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Services Report 2013


KOCH CENTRE FOR YOUTH

KOCH CEN

UTH

O FOR Y

TRE

KOCH CENTRE FOR YOUTH

Community need still there: education and connection key for youth

Youth Off The Streets continues to respond to the needs of the Macquarie Fields’ community with a centre that engages young people through education, recreational activities, community connection and employment. The centre was opened on 1 December 2011 and draws on several best practice models to offer the highest quality of service to young people in the area.

A year of steady improvement and activity

The Koch Centre for Youth (KC4Y) began its second year of operation during this financial year. It was a year of implementing and constantly improving programs being offered at the Centre for Youth. Through nationally recognised programs and partnering with other community services, young people that utilise the centre were provided with the highest quality of service, allowing them to achieve their personal goals. A review of the centre was conducted as part of a regime of constant improvement. Following the review, it was clear that in 2014 the Koch Centre for Youth will shift the day to day focus of the centre to more structured education programs rather than recreational programs.

2012/13 Goals • Provide

a quality, values based educational framework to facilitate purposeful engagement of young people in personalised learning experiences, transferable to the workplace and supportive of long term transformational and generational behavioural change.

Father Chris Riley said “Youth Off The Streets has established services in the areas that we will be offering events designed to assist local youth and their families. Our workers from the local community are dedicated to offering fun and engaging activities for young people during the celebrations, at the same time giving us the chance to create links with these individuals.”

• Encourage

and foster cultural, community and family partnerships to provide young people with safe, consistent and meaningful connections that instil a sense of belonging and contribute to growth in social capital.

• To

grow our environment and culture to inspire people, create ecological awareness and encourage sustainable living with respect to the needs of our people, resources and vision.

Ongoing Challenges

• Consolidating the Centre’s strengths is a big challenge this

year. It is a challenge to define and communicate the niche value in a way that expresses the Koch Centre for Youth mission and vision, to the target audience of young people around the area.

• The

availability, capacity and sustainability of resources, both human and financial, remain an ongoing challenge. It is difficult to find funding for specific engagement programs and once that is achieved it is difficult to appropriately staff and maintain the program.

• The Koch Centre for Youth’s environment is always changing.

A challenge is to adapt and embrace that change through building a positive culture. This is done by maintaining action and momentum among staff and participants.

2

What We Did

• Provided a safe and supportive environment for young

people and staff. The Koch Centre for Youth supported young people through personal growth and development, and staff through professional growth and development. We opened our doors seven days per week and operated a values based service that aimed to build rapport with young people in the community.

Highlights

Sport programs, Koch Rugby 7’s, Basketball Tournament and Midnight Basketball - Sporting programs were a key strategy to engaging young people within the community. A Rugby 7’s competition was hosted by the Koch Centre for Youth, which had 50 participants competing on the day. Over 100 young people participated in a basketball tournament that was supported by the Sydney Kings and the Koch family. Midnight Basketball was also introduced as a national social inclusion program to help build skills and confidence in young people. There is a compulsory life skills workshop, which young people must attend in order to play, and the motto is “No Workshop, No Jump Shot”. The sport programs were a huge success in engaging young people, which then allowed Youth Off The Streets staff, the community and partner services to contribute to the wellbeing, growth and development of the young people. Community Christmas Lunch -The Koch Centre for Youth , Junction Works and Glenquarie Neighbourhood Centre have had a long standing and fruitful relationship since the public disturbances of 2005. A highlight was hosting last year’s community Christmas lunch with over 150 people in attendance. The community was able to enjoy a delicious lunch and entertainment through the service and support provided by EDEN College students and the KC4Y team.

• Our independent, accredited school EDEN College continued

to offer a diverse, interest-based range of weekly after school educational and recreational programs. Students were able to enrol in these programs to continue their personal growth and development after school.

• Established the Koch Centre for Youth and EDEN Advisory

Committee to continue building connections and partnerships within the community. The Koch Centre for Youth consistently linked with cultural elders and groups, established key program partnerships and maintained active community interagency participation. This meant that young people received the highest quality services and programs.

youth off the streets 2013

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KOCH CENTRE FOR YOUTH

What we achieved

• After a year of operation, a review was undertaken and a new

5

21 8

19%

11%

outwerarrdal Ref l-55 Tota

7

%

with the service direction and desired outcomes of the centre. The Koch Centre for Youth will provide ongoing professional learning and development to ensure that the quality of service being offered remains at the highest level possible.

• Implement

a new operational model to better manage available resources. This will allow structures and systems to be streamlined and centralised – a ‘whole of centre’ style approach.

13

9% 7%

7%

According to the Australian Institute of Family Studies1. Young people who leave school early are at greater risk of experiencing social exclusion, through long-term unemployment and reliance on welfare. Independent schools represent a significant and growing share of the Australian education system as parents start to look for schools that meet their child’s specific learning needs. According to the Independent Schools Council of Australia, the majority of independent schools operate autonomously. These schools do not rely on central bureaucracies or bodies, and are separately accountable to parents and their school communities. All independent schools comply with state and federal education regulation and standards.

