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zachary moore

associate aia

san francisco | 303.917.5462 | zachary.moore@gmail.com

additional info: zachary moore 3469 20th street san francisco ca 94110 http://www.issuu.com/zachary.moore http://www.linkedin.com/pub/zachary-moore/5/819/994/

technical skills

COMMUNICATION DRAFTING

DESIGN ANALYSIS

FABRICATION

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verbal writing sketching / drawing autocad revit photoshop illustrator indesign after effects rhinoceros sketchup vray grasshopper excel gis wood concrete metal

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contents

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THESIS: RETOOLING URBAN PRODUCTION

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FOG POR[T]CH FERRY TERMINAL

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oakland ca

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Mt. Tam

san francisco ca

Telegraph Hill

SITE

Russian Hill Nob Hill

Twin Peaks Potrero Hill

Bernal Heights Mt. Davidson

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AUGMENTED REUSE HOUSING

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SYNTH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

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NIU SHI ALLEY TERRACES

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NATIONAL SPORTS CENTER FOR THE DISABLED

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AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER

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HOLIDAY GARDEN TOOL SHED

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EX(H)EMPLARY STUDY CHAIR

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GOOGLE EARTH 3D BUILDINGS

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SPATIO-TEMPORAL MAPPING OF CULTURAL INTERACTIVITY

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nanjing china

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winter park co

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denver co

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01 THESIS: RETOOLING URBAN PRODUCTION oakland ca

COURSE

CCA M. Arch Thesis

DATE

2012 - 2013

SCHOOL

California College Of The Arts

SCOPE

Adaptive reuse of aging, historic grain elevators

ADVISOR

Hugh Hynes

Advancements in manufacturing and digital technology are driving economic growth, creating more specialized jobs, and generating a new typology of hybrid maker communities. With the success of companies such as Etsy, Ponoko and Lifehacker, prototyping and manufacturing has fallen into the hands of everyday individuals. Oakland’s industrial waterfront offers a swath of abandoned structures once serving specific, homogenous functions. Due of their vast amount of embodied material, shear scale and adjacency to cities, these relics contain the infrastructure that could catalyze an urban production revolution. Strategically located along vital communication and distribution networks these structures could proliferate more transparent product development. It is the intent of this thesis to consider the implications that these large scale structures might provide to introduce a new framework allowing heterogeneous forms of urban production to exist simultaneously in complex aggregations.

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The Conagra grain processing plant in Fruitvale, Oakland plays a crucial role in aggregating an urban production framework. The structure will be adapted to perform specific functions through a series of phases.

of industry cater to specific requirements in terms of automation, processing and material needs. Finding complementing matches between old forms of industry and new forms will be critical in addressing what the grain silos can afford.

In phase 01, the mill will function as an urban “battery� to power the transfer of resources, energy and knowledge. The central grain elevators will becomer an institution of advanced manufacturing. This institution will begin to develop a series of adaptable production networks distributed around Oakland. Finally, the facility will connect small-scale manufacturing, distribution centers and material recycling.

Negative feedback loops are used to enable proper design development. Industrial facilities can adapt to heterogeneous means to develop new functions. In the heterogeneous industrial economy, multiple streams of product design and manufacturing will exist simultaneously. This allows adjacent systems to function at varying scales, materials, temperatures, or durations.

When each system is set up and running correctly, citizens, designers, programmers, manufacturers, prototypers, makers and farmers will become integrated into a new framework for heterogeneous urban manufacturing.

A reduction of production cycles coexist in a processing chamber to handle multiple simultaneous operations. This system addresses existing industrial typologies, flushing out redundancies in the extraction process. Because heterogeneous production is small-scale, multiple enterprises can exist concurrently. By inputting new forms of production seamlessly into this framework, strategies for adaptation can be evaluated.

STRATEGY. Grain elevators are gravityfed storage facilities, the most effiecient system for the process. New processes

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Military Zone

Recreation Zone

Educational Zone

Upper Level: Small-Scale Handling

Lower Level: Large-Scale Handling

Grain Silos Converted to Workshops / Classes / Labs

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site documentation

Industrial Zone


HUMAN CIRCULATION. HUMAN CIRCULATION.

