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APRIL 2013

W W W. G U I TA R P L AY E R . C O M

Michael hedges

John abercroMbie Kurt rosenwinKel toMMy tedesco Reviewed!

6 Pedalboards PLUS!

3 Free song TranscriPTions

The iconoclasTic fingersTyle guiTarisT discusses composing, radical Tunings, harp guiTar, and much more in his ocTober 1990 coVer sTory


Editor in Chief

Michael Molenda - mmolenda@nbmedia.com

Editors

Matt Blackett - mblackett@nbmediacom Barry Cleveland - bcleveland@nbmedia.com Art Thompson - athompson@nbmedia.com Jim Campilongo, Jesse Gress, Henry Kaiser, Michael Ross, Leni Stern, David Torn, Tom Wheeler

Consulting Editors

Designer Production Manager

Amy Santana Beatrice Kim Publisher : Joe Perry jperry@nbmedia.com, 770.343.9978

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April 2013 · Volume 3, Number 3

contents

New Artist FeAture 08

Kurt Rosenwinkel

(From the current issue of Guitar Player)

From the vAult 14

John Abercrombie The innovative jazz guitarist goes deep on improvisation, tone, gear, and guitar synths.

(from the November 1986 issue of Guitar Player)

30

Classic Michael Hedges Interview The iconoclastic fingerstyle guitarist discusses his Taproot album, composing, radical tunings, harp guitar, and much more in his October 1990 cover story. Bonus: “The Naked Stalk” Lesson!

GeAr 40

Reviewed! Roundup: 6 Pedalboards

(From the current issue of Guitar Player)

oN the NewsstANd 48

GP April 2013 Table of Contents

lessoNs 50

Arnie Berl on Improvisation, Scales, and Modes

(from the October 1978 issue of Guitar Player)

52

Tommy Tedesco Studio Log: “No Notes”

(from the April 1979 issue of Guitar Player)

sessioNs 54

The ever-popular TrueFire Lessons

trANscriptioNs 56

“Personality Crisis” New York Dolls

63

“Only The Lonely” The Motels

69

“You Can Leave Your Hat On” Randy Newman

Kurt Rosenwinkle - Page 8

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 7


artist feature ROCK Listening to the Future Kurt rosenwinKeL on Star of Jupiter and Beyond By Barry C levela nd Kurt rosenwinKel Came to prominenCe in the

SPONTANIK

early ’90s, playing with jazz legends vibraphonist Gary Burton and drummer Paul Motian, as well as hip contemporaries such as saxophonists Chris Potter, Saemus Blake, Mark Turner, and Joshua Redman. In addition to distinguishing himself as an extraordinary guitarist with the requisite sideman and collaborative credits, Rosenwinkel has also proven to be a prolific and adventurous composer, exploring music ranging from reimagined standards (Reflections) to big band extravaganzas (Our Secret World) to crossgenre hybrids (Heartcore). He received the National Endowment for the Arts Composer’s Award in 1995. Rosenwinkel’s tenth release as a leader, Star of Jupiter [Wommusic], is a double-disc tour de force that showcases the guitarist’s highly melodic and nuanced fretwork within an intriguing array of compositional contexts, accompanied by keyboardist Aaron Parks, acoustic bassist Eric Revis, and drummer Justin Faulkner. Upcoming projects include an “experimental, mad-scientist” album akin to Heartcore, and a solo guitar and looping album that will provide egress into yet another dimension encompassed within Rosenwinkel’s expanding musical universe.

8 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 9


artist feature rosenwinkel What you were hoping to achieve with Star of Jupiter, and did it turn out the way you anticipated it would?

The album was made very loosely compared to others I’ve recorded. In the past I have been very artistically driven and focused on exactly what I wanted to do and why, but in this case my manager just suggested I make a quartet album, and because I already had an amazing band and a lot of material, that sounded like a great idea. I was also already intensely focused on making two other records, which I’m sure had something to do with it. Once the music began taking shape, things took on a kind of mystical aspect for a number of reasons, and it started to feel like a pretty powerful convergence. Our experience in the studio was really strong—kind of like we had help from the spirits. So, although I approached the project relatively casually, I’m thrilled with how it came out, and I think it may be my best record yet. Does the title allude to that experience in some way?

