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YouthBudget2013 v.4_Layout 1 07/03/2013 17:03 Page 1

YOUTH

2013

THE REPORT

BUDGET

www.youthbudget.org.uk


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013

Contents Youth Budget 2013 executive summary

1

Youth Budget 2013 Taxation Work Consumer Business Public spending Welfare Health Education Employment Defence Public protection Environment

2-5

Conclusion Acknowledgements Methodology About us

5 6 6 7-8

2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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Welcome to the Youth Budget 2013

© Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images News

What should go into Budget 2013? Chance to be Chancellor, an online educational challenge, put this question to 14-18 year olds across the UK. Between November 2012 and February 2013 1,400 young people responded and Youth Budget is the result. Participants were also invited to make a case for their budget choices and enter into a national competition. Why publish Youth Budget 2013? Young people have a valuable contribution to make to public debate on the Budget and they have the right to have their voices heard. Whilst 14-18 year olds cannot vote, they are the next generation of voters, and will ultimately ‘pay’ for economic decisions made today.

Overview The young people who took part in Chance to be Chancellor, and whose views are represented here, were faced with four policy options across ten areas of Budget 2013. The results show that Youth Budget 2013 would: • Increase overall tax revenue; • Spend roughly the same as the Government; • Dramatically cut the deficit. Priorities Of the policies presented to participants the following table outlines the top and bottom three choices: Three most popular Budget 2013 policies

Three least popular Budget 2013 policies

Introduce a 1% ‘unhealthy food’ tax

56%

Reverse previous increase in Air Passenger Duty

Increase National Insurance by 1%

38%

Scrap 10% cut to Council Tax Benefit

Invest in adult apprenticeships

35%

Introduce ‘owneremployee’ employment contract

7%

12% 13%


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › POLICY AREAS

2 Business

Work 60%

60%

50%

50%

40%

40% 38%

30% 20%

29%

20%

20%

10%

28% 21%

25%

26%

Tax relief for research& creative industries

Reduce corporation tax by 1%

10%

13% Increase top Increase tax rate of tax to allowance and 50% on those reduce the earning basic rate limit £150,000+

30%

Introduce Increase ‘ownerNational employee’ Insurance by 1% employment contract

Increase corporation tax by 1%

Double the bank levy

As the largest area of taxation in Budget 2013 it is clear that, while opinion was divided on who should pay more, 67% would increase work taxes.

Participants were split between increasing and decreasing corporation tax and applying a tax increase on the financial industry and tax break for the creative sector.

Consumer

Welfare 60%

60%

50%

56%

50% 40%

40%

30%

30%

20%

20% 20%

17%

10%

32% 27%

29% 12%

10%

7% Introduce a ‘MansionTax’

Reverse Introduce a previous 1% 'unhealthy increase in Air food tax' Passenger Duty

Reduce VAT to the previous level of 17.5%

83% of respondents choose to increases consumer taxes to raise revenue and curb some behaviours over tax cuts to boost consumer spending. Introducing an unhealthy food tax was the most popular policy.

Scrap Universial Credit

Cap total household benefits

Launch ‘Work Programme’

Scrap 10% cut to Council Tax

Scrapping the Government’s proposed welfare reforms gained the most votes while focusing on the long term unemployed came a close second.


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › POLICY AREAS

3 Employment

Health 60%

60%

50%

50%

40%

40% 30%

30% 20%

25%

26%

23%

26%

35% 25%

20% 15%

10%

10% Find Increase Keep to the efficiency spending to meet current level savings in current health of health the NHS challenges spending

Invest in adult Scrap public apprenticeships support for manufacturing

Reform NHS budget

24%

Increase Cut Enterprise participation Finance age in Guarantee education & training to 18

As the second largest area of spending in Budget 2013 young people were split between maintaining or increasing spending (49%) and finding efficiency savings in the NHS (51%).

The majority of participants (60%) choose those policies that would invest in education and training to tackle unemployment in the economy.

Education

Defence

60%

60%

50%

50%

40%

40% 30%

30% 20%

23%

28%

25%

23%

20%

30% 24%

27%

19%

10%

10% Invest in early education

Scrap Free Schools programme

Invest in additional schools programme

Increase Pupil Premium to £900

Whilst a quarter of respondents would shelve the Government’s Free Schools programme, remaining three quarters opted to invest more money in education to improve standards.

Invest in increasing cyber operations

Keep the current defence budget

Scrap initial investment in Trident replacement

Sell off surplus military land

The majority of participants (57%) opted to cut the UK's defence budget - the fourth largest in the world while 30% voted to scrap initial investment in the Government's controversial replacement of Trident.


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › POLICY AREAS

4

Environment

Public protection 60%

60%

50%

50% 40%

40% 33%

30% 20%

23%

10% Further reduce spending on the police through efficiency savings

30% 26%

18%

Reduce Legal Aid in civil cases

20% 10%

Increase community sentencing

Invest in ‘Troubled Families Programme’

Most participants (59%) chose to invest in custodial sentencing through early intervention and community sentencing. Significantly, only 18% would adopt the Government’s controversial plans to reform civil legal aid.

31%

30%

21% 18%

Cut spending on National Smart Update flood carbon capture & Meter Programme defences storage technology

Scrap the Renewable Heat Incentive

A fairly even split was seen between saving and spending in the environment budget. Of those opting to spend, the majority voted to deal with the present environmental threat of flooding.


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › CONCLUSIONS

5

Conclusion

What can you do?