SIMULTANEOUS SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION. PRODUCTION.

ManufacturedManufactured products, rawproducts, raw materials andmaterials humans must and humans all must all have access and have designated access and designated circulation. circulation.

Concurrent production Concurrent systems production systems can exist and can operate exist and operate simultaneously. simultaneously.

A rotating mechanic A rotating adapted mechanic to adapted to the grain silos, the allows grainhybrid silos, allows hybrid pathways to line pathways up andtoallow line up and allow interchangeable interchangeable product product development.development.

Various instances Various need instances not be need not be activated for the activated facilityfor to the facility to operate efficiently. operate efficiently.

PRODUCT ACTIVATION. PRODUCT ACTIVATION.

LIGHT CIRCULATION. LIGHT CIRCULATION.

Zones are activated Zones are through activated through interlocking adjacent interlocking silos.adjacent This silos. This allows hybridization allows hybridization to occur and to occur and push manufacturing push manufacturing technology technology further. further.

Circulation services Circulation thoseservices who those who need it. In addition, need it.channels In addition, channels used for circulation used for cancirculation also can also become light become wells, allowing light wells, allowing natural light to natural hard to light reach to hard to reach places places

SYSTEMS DISPERSION. SYSTEMS DISPERSION.

LIGHTS OFF LIGHTS FACTORY. OFF FACTORY.

The inbetween The areas inbetween becomeareas become dispersion areas. dispersion This includes areas. This includes waste, biproducts waste, and biproducts other and other excesses. excesses.

A lights off factory A lights exists off factory on the exists on the lower levels. Due lower tolevels. the lack Due of to the lack of natural light. natural light.

REVOLVING WORKSPACES

EDUCATIONAL LABS

FACILITY SPACE

Contextually, different production systems synthesize architectural responses to existing typologies. METHODOLOGY. Sigfried Giedion posits that automation creates the processes of carrying out event in automation and efficiency. The grain elevator functions as a gravity-fed storage facility, designed as the perfect system for this process. The automation of grain storage can be seen in the formal logic of the grain elevator typology. New processes of industry cater to specific requirements in terms of automation, processing and material needs. Finding matches between old forms of industry and new forms will be critical in addresses the possibilities of adaptive reuse. In order to understand the capabilities of the design world, entrainment is the act of happening through likeness and extensive time. Learning from negative feedback loops enables the proper development of technological solutions. Industrial facilities can adapt to heterogeneous means to develop new functions. It is crucial to note that in the heterogeneous industrial economy, more streams of product

manufacturing and development will have to exist simultaneously. This means that concurrent systems could function at different scales, materials, temperatures, or durations. The development of a complex of industrial structures along the Oakland waterfront would provide more heterogeneous systems for urban production. When each structure is adapted to new digital manufacturing typologies, together they will produce more complex product dependencies. The adapted factories will begin working in synthesis, using common resource extraction to manipulate their usage potential. These post-industrial mechanisms are positioned strategically that will be vital to the city of Oakland.

PRODUCT OUTPUT

CORE SAMPLE

CLUTCH

creations inventions inputs

Envisioning this complex as a series of flows and conduits provides a visual understanding to develop strategies for the new forms of production and how they may operate together. Expired structures hold potential as capacitors in the age of heterogeneous industry. Through analysis and diagramming of old and new industrial processes, these buildings will be adapted to serve new functions.

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Shed Circulation

Computers & High Tech. Glass Blowing

ALUMINUM SHEETING

Clothing Shed

Ceramics

LOW DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

Metals Sector BULK FABRIC

BURLAP FABRIC

Circulation

Automotive Building Components Robotic Factory

Silos Glass Sector HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

Me

Pa

Wraping

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Heat / Bake

Plastics Sector

MONOCRYSTALINE SILICON

Welding

Ga

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Casting

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Parts Assembly

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Stitching

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Molding

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Painting

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Steel Extraction

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Rotation

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Cutting

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Bending

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Robotic Engineering

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3D Printing

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Stamping

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Selective Laser Sintering

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Machining

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Pressure Forming

Recycling

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Weaving

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RAW 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

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Extrusion Plastic Extraction