• Increase in staff capacity, specifically recruiting staff that align

34%

%

5%

Number of Independent Schools across Australia2

11

%

15

4

235

23 per cent

Secondary

58

6 per cent

Combined

657

65 per cent

Special schools

67

6 per cent

Youth Off The Streets five accredited, independent high schools are:

%

• Key College, Redfern • Chapel School – Key College, Merrylands Campus • EDEN College, Koch Centre for Youth, Macquarie Fields • Matthew Hogan School, Canyonleigh • Craig Davis College, Cordeaux Heights Centre for Youth,

9

%

19

%

12%

10% Advocacy -42 l a t o T % 5 14%

Primary

Youth Off The Streets has five accredited and independent high schools that offer a flexible curriculum with a focus on literacy and numeracy that responds to the specific needs, interests and talents of young people who have become disconnected from mainstream education. Our five schools are part of the 34 independent schools in New South Wales (NSW) catering for children or young people with very specific and special needs, as well as schools for students with behavioural issues who have experienced difficulty fitting into mainstream schooling₃.

%

20%

4%

14%

Accommodation service Dept of Community Services Detox/rehab service Education/training Employment/job-seeking Family / friends Financial/debts

4

strategic direction is being taken. We have increased overall capacity for enrolment at EDEN College and our educational programs. This also means we have increased the number of students positively engaged in full-time education and quality learning experiences.

Inwarrrdal Refel-32 Tota

%

Student connectivity: Life, Community and Learning

What is new for 2014 %

%

Education Services

Cordeaux Heights

17% 4% Juvenile Justice Legal Mental health Other Police Physical/sexual health YOTS service

s e c i v r e s n o i t a c u ed

Young people can often feel disconnected from mainstream education. They may have suffered disadvantage due to family breakdown, mental illness, substance abuse or poverty and are at risk of disengaging entirely from positive interaction including education, employment and training. Youth Off The Streets recognises that education is the key to breaking the cycle of poverty. Students attending our schools are provided with basic physical necessities, such as breakfast and lunch, to ensure they continue to learn throughout the day. Socialisation is an essential part of the schooling experience, creating connections with peers. All extra-curricular activities and support were developed to help students integrate positively into society. Teamwork is always encouraged.

youth off the streets 2013

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Education Services There are currently six extra-curricular programs offered: Step Up Program, Service Learning, Young People Connected, Mentoring Program, Integration and ASPIRE, the Aboriginal Education Program. Additionally, 22 young people each year receive financial support, ongoing assistance and a mentor to assist them to achieve their educational or skill-based goals, through the Youth Off The Streets’ Scholarship Program. Youth Off The Streets awards annual scholarships to disadvantaged young people who have shown determination, aptitude and skill in a particular vocation.

2012/13 Goals • Building

stronger community partnerships to create more cultural and language diversity, allowing increased cultural awareness and knowledge in all educational settings.

• Expanding

opportunities for dual accreditation through strengthening relationships with external course providers; for example, TAFE.

• Implementing

a school database to collect and utilise information at all locations. Creating a standardised method of collecting, storing and using data for the benefit of all students enrolled at our schools.

• Expansion

of Technical and Applied Studies (TAS) through the development and purchase of TAS specific buildings and equipment. Offering Board of Studies endorsed subjects for TAS.

Education Services

Ongoing Challenges

What We Achieved

• Reduce waiting lists for placements at each of our schools.

Youth Off The Streets’ reputation for providing quality education to disengaged young people has led to greater demand for placement within the schools.

1

%

9

%

• Strengthened

our relationship with Rotary to offer more Service Learning activities for our students. This created a stronger link with the community and students felt a sense of pride in helping those less fortunate.

1

%

3%

• Continued to improve the wrap-around health care model.

Students received support from Mental Health Services, general practitioners, psychiatrists and sexual health nurses.

Highlights

New Schools - This year we officially opened the Cordeaux Heights Centre for Youth, which includes Craig Davis College an accredited, independent high school. This is our fifth accredited high school and will offer students the opportunity to complete their Record of School Achievement and Higher School Certificate. It provides state of the art classrooms and learning areas for young people who have become disengaged from mainstream education.

4 3%

%

Graduation - In 2012, 32 students achieved their Record of School Achievement and seven students achieved their Higher School Certificate. Post School Opportunities - In 2012, 149 students were enrolled at Youth Off The Streets schools. Of this number, 19 students enrolled in TAFE or tertiary education courses; ten students maintained part-time work; 20 students completed their swim test; six students completed their Responsible Service of Alcohol training; and 22 students completed their First Aid certificate. Most students that weren’t in stable living conditions were able to improve their situation: seven moved into independent or semi-independent living; one student maintained long term refuge accommodation and one student returned home.

7

1

6%

%

1% 4%

• Staff continued their professional development by attending

14% 3

12

%

2% % 3

%

Inwarrrdal Refe-226 Total 29%

4

• Youth Off The Streets’ Transition to Independence support was provided. This role assisted students with career goals and establishing transition pathways on graduation. We connected with the community through a network of support agencies to further track and develop the student.

a range of internal and external professional learning events. This allowed staff to implement the latest and most effective learning techniques for students.

6

10

2% 6% %

What We Did

• Improving

1%

1%

• Highly disadvantaged students may perform up to eight or nine years below their chronological age in language, literacy and numeracy making standardised measures of achievement difficult to gauge across Youth Off The Streets’ five accredited, independent high schools.

What is New 2014

%

8% 7%

the curriculum based measurement across all schools. This will allow intervention and response to students’ success or failure with individual learning plans.

