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Content 1. Suitcase

A unique world inspired by daily life p1-3

2. Architectural School

New design for existing studio building p4-8

3. Archive

The collection of disasters that reflects Andy Goldsworthy’s work p9-11

4. Preservation Center

The place stores plants’ seed sample p12-14

5. Motel

That motels you’ve always want to design p15-16

6. New York Hotel

The corner of Crosby Street & Broome Street p17-18

7. Architecture Drawings & Renderings Drawings & Renderings about interior and exterior p19


Suitcase | 1

Suitcase

Spring 2014 Individual Project Instructor: Tat Bonvehi-Rosich Honor: Exhibition at both ISU Design library and an art gallery in Omaha

This project started with tracing activities of an object that we use a lot in our daily life. In my case, I chose my little purse, which has student ID card, apartment door key, USB drive, and some cash inside as my object and traced its 24-hour activities. Depending on these data I collected, I continued to work on my route map, which can be explained as diagrams that shows the frequency of each item’s usage inside my purse. Finally, I decided to explore the topic of the History of USB Drive. As you can see in the upper part of the suitcase, I show the percentage of how many data can be stored inside of each kind of storing equipment. Furthermore, at the lower part, I try to show that even though the USB Drive is small, it can store a little world. Therefore, inside the suitcase, I built a city above the inside structure of the USB Drive so that I can show my concept.


Suitcase | 2

1. Punched Card Period: 1900-1950 Storage capacity:960bits 2. 8 inches floppy disk Period: 1971-1979 Storage capacity:100KB-1MB 3. 5.25 inches mini floppy disk Period: 1976-1982 Storage capacity:100KB-1.2MB

The four diagrams on the left are routes of different items in my purse I need to use everyday. Different color shows different item that will be used at different places. After collecting data about items in my purse, I decided to use either USB Drive or key as my project object. Here are some exploration about ideas.

4. 3.5 inches floppy disk Period: 1985-2005 Storage capacity:400KB-1.44MB 5. CD Period: 1980~ Storage capacity:550MB-700MB 6. CF Card Period: 1994 Storage capacity: 100G 7. DVD Period: 1995~ Storage capacity:4.7GB-17.08GB 8. SD Card Period: 1999~ Storage capacity:1MB-128GB 9. USB drive Period: 2000~ Storage capacity:8MB-256GB 10. Blu-ray DVD Period: 2006~ Storage capacity:25GB or 50GB


Suitcase | 3

The project tried to show that everything in our daily life can be an interesting thing that enlighten our life. Just as USB Drive, it can actually reflects personal thinking by looking at theh content inside, which is a small world. The project was exhibited at both ISU library and Omaha gallery.


Architectural School Fall 2016 Instructor: Jungwoo JI Team: Robert Van Haaften, Hannah Hillyard Contributions: Concept, diagrams, renderings, sections, 3D modeling, 360 degree renderings, documenting Student Competition: Construction Specification Institute (CSI) competition

EXPOSING LAYERS EXPOSE - make (something) visible, typically by uncovering it LAYER - a sheet, quantity, or thickness of material, typically one of several, covering a surface or body Our goals are to expose the layers of... ...memories in the Armory to find its former glory again ...existing structure for students to use the Armory as a learning tool ...processes that students in Iowa State’s go through to become impactful designers

Architectural School | 4


Architectural School | 5

⬆ Timeline for Armory building

Current interior view of Armory building ➡

⬅ Vision Collage for design concept


Architectural School I 6

EXISTING ARCHES

ROOFS

Gn,en Roof

Third Floor Plan BUILDING PROGRAMS

Green Roof

-

"

'"

"

S亿1八6

INTERIOR VOIDS

三 CIRCULATION

少二龟P Bus Stops

~ 刁仑

EXISTING WALLS LANDSCAPING AUDITORIUM AND REVIEW SPACE

Currently the College of Design in ISU faces lack of space. Therefore, new tyological buildings are more and more significant for architectural students. Under such kind of circumstances, trying to propose a new "Architectural School" building in Iowa State University campus to be associated with existing CoD building and the rest part of the campus area is the challenge for this project. There are three possible site, and our team decided to use Armory Hall as the building to revise.

