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YUTING PAN Urban Design Portfolio Selected Work 2016-2017 GSAPP | Columbia University


Table of Content


Urban Design Core Studio Works

01

POOLING RESOURCES: FARMER CO-OP Water Urbanism Urban Design Studio Spring 2017

02

HEALTHWAY HEALWAY

Hudson Valley Regional Urban Design Studio Fall 2016

03

BUSHARE Collective Sharing Economy Urban Design Studio Summer 2016

Elective Course Works 04

REKINDLED BELONGINGNESS Fabrics and Typologies: New York City - Global Fall 2016

05

I REMEMBER, Interaction & Environment - Visual Studies Fall 2016

06

LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS Ultrareal - Visual Studies Spring 2017


JORDAN VALLEY REGIONAL ANALYSIS

Analysis of existing centralized water management system based on mega-projects


01

POOLING RESOURCES: FARMER CO-OP Reclaiming water resources through localized collaborative commons

Spring 2017 Urban Design Core Studio III Water Urbanism with Mengke Wu, Jinbao Liu, Kun Qian

What if a micro-scale, community driven water harvesting infrastructure challenged Jordan’s centralized water management system?

Introduction This project challenges Jordan’s centralized water management system by introducing a localized, community-driven, and micro-scale water harvesting infrastructure as an alternative to mitigate the dependency on the present water distribution system in Jordan. Pooling Resources Concept Localized Water Harvesting & Cooperative Farming Current agricultural practices consume up to 53% of the water available in the country. However, they contribute only 3% to the GDP. This project challenges the notion of water as a commodity to be distributed and controlled by the government, and proposes a move towards a more independent, and localized water commons. With this in mind, the project puts into question the current agricultural practices’ connection with the current land ownership pattern based on abstract property lines, disconnected from the land, its topography, and past understandings of territory. As a different form of cooperation occurs in this proposal, a self-sustainable agriculture community emerges, transforming the King Abdullah canal into an obsolete piece of infrastructure.


DEIR ‘ALLA SITE ANALYSIS To test this concept, one strategically located settlement was chosen: Deir ‘Alla. As a result of the construction of the King Abdullah Canal, this agriculture community has gone through tremendous change. The land reform policy (East Ghor Canal Project Law) was implemented in 1964, informed by the construction of the canal. The contradiction between the land reform policies and the traditional heritage law resulted in the current land fragmentation. The establishment of the Jordan Valley Authority in 1977 authorized the centralized water management in Jordan Valley. Water quota, which decides the amount of water distributed to each farm unit, was paired with certain crop patterns. The centralized water distribution management, based on pressure and price, changes the concept of water from a shared resources into a commodity. The agricultural sector in the Jordan Valley expanded tremendously after the construction of the canal. However, the developments of agriculture in the Valley fragmented the farmland limits further. The current agricultural practices, which are mostly based on mono-agriculture production, have resulted in a dysfunctional agriculture market in which both local farmers and migrant workers can barely make any profit.

6


DEIR ALLA SITE STRATEGY

Localized Rain Water Harvesting -- Utilizing Existing Topography Towards a localized rain water collection and water independence, the low points of the landscape are identified according to a carefully conducted analysis of the existing topography. The low points that are closer to main roads or existing settlements are selected and transformed into water nodes. Farmer co-ops are established around these nodes. The wadis on site form a gravity-driven, wastewater treatment and irrigation system, operating in parallel to the rainwater harvesting system.

7


EXPERIMENTAL GREENHOUSE EXISTING HOUSING

MIX PLANTING HYDROPONIC

LIVING CLUSTER WATER NODE

RAINWATER HARVESTING CANAL

PROTOTYPICAL FARMER CO-OP UNIT 8


Existing

Existing

Topo

Cut

Fill

Soil

Topo

Soil

Cut

Soil

Retain Wall

PRODUCTION FIELD WATER NODE

Existing

Topo

Cut

Soil

Fill

CS

GREY WATER DIVERSION WADI

Existing

Topo

Cut

Soil

Fill

Soil

Retain Wall

9

Soil


10

EXISTING SITE CONDITION

PHASE_1 SETTLING

Under the centralized water management, the farmers in Deir Alla relay on the water distributed by the Jordan Valley Authority, which is delivered several times a week based the crop pattern.

Centered around the necessity to collect water, the first phase proposes new water collection points, introduced at the low points mentioned above. Farmer co-ops are formed around these water collection nodes. Meanwhile, the potential wadis on site are mobilized to divert flows of treated wastewater from Deir ‘Alla. Date palms are cultivated along the wadis. In the future, those will also serve for the construction of the housing units, as they generate fast, renewable building material.