Yes. The title refers to a very powerful, mystical dream that I had in the run up to the album, and the phrase “Star of Jupiter” was taken directly from that dream. It was this sort of celestial measuring instrument that was given to me—but it was also a metaphor for spiritual transformation. After that all of these weird convergences began happening to me relative to that. For

example, when we drove to the Clubhouse in upstate New York to do the session, we arrived at about 10:30 at night. The studio is in a big field, and as soon as we got out of the car I looked up in the sky and there was Jupiter—and then suddenly a meteor with a green flame in front of it like I’ve never seen before moved slowly across the sky, looking almost as if it might strike the planet and explode.

my experience comes from this intuitive relationship with the spiritual or universal realms, in which I can experience a feeling of almost total obliteration or dissolution. That’s a very different kind of experience and motivation for playing music than the idea of self-expression. I really don’t care about self-expression in music [laughs]. I want to dissolve and disappear into the wave of the universe.

In the press release for the album you

Despite the heady compositional

talk about using intuition to listen to

structures, there’s a lushness and sen-

what the universe is telling you. Elabo-

suality to a lot of the pieces that tends

rate on that in terms of how it relates to

to seduce the listener into experienc-

your music, your guitar playing, and your

ing them as music rather than technical

view of creativity.

marvels. Was that an explicit goal while

In my experience, the most powerful moments in music have come when I’m just listening rather than trying to do something. That could be listening to the other musicians, or what’s in my internal space, or what I imagine to be my connection to “the universe,” which is just kind of a metaphorical name for the interconnected whole of reality. When I write a song, I don’t feel like I’m writing it, I feel like I’m finding it. And when I’m improvising I feel like I can take care of the nuts and bolts of the craft— but the essential ingredient is brought to the music by a certain kind of meditation, which is listening to the universe. There’s also human emotion and my personal expression through my life and things like that, of course, but the greater power in

you were writing, or do those two things

The KurT rosenwinKel sTandards Trio (wiTh eric revis and JusTin FaulKner) perForming live.

simply coexist naturally?

That’s a great observation, and I appreciate it because I feel the same way. I consider my music to be very accessible, even though it may be complex in its inner workings, and I get a kick out of that coexistence. Actually, I try to write pieces that are as simple as they can be, and that are connected to some tangible feeling or mood—but it just so happens that the things I find are naturally structured the way they are. A good example is “Welcome Home,” which was a piano piece that had been kicking around in my repertoire. When I decided to include it on the album I had to write a chart for the band, and although I had always thought of the piece as being simple, because it sounds simple, writing it out made me realize that it is incredibly complicated. I’m always hurt whenever someone calls my music “intellectual,” because it isn’t that way at all. It’s just the way that it needs to be. It couldn’t be any simpler. Blending your voice with your guitar lines is one of your trademarks, but on the new album you take it to some new places using signal processing. Talk about that, maybe using the opening track as an example.

The voice has always been an element in my sound, and I’ve gradually become more sophisticated in terms of effects processing and controlling the nuances of how I blend it with the guitar sound. On “Gamma Band,” there are actually sometimes three sounds, because I’m using an Electro-Harmonix HOG pedal with the guitar to get an organlike sound, and I blend that in, too. Being able to control the voice more allows me to

10 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


artist feature make it louder in the mix, whereas before I had to keep it really low so it wouldn’t jump out too much. My voice is processed with a DigiTech Vocalist pedal and some delay and reverb on that track. How do you control the blend of the dry and processed sounds coming from the guitar?

I only use the neck pickup on my D’Angelico NYSS-3, and the lead from that is split into two signal paths, each with its own volume and tone control and its own output jack. One output goes to the HOG, the other goes to my main signal path, and then the two are blended before they reach the amp. The pickup selector has been rewired to select either or both feeds from the pickup. On “Gamma Band” I had the selector in the middle, but I can also do things like flip to the HOG and play a chord swell, freeze that using the HOG’s freeze function, then flip to the guitar sound and play a distorted solo line over it—that sort of thing.

my left hand feels much more agile on the guitar in terms of fluidity or dexterity, so sometimes I’m kind of horrified about my right-hand fingerpicking technique [laughs]. But particularly with this quartet, which has a piano, the pianist is usually handling arpeggios and I’m playing the melodies, which is the way I like it. I can handle some arpeggios if I need to, but I’m kind of a hobbyist classical guitarist. Nonetheless, you play with a lot of

dynamics, even within the course of a single phrase.

Definitely. I want to be able to play anything in any way needed in order to get the phrase out, so I practice lots of variations on alternate picking, and specific exercises to develop articulation. In that sense, I feel pretty good about my right hand. What’s an example of a specific exercise?

One example would be articulating a phrase with a rhythm in your right hand

Speaking of distortion, how do you get that smooth distorted-yet-articulate solo sound that pops up throughout the album?