Green Energy

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Spinning

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HEAT RESISTANT FIBER

STEEL RODS

Circulation

Product / Industry

Processes

Materials

Fabrics Sector

Shed

Ceramics Sector

FIBER REINFORCED GLASS

RAW 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

TITANIUM SHEET METAL

“QUIKRETE” CONCRETE

TYVEK WEATHER BARRIER

DUPONT WEATHER BARRIER

CLOTH MESHWORK

CARBON FIBER

STEEL TUBING

3D PRINTING BULK MATERIAL

FIBER REINFORCED GLASS RESIN

EXPLODED ANONOMETRIC.

Production Scale

ALUMINUM BLOCK

XL Large Medium Small

Metals

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Ceramics

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ARTIFACT

ZONE 01 : Grain Elevator

DISTRIBUTION

SILO LIGHTWELL EXPERIMENTS.

WORLD (N)FORMATION. BRING THE PEOPLE TO THE KNOWLEDGE CENTER, INSTITUTE OF URBAN PRODUCTION

PLACEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE CENTERSCAPES

DISTRIBUTED MECHANISMS

OBJECT PRODUCT

PHASE 01: Battery

COMPATIBILITY OF DISTRIBUTION AND MARKETABILITY

DEPLOYMENT OF TOOLS

STORE MATERIAL AND PROCESSES

CHARGE THE SYSTEM

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BUILD FRAMEWORK FOR DEPLOYMENT

This phase is a rigorous prototyping of new means of production being deployed along the industrial complex. The requirements of structures will depend on the systems engaged and chosen and will effect the buildings’ position, orientation, scale, direction, materiality, structural integrity, capacity, and function.

FINAL PRODUCTION. In the final phase of Aggregating Urban Production, a proposal for the Oakland waterfront will be designed and prototyped. A series of sites will be adapted to new industrial processes. The challenge is to present forms of industry that are independent of large-scale infrastructure, while utilizing the systems and measures that once drove the industrial processes along the waterfront.

CLOSED CIRCUITOUS LOOP OF MATERIAL AND PRODUCT GENERATION

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT: COMPLEX FORCES. Independent sites will be analyzed for their ability to function adjacently. The results will be distilled into elements that can be evaluated for future design development. Each building will be developed with specific programs and adapted to meet the programs requirements.

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT: MACRO (URBAN/ SITE SCALE) ARCHITECTURE. I will evaluate the potentials of vital networks dictating the larger site. The nearby San Francisco Bay is a vital amenity for the historic industrial sector, offering protection and strategic port capacities due to its location. The site is adjacent to usable ground, rail and air transportation connecting to the larger network. Project development will incorporate these transportation networks solidifying design considerations and manufacturing strategies.

RESOURCE CYCLING

SCHEMATIC DESIGN. In the introductory design phase, I will quickly reprogram four industrial sites: a refinery, factory, power station and grain elevator for heterogeneous industry. The objective is to quickly research, design and implement formal proposal for the sites. Matching these structures to new processes and develop architectural solutions. The results will be analyzed to find out how existing industrial facilities could be repurposed for new forms of production.