• Increase in community gardens, enhancing the knowledge and interest of students and families in community gardens. This helps promote Youth Off The Streets schools as ‘Green Schools’.

• Integrating ex-students into leadership positions to help with mentoring, evaluating performance and any other guidance that is needed by current students.

• Measuring

and reviewing the sustainability of our schools across New South Wales in accordance with needs in the community and program models.

• Promoting the ‘wellness model’ and facilitating the student

1

wellbeing program to encourage a social, spiritual and an emotionally healthy life. This contributes to building positive relationships between staff and students at all schools.

%

2%

% d 22 r a w out erral Ref -264 Total 29% 13% 4% % 3% 3 3% % 1 11% % 2% 6 6% % 12 y c a Advoc 1 Total-99 % 13 25% 8% Accommodation service Dept of Community Services

Juvenile Justice Legal

Detox/rehab service Education/training

Mental health Other

Employment/job-seeking Family / friends

Police

Financial/debts

YOTS service

Family Factors in early school leaving, April 2013, Australian Institute of Family Studies. 2 Independent Schooling in Australia Snapshot 2012, Independent Schools Council of Australia. 1

&

7

Physical/sexual health

youth off the streets 2013

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Community services

COMMUN

ITY SERV

Youth connection: inclusion for those in need

ICES

2012/13 Goals

• Implement an organisation wide training package on child

Youth Off The Streets’ Community Services assist young people aged between 12 and 18 years of age facing homelessness and abuse to begin to unlock their full potential. Our programs link disadvantaged youth with the services they require immediately. Our Community Services programs include a Food Van, Street Walk, Don Bosco Home, Dunlea Alcohol and Other Drug Youth Service and a Mental Health Team.

Ongoing Challenges

Assesssment Counselling

• The

Don Bosco

Young Person Dunlea

Family Program

Job Program/ traineeship

that Youth Off The Streets provides.

Court Support

Parenting

Accomm.

Street Walk

Education Sports & Scholarships Recreation

Accomm.

Employment

Mentoring Aboriginal Services

demand for Youth Off The Streets drug and alcohol rehabilitation and homelessness services outweighed available resources.

• Lack of understanding by our target population of the value

of counselling. A large proportion of the young people who enter Community Services have had negative experiences with counsellors.

Legal Aid

Education/ TAFE

YOTS Annual Report 2013 Community Services Diagram

The Food Van is run by our volunteers and goes out most nights to inner Sydney city suburbs to give food and drinks to those in need. Street Walk offers a night time presence Sunday through to Thursday, referring young people facing homelessness, or who are already homeless, to internal or external services. A number of young people aged between 15 and 18 years of age facing homelessness will be referred through this program into our crisis and short term accommodation, Don Bosco Home, where they will receive on-site support in a safe environment. Young people facing drug and alcohol dependencies may be enrolled into the Dunlea Alcohol and Other Drug Youth Service, which provides a comprehensive treatment program designed to help them to change their levels and patterns of drug use. These programs are supported by the Mental Health Team which offers qualified psychologists and counsellors, available to both young people and their families for assessment, treatment and support. The team works across the Community Services to provide a holistic approach to a young person’s path to wellbeing.

8

a resilience study of young people. The study will increase staff skills and expertise improving the quality of service offered to our young people.

• Raise awareness of youth homelessness issues and services

Camps

Centrelink

• Develop a relationship with the Black Dog Institute to conduct

staff well-being, morale and retention of valued team members.

Counselling Service Learning

protection to educate staff of their mandatory reporting obligations. This includes staff that may not deal with young people on a day to day basis.

• Increase

Drug & Alcohol Detox Community Support

Community services

• Lack of discussion around the issues facing homeless youth impacts resourcing and funding of relevant services.

Highlights

Don Bosco House became Don Bosco Home – Youth Off The Streets was featured on Channel Nine’s hit show Celebrity Apprentice in March 2013. The show conducted a challenge that involved a complete refurbishment of key areas of the house, which saw a dramatic improvement in the ageing building. Father Chris Riley was so touched by the effort of the show and the new look of Don Bosco House, that he renamed the facility Don Bosco Home. Street Walk – Supporting Youth 204 nights of the year - Street Walk continued to support young homeless people on the street during 2012 and 2013. It is often the first contact the young homeless have before being referred to a service and starting on the road to recovery. Street Walk operates Sunday through to Thursday and went out 204 times in 2012 and 2013. In total, 627 young people were directly transported to a refuge or a safe place for the night, more than three young people per night. Youth Off The Streets continues to provide a night time presence that aims to refer young homeless to support services. Implementation of the Family Program - A new program was created at our Dunlea Alcohol and Other Drug service called the Family Program. A new worker was hired to ensure this service was carried out to the best of its ability. The program reconnects young people who have disengaged from family support. It is a crucial step in their healing process and can be the difference between staying clean and relapsing into drug use.

What We Did • Last

year, our young people benefited from many of our Community Service programs adopting a more holistic approach to their wellbeing. This year, this approach was built on to ensure where support is extended to include families and the communities that our young people reside in. Youth Off The Streets recognises that when young people leave our care without support they are more likely to relapse and end up in the same situation they were in when they needed our immediate help.

• Peer support and external supervision is mandatory to ensure we are providing a service which is of the highest standard.