Parking Area

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Combination of surrounding elements

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Basement Floor Plan

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First Floor Plan 畛

Second Floor Plan . '" " ""

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Archive | 9

Archive

Fall 2014 Instructor: Ivonne Santoyo-Orozco Team: Jasmine Au

What inspired us was Andy Goldsworthy’s act of construction, destruction, a n d r e c o n s t r u c t i o n through his Three Cairns sculpture. The Three Cairns was initially built as temporary sculptures where the elements could easily affect them. They were built with natural local limestones that were stacked to form the shape of an egg. This phase of the project became destruction of the idea. Once the cairns were allowed to deteriorate away, Goldsworth began the second phase of the project where he rebuilt the Cairns in a more refined way to create permanent sculptures. This is the reconstruction of the project. In order to document this idea, we archived natural disasters.


Archive | 10

Three Cairns is the largest project in the Western Hemisphere by British artist Andy Goldsworthy (born 1956, Cheshire, England). The project spans the continent with permanent and temporary stone markers called "cairns" at sites on the two coasts of America nad the Midwest. To key coponents of the project in Iowa are to be found within 50 miles of each other -the Midwest temporary cairn called Prairie Cairn near Grinnell and the Three Cairns (Iowa permanent cairn) in Des Moines. One of the permanent cairns is at the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York; a second is at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, California; and a third,the central cairn, is at the Des Moines Art center.Located in Greenwood Park on the Art Center's back lawn, the permanent sculpture consists of a cairn surrounded by three boxlike walls with cavities in them that exactly match the shapes of each of the three permanent cairns. The walls provide virtual "homes" for the two cairns located on the coasts and the one that accompanies them. Cairns have been created throughout history as trail markers or memorials -- they can be stone piles of almost any shape. Goldsworthy, who is internationally known for his work with natural materials, has been making cairns with a distinctive egg shape for more than a decade. Goldsworthy's oval cairn has become one of the central motifs in his sculptural repertoire, which also includes many serpentine forms and work structured around central voids. He was inspired by the local Lannon limestone that Eliel Saarinen used, more than 50 years ago, to create a low, modernist structure -- the first of our three-building complex -- and by the museum's setting in Greenwood Park. Under the majestic canopy of branches of an imposing Morton Bay fig tree, the cairn's 8-foot-tall form stands like a sentry. Together, tree and cairn illustrate the slow passing of time, with the tree actively growing, changing, and putting down new roots, while the stone appears passive -- a witness to this evolution. Yet the Iowa limestone of the sculppture has chronicled an earlier passage of time. Inherent in quarry stone is a history of movement and change through its journey of excavation, transportation, and subsequent manipulation. This limestone's history dates back even further, bearing witness through the fossilized remains of ocean-dwelling creatures to the legacy of geological time. Goldsworthy's cairn is an archaic form taking root in an area in which the facade of nature is new, drawing our attention to the transient aspects of nature as well as the relativity of our sense of time in relation to evolution.

Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans

Construction

Destruction

Reconstruction

Hurricane Sandy on Manhattan

Construction

Interior Example

Destruction

Reconstruction

In order to document the idea of construction, destruction and reconstruction, we archived natural disasters. Throughout history, human creation faced destruction via the wrath of natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and fire. As a result of this destruction, humans reconstruct their creations with the need to improve and preserve. Therefore, I felt that archiving these disasters and specific examples in history of them would accurately describe our concept. The archive is located at the slope near Three Cairns surrounded by trees. There are no direct paths to our archive; the only path leads people away from the site but the existing Cairns draws people near it. Although the archive is meant to be nondisruptive to the environment, it is not meant to be hidden from sight. Thus, the cairns act as a “marker� to hint that there is something important in the area. The archive consists of five total rooms. The entrance room, which is the most visible and near the top of the slope, represents the construction phase of the idea. The three rooms that show three different types of disasters descend down the slope and represents destruction. Finally, the last room is the vault that digitally store the images shown in the three rooms as well as additional time lapse videos of the disasters. This last room marks the turning point where reconstruction begins. In order to leave the archive, people must ascend the stairs from the last room to return to the entrance room. We chose to order the three rooms as hurricane for the first room, earthquake for the second room and fire for the third room. This hierarchy is based on how, as a person descends, the disaster becomes more human.


