Architectural Graduation Project Research - Youssef Sayed

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Helwan University Faculty of Fine Arts Department of Architecture

Graduation Project 2021-2022 Name: Innovation Hub (Art Hub)


Student or Team Name: Youssef Sayed Hussien Sayed

Supervised by: Prof. Aliaa Ameer

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Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................... 12 ............................................................................................................................ 15 ................................................................................................ 16 ................................................................................................................................ 20 ...................................................................................................................... 22 .................................................................................... 23 .......................................................... 24 .................................................... 24 ..................................................................... 25 ................................................................................... 26 ................................................................................................ 27 ................................................................................... 28 .......................................................................................... 29 ......................................................................................................................... 30 ................................................................................................................................................... 30 ................... 31 .................................................................................................................. 33 ..................................................................................................................... 34 .......................................................................... 35 ........................................................................................ 36 .................................................................................... 38 .............................. 41 ..................... 41 .............................................. 41 ................ 49 ............................. 55 .......................................................... 55 .................................................................... 61 ......................... 69

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........................................ 69 ........................................................................... 75 ............................................................................................... 77 .......................................................................................... 78 ........................................................................................................................ 78 ................................................. 85 ........................................................................................... 88 .......................................... 93 ............................................................................................ 98 ....................................................... 100 ..................................................................................................... 103 ............................................................................................................... 104 ....................................................................... 105 .................................................................................... 107 .......................................................................................................... 109 ......................................................................................................... 113 ............................................................... 116 ........................................................................................... 116 .................................................................................... 116 ....................................................................................... 117 .......................................................................................... 117 .................................................................................................... 118 .......................................................................................................... 118 ................................................................ 119 ........................................................................................................ 120 ....................................... 121 ....................................................................................................... 123 ......................................................................................................................... 126 ........................................................................................... 130 .......................................................... 130 ........................................................................................................ 130 ................................................................................................................. 131

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.............................................................................................................................. 131 ........................................................................................... 131 .................................................................................................. 131 ......................................................................................................................... 132

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Table of figures

5

Figure 1.1

the idea of the project : linking the field of business and art…

P. 13

Figure 1.2

bridge the gap between the past and the present……………...

P. 13

Figure 1.3

Project Location………………………………………………

P. 14

Figure 1.4

showing Project proposed main parts ………………………..

P. 14

Figure 1.5

Suggested spaces : general idea of the project ……………….

P. 15

Figure 1.6

Describes the proposed initial activities for the project………

P. 15

Figure 1.7

decline in the revenues of entertainment……………………...

P. 16

Figure 1.8

The collaborative goal of the project example………………..

P. 16

Figure 1.9

successful experiences to be developed in the project………..

P. 17

Figure 1.10

Describes the turnover of the investor's capital………………

P. 18

Figure 1.11

Describes Number of visitors to cinema halls 1 ……………..

P. 18

Figure 1.12

Describes Number of visitors to cinema halls 2 ……………..

P. 19

Figure 1.13

Describes The number of cinemas in Egypt………………….

P. 19

Figure 1.14

The number of cinemas in each governorate separately……...

P. 20

Figure 1.15

Cinema visitors in each governorate separately………............

P. 20

Figure 1.16

Filmmaking Studio Plan………………………………………

P. 21

Figure 1.17

Filmmaking-Music Studio……………………………………

P. 21

Figure 1.18

The Project Is Goint To …. [Diagram]……………………….

P. 22

Figure 1.19

How to go through our Scope………………………………...

P. 23

Figure 2.1

Egypt 2030……………………………………………………

P. 23

Figure 2.2

site location…………………………………………………...

P. 24

Figure 2.3

Location Tracking 1…………………………………………..

P. 24

Figure 2.4

Location Tracking 2…………………………………………..

P. 25

Figure 2.5

Location Tracking 3…………………………………………..

P. 25

Figure 2.6

New City Of Al-Alamein Advantages-Aspects………………

P. 26

Figure 2.7

Project Site……………………………………………………

P. 27

Figure 2.8

Project Plot Area……………………………………………...

P. 28

Figure 2.9

SWOT Analysis………………………………………………

P. 29

Figure 2.10

SWOT Results………………………………………………..

P. 30


6

Figure 3.1

Location Tracking 4…………………………………………..

P. 31

Figure 3.2

Location Tracking 5…………………………………………..

P. 32

Figure 3.3

Site Surrounding……………………………………………...

P. 32

Figure 3.4

Main Roads Pattern...…………………………………………

P. 33

Figure 3.5

Location Tracking 6…………………………………………..

P. 33

Figure 3.6

Landmarks…………………………………………………….

P. 34

Figure 3.7

Landuses 1…………………………………………………….

P. 35

Figure 3.8

Landuses 2…………………………………………………....

P. 35

Figure 3.9

Towers………………………………………………………..

P. 36

Figure 3.10

Recreation area……………………………………………….

P. 36

Figure 3.11

Culture City…………………………………………………..

P. 36

Figure 3.12

Downtown Housing…………………………………………..

P. 36

Figure 3.13

Lantin District………………………………………………...

P. 36

Figure 3.14

AASC Uni…………………………………………………….

P. 37

Figure 3.15

Tempreture During The Year…………………………………

P. 37

Figure 3.16

Wind Rose…………………………………………………….

P. 38

Figure 3.17

Sunny Days…………………………………………………...

P. 38

Figure 3.18

Sun Directions………………………………………………...

P. 39

Figure 3.19

Context & Site Topography…………………………………..

P. 39

Figure 3.20

Topography Map……………………………………………..

P. 40

Figure 3.21

Context-Site Topography With Sections……………………..

P. 40

Figure 3.22

Site Topography 1…………………………………………….

P. 41

Figure 3.23

Site Topography 2…………………………………………….

P. 41

Figure 4.1

Precedents Phase Map………………………………………...

P. 42

Figure 4.2

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Shot…………………….

P. 42

Figure 4.3

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Diagram………………..

P. 43

Figure 4.4

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Diagram………………..

P. 43

Figure 4.5

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Diagram………………..

P. 44

Figure 4.6

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Plan…………………….

P. 44

Figure 4.7

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Section…………………

P. 44


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Figure 4.8

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Shot…………………….

P. 45

Figure 4.9

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Layout………………….

P. 45

Figure 4.10

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Shot…………………….

P. 46

Figure 4.11

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Shot…………………….

P. 46

Figure 4.12

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Diagram………………..

P. 47

Figure 4.13

EuropaCity Cultural Cinema Center Diagram………………..

P. 47

Figure 4.14

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Shot…………..

P. 50

Figure 4.15

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Diagram………

P. 50

Figure 4.16

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Diagram………

P. 50

Figure 4.17

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Shot………......

P. 51

Figure 4.18

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Shot…………...

P. 51

Figure 4.19

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Shot…………...

P. 51

Figure 4.20

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Shot…………...

P. 52

Figure 4.21

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Plan…………..

P. 52

Figure 4.22

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Plan…………..

P. 53

Figure 4.23

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Section………..

P. 53

Figure 4.24

Pratt Institute's New Film/Video Department Section………..

P. 53

Figure 4.25

Pathways Innovation Center Shot…………………………….

P. 56

Figure 4.26

Pathways Innovation Center Shot…………………………….

P. 57

Figure 4.27

Pathways Innovation Center Shot…………………………….

P. 57

Figure 4.28

Pathways Innovation Center Plan…………………………….

