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AR30019

CENTRE FOR BRITISH CULTURE, ART AND STUDIES, BUDAPEST

YUN LIAO


CONTENT

01

BUDAPEST

32

ELEVATIONS

02

SITE ANALYSIS

36

SECTIONS

13

FINAL CONCEPT

39

ENVIRONMENT

15

PRECEDENTS

41

ANALYSIS

19

DEVELOPMENTS

46

PERSPECTIVES

24

PLANS

54

MODEL PHOTOS


01


Project Brief This project is to create a centre to promote British culture, art and studies in Budapest. This centre will offer a range of courses on English language as well as workshops and training seminars for teachers. Since culture and language is inseparable, learning about British life and culture will be an integral part of the language courses. Multi-Media and cinemas are essential for supporting facilities. They offer a view into contemporary Britain. In addition, a contemporary British pub is equally important to demonstrate the food culture in Britain today. Art could be seen as another dramatic reflection of one’s culture. Therefore the exhibition space will display two artists’ work on the opening. They would be individual series of works interpreting the essence and nature of the new centre.

02

01

BUDAPEST


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During the mapping the city exercise, I particularly paid attention to the use of the public space, such as square and gardens. There were a few with impressive scales however, I also received an impression of bleakness and lack of characteristics. As our guide explained, due to the history of communism, people generally consider that public space belongs to on one. Thus it may not get used or taken care of accordingly. In consequence, to create a modern English square as an extension of the culture centre became one of my motifs. In Jan Gehl’s publication of Life Between Buildings: Using Public Space, he suggested that there are three types of outdoor activities, and each one has a very different demand on the physical environment. For example, the ‘optional activities’ is especially dependent on the exterior physical environment; as Larice and Macdonald summed up, ‘a wide range of optional activities will also occur because place and situation now invite people to stop, sit, eat, play and so on.’ In condition, ‘social activities’ happen spontaneously, it is a ‘direct sequence of people moving about and being in the same spaces.’

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I

II

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View I

06

View II

02

SITE ANALYSIS


SITE PHOTOS & SKETCHES View I

I III

IV II

07


View II

08

View III

View IV


SITE FEATURE

ADJACENT BUILDINGS

This is the largest surviving section of the medieval stone wall exposed on its south boundary. The party walls of neighboring buildings are built on top of the approximately 6m tall ancient stone wall.

To the east of the site is a playground for the Kindergarten that is situated opposite in a tall 1970’s building. The adjacent buildings are a mixture of residential and commercial uses – on the ground floors are mainly shops, cafes and restaurants.

EXISTING GREENERY

Despite that fact that this area is mainly residential, there is a very limit amount of green space for the public use.

09


PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

Main pedestrian flow through the site. A key view to Buda from the site.

10

VEHICLE ACCESS

Potential service route to the site

SITE OVERVIEW


SUNPATH DIAGRAM

AVERAGE RAINFALL (mm)

WIND DIRECTION DISTRIBUTION

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11


SHADOW PLOT SUMMER LEVEL

0M

+5 M

+10 M

+15 M

+20 M

12

0900

WINTER 1200

1500

1800

0900

1200

1500

1800


ORDER OF THE SPACE

A GREEN EXTENSION

PRESERVATION

3 5 4 3 2

2

2

1

1

1

1 Service 2 Social 3 Education 4 Contemplation 5 Relaxation

1 Public Square 2 Terraces 3 Rooftop Garden

1 A Walkway Next to the Medieval Wall 2 A View Towards Buda

13


Site III is situated on the Pest side of Budapest, where has higher density of residential development and transportation network. In comparison to Buda, Pest has fewer green spaces for public use. Thus my intention is not only to create a centre for language and arts, but also an emphasis on the British garden culture. Moreover, this fascinating garden culture could be realised in two aspects — the private gardens and the public garden squares. The following images have shown a conceptual development of the integration architecture and nature. Architecture acts as a rigid base for the nature to gradually grow and expand, eventually inhabit with architecture.