PHASE 03: Consumption ZONE 03: East Lake

PROCESS

OBSERVER

PHASE 02: Generator

PROJECT

ZONE 02: Waterfront

GROUP

OCCUPANTS/ MANUFACTURERS CONSUMPTION (N)FORMATION

CENTRAL ALLOCATION GENERATION OF SMALL SCALE MANUFACTURING

CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK LOOP

INDIVIDUAL

SELF CONSCIOUS SYSTEM DEVELOPING PRODUCTION SOLUTIONS

DEPLOYMENT OF TOOLS AND PROCESSES

MULTIPLICITY

PHASE 04: Recycling ZONE 04: SF Bay

THESIS SCHEDULE

EXAMPLE SILO: WORKING ENVIRONMENT 09


02 FOG POR[T]CH FERRY TERMINAL san francisco ca

COURSE

Comprehensive Building Design (CBD) Studio

DATE

2012

SCHOOL

California College of The Arts

COLLABORATORS

Zachary Moore Kristina Kotlier

INSTRUCTORS

Lisa Findley Tom Silva

Mt. Tam

Mt. Tam

Mt. Tam

Telegraph Hill

The San Francisco Embarcadero unites tourists and residents in a space that reveals the city’s diverse history. As a port city, San Francisco attracts people from around the world and provides a gentle climate and atmosphere. The city’s investment in infrastructure and improvements has allowed public transportation to become more accessible and economict. A new ferry terminal is proposed along the Embarcadero, behind the Ferry Building to accommodate hybrid modes of transportation. The design for a ferry terminal will allow ferry service to expand to more locations throughout the San Francisco Bay. The site is located on a large pier which includes a 25’ shaft supplying ventilation and noise suppression for the trans-bay BART tube. Atop the vent shaft, we designed a belvedere to allow beautiful panoramas of the city and the Bay. We included a cafe and lounge at the end of the pier and courtyard for the farmer’s market. In addition, a do-it-yourself bicycle maintenance shed, storage facility and bike share station were included to accomodate commuters who depend on these modes of travel. Our concept was based on analysis of site and weather conditions, and in particular, how the fog moved throughout the site at various times of the year. We wanted to create an overhead cloud effect, introducing lightness and transparency, which also serves as a cover over programmatic elements such as the farmer’s market and other outdoor events. 10

Late summer, morning fog

Nob Hill

Potrero Hill

Potrero Hill

Mt. Davidson

Fall; late evening fog

SITE

Twin Peaks Potrero Hill

Bernal Heights

Bernal Heights Mt. Davidson

Summer, typical evening fog

Telegraph Hill Russian Hill Nob Hill

Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks Potrero Hill

Bernal Heights

SITE

Russian Hill

SITE

Russian Hill Nob Hill

Twin Peaks

Mt. Davidson

Telegraph Hill

Telegraph Hill

SITE

Russian Hill Nob Hill

Mt. Tam

Bernal Heights Mt. Davidson

Mid-winter; “advection” (tule) fog


SPRING

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WINTER

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AA

BB

Metal Decking Open Web Steel Joist Double Glazing UP

Curtain Wall

BB

+ 8” + 8” UP + 0”

+ 8” AA

+ 8”

+ 0” + 0”

+ 8”

UP

+ 0”

UP

+ 0”

Level 01: Accessibility Diagram

Polished Concrete Floor Operable Windows Wood Decking

Level 03: Accessibility Diagram

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Radiant Floor System Rigid Insulation Existing Pier


Ferry Building

ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) roof membrane Exterior belvedere

1’ Ø roof “tree” columns @ ~40’ spacing Ferry landing lounge (2-level)

Pratt truss structural system

Bike kitchen (DIY bicycle repair shop) Bike storage (enclosed, not conditioned)

BART vent shaft

BART trans-bay tube

Bedrock

18” sq. concrete piers @ 6’ o.c.

Bay mud

BART train

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FERRY TERMINAL WALK-THROUGH 15


ETFE Exterior Skin Section Cut Line

1’-0” ɸ Rim Beams

49’-0”

0’-6” ɸ Rafter Beams

Pratt Truss

Rafters and Rim Beams

0’-6” ɸ Upright Columns ETFE Exterior Skin 9’-0”

1’-0” ɸ Rim Beams

Pratt Truss

42’-0”

Pratt Truss 16


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03 AUGMENTED REUSE HOUSING san francisco ca

COURSE

M. Arch Housing Studio 3

DATE

2011

SCHOOL

California College of The Arts

INSTRUCTORS

Chris Falliers Darrel Fields

Based on research and tracking of local movement frequencies in the Mission District, this apartment complex attempts to foster a rhythmnic work-life balance. Adaptable housing frameworks are made available to meet assorted occupant needs. In the dense, transit-oriented Mission District, this repurposed building will allow occupants with distinct lifestyles to prosper and thrive. Congruent with the rates or amplitude at which people interact with and move through the city, the housing complex is designed as a series of zones that draw people through the building. The dominant platforms represent circulatory paths and provide shelter and places to socialize. These perches allow light and air to reach all units. Contrary to typical lightwells, these are oriented horizontally to provide large garden courts elevated above the city. A series of conceptual layers through the building shape structural and partitioning strategies. Analysis of local frequency reveals shifts from public to private zones as the observer gets further from Mission Street. As the observer settles deeper into the site, the building decreases in porosity, providing a buffer for individual privacy. UNITS: 42 AVERAGE UNIT AREA: 750 ft² GREEN SPACE AREA: 8000 ft² BIKE STORAGE: 750 ft²