I use a Pro Co Rat connected to a GigRig WetBox parallel effects blender so that I can mix the clean guitar sound with the sustained distorted sound to give it a little more body and clarity. I always like distortion sounds that don’t sound like rock guitar. Also, when recording the album I split my signal before it went to the amp, and routed the reverb and delay signals to two separate tracks, with only the dry signal going into the amp. What amp did you use, and how did you record it?

I used a Port City Pearl, which is a really clean, warm, and beautiful-sounding tube amp. I set it for a clean tone and got my other sounds with pedals. We miked it with Neumann M49 tube condenser and AEA A440 ribbon microphones, both placed close to the speaker, which gave us two different colors to work with. Although you cover a tremendous range of expression with your right hand, you mostly play with a pick using alternate strokes, right?

Yes, combined with lots of hammer-ons and pull-offs. I very rarely sweep pick, even when crossing strings, and I never play, say, two down strokes in a row. I do fingerpick occasionally, but although I am right handed,

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 11


artist feature rosenwinkel that’s different from the rhythm of the phrase that you are playing with your left hand. So, say you are playing a series of triads, and the natural rhythm of the left hand is triplets with the accent on the one: 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3. If you were to accent all of the down strokes with your right hand you would get: 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3. By having two different rhythms overlapping one another you can get into some really deep, cool, and complex phrasing. That’s

a big one for me right now. What’s another big one?

Hearing ahead. You know the concept of thinking ahead? I’ve been dealing with that for a long time—but now I’m trying to develop my ability to actually hear the music, and to formulate how it is going to sound in my head, before it happens. When I hear myself say that, it doesn’t sound so new [laughs]. It’s like, “yeah, duh.” But I don’t mean it in the sense of saying to

yourself, “I know the next chord is D,” and then hearing that chord. I mean listening in an open state of mind and trying to hear what comes in a natural way. It has to do with listening to the future. You are projecting your imagination into the future while you’re playing?

You could say that. I think of it as time travel. I want to put my consciousness into the future so that I find out what happens in the B section—not just with me, but also with the drums and the bass and the piano. So, I’ll time travel to the B section, I’ll see what’s there, and I’ll hear what it’s going to sound like. And then when that B section actually comes, the “me” in the past sense—because at that point it will be the past—will know exactly how to play in that moment. I’ll have a lot more wisdom. I’ll be acting rather than reacting. When you’re time traveling, what’s going on with the guy who’s still sitting there in the present playing?

He’s dealing with what I’ve already dealt with. He’s just back there in the past executing it. I love that image.

[Laughs]. That’s what I’m working on. Okay, here’s a hypothetical: You’re at a club and you’re asked to sit in. As soon as you strap on your guitar, the song starts, the changes are complex and totally unfamiliar, and the time is something crazy that you can’t immediately grasp. The leader points to you. What do you do?

Play. What’s happening inside your head as you are playing?

Actually at this point there aren’t too many situations in which I can’t figure out what is going on. But if I truly can’t figure it out, I love that, because then I can just use my ears. And my ears are pretty quick, so if the harmony changes I can react to that instantaneously—just playing by ear. It’s all playing by ear, it has been from the beginning, and it always will be. The situation you described is a very comfortable one for me. Are you analyzing what’s going on in that situation or just acting spontaneously?

Both. I’d be figuring out what was going on while winging it at the same time. The time travel thing might come in handy in that situation.

[Laughs]. Damn, you’re right! g

12 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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On Tour...

Paul Crook (Meatloaf ) plays GFS Pickups and GFS Pedals

David Foral (Dirty Heads) with his Xaviere XV-400 Ac oustic Bass

Earl Slick (David Bowie, New York Dolls) uses Slickstraps and plays GFS Pickups and Pedals. Joe Tomino and DP Holmes (Dub Trio, Matisyahu) use GFS Pedals and Cables.

r) uses wn (Trixte Steve Bro s GFS s and play ls Slickstrap da e P nd GFS Pickups a

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Duddy B and David Foral (Dirty Heads) use GFS Pedals. Slickstraps and GFS Cables.

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classic interview

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classic interview

CLASSIC INTERVIEW

Abercrombie plAys “Alice in wonderlAnd” solo.

from the November 1986 issue of Guitar Player magazine

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 27


classic interview

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classic interview

MicHael Hedges acoustic overdrive

By Joe Gore PhotograPhy By Jay BlakesBerg

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

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classic interview

Hedges performs “AeriAl BoundAries” live

CLASSIC INTERVIEW from the October 1990 issue of Guitar Player magazine

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classic interview

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Cl i ckor Sear ch i Tunesf or Tr ueFi r e


gear roundup!