P. 58

Figure 4.29

Pathways Innovation Center Plan…………………………….

P. 58

Figure 4.30

Pathways Innovation Center Plan…………………………….

P. 59

Figure 4.31

Pathways Innovation Center Section…………………………

P. 59

Figure 4.32

Scion Innovation Hub Shot…………………………………...

P. 62

Figure 4.33

Scion Innovation Hub Layout………………………………...

P. 62

Figure 4.34

Scion Innovation Hub Shot…………………………………...

P. 63

Figure 4.35

Scion Innovation Hub Diagram………………………………

P. 63

Figure 4.36

Scion Innovation Hub Shot…………………………………...

P. 63

Figure 4.37

Scion Innovation Hub Diagram………………………………

P. 64


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Figure 4.38

Scion Innovation Hub Diagram………………………………

P. 64

Figure 4.39

Scion Innovation Hub Plan…………………………………...

P. 64

Figure 4.40

Scion Innovation Hub Plan…………………………………...

P. 65

Figure 4.41

Scion Innovation Hub Plan…………………………………...

P. 65

Figure 4.42

Scion Innovation Hub Section & Elevation…………………..

P. 66

Figure 4.43

Scion Innovation Hub Diagram………………………………

P. 67

Figure 4.44

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Shot………………...

P. 70

Figure 4.45

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Layout……………...

P. 70

Figure 4.46

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Diagram……………

P. 71

Figure 4.47

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Diagram……………

P. 71

Figure 4.48

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Shot

P. 72

Figure 4.49

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Diagram……………

P. 72

Figure 4.50

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Diagram……………

P. 73

Figure 4.51

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Plan………………...

P. 73

Figure 4.52

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Plan………………...

P. 74

Figure 4.53

Huaihua Cinema and Exhibition Center Sections…………….

P. 74

Figure 5.1

“Wesal” project mainly functionally………………………….

P. 78

Figure 5.2

Dividing Parts………………………………………………...

P. 78

Figure 5.3

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 80

Figure 5.4

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 80

Figure 5.5

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 81

Figure 5.6

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 81

Figure 5.7

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 81

Figure 5.8

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 81

Figure 5.9

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 81

Figure 5.10

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 82

Figure 5.11

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 82

Figure 5.12

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 82

Figure 5.13

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 82

Figure 5.14

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 83


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Figure 5.15

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 83

Figure 5.16

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 84

Figure 5.17

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 84

Figure 5.18

Cinema Standards (See Referances)………………………….

P. 84

Figure 5.19

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 86

Figure 5.20

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 86

Figure 5.21

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 87

Figure 5.22

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 87

Figure 5.23

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 88

Figure 5.24

Exhibition Standards (See Referances)……………………….

P. 88

Figure 5.25

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 89

Figure 5.26

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 90

Figure 5.27

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 90

Figure 5.28

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 91

Figure 5.29

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 91

Figure 5.30

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 92

Figure 5.31

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 92

Figure 5.32

Offices/Workspaces Standards (See Referances)…………….

P. 93

Figure 5.33

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 94

Figure 5.34

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 95

Figure 5.35

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 95

Figure 5.36

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 95

Figure 5.37

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 96

Figure 5.38

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 96

Figure 5.39

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 97

Figure 5.40

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 97

Figure 5.41

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 97

Figure 5.42

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 98

Figure 5.43

Studios [ Music -etc..] Standards (See Referances)…………

P. 98

Figure 5.44

M.P.U. Standards (See Referances)…………………………..

P. 99


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Figure 5.45

M.P.U. Standards (See Referances)…………………………..

P. 99

Figure 5.46

M.P.U. Standards (See Referances)…………………………..

P. 100

Figure 5.47

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 101

Figure 5.48

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 101

Figure 5.49

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 101

Figure 5.50

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 101

Figure 5.51

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 102

Figure 5.52

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 102

Figure 5.53

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 103

Figure 5.54

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 103

Figure 5.55

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 103

Figure 5.56

Lecture Halls Standards (See Referances)……………………

P. 103

Figure 5.57

Banks Standards (See Referances)……………………………

P. 104

Figure 5.58

Banks Standards (See Referances)……………………………

P. 105

Figure 5.59

Cafes & Resturants Standards (See Referances)……………...

P. 105

Figure 5.60

Cafes & Resturants Standards (See Referances)……………...

P. 105

Figure 5.61

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 106

Figure 5.62

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 107

Figure 5.63

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 107

Figure 5.64

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 107

Figure 5.65

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 108

Figure 5.66

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 108

Figure 5.67

Parking & Vechile Dims (See Referances)…………………...

P. 108

Figure 5.68

Toilets Standards (See Referances)…………………………...

P. 109

Figure 5.69

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 110

Figure 5.70

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 111

Figure 5.71

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 111

Figure 5.72

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 111

Figure 5.73

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 111

Figure 5.74

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 112


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Figure 5.75

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 112

Figure 5.76

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 113

Figure 5.77

Auditoriums Standards (See Referances)…………………….

P. 113

Figure 5.78

Space Program Spread………………………………………..

P. 115-116

Figure 5.79

Space Program Numerical Analysis 1………………………..

P. 117

Figure 5.80

Space Program Numerical Analysis 2………………………..

P. 117

Figure 5.81

Space Program Numerical Analysis 3………………………..

P. 118

Figure 5.82

Space Program Numerical Analysis 4………………………..

P. 118

Figure 5.83

Space Program Numerical Analysis 5………………………..

P. 119

Figure 5.84

Conclusion…………………………………………………....

P. 119

Figure 5.85

Functional Zones Charts……………………………………...

P. 120

Figure 5.86

Final Demograph……………………………………………...

P. 120

Figure 5.87

Matrix Diagram……………………………………………….

P. 121

Figure 5.88

Matrix Diagram/Table : spaces needed aspects ………….......

P. 122

Figure 5.89

Matrix Full Detailed Table/Diagram………………………….

P. 123

Figure 5.90

Entertainment Part Bubble Diagram………………………….

P. 124

Figure 5.91

Start-Ups/Studios Part Bublle Diagram………………………

P. 124

Figure 5.92

Training Center Part Bubble Diagram………………………..

P. 125

Figure 5.93

Adminstration Part Bubble Diagram………………………….

P. 125

Figure 5.94

Other Services Part Buble Diagram…………………………..

P. 125

Figure 5.95

Collective Bubble Diagram…………………………………

P. 126

Figure 5.96

Site Impacts…………………………………………………...

P. 127

Figure 5.97

Site Zoning Arrangment………………………………………

P. 128

Figure 5.98

Zoning Plan GR………………………………………………

P. 129

Figure 5.99

Zoning Plan 1st ………………………………………………

P. 129

Figure 5.100

Zoning Plan 2nd ……………………………………………….

P. 130

Figure 5.101

Zoning Section………………………………………………..

P. 130


“ُ‫“ ”و ِ َصال‬Wesal” is a unique type of project specialized in the field of Art, where its

name “Wesal” (which means connecting/combining two things) symbolizes the connection between the new idea of the business facilties (Innovation Hub or Business Incubators) and the Art Industry in general, which has flourished greatly recently and controversy sparked between supporters and opponents of what Egyptian art has reached now.

The The majority of opinions recently is hostile to what the Egyptian/Arab art has reached at the present time, describing it as declining and trivial, and describing the current stage as a decline in artistic taste among the public .. So .. The project works (under its name "Wesal") to also connect the so-called "Era of Beautiful Art" with the current situation of Egyptian art and take the users in a deep journey through the different eras of Egyptian art and revitalize it.