• Continued

to build relationships with external services that support our young people. For example, a partnership with National Cannabis Prevention Information Centre was formed to develop a low literacy quitting cannabis resource for young people with multiple and complex needs. Another partnership was formed with Black Dog Institute to begin the resilience study referred to above.

youth off the streets 2013

9


Community services

What is New for 2014

• The increase in complex mental health issues faced by our

What we achieved

young people has led us to continue to focus on strengthening the skills of our staff and the processes followed in Community Services, in the coming years.

• Build on current partnerships with external mental health, legal and accommodation services to strengthen our service delivery and ability to cater to our young people’s needs. • Identify new opportunities for funding for homeless services

22 2%

12%

Inwarrrdal Refel-918 Tota

2%

5 6%

%

4%

5% 4%

3%

9%

Constant communication with the local community was undertaken during the refurbishment phase of the centre, which happened throughout 2012 and early 2013. It is only through the support of the community that we now have three co-located services operating for disadvantaged youth: Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service, Craig Davis College (accredited and independent high school) and Aboriginal Residential Care Services.

A socially inclusive model: connectivity is key

11% outwerarrdal Ref -753 Total

12

%

4 6 %

16%

2%

Youth Off The Streets officially launched the Cordeaux Heights Centre For Youth on 22 March 2013, two years after receiving funding for the renovation of the old Keelong Juvenile Justice Centre. Its aim is to assist disadvantaged youth between the ages of 12 and 21 years through a collaborative approach to youth care, working with local youth-specific services and services included at the centre.

5% 2% 10% % 1

15%

1%

2%

Commitment to the wellbeing of young people

19%

%

for young people.

%

30% 9%

5

16%

4%

CORDEAUX

The Cordeaux Heights Centre for Youth provides a number of ways for young people to access services including: education, sport and recreational facilities, residential services and other similar community support programs.

Craig Davis College, our fifth accredited, independent high school, is located in the facility. It offers a holistic approach to learning and grants young people the ability to study for their Record of School Achievement and Higher School Certificate. The school offers places for 12 students and has the latest in technology and educational resources.

Heights cen

FOR

tre

H YOUT

% y c 7 a c o v 5 Ad 5176 7% % Total10 % % 6 5 % 6 3% 10%

%

The centre is based on a socially inclusive model that aims to provide a safe and engaging environment for young people who attend Craig Davis College, reside in the Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service, the Aboriginal Residential Care Services Program and those who participate in community outreach programs.

2%

%

Accommodation service Dept of Community Services Detox/rehab service Education/training Employment/job-seeking Family / friends Financial/debts

10

CORDEAUX Heights CENTRE FOR YOUTH

Juvenile Justice Legal Mental health Other Police Physical/sexual health YOTS service

In partnership with St Vincent de Paul Society NSW, the centre offers the Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service, which offers beds to young males between the ages of 12 and 16 years. It serves as a diversionary platform to supervise bail conditions between young people and the justice system. To assist Aboriginal males between 12 and 17 years of age the centre also hosts an extension of the Aboriginal Residential Care Service. The young people in this program have been referred through the NSW Department of Family and Community Services. The aim of both residential services at the centre is to provide an environment that promotes empowerment and increases self-esteem. The centre also provides a shared ‘learning room’, which provides space for those not enrolled at Craig Davis College. It’s a shared space where students can engage in literacy and numeracy support, cultural learning, practical living skills, financial literacy, mental health and personal development learning. There is a wide range of technology and learning applications available to the young people including iPads, laptops and PCs.

11

youth off the streets 2013

11


CORDEAUX HEIGHTS CENTRE FOR YOUTH

2012/13 Goals

• Completing the refurbishment of the site and official opening

of the centre, including the upgrade to sporting fields and recreational areas at the facility.

• Establishment and opening of Craig Davis College, including

Board of Studies registration and accreditation of the school for years nine to 12.

• Research,

develop and implement a best practice ‘Bail Accommodation Service’ to assist male youth aged between 12 and 16 years who are eligible for bail and in need of suitable accommodation with emotional and practical support.

• Develop

an operational framework that promotes social inclusion, restorative practices, professional accountability, ongoing improvement and best practice across education, residential and outreach services.

• Development

of sustainable community partnerships and engagement across the youth sector in the Illawarra area.

Ongoing Challenges

• The centre received funding for the refurbishment of the site, but the biggest challenge remains funding support for the operation and administration of the complex centre for youth on an on-going basis.

• Limited

funding for the Bail Accommodation Service has restricted the number of beds we have been able to offer young people.

• Although

undertaking a community consultation process, our presence in the area is not well known and, as such, student numbers and resident numbers have not been as high as anticipated. Continued community engagement and education is a current challenge.

What We Did • An

operational framework was established for the centre to support staff across all co-located services. This has established a culture of collaboration, co-operation, respect, transparency and mutual support amongst staff. Young people who use the centre now receive a consistent delivery of service and feel safe and supported by staff at all times.

• Community

consultation occured during the early part of 2013 to educate the region about the services being offered and learning about the specific needs of the area. In response to community consultation, Craig Davis College established an advisory group that meets monthly and brings a diverse range of professional expertise, local knowledge, support and opportunities to the school. The Bail Accommodation Service also established a bi-monthly reference group that includes key personnel from our partner St Vincent de Paul Society.

• In addition to the three main services, the centre offers a

shared space called ‘the learning room’. This offers young people who use the facility a space where they can learn valuable life skills, which include: literacy and numeracy skills, employability skills and practical living skills. A wide range of technology is also available for use by the young people.

