6"

12" CRUSHED STONE COVER, NO FINES

1'-7 3/8"

PERFORATED DRAIN PIPE, 4" MIN.

7'-6"

1 CRAFTSMAN STYLE HANDRAIL, 36" HIGH MIN.

2A

3

1

2

2

5 A3.1

5

PARTY WALL AT FOUNDATION   1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1

Section 3   1/4" = 1'-0"

121