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It is suggested that the project be located in one of the new cities in Egypt, such as (the new administrative capital, the new Alamein, the new Galala, etc...) in order to comply with the building requirements of these cities with modern methods and ideas, including the idea of the innovation hub, as these cities were designed to keep pace with the latest ideas in different fields.

After the analyzes and studies presented in that research, the choice was made on The New City of ElAlamein, located between the cities of Alexandria and Marsa-Matrouh, On the northern coast of the Arab Republic of Egypt provided that a plot of land with an area of about 40,000 square meters will be allocated near the El Alamein Towers and the iconic tower On the shore of New Alamein Lakes

“Wesal” project mainly functionally consists of 4 parts (the administrative part - the business part - the entertainment part - the outdoor part) In principle, the administrative part consists of three sections (the cinema and theater department - the music department - the cinematic and theatrical costume design department), which contains studios dedicated to each of these three areas, and the business part contains the sponsoring companies (incubators) for those fields and workers with. As for the entertainment part, it contains cinemas, red carpet corridor, and a large theater to display the works that have been prepared within the project.

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The project "Wesal" works on a range of talented young people who want to start their own career in art, but they do not know the appropriate way to start it. Accordingly, the Wisal project has many proposed goals and values  

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Working as a training center incubating the talented, to be a beacon of art in Egypt and the Middle East Stimulating artistic innovation and integration between art-producing fields such as film making, fashion design and music, and working to build communication between these fields to produce integrated artistic outputs. Presenting a set of seminars, parties, workshops and international conferences, such as the International Youth Conference in Sharm El Sheikh, as well as educational courses and programs, and organizing many study tours in various fields of art. Improving the economy by achieving great financial profits through the renters of studios or from cinemas, theaters and shows that will be held in addition to the entertainment area, malls, etc...


Recently, especially in the last decade, the decline and disappearance of high-end and purposeful art in general from society has begun, coinciding with the emergence of other types of art, which the majority described as declining and trivial art. As a result, in general, a decline in the revenues of the art and entertainment industry in Egypt and the Arab world in general, given that Egypt is the main driver and the leading country for arts in the Middle East. And this is what has invaded the headlines of Egyptian newspapers in many times in the recent period. (news headlines and some case studies supporting the idea presented in the Annexe part at the end of the research)

Accordingly, the idea of the “Wesal” project came out, which attempts to restore profits to the field of entertainment in general and art in particular by creating a good environment for talented in all fields affecting the production of fine works of art in which all means of cooperation and sharing are available and facilitates the convergence of talented people in addition to Existence of places and platforms to display these businesses and benefit from their profits economically.

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Worldwide, there have been many successful experiences in the field of visual art and entertainment, and these experiences are intended for the leading companies in the field of filmmaking, which confirms the feasibility of the idea of the project "Wesal", which tries to develop that experience in a connected way with new business ideas and landing them on the The land of Egypt with an Egyptian-Arab background at that time when Egypt is looking forward to great development and a great vision for Egypt 2030 and Egypt 2050.

One of the project’s objectives is to reach results similar to those successes with an Egyptian-Arab Identity that is sweeping the world with its artistic works and working to export the Arab lifestyle and identity to the whole world.

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Looking at the status of the business of the film, art, or entertainment industry in general, we find that it is in a severe depression, especially in recent years, where indicators confirm a gradual decline in profits since 2007.

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Reference : https://www.capmas.gov.eg/ And from the previous statistics, we find that there is indeed a stagnation in the revenues of entertainment investments and a decline in the number of those interested in and followers of art, which is represented, for example, by the number of visitors to cinemas over the past 15 years, which the statistics indicate the beginning of its boom again starting from the year 2019. Looking at the number of cinema halls in Egypt and analyzing those numbers according to each Egyptian governorate separately...

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Reference : https://www.capmas.gov.eg/ From the above, we conclude that the number of cinemas in Egypt is not large at all and is not commensurate with the number of visitors and the audience interested in art, in addition to the decline in the number of cinemas over the past 15 years. Which confirms the necessity and importance of the "Wesal" project in the advancement of this industry once again and its flight to a place far beyond what the greatest optimists expected. And by scrutinizing in more depth the analysis of the numbers of those interested in this industry in each Egyptian governorate, we find that far from the capital (Cairo-Giza) there is a large audience in the northern coastal cities, despite the weak capabilities and the lack of cinemas there. This must be taken into considration in site selection phase ...

Talents must be encouraged to show their talents and help them find the right starting path and provide them with all the needs necessary to succeed and produce creative and honorable artistic outputs This leads us to try to create a project capable of reviving the relationship between talent, art, work and architecture that derives from their actual needs by influencing different aspects of human behavior for creativity.

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Accordingly … The Project is Going To :

And all of this can be achieved by … 

The right selection of location in the place of an icon allows to make the project a great attraction for all art lovers.

The correct exploitation of the site from the point of view of the zoning, where the visitor areas are concentrated in the appropriate area and the administrative area in the appropriate area and so on ...

Creating trending points within the project, where it works to make the place iconic, distinctive and attractive to visitors and talents by conveying the experience with personal photos.

Pay close attention to the physical or psychological needs of talents and work to achieve them in an integrated manner in the project’s space program and in the design itself.

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Working on the in the design between the areas of visitors, talents, sponsoring companies and visiting celebrities, and designing the intersections of their movement paths in a precise manner that allows creating opportunities for all.

Achieving thermal comfort by analyzing the weather conditions of the chosen site and designing based on the results of those analyzes, which provides greater comfort for users.

It is suggested that the project be located in one of the new cities in Egypt, such as (the new administrative capital, the new Alamein, the new Galala, etc...) in order to comply with the building requirements of these cities with modern methods and ideas, including the idea of the innovation hub, as these cities were designed to keep pace with the latest ideas in different fields.

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After studying the statistics presented, it is clear that the coastal cities enjoy a large audience for art, despite the lack of artistic facilties and business facilities, and due to the great development that occurred from the state in the reconstruction and development of coastal cities, The New City of Al-Alamein appeared, which is one of the largest Egyptian projects in the coming period.

The site was chosen in a special place in New Alamein, overlooking the two most important streets, which are Alexandria-Marsa Matrouh Road and the main road to New Alamein City. From the eastern side, the site overlooks Lakes of El Alamein, which will provide it with a wonderful view.

Reference : Google Earth , Google Maps It is about 250 km away from the capital (Cairo), and it is combined with the canal cities by one road 350 km long from the farthest city (Port Said).

23


With a circle of length of 50 meters, we can estimate the distances between different cities until we reach the chosen city, the new city of Alamein.

24


The city's location, borders, and surroundings make it easy to reach, and it is crossed by a very important main road, which is the international coastal road.It can be reached from the coastal cities via the aforementioned road or from Cairo via the Cairo-Alexandria desert road.

The new city of El Alamein is considered one of the most important investment projects that the Egyptian state depends on in the coming years to achieve great profit in the fields of investment, tourism, trade, entertainment and sustainability. Where the new city of El Alamein is based on several slogans / goals, the most important of which is achieving sustainability and attracting investment to the state Several elements in the city help in this, as these elements indicate the correctness of the steps taken to end this huge project. These features are .. New City Of Al-Alamein Advantages-Aspects

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The project site was chosen very carefully to be able to achieve all the previously mentioned considerations, whether it was the main idea of the project or the scope or etc... The project land is located near the iconic tower and next to the new Alamein Towers, moreover its presence on the shore of one of the new Alamein lakes. And all this in addition to the close distance between it and The AAST International University.