14

03

DESIGN CONCEPT


REGULAR GRID

MATERIAL CONNECTION

RYTHEMIC OPENINGS

ORTUS, Home of Maudsley Learning Duggan Morris Architects

15


LIGHT

16

SOLID & VOID

REFLECTION

Allies and Morrison Studios, London

Xi'An Museum Hotel, China

Z58, China

Allies and Morrison Architects

Neri & Hu Design and Research Office

Kengo Kuma & Associates

04

PRECEDENTS


URBAN & NATURE

CASCADING GARDENS

VERTICALITY

Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall Emilio Ambasz & Associates

17


HARD & SOFT LANDSCAPE

18

TRANSITION

AN ENGLISH SQUARE

Shaw Centre for the Arts, USA

NEO Bankside Landscape, London

Tate Modern Landscape, London

Hargreaves Associates

Gillespies Design

VOGT Landscape Architects


PRIVATE & PUBLIC SPACE

The initial concept is focus on the relationship between the solid mass of the culture centre and the public space donated to public use. The public space is approximately half of the footage of the building. It could be seen as a reflection of the solid mass.

VOIDS

The suggestion here is that the medieval wall should be accessible by the public all the time, thus the mass has recessed a certain distance to create a walkway. In addition with the vertical void in the building, they introduce a better lighting condition on the overshadow side.

FEATURES & FUNCTIONS

The stretching out of the art gallery emphasises the existing medieval wall could also be a piece of art – to appreciate the historical layer on the site.

19


LIGHTING

The stepping down layers of the massing allows more light for the public ground and the surrounding buildings.

20

CIRCULATION

The stepping down feature also introduced a secondary circulation through the terraces.

VIEWS

The only continuing vertical slot is reserved for the view towards Buda. In comparison, other openings are irregular to form a contrasting pattern to the surroundings. It implies a foreign culture could be seen alienate yet to bring a lively vibe into the area.

05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


21


SITE PLAN 1:1000

0

22

10

20

M

06

DRAWINGS


3

2

1

4

23


GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:200

0

2

4

M 6

01 02 03 04

7

Reception Lounge Pub & Restaurant Art Gallery

5

8

UNDERGROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:200

0

05 06 07 08

24

2

4

M

Underground Pub Service and Utility Kitchen Auditorium


10

11

12

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1:200 9

0

09 10 11 12 13

2

4

M

Language Admin Office Staff Room Teaching Room Student Common Room At Split Level:

13 Administrative Hub

25


15

16

17

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1:200

0

14 15 16 17

2

4

M

Study & Reading Space Teaching Room Teaching Room Terrace At Split Level:

14

26

18

18 Administrative Hub


23 21

22

26

25

20

19

24

3F

4F

27


THIRD FLOOR PLAN 1:200

0

2

4

M

19 Library Infomation Desj 20 Quiet Reading Space 21 Teaching Room 22 Teaching Room 23 Terrace 27

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN 24 IT Area 25 Reference Book Stacks 26 Quiet Reading Area

FIFTH FLOOR PLAN 27 Rooftop Garden

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5F


29

NORTH ELEVATION


30


WEST ELEVATION

31


32


33


Material Selections

In Situ Concrete Application: columns and floors

SECTION AA

A

A

Concrete is a relatively modern material compared to the surrounding buildings which are mainly masonry. It has high thermal mass and provides the required structural supports that based on a grid. Moreover the exposed concrete frame does not require additional cladding, visually it creates a honest and regular frame for the spaces.

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4

3

2

1

35


Material Selections

Handmade Brick Application: brick wall panels

B

B

36

SECTION BB

The brick is a modular material; they can be easily assembled to create different length for the openings. More importantly, handmade red brick has a sense of craftsmanship, which could be associated with a nostalgic Britain. In addition, brick is also an earthy material that is relevant to the gardening context of this design.