The Skinny on Six Pedalboards TesT ed By A rT T hompson CrAfTing A pedAlBoArd from A pieCe of

to handle current-hungry digital effectors, you may still

plywood might be your first impulse if you want to end

need to shell out for a pro-grade power supply (and

the madness of stringing a bunch of loose stompboxes

reserve space on the board for it).

on the floor, but the availability of quality, ready-made

A pedalboard has to be reliable too. Troubleshooting

boards makes it hardly worth the effort of going all DIY.

connections on the gig is a non-starter, so do you trust

Aftermarket boards come in a wide variety of sizes,

your own skills at wiring it up or should you hand that job

materials, and configurations to suit almost any need, so

over to a pro? And even if you get a “turn-key” board with

basically all you have to do is determine is how big your

all your pedals professionally mounted and wired, any

board needs to be and what amenities it should have. A

changes you make to it can compromise the system. If

few things to consider: Are you comfortable with a flat

cost isn’t an issue, it’s probably best to leave a properly

board or do you prefer an angled type? Is a riser needed

working board alone and build another for all those new

to make the inboard pedals easier to reach? Do you plan

pedals you’ve bought.

on turning pedals on and off individually, or will you need

For this roundup we gathered six pedalboards that run

to factor in some extra space for a switching system that

the gamut from basic flat and angled platforms to more

can activate multiple pedals with a single stomp? Some

feature heavy models to a unique new board that offers

boards come with their own power supplies, which can

wireless pedal switching. We evaluated them on the basis

save you some dough, but if the DC output isn’t sufficient

of construction, features, and ease of setup.

40 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


Boss BCB-60

MoDEL

Boss BCB-60

As you might expect, the BCB-60 is designed with Boss pedals in mind. The novel attach-

ContaCt

bossus.com

ment method for them employs a trio of foam pads, each pre-cut for two standard Boss

PriCe

$169 street

pedals or one “twin” model. You simply unscrew each pad at its four corners, remove the pre-punched cutouts as needed, place the foam pads around your pedals, and screw

s p E c i f i c at i o n s

them down again. The system provides a reasonably secure hold on Boss and equivalent

Size

26 7/16" x 14 5/8"

sized boxes, but pedals with smaller or larger dimensions require you to cut their outlines

ConStruCtion

Molded plastic with hinged cover

into the blank piece of foam that’s included for this use. Of course, you can always resort

Color

Dark gray

to Velcro for keeping odd-sized pedals in place, and the board’s removable plastic cover

Mounting SurfaCe

Plastic with foam holding pads

ensures that everything stays put and is well protected while traveling.

ConneCtionS

Input, Send, Return (x2) Output (x2), DC input and output 2.1mm jacks

Another thoughtful feature of the BCB-60 is the wiring channel that runs along the front of the pedals. Take off the two hatches that cover the channel, place the supplied

Power SuPPly inCluded?

Yes

“daisy chain” power cable inside, and then push the ends out though any of the 12 open-

CableS inCluded?

Yes, audio and power

ings to connect to your pedals’ DC input jacks. Up to seven pedals can be powered in

oPtionS

N/A

this manner, and once you put the covers back on the bulk of the wiring is well hidden.

built

China

A section of the channel on the far right side can even be removed so that you can put

KudoS

Holds pedals without Velcro or locking tape. Allows power cables to

a Crybaby or other extra-long pedal in the first slot. Nice!

be hidden. 1000mA power supply

The dual 1/4" return and output jacks make it easy to configure this pedalboard for

included.

stereo, and you get the pro-style convenience of plugging directly into the board to make all the audio connections. Obviously a lot of thought went into the BCB-60, and it’s an

ConCernS

Best suited for Boss-sized pedals.

excellent choice if you mainly use Boss pedals and want a self-contained system for them.

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 41


gear roundup!

MoDEl

DiabloFX SC-6

DiabloFX SC-6 Pedalboard systems that use relay controlled

ContaCt

diablofx.com

switchable loops to bring effects in and out of the

PriCe

$599 retail (includes soft case)

signal path have been around for years, but what makes the

S p E c i F i c at i o n S

SC-6 different is its use of wireless technology to remotely activate six loops via a wireless four-button floor switcher (powered by a small 12-volt

Size

16" x 24"

battery) that you program using a simple matrix of switches on the main board. On the

ConStruCtion

Steel

left side of the board are LEDs labeled A, B, C, and D, which correspond to the identi-

Color:

Black

cally labeled buttons on the floor switcher. Across the front of the board we also find a

Mounting SurfaCe

Steel

quartet of switches for each loop that are used to assign pedals to any of the momen-

ConneCtionS

Input and and output jacks.

tary buttons on the floor switcher.