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Total Area : 40,000 sqm The site is surrounded by 3 main roads from 3 sides & a neighbor from a side & AlAlamein Lake from another side It is allowed to build on only 30% of the plot area, provided that it is also allowed to build the all plot area of the land in the underground floors. Buildings heigh max is G+6.

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Strengths , Weakness , Opportunities & Threats     

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   

From the above it is clear that the site is very suitable with some warnings of the points of threat and weakness, such as the proximity of the site to recreational areas and business facilities, and also some strengths such as the location of the site on the lakes of the Alamien which gives an indication of the importance of working to make the project unique like a Landmark.

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Reference : Google Earth , Google Maps

The site can be reached from the nearest (airports-ports-cities) through the two main international roads in the new city of Al-Alamein, which are the Al-Alamein-Wadi AlNatroun road and the international coastal road.

The site surrounds 3 main streets and is located near the tourist walkway and is 600 meters away from it. It is also 600 meters away from the iconic tower.

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Site is located near the tourist walkway car parking and also near the Golf Porto Marina bus station. It is also about 8 km from El Alamein train station.

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The site is located next to the most important landmarks of the new city of Alamein such as (the iconic tower - the new Alamein towers - the entertainment area - the tourist walkway + the Arab Academy for Navigation Sciences and Technology - New Alamein Lakes - etc...

Reference : Google Earth , Google Maps , http://www.mhuc.gov.eg/Programs/Index/133

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The project site is located in the administrative zone according to the official plan for the New Alamein city issued by the Egyptian Ministry of Housing.

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There is no unified character for the city, as the projects (most of which are administrative near the project site) are based on titling their land to one of the real estate developers, who each sees a different vision of the architectural orientation that they will take. Reference : http://www.mhuc.gov.eg/Programs/Index/133

We conclude from that the emphasis on the foregoing, which is the lack of clarity of a unified architectural character of the city, despite the fact that most of them agreed on the nature of modernism in one way or another.

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Of course, when you choose a location in a coastal city, and if it is on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, you have taken into account the climat aspect. Claims are one of the most important features of this site, which is what the following studies will explain …

With regard to the temperature, it is moderate. The lowest temperature was recorded in January, 10 degrees, and the highest temperature was in June, which was above 30 degrees. As for the wind speed, it is volatile and has a large range, where the highest wind speed was recorded at 50 km / h and the lowest wind speed was 10 km / h.

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With regard to the direction of the wind, it is noted that the direction from which the largest proportion of the wind blows is the northwest direction.

As for insolation, it is noted that the site is sunny most days of the year, and with reference to the temperature chart, we find that insolation coincides with moderate temperatures, which gives the area a beautiful atmosphere.

Reference : https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/

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This study shows the direction of the sun relative to the site with the angle of incidence and reflection, etc...

Reference : https://drajmarsh.bitbucket.io/sunpath3d.html

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Reference : https://en-us.topographic-map.com/

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The drawings show the presence of an average contour in the ground, where the highest point in the site is about 10 meters in height, and by comparing this to the total land surface, we do not find that the contour is significantly sloping, in these cases it is considered moderate.

We also note that the slope in the ground is uniform as it moves in a slope from the northeast to the southwest, which gives a very good chance for the winds to blow and give good ventilation for every meter in the site.

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Location : Paris ,France Architect : UNStudio Type : Cinema Complex - Cultural Laboratory Site Area : 10,000 Sqm Building Area : 7,641 Sqm NO. Floors : G + 4 Year : 2018

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Description .. The complex features a variety of indoor and outdoor venues for enjoying cinema in both traditional and unexpected ways. Rather than simply designing a simple container for a theater within, the building is envisioned as a completely accessible public space where people can gather and relax. The expanded program will also include media and production facilities, restaurants and cafes, and viewpoints for 360 degree panoramas of EuropaCity and the Paris skyline.

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“Cinemas are the perfect example of concealed architecture,” explains founding partner Ben van Berkel. “The cinema is the one type of building that becomes invisible once you step inside it. You spend up to two hours in a darkened room, immersed in the alternative space and time of the imagination…and then you leave. This limited user experience of the cinema as a venue led to the key concept that drove our design: “ the desire to create a building that in its totality offers a much more extensive experience of cinema.”

The design of the building draws cues from BIG’s ‘Rolling Hills’ master plan, using sweeping curves and occupiable rooftops to embed the building into its surroundings. One key design concern was to keep a low profile to allow maximum natural light to reach the adjacent hotel. To achieve this, the building is oriented to cause minimal shadows while still allowing light to reach the building’s terraces and sundecks.

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But the building also stands out, through its overall form and choice of facade material. Inspired by landscape sculptures, the weathered steel expresses a natural tone and familiarity. Perforations in the metal work in tandem with the overall form to harness natural winds and provide ventilation for indoor spaces.

The three “blocks” of the building are organized by film genre, allowing the space and the art to interact and heighten one another. At the center, they converge on a lobby that offers access into the theaters and glimpses into the production studios on the level below.

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Project’s Active & Passive Ideas ..

Orientaion ..

Reference : https://www.archdaily.com/889575/unstudio-wins-frances-largest-privatearchitecture-competition-for-cultural-cinema-center-in-europacity

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The three “blocks” of the building are organized by film genre, allowing the space and the art to interact and heighten one another. At the center, they converge on a lobby that offers access into the theaters and glimpses into the production studios on the level below.

The mass shows a great design dynamism as it combines more than one function in an irregular coherent form. The mass also has also provided places on the roofs to form open cinemas that can be accessed through the heights and levels on the roofs. The movement paths have also been designed in a wonderful way that mediates all the spaces and is interspersed with restaurants, cafes, etc... of recreational spaces.

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It would have been preferable for the production zone to be in the upper floors so that the ground floor would be for display activities and more interactive activities with the audience.


The building is located in a similar sround, surrounded by some hotels and gardens, as well as a music building.. The directive was dealt with to help not withhold natural ventilation from the hotels behind the building, in addition to directing the view to the music building .

In addition to what the Reference mentioned at that point, a moral bridge has been built to achieve visual contact between the two buildings, as they have similar functions, which compatible with the general idea of the main project, which is the connection and interconnection "Wesal".

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Despite the success of the project as a mass and a function, the orientation has some question marks, as it was decided to orient the building so as not to affect the amount of natural ventelation heading towards the hotels behind it, which led to some orientation problems.


Location : Brooklyn, United States Architect : Think! Studio Type : Institute – Filmmaking Studio - Cinema Building Area : 1,400 Sqm NO. Floors : G + 1 Year : 2015

Unveiled in Spring 2015, Pratt Institute’s new Film/Video Department offers students a cutting-edge facility boasting 280 Sqm in soundstage space including an infinity green screen, a 96-seat screening room with surround sound, a sound recording studio, and two high-end post production suites. Located on Pratt’s Brooklyn campus at 550 Myrtle Avenue, the 1,400Sqm, two-story building was formerly the home of the PrattStore.

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The design team focused on honoring the expansive, open quality of the building. Built using free-span trusses, the interior space is column-free and features 7m high ceilings. a stunning series of perforated, sculptural metal panels wrap around the entrance lobby and envelop rooms requiring sound-proofing and darkness.