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HOUSE UNIT 01 SCALE: 1” = 20’

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LEVEL 01 PLAN SCALE: 1” = 40’

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HOUSE UNIT 02 SCALE: 1” = 20’

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LEVEL 03 PLAN SCALE: 1” = 40’

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04 SYNTH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

PARAMOUNT THEATER

oakland ca

I-980 FREEWAY

COURSE

CCA Advanced Studio

DATE

2012

SCHOOL

California College of the Arts

COLLABORATION

Zachary Moore Dane Bunton

INSTRUCTORS

Lisa Findley Peter Anderson

The goal of this project was to research and propose a design for a site located within frayed urban fabrics. Our proposal crossstitches three adjacent lots in uptown Oakland programmed as a performing arts institute, career development center and temporary/permanent housing. The site spans three blocks each falling within their own zoning district. The western site is on the edge of a residential zone, the central site is on the edge of a commercial zone and the eastern site is on the edge of the city’s emerging arts district. This project draws aspects from each of these districts complementing the adjacent city. The main building contains the Synthe Performing Arts Center, where students practice dance, music, theatre, ballet and opera. The central building has professional studios, offices and retail. The western building houses retail, apartments, and temporary dormitories for travelling performers and students.

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ORDWAY BUILDING (Tallest building in Oakland)

CIVIC CENTER

SITE @ 1800 SAN PABLO AVE


INTERCITY ARTS DISTRICT (UPTOWN) COMMERCIAL/GOVERNMENT RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE

Structure, Glazing and Shell

WEST SITE

CENTRAL SITE

EAST SITE

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05 NIU SHI ALLEY TERRACES nanjing china

COURSE

CCA Advanced Studio

DATE

2012

SCHOOL

California College of the Arts

COLLABORATION

Zachary Moore Dane Bunton

INSTRUCTORS

Lisa Findley Peter Anderson

The Niu Shi Alley Terraces were a result of an endeavor to repair damaged urban fabric in Nanjing that has occurred due to rapid modernization of Chinese cities. We proposed a design that would soften the transitions taking place. Chinas growth has rendered many neighborhoods obsolete and displaced many communities. Our design proposal weaves a community oriented program into a neighborhood that faced such demolition in 2006. To help relieve the existing traffic bottlenecks from the two alleyways, we proposed multiple stacking plazas, courts and pathways of varying scale through the plan. Tieing in with the local cultural aspects of Nanjing, we included a culinary institute, retail shopping center, hostel and residential spaces juxtapositioned between a busy street and tranquil canal. Aligning the public urban facades toward the noisy alley and terracing the back sides towards the canal allowed us to meet the code requirements for light, air and noise.

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ST

FA

SLOW


public

private

Dining

temporary

permanent

Housing

Floor_00

Floor_02

shops

circulation

Retail

kitchens

classrooms

Culinary Arts Institute

Top of Roof 183’ - 0”

Level 03 168’ - 0”

Level 02 152’ - 0”

Level 01 137’ - 0”

Level 01 120’ - 0”

O.G. 100’ - 0” Canal Walk 94’ - 0”

FLOORPLANS AND SECTIONS 23


06 NATIONAL SPORTS CENTER FOR THE DISABLED winter park co

COURSE

ENVD Studio 4

DATE

2006

SCHOOL

University of Colorado, Boulder

SCOPE

Off-grid ski school at resort summit

INSTRUCTOR

Rick Sommerfeld

The site for the NSCD headquarters project is at the top of the ski mountain at Winter Park. The program includes offices, ski workshops, a restaurant, ski school and warming space for members of the NSCD. The project was to design a self-sustaining, green building to maximize energy savings while providing a warming hut for members. A breathable glazing system pulls air inside the building through a sun-heated enclosure and vents to the exterior. The sun heats up the air to create an insulated layer. The kitchen is situated on the west side of the building, acting as a heat buffer to resist the cold western winds. Solar panels were implemented on the south facades allowing the building to run off the grid. ADA handicap requirements dictated the floor plan design and layout. A ramp extends through the building allows the offices and cafe to become activated spaces. There is a rental shop of custom ski equipment for members of the NSCD.