Send and return jacks for Power SuPPly inCluded?

The intuitive interface makes it super easy to get multiple effects configured for

each of the six loops

one-button activation, and with the pedalboard and switcher placed a stage length’s

Yes, for switching unit only;

away from each other, the system worked flawlessly and without interference. It’s clear

wireless floorboard uses

from the DiabloFX video demo that the board and switcher can communicate at much

a small 12v battery

greater distances as well.

CableS inCluded?

No

oPtionS

N/A

were LEDs on the switcher to indicate what loop is active. It would also be nice if you

KudoS

Wireless system allows floor

could access the six loops individually, which would require adding two buttons to the

switcher and pedalboard to be

switcher or perhaps a bank A/B switch. Power for the switching and wireless electronics

placed anywhere on or off stage.

could also come from an internal supply instead of having to plug in a dedicated 9-volt

Pedals can be easily configured

adapter (along with another adapter for the pedals).

for single-button activation. ConCernS

From a conceptual standpoint the SC-6 is brilliant, but it would be helpful if there

As it stands, though, the SC-6 six certainly brings a high level of convenience factor

No LEDs on the floor switcher.

to the pedalboard equation in an easy to operate system. Being able to put the pedal-

Only four of the six loops

board anywhere you want is a real boon when stage space is limited, and players who

can be activated individ-

already go wireless will especially love how the SC-6 utilizes RF technology for stomp-

ually by the switcher.

box management. An impressive debut, and it will be interesting to see how the system evolves from this early production version.

42 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


gear

MODEL

FIX PEDALBOARDS Type 2

Fix Pedalboards TyPe 2

ContaCt

fixpedalboards.com

The company behind this brand makes a lot of components for the automotive racing

PriCe

$199 direct

world, and Fix brings this high level of metal fabrication to its new line of pedalboards.

S P E c I F I c At I O n S

The stock models currently available include the Type 2 tested here along with the Type 0 (16" x 12"), Type 00 (19" x 15"), Type 1 (15" x 12"), and Type 3 (27" x 16.5"). All

Size

23"x16 1/2"

are milled from tough aerospace-grade aluminum and sport beautifully rounded cor-

ConStruCtion

Milled 5052-H32 Aluminum

ners and luscious candy-powder-coat finishes (polished aluminum is also available).

Color

Grandaddy Purple; also avail-

A roll of 3M Dual Lock is included with each board, and Fix also makes metal holders

able in Stage Black (gloss

for pedals (available separately) that install easily on your pedals to prevent damage

or matte), Spy White, Agata

to the bottoms by super-strong locking tape.

Yellow, Candy Red, Payday

The Type 1, 2, and 3 boards also feature a hinged compartment that can hold pedals

Green, Rasp Red, La Paz Blue,

on the top and swings open when you undo the quick-twist metal fasteners (the same

Extra Gold, and Antarctic Blue

ones used to keep hatches on funny cars closed at 300+ mph) so you can put power

Mounting SurfaCe

Aluminum

supplies, AC strips, etc., under the raised section for more efficient use of space. The

ConneCtionS

None

Type 2 on review here also has five holes in the mounting surface for routing power and

Power SuPPly inCluded?

No

audio cables under the board, where they are protected by a removable sheet-metal

CableS inCluded?

No

cover. Very cool! Ease of setup, excellent construction, and a hip look make Fix pedal-

oPtionS

Custom sizes and colors. Metal

boards an attractive new option for the stompbox scene.

holders available for a variety of pedals. Aluminum foamlined travel cases ($112 to $150) built

USA

KudoS

Excellent construction and materials. Flip-open pedal riser is perfect for stashing power supplies, AC strips, etc.

ConCernS

None.

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 43


gear roundup!

MoDeL

GatorCases G-Tour Pedalboard SM

Gator G-tour Pedalboard This compact system is designed for players who need the high level of protection for their pedals that only a hard case can provide. As such, you get a board measuring 11" x 17" that is constructed from plywood with an aluminum valance around the perimeter.

gatorcases.com

ContaCt

PriCe

$169 street (includes hard case)

s p e C i f i C at i o n s Size:

11" x 17" (also available in 24" x 11", $199 street)

Chromed handles allow you to pick up the board easily, and the foam-lined ATA-style case keeps your pedals safe and secure while also providing ample space underneath

ConStruCtion

Plywood with aluminum valance

the board for cords and other essentials. It doesn’t take a lot of pedals along with a

Color

Black

power supply (not included) to fill up the real estate on this flat board, but if you stick

Mounting SurfaCe

Black melamine over plywood (includes 3M Dual

with Boss-sized boxes or the more compact types such as made by Red Witch and Xotic,

Lock for pedal mounting)

there should be plenty of room to mount all the effects you need. And if you need more ConneCtionS

None

Power SuPPly inCluded?