CORDEAUX HEIGHTS CENTRE FOR YOUTH

What is new for 2014

• In April 2013, Youth Off The Streets was awarded funding to

begin ten new outreach services from the National Crime Prevention Fund. One of these outreaches will be located in the Illawarra region. This program will run in addition to the centre and offer another avenue for young people to be included in the community.

• Continue

to build and maintain a strong presence within the Illawarra community and develop partnerships that will support referrals, advocacy, access to support services and socially inclusive opportunities for the young people in the programs.

• Continue to improve the curriculum of Craig Davis College in

accordance with the new Australian Curriculum Framework. Craig Davis College aims to develop an inclusive learning environment that promotes professional development and collaboration of staff to inform teaching decisions and practices.

• The Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service aims to continue to develop and improve its service offering, which will support young people to form appropriate connections with settings and people beyond the program.

Highlights

Completion of the refurbishment and official opening of the Centre - The Centre was officially opened by The Hon. Sharon Bird MP on 22 March 2013, signaling the end of a long refurbishment process. Consultation with the community was already complete and after the opening the centre offered a vibrant, engaging environment for both young people and staff. Development of the Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service - The Bail Accommodation Service successfully developed a practice model, recruited its team and established a bi-monthly reference group after talks with community groups. Staff engaged in a range of professional development and program framework training to better the service offering for young people at the centre. Partnerships were developed with St Vincent de Paul Society and University of Wollongong, to increase the quality of the service and to also guarantee it works well into the future. Opening of Craig Davis College - Craig Davis College successfully achieved a recommendation from the Board of Studies receiving accreditation over a five year period for Years 9 – 12, allowing students to attain their Record of School Achievement and Higher School Certificate. The school has developed beneficial educational partnerships with local high schools, a community driven advisory group that meets monthly and established ongoing service learning opportunities in the local area.

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youth off the streets 2013

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OUTREACH services • Expand and develop relevant programs to assist our young

Connecting with Young People in the community

people to prepare and transition into independence and the community.

Youth Off The Streets’ Outreach Services provide a positive impact and flexible response to the needs of young people and their community. Our services invite young people to participate in a safe and supervised program in their own communities, providing low-key and positive diversionary activities that allow young people to interact, socialise and meet youth workers. Free BBQs and recreational activities are a feature of all Outreaches.

Ongoing Challenges

Our Outreach Services target young people aged between 12 and 21, but all ages are welcome to attend. We especially encourage families to attend and support our programs and the involvement of their child.

• Challenges

Youth Engagement Bankstown East Cessnock Cranebrook

Structure Programs Kurri Kurri

OR

1 on 1 Development Case Management

14

Once trust and acceptance grows, the service builds up to more structured and specific activities that cater to the specific needs of young people in the community. Outreach Services has achieved great success in engaging disadvantaged and disengaged young people since its early beginnings in 2005. As a result, Outreach Services are now offered in Blacktown, Doonside and Cranebrook in Western Sydney; Kurri Kurri and East Cessnock in the Hunter Valley; and in Bankstown.

ces

the professional boundaries of Outreach youth workers whilst working within their own community. for Youth Off The Streets to quickly staff and resource new Outreach programs, particularly in response to community disturbances.

• Identify,

works. An audit of internal and external policies, procedures, templates and forms was conducted in an effort to streamline the way Outreach works. The goal is to have a systematic and integrated way of working by 2015. Established a ‘The Way We Work’ team to ensure that the project moved along and achieves the desired goals.

• All Outreach Services are now using online reporting methods

Youth Off The Streets Outreach Model

servi

• Managing

• An action orientated approach to improving the way Outreach

Stay in Community Doonside Blacktown

ach

a willingness to work evenings in our Outreach programs has been a challenging process.

What We Did

Response to Crisis

Centre for Youth Macquarie Fields

• Finding candidates with good qualifications, experience and

staff and implement 10 new Outreach locations according to the Federal Government National Crime Prevention Fund grant of $5 million over two years.

Move out of Community

outre

OUTREACH services

2012/13 Goals • Raise

awareness and educate about what Youth Off The Streets’ Outreach Services is, does and how we can help young people.

• Train staff in data collection methods, including ‘participant observation’, and introduce online reporting templates to track the impact of our services on young people and the community.

as a means of recording data and participation observations. Internal training, was delivered by the Youth Off The Streets’ Research and Evaluation Team on the methods of reporting data were conducted with each of the teams. Data that is regularly collected and reported is being used to steer the direction of each program, ensuring that the service continues to be relevant and responsive to the needs and trends of each community.

National Youth Week - Youth Off The Streets Outreach Services celebrated National Youth Week from the 5 to 14 April 2013, supporting the theme of ‘Be active Be happy Be you’. To celebrate the contribution of young people to their community, each Outreach Service hosted a number of free events that were promoted and marketed via Youth Off The Streets communication and as a unified Celebration of Youth. Some examples of activities are:

• Hunter Valley Outreach held an Open Mic Night as one of

their National Youth Week events, inviting young people to perform on stage and in front of an audience, supporting the growth of self-esteem and confidence of participants. On the night, 70 young people participated.