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02

03

04

05

06

01

07

08

09

N

UPPER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN

Program Layout 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Kitchen Cafe Administrative Office Ski Instructors Office Office Elevator Ramp to lower level Entry Deck Ski storage

EXAMPLE STUDY MODELS 25


07 AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER denver co

COURSE

ENVD Studio 2

DATE

2004

SCHOOL

University of Colorado, Boulder

SCOPE

Urban infill; community center

INSTRUCTOR

Rick Sommerfeld

The design for a community and recreation center in the city of Denver was based on analysis of the forces acting upon the site. Adjacent to the north side of the site is the Denver Broncos football stadium. To the west is Colfax Avenue leading to the mountains. The project aimed to bring a community center to an urban dead space: the viaduct under Colfax Avenue and Auraria Parkway. The 90,000 square foot building has three wings (recreation, community, and teen center), plus a “spa� retreat towards the river. The project was developed with hand conceptualization and physical representation. The model to the right was hand-built in under 25 hours and includes interior partitions and structural elements.

LOWER LEVEL SITE PLAN

N

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03

07

08 06

11

05

UP

13

10 09 09

17

12

14

16 15

Program Layout 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Sauna/Massage Room Baths Passive Solar Room Bathrooms Community Lounge Meeting Rooms Maintenance Storage Bathrooms Entrance And Elevator Basketball Court Recreation Storage Women's Locker Room Men's Locker Room Children's Day Care Center Kitchen Main Entrance

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08 HOLIDAY GARDEN TOOL SHED boulder co

POSITION

Designer, Contractor and Builder

DATE

2006

COMPANY

Moore Design Build, LLC

CLIENT

Boulder Housing Partners

TOTAL COST

$4,992

Existing Trellis

Community Garden

I designed and built a tool shed in North Boulder to complement a local, newurbanist community. Built to last for more than a hundred years, my concept was to minimize waste and use locally available materials. The timber-frame members were custom milled lodge-pole pine trees that had been infested by pine bark beetles in Colorado. A local sawmill cut each piece to meet specifications for the timber-frame.

16th Street

TOOL SHED Community Garden

N

Based on a 64” grid maximizes floor area and material usage per dollar spent. (This allows both 16’ pieces of lumber and 4’ x 8’ sheets of plywood to be utilized completely.) Interlocking non-load-bearing wall panels were built off-site and flat-packed in. I organized a “timber-raising” party with friends, employees of the project and local volunteers. In just a few hours, we had completely assembled, leveled and fastened the entire structure, including inserting all wall panels. By late evening, we had completely finished all of the rough framing and roof. Over the next few weeks, I completed the project with volunteers who painted, pounded nails, and kept company. The shed’s timber frame is intentionally unsealed and will develop a rustic patina to resemble

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Yellowpine Avenue


2x2 rough pine @ 4" o.c. Galvanized roofing Ice and water shield

12'-2" 5'-4"

2 1/2"

1x4 sub-roofing

14"

16"

16"

H3 Simpson Clip

1x8 fascia

16"

6 6

5'-4"

10

6x6 post beyond

6

4’-0"

H6 Simpson Clip

2x4 support for door

7/16" OSB

1x6 T and G pine

2'-8"

6'-4"

Vented bridge blocking

29


09 EX(H)EMPLARY STUDY CHAIR COURSE

Green Technology and Resources

DATE

2005

COMPANY

University of Colorado

SCOPE

Minimal waste; efficient design

INSTRUCTOR

Rick Sommerfeld

The assignment for this class was to research, design and fabricate a custom piece of furniture using sustainable materials while minimizing waste consumption. After sketching multiple variations and prototypes, I decided to design a “twolegged� arch supported chair. I learned about proper chair dimensioning and balancing as I developed the chair. The materials for the Ex(h)emplary Study Chair consisted of two fast growing resources, hemp and Italian poplar. I maintained a minimal waste design strategy throughout the development of the project by designing according to material dimensions. The final product is a chair that could be used in an office environment or in the living room of a house. The chair complements any space it is placed and can be disassembled for transport.