Archive | 11

Archive just built

The archive is a white concrete structure with a glass ribbon pattern so people can see through into the building. The archive is not meant to be immediately opened after creation, but rather, should be opened hundreds of years in the future. Thus, the glass ribbons allow people to see what’s inside but not enter. While the archive spaces themselves cannot b e opened for several hundred years, the circulation spaces are open to the environment. These staircases are meant to change with the environment so that as people in the future pass through each space, they’re re-enter their world only to re enter ours in the next space. This idea of allowing people to enter hundreds of years later allows people to better understand the differences of disasters in the past versus the disasters in the future

500 years later


Preservation Center | 12

Preservation Center

Fall 2014 Instructor: Ivonne Santoyo-Orozco Team: Rebecca Schodin

The project asked us to deal with the relation between Architecture, Landscape and Time through the design of a ‘Preservation Center’ for Seed Savers Exchange in Deborah, IA. This non-profit organization is committed not only to the preservation of seeds at risk of extinction or those threatened by industrial forms of farming, but also to communicate and preserve the cultural histories behind the seeds. The Preservation Center will be located within their facilities, and the project responds to a real demand facing the institution that aims to plan their future growth. Therefore, we tried to combine the function and aesthetics to the building and try to connect the building better with the existing buildings and surroundings.


Preservation Center | 13

Green House Green House Green House Green House Green House

Courtyard Pavillion Center

Green House

Center

Building

Visitor Center

Seed Savers Exchange Master Plan N 0’

25’

50’

100’

Vehicle Route Pedestrian Sta Proposed Building Garden/Park/Orchard Tree Cover Parking

200’

Visitor Learning Experience

A f t e r v i s i t i n g the s i t e , we rearranged some existing building there and changed their functions. By doing this, we tried to let staffs at the center and visitors have different traffic routes so that they can have different activities without interruption. Combining with routes, we tried to let different buildings located at the place where people can easier get into. This can better shows the idea of function part of the project. For the main building, which is the preservation center, we also want it to be two parts so that staffs and visitors can have different spaces but at the same time interact with each other. Related the building to landscape, we tried to use the slope as part of the building and help the building have two parts for different main function. The blue part shows the staffs’ working space while the green part shows the place where visitors can have different experience there. Furthermore, by using the slope of the terrain, it helps improve the aesthetics part of the project.


Preservation Center | 14

Basement

Second Floor

First Floor

Section


Motel | 15

Motel Spring 2015

Individual Project

Instructor: Daniel Naegelet

The motel is typically a collection of rooms for rent for one or several nights to those traveling in automobiles. It was a standard building type in the USA from the late 1940s until the mid-1970s when many traveled by automobile and was usually located off or near major highways. Seldom a destination, it offers instead convenient accommodations to the traveler—parking close to one’s room, fast food, easy access, close proximity to major road thoroughfares, proximity to local attractions occasionally.


Motel | 16

Inspired by the Nolli Map, I decided to use the triangle corner as the main design element. The motel includes 30 rooms with parking, lobby, checkin, breakfast room, etc. I also let the shape fit into the landscape so that it is easier for people to get in each room directly.

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DN XSIZE YSIZE

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0

10'

20'

40'

N

Third Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


Soho Hotel | 17

Soho Hotel Spring 2015

Individual Project

Instructor: Daniel Naegele

The hotel located at the corner of Crosby Street and Broome Street, Soho, New York. It needs to have 200 rooms about 5% accessible and lobby, breakfast room, nightclub, baggage storage, office, etc. At street level, it is devoted to retail, with minimal access (prevalente scalat o r, background elevators) to hotel lobby on Second Floor. Near the elevators on Street Level should be a baggage storage of 150 sq. ft. The laundry and linen storage might be in a lower level, below street, and accessed by service elevators. The roof should be garden for people to access.


Soho Hotel | 18 RETAIL-1

DOWN

DOWN

Crosby Street

RETAIL-2

UP

Broome Street

UP

N

1st Floor

0

10'

20'

Site map

40'

N

UP

DOWN UP

MECHANICAL ROOM

Laundry

UP

UP

UP

2nd Floor

0

10'

20'

Basement

40'

N

0

10'

20'

40'

N

DOWN

UP

3rd-8th Floor

0

10'

20'

40'

N

Roof Plan

0

10'

20'

40'

N


Architectural Hand Drawings & Renderings (Cinema 4D)

Architectural Drawings & Renderings | 19

Portfolio University of Minnesota  
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