No

package that’s especially well suited for players who do a lot of fly dates and need to

CableS inCluded?

No

keep things small and light.

oPtionS

space, consider the larger (11" x 24") G-Tour, which costs only $30 more. Bottom line: The Gator G-Tour gives you the basics in an rugged and affordable

Tow handle and wheels on larger model

built

China

KudoS

Rugged board and ATA road case combo at a great price. Ideal for players who need just a few pedals.

ConCernS

44 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT

None.


gear

MODEL

Pedaltrain 3

PEDALTRAIN 3 ContaCt

pedaltrain.com

Check out a live gig these days and chances are good that you’ll see a Pedaltrain board

PriCe

$139 street (includes soft case)

somewhere on stage. These popular, all-metal platforms use a system of mounting bars

S P E c I f I c AT I O N S

that not only makes it easy to affix pedals of various shapes and sizes (Velcro is included for this task), but also to route the audio and power cables under the bars for a clean

Size

24"x16"

appearance. Our review board also came with the optional ATA hard case, which pro-

ConStruCtion

Aluminum

vides excellent protection and has a generous space inside for accessories (ordered with

Color

Black

a Pedaltrain 3, the package price is $270 street)

Mounting SurfaCe

Aluminum bars

ConneCtionS

None

power supply (not included), and Pedaltrain includes the necessary hardware to do this.

Power SuPPly inCluded?

No

All you have to do is attach the two brackets to the sides of the supply and drill four 1/8"

CableS inCluded?

No

holes on the bottom side of the bars to secure the unit with the self-tapping screws. It

oPtionS

Powertain 1250 power supply

took me about 20 minutes to do this part of the setup.

The underside of this angled board is perfectly suited for mounting a Voodoo Lab

($TBA). ATA hard case

Pedaltrain now also offers its own Powertrain 1250 supply that installs with simi-

($270 w/Pedaltrain 3)

lar ease. It’s still a “drill baby, drill” affair, but no brackets are needed for this unit. And

built

China

once you have your power in place, you’ll find the Pedaltrain 3 (as well as the Pedaltrain

KudoS

Rugged and simple. Easily

Jr., PT-1, PT-2, and PT-Pro) to be some of the easiest boards to configure your pedals

accommodates pedals of var-

on and make everything look neat and professional—even if you’ve never put a pedal-

ious sizes. Cables can easily

board together before.

be run under the pedals ConCernS

None, though drilling is required for mounting a power-supply.

GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 45


gear roundup!

Model

Trailer Trash Pedalboards ProSerieS ContaCt

trailertrashpedalboards.com

PriCe

$95 direct ($440 as tested with options)

Trailer Trash Proseries Trailer Trash boards come in three basic flavors—FlatTrash, ProSeries, and Glowtop—

s P e c i f i c aT i o n s Size

24"x12" (also available in 28"x16", 30"x18", 36"x18", and 40"x18")

which can be ordered with a variety of options (see Specs) and even custom wired with your pedals at the factory if you so choose. The 24"x12" ProSeries we tested came

ConStruCtion

Steel with welded corners

with a Voodoo Lab PP-2+ power supply installed ($175), a side-mounted AC input jack

Color

White, (also available in red, black, diamond-plate)

pre-wired to the power supply ($25), two side-mounted (but not wired) Neutrik jacks ($40), a 10-foot X-cord for the AC power ($25), and a courtesy AC outlet ($25). This

Mounting SurfaCe

Hardtop (also available with VelTop)

latter option was especially handy when it came to powering an Eventide Space pedal, which uses a large proprietary adapter. Without it the side-mounted AC outlet I would

ConneCtionS

See options list

have had to mount the adapter under the board and make a short cord for it to con-

Power SuPPly inCluded?

See Options list

nect to the VooDoo Lab’s AC extension out. Not a bad way to go, come to think of it …

CableS inCluded?