30


1.

A soft-body animation was used to model how the bendable plywood would drape over forms to create a seat rest.

2.

3.

4.

1.

2.

The 4 foot curve of the arch support was also determined by a soft-body simulation.

3.

4.

31


10 GOOGLE EARTH 3D BUILDINGS around the world

POSITION

Program Manger, Google Earth

DATES

2006 - 2011

COLLABORATION

3D Data Pipeline Team

COMPANY

Google, Inc

MANAGER

Chris Keating

Work Samples

As part of the original Google 3D Buildings team, my tasks were to construct photo-realistic 3D buildings using Google SketchUp. Throughout my career at Google, I created more than 700 signature buildings that are publicly viewable in the 3D Buildings layer in Google Earth. To help facilitate team projects and bring to realization several of my own projects, I was responsible for training three internal contractors on various job tasks. My main responsibility was to manage, process and launch 3D cities for Google Earth. Several exemplary cities that I brought to realization were Athens, Barcelona, Denver, Helsinki, Nelspruit, San Francisco, and Tokyo. Supplementing this main focus, also ensured building accuracy in Google Earth and managed Google’s many diverse collections of buildings and building components on the 3D Warehouse by responding to thousands of user reported inquiries. My passion for architecture and urban renewal has been augmented through the contributions I made to more than 100 Google Earth 3D cities worldwide.

32

FINANCIAL DISTRICT, SAN FRANCISCO SEPTEMBER 2007


THE STEEL BRIDGE, PORTLAND JUNE 2011

TOKYO TRAIN STATION, TOKYO MARCH 2009

CHICAGO TITLE AND TRUST BUILDING, CHICAGO JUNE 2007

EXAMPLE 3D CITIES 33


11 SPATIO-TEMPORAL MAPPING OF CULTURAL INTERACTIVITY san francisco ca

POSITION

Intern, Innovation Studio

DATE

Summer 2013

COMPANY

MKThink

CLIENT

RoundhouseOne

SUPERVISORS

Signo Uddenberg Mark Miller

At MKThink, I spent the summer researching and developing a tool that could map out cultural interaction in the built environment. Developing a series of questsions about how qualitiative and quantitaive data can describe how spaces operate, I soon decided that an automated approach to mapping behavior would be best. The features of this tool are to collect and evaluate spoken words to generate an understanding of the scope of occupancy. The end user would be able to search for a binary set of specific words and generate a mapping of the space compared with its intended purpose. The social graphics shown are figurative, meaning they are from a purely speculative standpoint. I chose to embark on this topic of research as a means to help evaluate current trends in automated collection, critiquing precedents such as Deb Roy’s “Birth of a Word” (MIT), the National Security Administration’s monitoring of phone calls, and various other uses of word databases, such as social mapping of productivity, happiness and engagement in curent events based on spatio-temporal usages.

34


DATE: July 10, 2013 CONTEXT: Zach’s Desk SPEAKER: Signo

Time Range Confidence Zoom

During the research project, I developed a series of useful graphics to represent speech patterns. Using Processing, an open-source Java based drawing tool, I was able to take raw data in XML format and compile a responsive tool displaying content in vartious formats. The graphs above represent two ways to highlight the quality of interaction in a space. Processing proved to be invaluable in the devleopment of the project, to an extent that I better understand how programming works and can be useful to represent our environment. As a design tool, processing could be used to generate responsive feedback in generating design ideas. To the left is a Processing application I built that simple takes tweets from a specific hashtab, in this case “#design” and displays them randomly on a screen. The tool is not real-time, but it will incorporate any new tweets during its running process. At MKThink, we used this at various events to allow interaction between the event-goers and the event itself.

PROCESSING: JAVA-BASED GRAPHICS EDITOR

35


MEETING

S In small spaces such as meeting rooms, patient rooms, or rehearsal spaces a single microphone is sufficient to capture the content of interaction.