1:20 DETAILING 2 1) 350mm CONCRETE SLAB 2) 40mm INSULATION 3) VAPOUR BARRIER 4) 60mm CONCRETE FLOOR 5) DOUBLE GLAZING

1 1) FREE-DRAINING BACKFILL 2) COARSE GRAVEl 3) PERFORATED DRAIN PIPE WITH FILTER FABRIC 4) PROTECTIVE BOARD 5)200mm INSULATION 6) DPM 7) 350mm CONCRETE WALL 8) 150mm HARDCORE 9) 50mm BLINDING 10) 200mm INSULATION 11) DPM 12) 350mm CONCRETE SLAB 13) 40mm INSULATION 14) VAPOUR BARRIER 15) 60mm CONCRETE FLOOR

37


4 1) CONCRETE STRUCTURAL DECK 2) WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE 3) PROTECTION COURSE 4) ROOT BARRIER 5) THERMAL INSULATION 6) AERATION LAYER 7) MOISTURE RETENTION LAYER 8) DRAINAGE LAYER 9) FILTER FABRIC 10) SOIL

3 1) 350mm CONCRETE SLAB 2) 40mm INSULATION 3) VAPOUR BARRIER 4) 60mm CONCRETE FLOOR 5) BRICK WALL PANEL

38


NATURAL LIGHTING & VENTILATION

Natural Light

Cross Ventilation Natural Light

Hot Air

Cool Air

The 8m*8m void is designed for two main purposes. Firstly is to bring natural light into the overshadow side of the building. Secondly is to act as an atrium for a certain degree of natural ventilation. The above diagram has shown that cool air being pumped mechanically from the basement floor while hot air arises from each floor then sucked out from the void due to the stack effect.

The rooms are arranged according to the demand of natural lighting and ventilation. For instance the grey colour block is the core service where demands mechanical ventilation, thus it is situated in the centre with no access of natural lighting. Most of the classrooms are lit by north light and have two or three openings for cross ventilation. However, mechanical ventilation also provided towards the further end of the rooms.

Concrete ceiling soffits also act as a good device for heat storage - it absorbs the heat during day time and slowly release at night.

39


GREEN ROOF & WATER HARVESTING SYSTEM

An idea for recycled water use Rainwater harvesting system is a relatively simple system that can have multiple human and environmental benefits including reduction of water consumption. There are five green roofs/terraces could be used for rainwater harvesting. They will contribute to part of the water usage at the service core. It could also be used to maintain the vegetation on the terraces.

40

07

ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES


STRUCTURE

• •

In-Situ columns at 4m*8m grid Load bearing slab

CIRCULATION

• •

Main circulation core at the entrance Secondary circulation route at the east side of the building, connecting all the terraces

FACADE

• •

Facades are given a rhythmic pattern by the brick panels at different length, variations also occur from floor to floor Brick panels are sit between the concrete frame however they also recess towards the back to emphasis the embedded regularity created by the frame

41


OPENINGS

42

Although the façade seems rather irregular, the openings are restrained to three dimensions: 500mm, 1000mm, and 1500mm at width. They are placed according to the demand of sunlight.

GREEN SPACE

Five green spaces are connected by a set of external staircases. They are used for social space as well as rainwater harvesting.

LANDSCAPE

A narrow pathway links the front of the building with the public square at the back. The public square consists a mixture of hard and soft landscape.

08

BUILDING ANALYSIS


43


44

A view towards the main entrance of the building, and a glimpse of the walkway along the medieval wall

09

PERSPECTIVES


A view at the east side of the building, and the openness of the public space

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46


47


Interior view of one of the student break out space

Entrance of the building entrance and the walkway along medieval wall. The walkway is a key piece of landscape which encourages and promotes the experience of a modern building upon a historical layer.

48


ART WORK DISPLAY The main concept for the art gallery space is that the two artists works are displayed in relevant pairs, since there is a nature of duality existing among the cultures.

Barry Sykes - ARTWORK#1: 'Pages from An Opened Notepad in The Jewish Museum Shop', 2004 Lovas Ilona - One hundred unidentifiable copy, 2004

Barry Sykes - ARTWORK#3: 'Mirror From Somewhere Else' Lovas Ilona - As the sewing thread avoids the key

49


Lovas Ilona - S.O.S, video installation

Barry Sykes - ARTWORK#2: 'Mirror From Somewhere Else #6' Lovas Ilona - Stacio No. 37

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10

MODEL


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British Culture Centre at Budapest