• Western Sydney Outreach was involved in two Youth Week

events, one of which saw the service organise an OzTag Tournament in partnership with the Penrith Panthers. In total, 12 teams entered the competition, engaging 200 young people in total on the day. This was the first time that Youth Off The Streets coordinated such a large sports tournament day. Through our experiences at our regular, twice weekly Outreaches held at Doonside, we determined that OzTag was the sport of choice for the community.

• Bankstown

Outreach participated in four different Youth Week events. One event that was coordinated by the staff at Bankstown Outreach was the African Youth Soccer Team, which engaged 60 young people on the day, with six teams entered into the competition.

Hunter Valley Skate Competition - Hunter Valley Outreach held a Skate competition at Margaret Johns Skate Park in Kurri Kurri on 17 November 2012. Many skaters, scooter and bike riders showed off their talent performing some gravity defying tricks. The young people who attended had a great day enjoying the free BBQ, circus activities, break dance performances and witnessing some professional scooter riders.

• The lifecycle of an Outreach Service has been determined and

formalised, identifying the various points for change or growth for an outreach program. The core business of the lifecycle is the Youth Engagement stage, which focuses on the creation of programs that engage youth at the most convenient time and in places where young people are connected to the whole community and their family. Youth Engagement is the hinge that all other programs and activities are connected to.

Highlights

National Crime Prevention Fund – Expanding our Outreach Services - In April 2013, Youth Off The Streets received $5 million over two years to establish 10 new Outreach Services for areas in need. This money will be spent expanding our services to communities that have high youth unemployment, low levels of schooling and are socio-economically disadvantaged. We need to identify the communities in need before they reach a crisis point. Establishing services and infrastructure in high need areas for young people to escape the cycle of disadvantage is imperative.

youth off the streets 2013

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OUTREACH services

What Is New in 2014

What We Achieved

• Continue the successful streamlining process for Outreach operations to boost staff collaboration and morale across different, remote locations.

9

• Concentrate

efforts, creating more opportunities for local community participation, particularly for community Elders. contribute to and guide the programs offered.

• Outreach Service vision strategy for 2012 to 2015. The aim

is to plan, develop, implement and evaluate policies and procedures that will assist the Outreach Service improve the way it works. The mission is to have Outreach Services that work in a systematic and integrated way by 2015.

2

%

2

7%

8

%

3%

14

%

%

17%

9%

24%

22% 22%

Youth Off The Streets’ Aboriginal Service

9

5% 2%

7%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are still overrepresented among clients for specialist homelessness services in Australia. They represent 23 per cent of those accessing the services, despite making up just 2.5 per cent of the population2. Our Aboriginal Residential Care program has been running for 18 months and provides out-of-home accommodation for young Aboriginal males aged between 12 and 17 years who have been referred to us by the NSW Department of Family and Community Service (FaCS). The program is a cultural residential program that works in partnership with Traditional Elders, Community Elders, Aboriginal service providers and Aboriginal community members. The program aims to build the self resilience and self confidence of young people, and create a strong sense of pride in their cultural identity and heritage. This program is one of a few programs of its kind that has received endorsement and support from the Aboriginal Child, Family and Community Care State Secretariat NSW (AbSec).

1% 22%

4% Advocacy1 Total-17 19% % 1

%

5

%

4

Accommodation service Dept of Community Services Detox/rehab service Education/training Employment/job-seeking Family / friends Financial/debts

Cultural & Community Support

Wellbeing Programs

outwerarrdal Ref l-164 Tota 12%

13%

Aftercare, Integration & Mentoring

Residential Programs

1

1

Learning & Development (Educational Support)

Outreach

15% %

16

Approximately 19 per cent of the young people in Youth Off The Streets’ programs identify as Aboriginal₁. As part of our commitment to provide culturally appropriate care to all young people in our services, Youth Off The Streets has developed strategies to support the long term outcomes of young Aboriginal people in our programs. Aboriginal Services works across the organisation to ensure the rights, needs and aspirations of Aboriginal young people are considered and met throughout all programs.

24%

Inwarrrdal Refel-87 Tota

10%

• Provide further opportunities for young people to directly

Connected culture

%

6%

%

ABORIGINAL Services

%

Juvenile Justice Legal Mental health Other Police Physical/sexual health YOTS service

2012/13 Goals

aboriginal 17

• Implement and improve the model for Aboriginal Residential

ser4 vices %

Care, providing a strong cultural program for young people who require out-of-home support.

• Increase

recruitment and retention of Aboriginal staff across Youth Off The Streets’ services. Identify and develop programs that provide culturally appropriate care to all our young people in our services.

• Build and improve relationships with Aboriginal communities.

youth off the streets 2013

17


ABORIGINAL Services

Ongoing Challenges • Recruitment

and retention of staff from Aboriginal Communities can be difficult due to the location of some of our services requiring them to travel a long distance and face adverse road conditions.

• Securing

sustainable and long term government funding is a challenge. Funding guidelines and timing deadlines can restrict the capacity of our staff to provide follow up if a young person requires ongoing support.

What we did

• Focused on meeting with other Aboriginal services, community members and funding bodies to increase awareness of the function of our programs. • Appointed

two Aboriginal youth workers to provide full time support to the existing Aboriginal senior youth worker at the Koch Centre for Youth, which resulted in the creation of a Men’s Business group, cultural camps and cultural activities that educate young people from Aboriginal communities about their culture and others about respecting Aboriginal culture.