A floating bridge spans over the building’s first floor and connects classrooms and offices on the second floor while various interstitial spaces throughout serve as dynamic social areas for students to meet and interact. The design is intended to foster the spirit of students learning from each other ”and create“ a vibrant and collaborative filmmaking environment.

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Sustainable and eco-friendly components of the project include high-efficiency LED lighting and the re-use of pre-existing construction features from the original building including stairs and ductwork.

Plans & Sections …

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Reference : https://www.archdaily.com/770431/pratt-institutes-new-film-videodepartment-building-wasa-studio-a

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The design team focused on honoring the expansive, open quality of the building. Built using free-span trusses, the interior space is column-free and features 7m high ceilings. a stunning series of perforated, sculptural metal panels wrap around the entrance lobby and envelop rooms requiring sound-proofing and darkness.

The interior design of the building reflects its function and works to make the users in a special state of communication with the art they present. Where I used a pattern in the form of shiny and luminous stars and after the red-tinted paint materials.

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The ceiling is not well designed as the industrial feel in the ceiling does not correspond to the function of the building


Unveiled in Spring 2015, Pratt Institute’s new Film/Video Department offers students a cuttingedge facility boasting 280 Sqm in soundstage space including an infinity green screen, a 96-seat screening room with surround sound, a sound recording studio, and two high-end post production suites. Located on Pratt’s Brooklyn campus at 550 Myrtle Avenue, the 1,400Sqm, twostory building was formerly the home of the PrattStore.

One of the clear features in the design is the separation between the spaces with different functions in a smooth and balanced manner, while maintaining the structure of the building interconnected and not disintegrated, and this was done by working on two floors, one of them is the ground one, which is what was installed on the spaces with the highest interaction with visitors, as for the spaces on the upper floor It was more specific to students and faculty.

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This came with a very suitable design for the entrances, as there were 3 entrances for students and visitors, and an entrance for the service in the warehouse zone.

Location : Casper, Wyoming, United States Architect : Cuningham Group Architecture and MOA Architecture Type : Higher Education – Innovation Center Building Area : 12,000 Sqm NO. Floors : B + G + 2 Year : 2016

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Description … Pathways Innovation Center is providing students with an interactive and personalized learning experience and exposure to future career opportunities. Pathways Innovation Center offers junior and seniors in the Natrona County School System in Casper, Wyoming, an interactive and personalized education through four academies focused on multiple disciplines, including engineering and design.

At the center of Pathways Innovation Center is “Fabrication Hall,” a 450 Sqm, two-story common space surrounded by labs equipped with cutting-edge technology, and is meant to encourage teams from all academies to collaborate on projects. The architects’ innovative design concept for Fabrication Hall was inspired by private sector facilities, including Boeing in Washington state, where engineering and design teams work under one roof.

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“This is a unique space that you don’t see at other schools,” Krenner says. “It is fully sunfilled and large enough to build homes and solar-powered airplanes.” The hall has 5m High, custom-fabricated glass bay doors that fully open to the outside. On the inside, the hall is viewed from glass-walled design spaces, including a “floating blue box” overlooking the hall for informal learning. “This approach creates a conversation between academic disciplines, including construction, woodworking, metals, welding, robotics, arts and furniture making,” he says. “It’s an incubator for prototyping. Ideas are generated and then connect with the different academies at the school. As the Fabrication Hall, the transparent design stimulates synergy and is a celebration of student achievement.”

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Reference : https://www.archdaily.com/801370/pathways-innovation-center-cuningham-grouparchitecture-plus-moa https://educationsnapshots.com/projects/1172/pathways-innovation-center-roosevelthigh-school/ https://www.moaarch.com/project/pathways-innovation-center-roosevelt-alternativehigh-school/

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“This approach creates a conversation between academic disciplines, including construction, woodworking, metals, welding, robotics, arts and furniture making,” he says. “It’s an incubator for prototyping. Ideas are generated and then connect with the different academies at the school. As the Fabrication Hall, the transparent design stimulates synergy and is a celebration of student achievement.”

The most obvious feature of the project in my opinion is the wrapping and merging of voids with different functions around each other.. Green represents educational/practical areas . Violet color areas with a casual educational character . Blue color for the areas of services and administration . Yellow color for the comfort zone and the coffee zone . Red color for the entertainment space, and on this floor and area was a gym .

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In addition to the meticulous and elegant design of the Neutral paths, which means entrance areas, movement paths, rest areas, etc. We find it mediating the heart of the project in all directions, which ensures the shortest and most enjoyable movement path for the user.

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Location : Rotorua, New Zealand Architect : RTA Studio + Irving Smith Architects Type : Innovation Center – Office Building Building Area : 2,000 Sqm NO. Floors : G + 2 Year : 2020

Description … This project is a reinvention of the Rotorua headquarters of Scion, a Crown Research Institute that specializes in technology development for the forestry industry. Aptly located on the edge of the redwood forest in Whakarewarewa Forest Park, the project brings the workforce, previously siloed in smaller buildings dotted around the campus, into a central innovation hub while creating a new campus arrival point to strengthen the public interface for Scion.

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Named after Tuteata, an ancestor of the three local subtribes ‘Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’ is a cutting-edge showcase for engineered timber not only in terms of the aesthetic but what it contributes to a carbon-zero future. A trio of ‘peaks’ in gluelam timber, representative of the three hapu in the region, stand proud and tall at the entrance.

Visitors pass beneath these portals to a tripleheight atrium where a curated exhibition of wood-fiber technology and a café welcomes the public. Immediately present is the structural diagrid which rises three storeys to form the skeleton of the building. These structural elements are made of highperforming Laminated Veneer Lumber and feature dovetail node joints that slot and glue together in an expression of craftsmanship. Looking upward from the atrium, the levels above provide the more private, acoustically considered open-plan office and collaboration spaces.

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As assessed using the Etool system, the Scion Innovation Hub achieves embodied carbon zero at the time of completion. Furthermore, to measure all of life and end of life carbon, the new building was assessed to achieve the 2030 target set by the RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) of 500kg of carbon/ msq. By using engineered products made from sustainably grown pine and putting more thought into the operational characteristics of a building, the building significantly contributes to New Zealand’s carbon-zero future to leave a much lighter footprint on the land. Moreover, a high-quality natural ventilation system has been designed and follows a carefully designed energy model, where the materials on the facades have been chosen to be permeable to natural light and natural ventilation, in addition to the inner courtyard attached to the louvres on the last floor.

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Reference : https://www.archdaily.com/972151/scion-innovation-hub-rta-studio-plus-irving-smitharchitects?ad_source=search&ad_medium=projects_tab https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/latest/127216986/scion-innovation-hub-by-rtastudio-and-irving-smith-architects-wins-at-world-architecture-festival http://www.isarchitects.nz/projects/scion-timber-innovation-hub

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Visitors pass beneath these portals to a triple-height atrium where a curated exhibition of wood-fiber technology and a café welcomes the public.

In my opinion, the main idea of the design in this project came from the section, where the design decision was that the ground floor would serve as a future for all groups, and then the different jobs would be distributed on the various upper floors With an atrium in the middle of the building that connects the floors together and adds more communication and interdependence between users.

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In addition to the main idea of the innovation hub, which works to achieve communication and interdependence between all members of the system in one of the areas, and the design in that project was also based on the vertical interconnection between all floors and sections through an atrium in the middle of the building, around which all functions.