DC power cables included if ordered with optional power

This rugged pedal platform sports the new raised chrome-plated logo on the front

supply—matching AC cord $25

and it also came with an opening in the top for routing the power-supply cables (no charge for this). All I needed to do was lock my pedals down (best done with T-Trash

oPtionS

Voodoo Lab power supplies

Tour Grade Velcro; $6 per foot) and the rig was ready to roll. Worth mentioning too, is

($120-$175); side-mount AC In

the soft case that is included for a package price of $150. It features 1" foam padding,

($25), Courtesy AC out ($25);

extra canvas on the corners for durability, a big pocket on the outside, and is rigid enough

side-mount Neutrik jacks ($20

to stand upright with a pedalboard inside. Very nice!

each); Soft or ATA cases (prices vary). Other options available

A reasonably tricked Trailer Trash board can get pricey: Our review unit with soft

so check with manufacturer.

case and options brought the grand total to $440. But you get what you pay for here, and if a top-notch pedalboard is your wish, you’ll definitely want to investigate what

built

USA

Trailer Trash has to offer.

KudoS

A stylish, well-made board for discriminating players. Multitude of options.

ConCernS

46 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT

None.


Paul’s Guitar

Carrying on the Modern Eagle tradition, Paul’s Guitar is a production version of the Private Stock guitar Paul has been playing in his studio and on stage. With exclusive “brushstroke” bird inlays, two specially-wound narrow 408 pickups, and a newly designed stoptail bridge, this guitar is not only unique....its every appointment has been specified by Paul Reed Smith.

Watch Paul demo his new guitar and amp.

www.prsguitars.com

Paul’s Amp takes Paul Reed Smith’s favorite amplifier and adds several new features that expand its tonal character and flexibility. A great single-channel amplifier with two distinct voicings that replicate the tones Paul uses in the studio and on the stage.

© 2013, PRS Guitars - photos by Marc Quigley


current issue g u i tA r P l Ay e r .co M

BACKSTAGE WITH JASON BECKER & FRIENDS Kurt rosenwinKel * JAson MrAZ * KAKi KinG ®

ANNUAL NEW PRODUCTS ISSUE!

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“MUST HAVE” GUITAR GEAR HAND PICKED BY GP’s EDITORS

RIFFS

Images from the Jason Becker Not Dead Yet Concert 2, the Clapton Crossroads Collection, sound at the Grammys, Robert Rich on lap-steel techniques, and more!

COVER STORY 2013 NAMM Gear

PLAY

PINK FLOYD’S

! TED TES ! GIG AMP R DS N O N

“MONEY” THE RIGHT WAY! APRIL 2013

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OA L E N ALB JOHN PED K AT E W LO O 6 N FIRST

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The coolest tools, toys, and treats from the Winter NAMM extravaganza, as chosen by the GP staff.

ARTISTS Kaki King · Guthrie Trapp · Jason Mraz · Kurt Rosenwinkel

Artists

LESSONS New Column! Under Investigation

A thorough examination of a particular style or player. This month: Larry Coryell.

Bryan Clark on the Subtle Side of Slide

Fretting behind the slide, right-hand-damping, and more to take your slide playing to the next level.

New Column! Rhythm Workshop

Simple and compound rhythmic groupings demystified.

New Column! You’re Playing It Wrong

We all think we know how to play classic riffs like Pink Floyd’s “Money.” Here’s the absolute real deal.

ANT HONY SCAR LAT I

40

G U I TA R P L A Y E R . C O M / A P R I L 2 0 1 3

2/15/13 3:28 PM

gpr0413_art_trapp_ko2.indd 40

Hey Jazz Guy

Connecting your phrases in the language of jazz.

Lessons

You’re Playing It Wrong Pink Floyd’s “Money” By J eSSe G reSS

you learn the correct sequence of notes, but proves that how you play a riff is just as important as which notes you play. ex. 1 depicts how this shuffle-eighthbased figure in 7/4 typically appears in print, but even though all of the notes shown are correct, playing the riff this way will sound stiff and slightly anemic.

SometimeS there’S more to nail-

ing a classic riff than simply playing the right notes at the right time, because all guitarists inject their own unique X Factor, a “feel” thing that can be difficult to capture in print. Case in point: David Gilmour’s iconic main riff from Pink Floyd’s “Money,” which certainly isn’t hard to navigate once ex. 1 = ca. 124

3

(

=

(Bm) N.C.

74

4

1

T A B

= ca. 124

74

=

4

)

2

2

5

74

4

1

2

5

T A B

ex. 2c

74

) ( )

2

98

4

4

grad. B1/4

2

22/3

2

5 (5)

3 =

)

( )

( )

P.M. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - grad. B1/4 grad. B1/4

4

(

4

3 =

2 (X)

)

2

T A B

5 (5)

4

4

“Money” Words and Music by ROGER WATERS TRO—(C) 1973 (Renewed) HAMPSHIRE HOUSE PUBLISHING CORP., New York, NY.