PHASE_2 INHABITING

PHASE_3 GROWING

The construction of the farmer co-op starts from the low points through a process of “cut and fill” operations. This will leverage the existing micro-topography on site as new water infrastructure. The greenhouses, an existing typology in this area, will support this shift. As these structures are being established, they will be transformed from being solely agriculture production tools into a water infrastructure system, offering the farmers additional sources to collect water. In addition, these greenhouses may serve for potential upgrades, where hydroponic systems can be introduced.

As the new co-op is being established, new collaborations lead to other means of agriculture. The co-op also facilitates new potential initiatives. For instance, “co-agriculture laboratories” can be formed as a trial to further explore and test different innovative forms of agriculture. A social credits program is introduced based on a virtual currency system, aimed to generate a mechanism to connect the users to education, technology, and other initiatives to empower the community. By implementing these forms of collaboration, this projects aims to gradually form a network of regional water collaboration and a comprehensive agriculture business to truly benefit the agriculture community in the Jordan Valley.


CO-FOOD PROCESSING

CO-AGRICULTURE LABORATORY 11


BUILDING T

Greenhouses occupy 50% to 70% of fa structure allows the potential for rainwat of the greenhouse is flexible, affordable, be altered and adapted to meet different co-op unit, three typolo

1 Bedroom Housing Family 2-4 people 32 m2 + 16 m2

3 Bedroom Housing Family 6-8 people 96 m2 + 32 m2

Family Friendly Housing Cluster

Co-Living Cluster

2 Bedroom Housing Family 4-6 people 80 m2 + 16 m2

CO-HOUSING PROTOTYPICAL LAYOUT Co-housing is introduced to improve the living conditions of migrant workers on site. Different housing typologies are introduced to meet the demands of various family structures and lifestyles. The structure of co-housing would be funded by the Jordan Valley Authority, as part of the localized rainwater harvesting system. After the construction of the structure of co-housing, the migrant workers on site can use localized material, for example stones, mud bricks, and dried date leaves to complete the construction of their housing.

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CO-FOOD PROCESSING P

As the farmer co-op is implemented, c to enable post-production value-adding various kinds of value-adding processes of agricultural products. It can also link grocery stores, and wholesalers as a way agriculture market.


TYPOLOGIES

armland in Deir ‘Alla. The arch-shaped ter harvesting. Meanwhile, the structure and conducive to bulk production. It can spatial needs. In the prototypical farmer ogies are implemented:

PROTOTYPICAL LAYOUT

co-hiring programs can be established g processes. Co-Food Processing host s from washing, packaging to processing k the farmer co-ops to local restaurants, y to gradually break the mono-functional

CO-AGRICULTURE LABORATORY PROTOTYPICAL LAYOUT In the last phase, Co-Agricultural Laboratories are established to test other means of agriculture, for example organic farm, aquaponics, etc. Different parties and players, like experts from USAID and Eco-consultants, scholars, researchers and students from the College of Agriculture in the University of Jordan, etc. can get involved. Meanwhile, different programs can be held here, like agriculture research and experimentation programs, internships, and training programs.

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VIEW OF CO-HOUSING | LIVING CLUSTER WATER NODE

14


VIEW OF AGRICULTURE PRODUCTION FIELD

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HUDSON VALLY REGIONAL COLLABORATION Analysis of existing hospital competitive & potential of future collaboration


02

HEALTHWAY HEALWAY Therapeutical Interfaces for Poughkeepsie

Fall 2016 Urban Design Core Studio II Hudson Valley Regional Studio Team Work, with Chu Li, Fu Wang, Ge Zhao Exhibited at Mid-Hudson Heritage Center

Our project seeks to address the imbalance between healthcare system economic insecurity in the city of Poughkeepsie by proposing distributed healthcare infrastructure and therapeutical landscapes across the neighborhood. The new heath care network intends to make Poughkeepsie a health destination and thus have systemic impact at regional scale. As the largest industry in Poughkeepsie, healthcare, especially, hospitals are making huge profits. The Vassar Brothers’ Medical Center is undergoing an expansion project which attracted over half a billion investments, making it the largest construction project in history. However, the neighborhood is excluded from the prosperous industry. The enclave campus designs and the car-targeted neighborhood structure physically segregate hospitals from the neighborhood. In this case, we argue that healthcare institutions ought to shoulder up social responsibility and act as a catalyst for community revitalization and economic development. By dispersing the healthcare related programs, we are also trying to address the psychological perspective of user groups. In hope of alleviating negative connotations of centralized the hospitals, we propose designs that can improvise the medical user experience and increase the interaction with the community.