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Location : Huaihua ,China Architect : United Design Group Type : Cinema ,Exhibitions ,Fine Arts Museum ,Art Training Center Site Area : 124,811 m² Building Area : 29,141 m² NO. Floors : B + G + 6 Year : 2013

Description … Huaihua is a prefecture-city level in the Hunan Province in the south central part of China. The city is surrounded by one of the Five Great Mountains of China, Mount Heng (150 km long) and crossed by a web of rivers named “Wu Xi” (five rivers) which helped the growth of this relatively small city and its economy; The site of the project is located in the north east part of the municipality, just south of the park along the main branch of the river’s web that form a buffer between the site and the newly built headquarter of the local government.

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The Huaihua Theater and Exhibition Center will be managed by three different subjects adding further difficulties in organizing the layout. Designed by United Design Group, the 60,000 m² complex is equally subdivided between the theater/cinema part (30,000 m²) and exhibitions: 12,000 m² for the museum; 10,000 m² for the urban planning hall; 3000 m² for the fine arts museum and 1000 m² for the local history exhibition. An extra 6000 m² will host the art training center. More images and architects’ description after the break.

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An important feature of the projects will determine the appearance of the buildings in its elevation, the mountains which surround the city. We wanted to achieve a solid look, that’s why the choice of the stone in the façade and the extensive use of green pitched roof to give a more natural aspect. The Theater building will be separated from the rest of the system, not only this individuality will be reflected in its shape but also in the different pattern of the stones in the façade.

The form (shape) of the system will take into account the site topography; the stripes configuration will ease fitting the building into the land. The WuXi spirits will be reflected also into another level, the landscape layer, in which five pools of water will

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take place, to underline the entrances of the buildings but also will work, in the Theater Building as the element that will keep it apart from the rest of the system.

Referances : https://www.archdaily.com/317945/huaihua-theater-and-exhibition-center-proposalunited-design-group

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The several subjects involved in the management and the different uses, initially led us to focus on the relationships between the different functions. The program clearly stated that the new building had to express in some way the “Wu Xi Spirit”. In the ancient times, the river system was the primary way of communication and connection between the several villages along its path. We tried to translate it into our project, superimposing the layout of the five rivers into our site; this pattern will form the circulation space inside the building.

And despite my reservations about the way the movement paths were designed, which reflects the failure to take the visual sequence and communication between the parts into consideration, but it has been employed in a suitable place that mediates all the functions and works to provide the least movement distance to reach the desired part.

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I see that the great division and disintegration between the various functions that are linked in one way or another and agree in the field (the field of art) The determination to deconstruct and separate these functions weakens communication and does not reinforce the core values of innovation hub projects.


In addition to the absence of any distinct visual connection between the paths of movement and movement between the different parts of the project, we see that the main movement path in the project is cumbersomely broken and not connected to the smooth connection.

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“Wesal” project mainly functionally consists of 5 parts (The Administrative Part - The Start-Ups/Studios Part - The Entertainment part - The Training Center Part – Other Services)

The different parts were divided according to the following ratios (indicative ratios) and it is also mentioned in the following digram the intended goal of each part, which further clarifies what it is.

Accordingly, in the next stage, the contents of each part and its expected spaces will be clarified with the presentation of the Standards.

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Film projection: Fire separation materials are no longer required for the projection room with safety film. Projectionists operate several projectors; the projection room is no longer a continuously used workplace for staff. 1m of space behind the projector and at the operating side, 2.80 m high, ventilation, noise insulation to the auditorium side. Projection rooms may be combined for several auditoriums. Film widths of 16 mm, 35 mm and 70 mm. The centre of the projected beam should not deviate more than 5 horizontally or vertically from the centre of the screen, or it should be deflected via a deflection mirror. Conventional systems two projectors in asn superimposing operation. Nowadays, automatic operation with only one projector using horizontal film plates provides nobreak film presentations with 4000 m spools. This system is sometimes used with several projection rooms and remote control from projection and control points. The film automatically gives control signals for all the functions of the projector, lens changes, auditorium lighting, stage lighting, curtain and picture cover.

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Picture sizes depend on the distance of the projector from the screen; height/side ratio is 1:2.34 (Cinemascope) or 1:1.66 (wide screen) for smaller room widths. The angle from the middle of the last row of seats to the outer edge of the picture should be at most 38 for Cinemascope. The ratio of the spacing of the last row of seats to the projection screen should be 3:2 . Projection screen: Minimum distance of projection screen from wall in the case of THX is 120cm, according to theatre size and system reducible to 50cm with respect to the sound system configuration. The projection screen is perforated (sound-permeable). Movable blinds or curtains limit the projection screen to the side for the same picture height. Large projection screens are curved with a radius centred on the last row of seats. The lower edge of the projection screen should be at least 1.20m above the floor. The auditorium should have no outside light other than emergency lighting. Walls and ceiling are made from non- reflective materials and in not too bright colours. Spectators should sit within the outside edge of the screen. The viewing angle from the first row of seats to the centre of the picture should not exceed 30"

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Acoustics … Neighbouring auditoriums should be separated with partitioning walls of approximately 85 dB 18-20000 Hz. Acoustic deflecting surfaces on the ceiling with low acoustic increase with increasing room volume and decreases fram 0.8-0.2 seconds from low toa high frequencies - p. 486 (6. The rear wall behind the last row of seats should be delay difference time. The reverberation time can increase with incresing room volume to prevent echo. The loudspeakers should be distributed around the auditorium so that the volume difference between the first and last row of seats does not exceed 4 dB. Sound reproduction … In future, apart from mono-optical sound reproduction, the Dolby stereo optical sound system in 4channel technology is also necessary with three loudspeaker combinations behind the screen and the fourth channel with additional speakers to the side and rear. For 70 mm film 6-channel magnetic sound, the additional pue speaker combination is behind the screen. In the case of BTX, there is a sound absorption wall behind the screen according to the Lucas Film System

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into which the loudspeaker combination is built. Ticket offices are now superseded by electronic booking and reservation systems. Multi-screen complexes are now considered necessary to be commercially viable. Various theories are used to determine the total seats needed. A basic requirement is to give visitors a choice of programmes and to enable the operator to show each film in an auditorium with a capacity to match anticipated public demand. Thus, a film playing to half capacity audiences can be transferred to smaller auditorium or vice versa. Seating capacity varies between 100 and 600 chairs.

In larger units, there are boxes with children which have fire-resistant and soundinsulating partition walls and special sound reproduction systems. Car parking space: normally one per 5- 10 spectators. New larger cinemas with several projection roams in combination with multi-level communications, leisure. sporting and shopping options provide entertainment for the whole family under one roof, and they can also be used for seminars and events. Can be located in peripheral areas of towns with corresponding car parking spaces, e.g. Kinopolis in Brussels with an amusement park, 27 projection rooms with 7500 seats (150 and 700 per room) and screens from 12m x 8m up to 29 mx 10m.

Referance : Neufert, Architecture Date, 3rd Edition

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Drive-in cinema spectators do not leave their cars; they watch the film from their cars. The size is limited by ramps and the number of cars (max. 1000-1300) which still permits a good view. Normal size is 450-500 cars.

The location should be near to a motorway, petrol station or service area, and screened off so that light and noise from passing vehicles does not interfere. An entrance with a waiting area will avoid traffic congestion on the road. A drive-past ticket office allows tickets obtained from the cars ).