• Continued

to develop the ASPIRE Aboriginal Education Program at Key College, Chapel School, Merrylands Campus to help Aboriginal students to realise their full potential. The program supports Aboriginal students to engage with education, learn how to make positive life choices and participate in and implement cultural activities in collaboration with the community.

• Increased communication and availability of Aboriginal job

positions within the organisation, encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply for roles within the organisation. As a result, Youth Off The Streets has seen a 100 per cent increase in the number of Aboriginal staff recruited across all the services.

• During the year, NSW Department of Family and Community

Services (FaCS) funded three cultural bush camps. The camps created an opportunity for a young person from FaCS – with very challenging behaviour – who is waiting on an Intense High Needs Placement to be engaged in cultural activities and given the opportunity to learn traditional practices on a one-on-one basis. The camps provide an intervention with the young person to stop them from absconding from their placement with FaCS. As a result of the success of these camps, we will continue this program in the following year to provide assistance for other Aboriginal and nonAboriginal young people who would benefit from intense one-on-one support.

18

Highlights

Celebrating national apology day at Merrylands - On 20 February 2013, Youth Off The Streets celebrated National Apology Day at our site in Merrylands, Western Sydney. Around 80 attendees, including young people and staff from various Youth Off The Streets Services, gathered to commemorate the fifth anniversary since the then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd made a national apology to the Stolen Generation. The day was organised by our ASPIRE Aboriginal Education Program and our Reconciliation Action Plan Committee. The day was celebrated with a viewing of The Rabbit Proof-Fence, a film that gives one example of a family who have lost much and suffered at the hands of discrimination. Aboriginal Services at the Koch Centre For Youth – Youth Off The Streets appointed two Aboriginal Youth Workers to provide full time support to the existing Aboriginal senior youth worker at the Koch Centre for Youth. They provided the following services to young people at the facility: educational support; aftercare, integration and mentoring; cultural and community support; and wellbeing programs. All the activities run by Aboriginal services at the Koch Centre for Youth are aimed at the promotion, recognition and appreciation for Aboriginal people, history and culture across Youth Off The Streets. The Aboriginal Services youth workers at the Koch Centre for Youth, Macquarie Fields, held a number of culturally specific activities throughout the year to engage and introduce the local young people to the community Elders and traditional activities from the local area. For example, in October 2012, Traditional Indigenous Games were held at the Koch Centre for Youth. Respectful Relationships Programs - The Narrandera Respectful Relationships program began in February 2011 and ended in January 2013. The Griffith Respectful Relationships program began in February 2012 and is due to end in 2014. Both programs are in the heart of the Wiradjuri Nation, which is the largest nation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Both programs targeted Aboriginal youth aged between 12 and 24 years old and living in the local community. A prevention and early intervention strategy was implemented to improve access to culturally competent and sensitive domestic family violence services for the Narrandera and Griffith Aboriginal population. The main components of the programs include: a healthy relationships program in partnership with local specialist services; and the journey to respect program, which incorporates a range of social activities; and the establishment of a Youth Advisory Group and Family Violence Committee. Funded by NSW Premier and Cabinet - Family and Domestic Violence, the Narrandera program has recorded 42 sessions last year with each session having an average of 10 young people attend. The Griffith program was funded by Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and has recorded 39 sessions with an average of nine young people attending this year. The sessions have greatly helped those involved through talking about the issues they face in each session, which include: criminal offences, respectful relationships with others, masculinity and what it means and cyber bullying.

ABORIGINAL Services

What is New in 2014 •

Set up at least three new Outreach programs in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities such as Logan, Queensland; South Eastern Sydney and regional New South Wales as part of the funding received from the federal government through the National Crime Prevention Fund.

• Continue to focus on the increase in recruitment and retention

of Aboriginal staff across Youth Off The Streets services and the identification and development of programs that provide culturally appropriate care to all our young people in our services.

What We Achieved

5% 29%

Inwarrrdal Refel-42 % 21 Tota

Youth Off The Streets Young People Survey 2013.

1

19%

‘Specialist homelessness services: July-December 2012’, AIHW, Published 1 July 2013, http://www.aihw.gov.au/publicationdetail/?id=60129543512

2

21%

5%

13%

22% 3%

16% outward Referl-r3al1 Tota % 10% 26 10% 13%

20

%

Advocacy Total-55

13

%

11%

9% 7%

Accommodation service Dept of Community Services Detox/rehab service Education/training Employment/job-seeking Family / friends Financial/debts

15% 7%

5%

Juvenile Justice Legal Mental health Other Police Physical/sexual health YOTS service

youth off the streets 2013

19


RESIDENTIAL Services

Accepted rather than rejected, nurtured rather than neglected and abused Foster Care Where placement is in the home of a carer who is receiving a payment from a state or territory for caring for a child.

Relative or Kinship Care Where the caregiver is a family member or a person with a pre-existing relationship to the child.

Residential Care Where placement is in a residential building whose purpose is to provide placements for children and where there are paid staff. This category includes facilities where there are rostered staff and where staff are offsite. Youth Off The Streets Residential Programs Family Group Homes Where placement is in a residential building which is owned by the jurisdiction and which are typically run like family homes, have a limited number of children and are cared for around the clock by resident carers.

residential 20

Youth Off The Streets continued to review our residential programs; as the gap between cost per head funded by the Department of Family and Community Services (FaCS) and the actual cost per head increases. During the 2012 and 2013 financial year we had two residential services in operation, the Aboriginal Residential Care Program that is based on the premise that young people can develop selfworth, dignity and responsibility through positive values, mutual support and trust; and New Pathways which is for young people who have problematic sexual behaviours. The development of pro-social values is the primary focus of treatment for each young person at both facilities.