Phase 1 | Neighborhood Scale

Phase 2 | City Scale

Phase 3 | Regional Scale

Three trans-formative magnets will be established as our therapeutically interfaces offering different types of care based on the surrounding population.

Tactical street interventions will take place along our identified “Healway�. For instance, temporary pop-up plazas, street fitness paths, mile makers, street body metrics.

Following the aforementioned steps, healthcare will become an eminent asset for Poughkeepsie in establishing collaboration with other Mid-Hudson River Region cities.

POUGHKEEPSIE CITY SCALE ANALYSIS 18

Analysis of existing program & proposed design | phasing strategy


CITY SCALE CO-OPERATION & DESIGN STRATEGY 19


Street Fitness Path

Bike Lane

eet Main Str

Corner Plaza

City Plaza

Shuttle Bus

PROPOSED STREET DESIGN STRATEGY

20

Existing Civic Center


tion

Medita

Library Urgent

Dining

Care

Hall Healing

Garden

SUBSTANCE ABUSE THERAPY

21


Swimming Pool

Therapeutic Spa

Occupational

Therapeutic Horticulture

AQUATIC THERAPY

22


Multi-Generation Playground

Pediatric Center Therapy for Seniors Check Up Center

Sports Therapy

Meditation Garden

Exercise Park

Running Track

Cafe & Food Truck

After School Program Plaza

After School Program Plaza

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE THERAPY

23


VIEW OF HEALTH LIFESTYLE INTERFACE multi-generation playground | therapeutic garden

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VIEW OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE THERAPY dining hall | urgent care

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VIEW OF AQUATIC THERAPY INTERFACE therapeutic horticulture | therapeutic ramp

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Compost

BUS ARE Bodega

Policy Change

Fresh Food

Compost

BUSHARE Garden Corner Bodega & Plaza

BUS ARE School

Bodega

Policy Change

Fresh Food

BUSHARE Garden Corner Bodega & Plaza School

PROPOSED BUSHARE COLLECTIVE NETWORK BUSHARE garden | corner bodega plaza | new fresh food & social network


03

BUS ARE COLLECTIVE

Revamping the Community Food Culture in Bushwick Revamping the Community Food Culture in Bushwick

Summer 2016 Urban Design Core Studio I Sharing Economy Team Work, with Carmelo Ignaccolo, Christoper Chiou, Linshu Huang AECOM URBAN SOS Semi Finalist

Bushwick lacks access to fresh food and small scale recreation spaces. The Bushare Collective proposes a new building regulation policy and a sharing platform to create a sustainable, locally produced fresh-food network. Bushwick is currently served by the city’s FRESH program, however the incentive caters only to the consumption end of the spectrum. Our proposal tackles the lack of fresh food production by localizing the process. According to our proposed policy change, developers are tasked with providing an aquaponics garden and the necessary programs and equipment associated with the process. In exchange, developers receive an RFA bump equal to garden space provided. Each new development houses a rooftop aquaponics garden coupled with a basement composting center. The garden acts as not only a production center but also a communal gathering space. Passenger and waste/food transfer elevators will supplement the development as well. The nearby bodegas, primarily selling processed food, participate in the program by acting as food waste drop-off points and fresh food vendors. Residents join the Bushare Collective and earn coupons in the form of Bushare points which are used towards the locally produced food at the bodegas. Our Collective creates an ecosystem of recycling and community aimed at a sustainable future.


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EXISTING VACANT LOT

EXISTING FOOD MARKET

The neighborhood of Bushwick is located in the northern part of the Brooklyn borough of New York City. It is bounded by Queens to the northeast, Brooklyn neighborhoods Williamsburg to the northwest, East New York to the southeast, Brownsville to the south, and Bedford-Stuyvesant to the southwest. Bushwick has been a predominantly Hispanic neighborhood comprised primarily of Puerto Rican and Dominican immigrants. 32% of the Bushwick population falls under the poverty line, which makes it the 7th most impoverished neighborhood in NYC. Bushwick has a relatively high number of Bodegas. However, the percentage access to locally produced fresh food is relatively low. The lack of affordable fresh food in Bushwick is linked to a lot of health issues, such as high obesity and diabetes rate. On the other hand, the typology of recreation places provided in the neighborhood is limited. There is no block scale recreational space provided to the neighborhood.