(is the patient recieving proper attention and medication to treat their ailment?)

doctor speaker ID

Typically, 2-3 individuals will be interacting in these spaces.

patient

Behavioral Comfort duration

CLASSROOM

MEDICAL FACILITY

M

Group tables or individual desks tend to face the front of the room. Desks can be arranged in semi-circular or other configurations. Treat classrooms as a lecture environment. Position one microphone downward from the ceiling to capture the content in these spaces. If needed, install multiple recorders above each desk to acquire data in a lab environment.

location

ER Response Time

lab

(how is the spatial arrangement affecting how class is carried out?) q&a s)

e iti

iv

ct

(a

lecture

speakers Punctuation Speaker Turn Age Tone

Classroom Dynamics

LIBRARY

L

duration

EDUCATION FACILITY

location

Large, open spaces such as libraries typically do not have very loud dialog. Recorders should be set up over each working table, with sensitivity set to high. In these spaces we can track the percentage of time individuals are actively engaged in their work.

Word ID

CONFERENCE

(are teams engaging in sufficient dialog to achieve their goals?)

36

Word ID Age Rate of Speech Tone Gender Punctuation

Gender Dynamics

Session Brainstorm Analytics

XL

Conference rooms, lecture halls can have many people engaged at once. Multiple recorders need to be set up to gather the goings-on in the space. For lecture and auditorium spaces, place multiple recorders above the audience.

duration

OFFICE BUILDING

location

Project Movement

Rate Tone Department ID Word ID Speaker ID Duration Age Gender


F2

F2

F2

M1

F2

F2

F2

F2

F2

F2

M1

M1

100 F1

F1

M2

0

F1

F1

F1

F1

5

F1

10

M2

F1

F1

15

F1

F1

20

M2

F1

F1

M2

F1

50

19-59

F1

F1

25

30

6

7

9

10

11

12

13

F1

14

15

F2

M1

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

F1

F1

F2

F2

26

27

F1

F2

M1 F2

M1 F2

F2

M1

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

F4

F3

F3

36

37

38

39

40

M1

M1

M1

M1

M1

41

42

M2

F1

F1

M1

200

F3

M1

43

44

45

M2

F1

46

F1

M1

M1

47

48

49

50

M2

F1

M2

51

52

54

55

56

57

M2

M2

M3

M1

53

M3

58

F1

M3

59

F1

60

61

M2

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

66

67

68

M2

M4 F6

M3

10-18

M1

8

F3

F5

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

0

11

12

13

14

15

16

1

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

2

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

3

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

4

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

5

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

6

64

( Words / Minute )

5

F1

19-27

Age

0.95

65

7

Time ( Min )

0.85

SCORE 0.68 “ideate”: 3 “think”: 12 “design”: 4 “can’t”: 2 “problem”: 1

20

+1

10

Dialog Score

15

0

5

0

30 20

PM

SUN

6P M

6A M

12

AM

10

Length of Stay (min)

-1

12

ABU: 2 SBU: 0 ISBU: 0

Time / speaker (min)

ABU: 2 SBU: 1 ISBU: 9

4

F3

150

3

28-36

2

F3

100

F3

50

37-49

Time ( Min )

1

-0.45

F2

F2

F2

Below is a graphic that showcases a “Work-Life Balance” I was hypothesizing. It suggests that at different times of the day/week/month/year, in various locations in a given space, we could measure whether the content of dialog was related more to internal projects, or more towards extracurricular activities such as lunch, weekends, or holiday plans. These differences could be established using simple keyword search in a binary environment.

ABU: 1 SBU: 1 ISBU: 1

F2

( Words / Minute )

F2

150

60+

200

The red levels signify a higher probabilty that the space is being used for work related conversations. A score of 0.95 is

Age

The designed tool described here, would be applicable to a variety of scenarios. From Small spaces such as meeting rooms, patient rooms, to Extra Large spaces such as lecure halls, and conference rooms, we could use the tools developed to generate a conditional understanding of the occupancy of the space.

MON

TUES

WED

THURS

FRI

SAT

FINAL INTERACTION MAPPINGS 37


Graduate Architecture Portfolio 2013