MORE OnLInE

(

guitarplayer.com/april2013

) (

2

2 (0) 5 (5)

( )

)

grad. B

2

22/3 2

5

(6)

GEAR Roundup! Six pedalboards Squier USB Stratocaster

> Watch Gilmour nail the “Money” lick.

New Column! Speed Rating Four mini-reviews: EarthQuaker Devices Rainbow

grad. B

2

Intervallic Designs, Part 3, excerpted from Jesse Gress’ Guitar Cookbook.

Fuchs Casino Series Four Aces Combo and Full House-50 Head

3

P.M. throughout

grad. B1/4

2 (0) 5 (5)

(

(Bm) N.C.

2

= ca. 124

(

P.M. throughout T A B

4

1

3

(

= ca. 124

3

4

2

ex. 2b

ex. 2a

)

Why? Listen closely to the original studio recording from Dark Side of the Moon and you’ll discover that Gilmour—consciously or not—adds numerous “ghosted” artifacts between the actual notes he’s playing to bring the riff to life. ex. 2a illustrates the first of five such embellished variations, this one adorned

New Column! Fretboard Recipes

5 (6)

G U I TA R P L A Y E R . C O M / A P R I L 2 0 1 3

gpr0413_less_ypiw_ph1.indd 98

2/13/13 3:48 PM

Machine Polyphonic Modulating Harmonizer, Orange Advanced Studio Quality Instrument Cable, TC Electronic Ditto Looper, and Xotic Effects SP Compressor

New Column! Art’s Boutique The John Lennon Artist Series Amplifier by Fargen

Gear

T esT D r i v e

New Column! Whack Job 1968 Teisco Checkmate 30 Fable Fighters What’s the Big Deal About Chambered Guitars

NEw SECTION! CHATTER Ian Brennan We Aren’t the World

Squier by Fender USB Stratocaster T esT e D By G i n o ro Ba i r iT shoulD come as no surprise ThaT The electric guitar would one day become iOS-compatible, but

guitar receives stereo digital audio in return and uses the

did you ever expect to see a decent axe being sold in the

built-in 24-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) to feed

Apple Store? The Squier by Fender USB Stratocaster is a

the instrument’s headphone amp. The guitar’s second

hybrid instrument that can be connected directly to your

Volume knob (the one closest to the edge of the body)

computer or iDevice via USB and plugged into an amp like

controls the signal level coming in via USB. Unfortunately

any other electric guitar. However, the best thing about

you need a USB connection, which powers the onboard

this guitar is that the USB connection is bi-directional:

electronics, to use the headphone amp. The headphone

plug it into your computer, iPhone, iPad or iPod touch, and

output is very loud at maximum level, so keep that in mind

jam along with iTunes or YouTube while hearing yourself

when playing for long periods of time.

through your favorite virtual-amp software. Is this the ultimate practice tool? While the USB Stratocaster is not the first guitar to offer

Note that this instrument doesn’t send or receive MIDI, nor does it rely on DSP modeling. It uses Fender-designed pickups to feed an amp the old-fashioned way, while simul-

USB connectivity, Fender deserves kudos for releasing an

taneously sending and receiving digitized signals over USB.

instrument that is priced low enough for beginners and

The 1/4” jack is in the traditional spot on the body’s lower

intermediate players, yet plays like it cost twice as much.

bout, while the headphone jack and USB port are on the

When you use the digital connection, the USB Strato-

bottom next to the strap button.

caster acts as an audio interface: it has an onboard 24-bit

The instrument comes with two six-foot USB cables

analog-to-digital converter (ADC) that sends a digitized

that have a Mini-B connector on one end that plugs into

118

Carl Verheyen The Hole in the Wall Gang

signal to your computer or iDevice. At the same time, the

MORE OnLInE

guitarplayer.com/april2013 > See Fender’s Video Demo

Nicky Garratt Big Pedalboards = Road Kill?

G U I TA R P L A Y E R . C O M / A P R I L 2 0 1 3

gpr0413_Gear_squier_ph1.indd 118

Gary Brawer Simple Setup Secrets

2/19/13 8:23 AM

48 | April 2013 | GUITAR PLAYER VAULT


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k dolls

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transcriptions new york dolls

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transcriptions

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transcriptions new york dolls

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GUITAR PLAYER VAULT | April 2013 | 61


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transcriptions randy newman

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