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Food Retail Expansion to Support Health

Bushwick

Zoning Incentives Map Bushwick Community District 4 Eligible for FRESH program zoning incentives

Existing Code “A developer seeking to utilize the zoning incentives of the FRESH Program must demonstrate that the primary business of the retail space is the sale of food products.”

1 sf of FRESH food store provided by developer

=

1 sf of Residential Floor Area bonus for developer

1 sf of BUSHARE garden

=

1 sf of Residential Floor Area bonus for developer

Proposed Code “A developer seeking to utilize the zoning incentives of the FRESH Program must demonstrate that the primary business of the retail space is the sale of food products OR that the primary use of the space is the local production of agriculture.” ALSO “Developers must also provide necessary programs and/or equipment required for the local production of agriculture.”

provided by developer

Existing Schools

(BUSHARE garden added to existing school) within 600’ of New Residential

New Residential (BUSHARE garden in new

600’ 300’

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Existing Community Gardens

(BUSHARE garden added to existing community garden) within 300’ of New Residential


WHAT IS AQUAPONICS?

Aquaponics is the combination of hydroponics (soil less plant farming) and aquaculture (fish farming).

0

waste

10x

Aquaponics Garden

more produce grown in same footprint as terrestrial farming

30%

faster harvesting time compared to soil farming

WHAT IS BUSHARE GARDEN?

A community gathering space providing locally harvested produce through aquaponics.

Cooking class

Exchange food culture among different communities

Community space

Enjoy your time with the local community

Nutritional training

Become familiar with food nutritional values

PROPOSED BUSHARE COLLECTIVE NETWORK | BUSHARE GARDEN 33


BUSHARE BODEGA CORNER PLAZA

CORNER BODEGA

CORNER BODEGA

Pr-established Community Public Space

MODULAR

SELLING

New Community Public Space

SITTING

Bodega Corner Plaza Vegetable Showcase

VIEW OF NEW BUSHARE BODEGA CORNER PLAZA 34


BUSHARE MOBILE

21:00

100%

21:00

21:00

100%

21:00

100%

100%

21:00

100%

CHAT Hi Chris ! SCAN ME and ...

points

points collected

points

Well done, today you have produced ...

FOOD WASTE wallet balance : 18 POINTS

2 LITERS of FOOD WASTE

Hi Carmelo, I’m going on vacation for a couple weeks and I have a lot of fresh produce in my fridge. Would you be interested in purchasing them? Hi Chris, yes absolutely! I can pick it up at the local Bushare Collective bodega.

Great! I will meet you there tomorrow noon!

Options : 2 lbs fresh vegetables 9

... weigh your food waste

15

2 lbs season fruit

... so you deserve : 3 POINTS

Thanks for using Bushare !!

my points wallet

POINTS

SCAN

EARN

SPENDING

PURCHASE

BUSHARE members can earn points by composting food waste or selling unused produce.

Members scan th QR code when food waste is dropped off at the bin for composting.

Application analyzes the amount of food waste and members receive points.

Application analyzes the amount of food waste and members receive points.

Members can purchase unused produce from other members at a gr

Application

The smart trash bin weighs the amount of food waste and produces a QR code which can be scanned with a smart phone.

Smart Trash Bin

VIEW OF NEW BUSHARE BODEGA CORNER PLAZA 35


DAY TIME VIEW OF NEW BUSHARE GARDEN community space | cooking class

36


NIGHT VIEW OF NEW BUSHARE GARDEN community space | view tower

37


04 REKINDLED BELONGINGNESS

RE-ESTABLISHING TYPOLOGY SPIRITUAL SPACE ORIENTED NEIGHBORHOODS IN HAIDIAN ISLAND Fall 2016 Fabrics and Typologies: New York City- Global Team Work, with Chu Li Instructor: Richard Plunz

China

Hainan

Haidian Island

The Haidian Island in Haikou witnessed a rich history of culture heritage, eradication and gentrification. Separated from the main terrain of China by the Qiongzhou Strait, the tipping point of Hainan Island has always been an ideal place for immigration in periods of war and chaos. Ever since the Qing Dynasty, people from different areas of China settled in Haidian Island. Upon their arrival, they resided in clusters and built temples and shrines of their own religion. This kind of religious public space tightened the connections between people and provided s spiritual support for the neighborhood. Thus the dwellings on Haidian Island centered around the temples and grew out in the pattern of a shell. With the gentrified development in 2009, this entire piece of unique fabric was eradicated. Albeit more density and economic benefit is achieved through the current model, one can barely find any trace of the once rarefied village patterns. BOBAI