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Exiting is best done by leaving the ramp towards the front. Ramps are inclined in curves so that the front of each vehicle Buipinoid even the rear. pasies SI seat passengers with a good view of the screen over the roofs of the front row of cars . The design of the whole ground area should be dust-free and not slippery when wet. Ticket booths: one booth for 300 vehicles, two for 600, three for 800, and four for 1000 vehicles. The screen size varies according to the number of vehicles, 14 50 mx 11.30m for 650 cars; 17.0m x13.0m for 950 cars. The screen is best facing east or north since this permits earlier performances and in areas with harsh climates the screen should be housed in a structure with solid walls. The height above the ground depends on the ramp slope and angle of sight. A screen which inclined towards distortion. The framework and screen wall must be capable of withstanding the wind pressure. Rows of seats should be the reduces doj included pue playground is desirable. The projection building is usually centrally located 100 m from the screen. The children's je projection room contains film projector(s), sound amplification system. Sound reproduction is best with loudspeakers inside the cars. These speakers (for two vehicles) are located on posts set 5.0m apart and are taken into the car by the cinema visitors. Heating may be supplied on the loudspeaker posts possible connections for internal car heating. generator and with possible connections for internal car heating.

Referance : Neufert, Architecture Date, 3rd Edition Time Saver Standards For Architecture Design Data The Metric Handbook Architecture

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Museums and art galleries tend to have several of the same concerns, and as building types they tend to share many of same features. In general, the main concerns of museums and art galleries are collecting, documenting, preserving, researching, interpreting and exhibiting some form of material evidence.

For this purpose, many people with varied skills are required. There are, however, important distinctions not only between museums and art galleries, but also between the different types of museum and art gallery. There are institutions such as heritage centres, exploratoria and some cultural institutes which are considered to be types of museums.

Referance : Neufert, Architecture Date, 3rd Edition Time Saver Standards For Architecture Design Data

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Calculations for museum and art gallery lighting are highly theoretical; the quality of light is decisive. Experiments carried out in America can be useful. Recently there has been a steady increase in the use of artificial lighting instead of daylight, which constantly changes even if north light is used. anges even if north light is used. According to experiments carried out in Boston, a favourable viewing space is between 30° and 60° up, measured from a point in the middle of the floor. This means a sill height of 2.13 m for pictures and a viewing range of 3.00- 3.65m for sculpture.

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The average American museum visitor, if a man, is about 5 ft 9 1/4 in tall, and his eye level is 5 ft 4 3/4 in ; the average woman is about 5 ft 3 1/4 in tall, and her eye level is 4 ft 11 ¾ in . Thus, the mean adult eye-level height is about 5 ft 2 1/4 in . With little eye movement, people usually see and recognize with ease things that are within an approximately elliptical cone of vision, with the apex of the cone at the eyelevel height .

The next step in the planning of a museum is the working relationship between these various functions . The planning of a good museum must reflect the most efficient manner in which the various tasks are carried out individually and in relationship to each other, without one adversely affecting the other. A major consideration in this planning is the matter of future expansion and construction in several stages .

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In new buildings, this experience leads to more value being placed on reversibility, in order to be able to react better to the ever-shorter innovation cycles of office technology. This leads to buildings which can be divided into user units of varying sizes without great inconvenience or even permit a combination of production and administration (start-up centres) .

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The changed values regarding the workplace, plus high energy prices, are leading to new architectural forms with building elements intended to provide temperature regulation and natural ventilation (conservatories, halls, double facades).

Workplace According to the new Workplace Regulations, there are no longer any fixed minimum dimensions for workplaces. But the requirements of the accident insurers and the fact that all workplaces today have computer screens means that the minimum dimensions in the relevant standards and regulations apply.

Referance : Neufert, Architecture Date, 3rd Edition

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Types of offices Offices : can be categorised according to size and occupation into two types: single rooms and open -plan offices. All further types are variations and different arrangements of these basic types.

Furniture areas : the standard no longer prescribes fixed dimensions for workplaces, but requires sufficient working and movement areas for changing positions at work and for the individually adaptable placing of work equipment. The assignments of various areas are differentiated by the standard; however, they can overlap if this results in no limitation of the function. The areas are: - work area: table - shelf area: plan area of the furniture - furniture function area: space required for doors and drawers - movement area at the workstation - traffic and through –passages.

Forms of office and work : The office's form and thus its room layout are part of a system influenced by activity, procedural organisation, IT technology and company culture. The building structure and design of rooms can have a significant influence on the use. Efficiency gains can result from factors like reduction of the area per

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workstation, rooms designed to support procedures and improve motivation, for which emotional factors above all are decisive, like material and colour ideas, but also the provision of quiet and communication areas for formal and informal meetings. The analysis of requirements can produce valuable pointers to possible forms of office.

Workspaces are where elements such as computer screen, keyboards and document or sound recording device are decisive for dealing with the work. Computer workstations are not based on one standard solution but according to the specific work procedure (e.g. information point, data entry point etc.).

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Grid : Grid module spacings define possible room sizes through the resulting spacing of columns and fagades. The fitting out and fagade grids must be the same in order to enable the partitions to connect to the windows. Modular dimension 1.50 m This is the economical module dimension for single-room offices consisting mainly of double workstations. Modular dimension 1.35 m Room widths of 3.80 m (-18 m2 usable area) enable Partitions The junctions of light partitions demand particular attention to noise reduction.

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Music/Art facilities can be divided into two general classifications depending upon their function : those used for instructional activities end those serving in an auxiliary capacity such as storage areas, workrooms, and offices . A typical large music facility for an institution of higher education will require a wide variety of rooms and work areas . The needs of elementary and secondary schools will probably be somewhat less but will incorporate many of these functional areas . Instructional areas        

Rehearsal halls Practice rooms Class piano rooms Regular classrooms Listening facilities Studios Recital hall Combinations

Auxiliary areas     

Storage areas Music library Work rooms Broadcast control booth Additional facilities

Referance : Time Saver Standards For Architecture Design Data 2nd Edition

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Precedents (Some Studios Around The World With Dimensions & Specs.)

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Cartoon Network Studios in Burbank, California. Designed by STUDIOS Architects.

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Pixar Animation Studios in Emeryville, California. Designed by Allied Works Architetcure.

The main entrance and main path is in red. The secondary paths are in orange. All of the public spaces are acceible from the main path.

The public areas and private ares are kept separate by doors and walls. The private areas are along the perimeter of the building mostly. The public areas are the first thing you see coming in from the main entrance.

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It is preferable to group larger lecture theatres for central lectures in separate complexes. Smaller lecture theatres for lectures on specialist subjects are better in the individual department and institute buildings. Access to the lecture theatre is separated from the research facilities, with short routes and entrances from outside at the back of the lecture hall; for raked seating entrances can be behind the top row and larger theatres can also have them in the centre on each side . Lecturers enter at the front, from the preparation room, from

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where equipment carrying the experimental animals can also be trollied into the lecture theater. Usual sizes for lecture theatres: 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800 seats. Theatres with up to 200 seats have a ceiling height of 3.50 m and are integrated into the departmental buildings, if larger they are better in a separate building.

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Room dimensions : The maximum number of pupils in a class is 32. According to the school building guidelines, the design of classrooms should normally be based on tables with two workplaces If the windows are all on one side, the max. room depth is 7.20 m. If possible, have windows on both sides to permit furniture to be freely positioned. The distance between the blackboard and the pupil workplaces at the back should not exceed 9.00 m The ceiling height of classrooms (min. 3 m) may not be reduced by more than 0.30 m by individual construction elements.