2012/13 Goals • To

evaluate and review our Residential Services taking into account the existing discrepancy between per head funding available through FaCS and the actual cost per head for a place within Youth Off The Streets residential programs and the impact of the state government reforms to the OOHC sector.

• To focus on providing programs that match to the need of

young people, whether that need is cultural or a specialised service such as drug and alcohol intervention or a program for young people being unnecessarily incarcerated prior to a court appearance.

• Seek

further funding from FaCS to increase placements available at New Pathways.

Ongoing Challenges Independent Living Such as private boarding arrangements.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) characterises a number of different living arrangements as out -of-home care:

services

RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) describes out-of-home care (OOHC) as providing alternative accommodation for children and young people under 18 years of age who are unable to live with their parents. Most children (between 78 and 100 per cent) in OOHC in Australia are on Care and Protection Orders (AIHW 2005). The ACOSS Australian Community Sector Survey (2013) found that 47 per cent of clients to community sector organisations wanted the state government to reverse funding cuts to the community services. The survey also revealed 66 per cent of homelessness services found the cost of delivering the service exceeded the revenue gained. This is one of the main reasons

• The

extended OOHC industry negotiations with FaCS regarding service agreements.

• Increasing

the resources and funding available at our Residential Programs to cater for the number of young people that require the service and to reduce waiting lists continues to be a challenge.

who were working at capacity to achieve effective and holistic care and intervention. Additionally we have increased staff support to grow the confidence, skills and satisfaction of staff, including mentoring for newer staff members, mandatory training and a New Pathways Leadership Team has been developed.

• The

Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service was established at the Cordeaux Heights Centre for Youth, in March 2013. This service works with Juvenile Justice and FaCS to provide beds to young males between the ages of 12 and 17 years of age. It serves as a diversionary platform to supervise bail conditions between young people and the justice system. Partnerships were developed with St Vincent de Paul Society and University of Wollongong to increase the quality of the service and to also guarantee it works well into the future.

Highlights

Specialised Aboriginal Residential Care Program - Our Aboriginal Residential Care program is for Aboriginal young males aged 12 to 17 years of age referred from FaCS. In partnership with Traditional Elders, Aboriginal Elders, Aboriginal service providers and Aboriginal community members, our staff work with the young people to restore them back to their families, kinship and community. The goal of the program is to build the self resilience and self confidence of young people, and create a strong sense of pride in their cultural identity and heritage. Graduations at New Pathways - Throughout the year we have had three young people who have successfully completed the program at New Pathways. One of the graduates transitioned into semi-independent living in the Southern Highlands and has secured full time employment, working in the mines. Another graduate has transitioned back to live with his family, is engaged in mainstream schooling and is working with a spray-paint artist where he has been able to demonstrate his artistic talents.

• The high and very complex needs of young people in our

Residential Programs requires highly trained and resilient staff with a minimum qualification level for employment. Due to both the need for specialised staff and geographic distance to an urban centre, staff recruitment and retainment continues to be a challenge.

What We Did

• Youth Off The Streets continues to provide its New Pathways

Program, which is based on best practice treatment models that address the needs of moderate to high risk male adolescents who present with sexually problematic behaviours. We have submitted an expression of interest to FaCS requesting for support to increase the capacity of New Pathways and potentially expand the service. We have not received approval for this growth, however this continues to be a goal for the service next year.

• We

have developed a number of initiatives to improve employment at our Residential Services, including a restructure of the staff at New Pathways to support staff youth off the streets 2013

21


RESIDENTIAL SERVICEs

What We Achieved

10 6%

6

%

What Is New in 2014 • The

Inwarrrdal Refe l-31 Tota

13%

role of Education Support youth worker will be developed for New Pathways to give the young people some consistency and support with their education. The Education Support youth worker liases closely with case workers, Karabar Distance Education Centre and our Education team to ensure the best possible outcomes for our young people.

%

• Measure

65%

and review the sustainability of the Aboriginal Residential Care Program in relation to the specifications of the agreement between FaCS and Youth Off The Streets and the Aboriginal Residential Care Program model.

• Measure and review the impact of the Barbara Holborow Bail Accommodation Service.

3% 3% 3

%

6% 9%

9% 6%

outwerarrdal 23% Ref l-34 Tota % 12 % 26 1%

11%

2%

5% 6%

16%

% 1 5% cacy o v d A 7% Total-108 15% 6% % 4 4% % 4% 17 Accommodation service Dept of Community Services Detox/rehab service Education/training Employment/job-seeking Family / friends Financial/debts

22

Juvenile Justice Legal Mental health Other Police Physical/sexual health YOTS service

Youth Off The Streets is accredited as a Designated Agency and maintains policies and procedures that comply with the benchmark standards as defined by the Office for Children the Children’s Guardian.

For further information about Youth Off The Streets or to donate Phone: 1800 062 288 Email: info@youthoffthestreets.com.au Visit our website: www.youthoffthestreets.com.au


Youth Off The Streets 2013 Services report