Guangxi

BOBAI

Guangxi

Guangdong

Tang Dynasty

Tang Dynasty

Guangdong

7,000

7,000 First under governance First under governance

OU

OU

IZH

IZH

TA

TA

U

O SUZH

HAIKANG

North Sea

U

O SUZH

HAIKANG

Song Dynasty

North Sea

XUWEN

10,000

XUWEN

South Sea LINGAO

South Sea

LINGAO HAIKOU

Yuan Dynasty

HAIKOU

17,000

CHANGJIANG ASI A

47,000

BAISHA QIONGHAI

QIONGHAI

Ming Dynasty

AD1368-1389 Ming war AD1368-1389 Ming war

SO

UTH SO

LINSHUI

47,000

Ming Dynasty

UTH

EAST

BAISHA DONGFANG

EAST

CHANGJIANG

DONGFANG

Yuan Dynasty

AD1253 An’nan war AD1253 An’nan war 17,000

ZHANCHENG

ASI A

ZHANCHENG

Song Dynasty

Song- Xia war AD1040-1044 Song- AD1040-1044 Xia war

10,000

LINSHUI

217,000

217,000 Qing Dynasty

SANYA

AR AB

IC

CO

UN

TR IES

IES

BRIEF HISTORY OF HAINAN 38

Qing Dynasty

AD1840 Opium war AD1840 Opium war

TR IES

UNTR

UN

IC CO

CO IC

ARAB

AR AB

ARAB

IC CO

UNTR

IES

SANYA

100,000

100,000 1950s

1950s


Our proposal aims at reclaiming the residue of the traditional pattern but at the same time catering the need of density for a more modern community. We scrutinized the layout of the traditional village, and analyzed its dimensions and functions, and reaching the conclusion that while the dimensions of the traditional are human scale, the functions of old housing types are much outdated. Thus we extracted the dimensions of the traditional housing and retrofitted into new patterns that bear modern functions. While a shed for the guard might be a necessity in every house in Qing Dynasty, we are now proposing to turn it into the circulation core. The auxiliary units for each house hold can be shared and enlarged in the contemporary setting, creating more usable and semi-public spaces. The courtyard typology is being preserved for offering green and public spaces. The height and the layout of the housing patterns are all centered around an old temple, targeting at bringing back the spiritual space and support that was once and still should be very important to the neighborhood. The building massing cannot retrieve the profit-oriented development of 2009, but strives to find the balance between the village settings and the increased density of modern society. In additional, commercial spaces and parking are also implanted to adapt to the needs of modern society.

Wenying Village

2007

2009

2015

Nanxuan Village

Dongshan Village

TEMPLES OF HAIDIAN ISLAND 39


EXISTING SITE PLAN-BEFORE 2007

EXISTING SITE AXONOMETRIC - BEFORE 2007

EXISTING SITE PLAN-AFTER 2009

EXISTING SITE AXONOMETRIC - AFTER 2009

ERADICATION OF TRADITIONAL TYPOLOGY 2007-today

40


Site Strategy

PROPOSED SITE PLAN

PROPOSED SITE AXONOMETRIC

PROPOSED HOUSING TYPOLOGY spiritual space oriented neighborhoods 41


05 I REMEMBER, Fall 2016 Visual Studies Interaction & Environment Individual Work Instructor: Tim Gambell, Florian Mewes

The design intents to transform a website into a physical site, through, comparing, incorporating and transforming. “I remember,” is a website, a social network dedicated to memories. The “Ground Zero”, is a site, a memorial site, also dedicated to memories. The new design of “I remember,” is a interactive street installation, dedicated to memories and stories. Two key element of the design is the “memory bubble”and the “memory room”, where people can share their memory and explore memory of the others.

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06 LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS Spring 2017 Imagining the Ultrareal Visual Studies Team Work, with Zichang Yan, Mengke Wu Instructor: Phillip Crupi, Joseph Brennan

CONCEPT SKETCHES

The design is a church, located in the middle of the desert, emphasizing the contrast between different entities. The contrast between stone and glass panel; man-made pool and the endless desert; the light and shadow.

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Yuting Pan's Selected Works from GSAPP | Columbia University | MSAUD  

Yuting Pan's Selected Works from GSAPP | Columbia University | MSAUD 2016-2017

Yuting Pan's Selected Works from GSAPP | Columbia University | MSAUD  

Yuting Pan's Selected Works from GSAPP | Columbia University | MSAUD 2016-2017

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