The Youth Budget 2013 would tax more in order to reduce the deficit to a greater extent than the Government. Taxes were increased to curb certain consumer behaviours as well as raise revenue rather than cut to boost consumer spending.

Youth Budget 2013 demonstrates that, when given the opportunity and a more detailed understanding, young people have a valuable contribution to make to the public debate on the Budget.

Youth Budget 2013 would spend the save amount as the Government. Whilst split on the issue of the NHS and the environment, there was an emphasis on investing in education and employment over defence. The central themes to Youth Budget 2013 were: • Taxing more to cut the deficit to a greater extent; • Targeting investment in education and employment; • Getting the economy back on track.

It is vital that young people are equipped with the knowledge, skills and confidence to effectively engage in our democracy. This means: • Schools & teachers facilitating learning on current political and economic debates as a part of citizenship education; • Charities, business & Government providing resources and opportunities for young people to form and express their opinions; • Politicians & policy makers engaging young people on the big issues of the day and considering youth voice when developing policy. Help us to make the Youth Budget an important channel for young people to express their views on the Budget and the economy by: • Writing to your MP about the Youth Budget 2013; • Promoting the Youth Budget 2013 online and in print; • Encouraging colleagues, friends and students to get involved; • Getting in touch with the Citizenship Foundation with any opportunities to talk publicly Youth Budget 2013.


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & METHODOLOGY

Acknowledgements

6 Methodology

The Citizenship Foundation would like to thank all the young people, teachers and volunteers who participated in Chance to be Chancellor. Thank you also to the following people in particular for their support, advice and contribution to Youth Budget 2013: Deborah O’Malley (Aviva), Mark Jaeckel (un-titled), Daniel Crabbe (JYNK), Elizabeth Morgan and Michael Cornford (HM Treasury), Ruth Dwight, Robert Geddis and Robert Bickers (Citizenship Foundation). The facts presented, information used and views expressed in Chance to be Chancellor are not necessarily those of the Citizenship Foundation, Aviva or any other organisation. This simulation is based on the real world and real decisions that the Government has had to make, but it has been simplified to ensure it is an enjoyable and informative learning tool.

The data presented and analysed in the Youth Budget report was gathered using the Chance to be Chancellor web-based educational tool: www.chancetobechancellor.org.uk. It provides a range of background information on the Budget and the economy for users to explore. Chance to be Chancellor presents users with ten areas of Budget 2013 - three in taxation and seven in public spending. Each area contained a brief introduction, the Budget 2013 value and four realistic policy options. After choosing a policy option for each area covered, participants were presented with a summary of their overall Budget, how it compared to Budget 2013 and the potential consequences of their choices. They can then edit their choices before submitting their final choices. All policies and consequences were written by the Citizenship Foundation and are based on policies proposed by the Government and from October 2010’s Comprehensive Spending Review.


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YOUTH BUDGET 2013 › MARKETING & ABOUT US

Marketing Chance to be Chancellor was specifically designed, and made available online, to maximise accessibility and participation. Chance to be Chancellor was promoted exclusively to 14-18 year olds and their teachers with targeted poster, online and social media campaigns. Teachers were encouraged to run Chance to be Chancellor as a lesson or special activity, as part of the broader Paying for It programme which offers free lesson plans, teacher training and support. The challenge was open from 28th November 2012 to 14th February 2013 and was completed by 1,400 registered participants.

About Paying for It Paying for It is an educational programme that helps young people to develop their economic awareness by exploring the relationship between the economy, government and society with real life examples covered through lesson plans, supporting materials and teacher training. The programme culminates in the opportunity for students to participate in Chance to be Chancellor and contribute to the Youth Budget. Paying for It is run by the Citizenship Foundation, in partnership with Aviva. For more information please visit: www.payingforit.org.uk

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About the Citizenship Foundation The Citizenship Foundation is an independent education and participation charity that aims to encourage and enable individuals to engage in democratic society. Founded in 1989, our particular focus is on developing young people’s citizenship skills, knowledge and understanding of the law, democracy and public life. We do this by: • championing civic participation; • supporting teachers, schools and colleges with the delivery of citizenship education; • working with young people in community-settings on issues that concern them.

About Aviva Aviva provides insurance, savings and investment products to 43 million customers worldwide. We are the UK’s largest insurer with over 14 million customers and one of Europe’s leading providers of life and general insurance. We combine strong life insurance, general insurance and asset management businesses under one powerful brand. We are committed to serving our customers well in order to build a stronger, sustainable business, which makes a positive contribution to society, and for which our people are proud to work. Aviva’s relationship with the Citizenship Foundation forms a key part of our community investment strategy.

www.citizenshipfoundation.org.uk

www.aviva.com/cr

General enquiries: Ruth Dwight Programmes Manager - Corporate Partnerships ruth.dwight@citizenshipfoundation.org.uk T: 020 7566 4157

General enquiries relating to Aviva: Deborah O’Malley Community Affairs Manager deborah.omalley@aviva.co.uk T: 01603 689160

Paying for It programme & press enquiries: Robert Geddis Project Manager, Paying for It robert.geddis@citizenshipfoundation.org.uk T: 020 7566 4136

Press enquiries: Jenny Chapman Senior Media Relations Manager, Aviva jenny.a.chapman@aviva.co.uk T: 01603 689894

* based on gross worldwide premiums at 31 December 2010 ** at 31 December 2010


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YOUTH BUDGET

2013

www.youthbudget.org.uk


Youth Budget 2013