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Teaching Area : This includes teaching, teaching/practical, practical, preparation and meeting rooms, photo work and photo lab rooms. Teaching rooms for biology, physics and chemistry approx. 2.50 m2/place. For lectures and demonstrations approx. 4.50 m2/place. Demonstration and practical room for natural sciences, chemistry and biology, and physics, chemistry and biology approx.70-80 m2 Teaching room for lecturing and demonstrations in the subjects physics, biology and perhaps chemistry approx. 60 m2 , with permanently installed, ascending auditorium seating. A second entrance and exit may be necessary. This room may be in an internal location with artificial lighting. Practical room for pupils, collaborating groups etc. in biology and physics or also interdisciplinary practical area, space subdivided by means of partitioning, area per room or section approx. 80m2. Preparation, meeting and materials room for subject combinations or single subjects: together approx. 30-40 m2 or approx. 70 m2, according to the size of the science area. This room may be in an internal location with artificial lighting.

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Basic space requirements for all subjects : Lecture theatre for basic and special lectures, seminar and tutorial rooms (partially with PC workplaces) for detailed instruction of the course material, specialised libraries, rooms for scientific assistants, conference and examination rooms.

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This plans are recommended for single-aisle vaults up to 14' inside clear widths . Interior vault dimensions should be established in accordance with individual requirements and the emergency vault ventilator should be located through a convenient wall area that is exposed inside the building . Location of the vault alarm control cabinet is designed [sic] by "A" and should be recessed in the vault wall when if interferes with the removal of the bond boxes . When the vault width is 14' or more, refer to double- or multiple-aisle vault plans .

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Show how parking spaces can be creatively integrated into their surroundings without restricting their use. Parking spaces can be completely or partially sunken or provided with roof planting to increase the area of open space. Planting not only enhances the look of the area, but also provides shade and improves the environment by absorbing dust.

TOILET STALL : A 5' x 5' stall is usable by most people and has the following requirements.     

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Stall must be 5 x 5 ft W.C . center line is 1 ft 6 in from side wall 32 in door diagonally opposite W.C . Handrail extends 1 ft 6 in in front of W.C .1'/2 in O.D ., 1 t/2 in from wall, 13 in above seat Standard partition toe clearance.


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Sight Lines : The horizontal angle to the center line at which objects onstage, upstage of the curtain line, cease to bear the intended relationship to other objects onstage and to the background is approximately 60°. The horizontal angle to the projection screen at which distortion on the screen becomes substantially intolerable is 60° . (b) Based on the ability to recognize shapes and confirmed by sequential seat selection of unreserved seats, the order of desirability of locations is: A, front center, except when the picture screen is close to the front row; B, middle center ; C, middle side ; 0, front side ; E, rest center ; F, rear side . (c) Audiences will not choose locations beyond a line approximately 100° to the curtain at the proscenium . The shaded Brass contain undesirable seats.

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(a) Maximum tolerable upward sight line angle for motion pictures. (b) Maximum angle determines location of closest seats. (c) Basic dimensions for plotting floor slope.

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Arrangement : "Front" or public areas, and "backstage" or work groups, constitute the two major elements . Spectators should find everything necessary for their needs accessible from the foyer once they have presented tickets . Included are toilets, coatrooms, drinking fountains, lounges, and smoking areas The lobby should provide waiting space and circulation to areas other than the theater, which may be contained in the building . The manager's office is convenient if adjacent to the box office and accessible from the lobby . In the work group, control of the stage entrance will avoid interference from unauthorized persons and facilities.

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The proscenium stage at Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, N.Y . Architect : Marcel Breuer . Consultants : Stanley C . McCandless, E . C . Cole, Sidney K . Wolfe . This multipurpose auditorium (capacity 500) is steeply raked and the stage floor is low to allow better audience perspective, especially for dance performances . Alternate rows of seats are removable to permit installation of tables or desks . The lighting gallery is close to the stage so that the control board operator's sight lines are similar to those of the spectators . The backstage wall opens onto tennis courts so the stage may be used for outdoor performances, commencement exercises, and special events

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Space Program Key .. PB : Public S.PB : Semi Public W.S : Work Space P : Private

*Note : Toilets , Storages & Other Services Spaces was added at the end of the table in the stage of additions, specifically “Circulation & Services”

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Net Square Footage : 3870 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 5031 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 5805 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 6192 M2 Gross Square Footage = 6270 M2

Net Square Footage : 5630 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 7320 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 8445 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 9010 M2 Gross Square Footage = 9120 M2

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Net Square Footage : 2410 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 3133 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 3615 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 3856 M2 Gross Square Footage = 3900 M2

Net Square Footage : 2150 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 2795 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 3225 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 3440 M2 Gross Square Footage = 3480 M2

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Net Square Footage : 1960 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 2548 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 2940 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 3140 M2 Gross Square Footage = 3180 M2

“ُ‫“ ”و ِ َصال‬Wesal” Full Calculations .. Net Square Footage : 16020 M2 30% Circulation : 5340 M2 Net Occupiable Square Footage : 21360 M2 20% Efficiency : 4272 M2 Nosf With Efficiency : 25632 M2 10% Mechnical : 2563 M2 Nosf With Efficiency + 10% = 513 M2 Gross Square Footage = 28708 M2

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“ُ‫“ ”و ِ َصال‬Wesal” Conclusion ..   

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The total gross square footage = 29000 m2 Project Site is 40,000 m2 & it’s Allowed To Build in 30% [12,000] SO … The Project Will be Constructed on 3 Floors A.B. .. [B + GR + 1st + 2nd ]


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PB : Public S.PB : Semi Public W.S : Work Space P : Private

Y : Yes M : Maybe N : No

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Key …

PB : Public

S.PB : Semi Public

Y : Yes

M : Maybe

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W.S : Work Space N : No

P : Private


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Entertainment Part

Start-Ups/Studios Part


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Training Center Part

Adminstration Part

Other Services


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Collective Buble Diagram


Impacts Affecting The Project’s Site …

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Arrangment Of The Project Parts On The Site According To The Previous Impacts

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Functional Zoning (Horizontal & Vertical)

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Functional Zoning (Horizontal & Vertical)

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1- https://climate.nasa.gov/causes/ 2- https://www.csbe.org/climate-change-and-global-warming 3- https://ecosphere.plus/the-science-of-climate-change/ 4- https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-convention/what-is-the-united-nationsframework-convention-on-climate-change 5- https://ourworldindata.org/ 6- https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/ 7- https://en-us.topographic-map.com/maps/khb/Myrtle-Beach/ 8- https://www.openstreetmap.org/\ 9- https://drajmarsh.bitbucket.io/sunpath3d.html 10- Google Maps 11- Google Earth Pro 12- Trimble SketchUp Terrien Map 13- https://www.archdaily.com/889575/unstudio-wins-frances-largest-privatearchitecture-competition-for-cultural-cinema-center-in-europacity 14- https://www.archdaily.com/770431/pratt-institutes-new-film-video-departmentbuilding-wasa-studio-a 15- https://www.archdaily.com/801370/pathways-innovation-center-cuningham-grouparchitecture-plus-moa 16- https://educationsnapshots.com/projects/1172/pathways-innovation-center-roosevelthigh-school/ 17- https://www.moaarch.com/project/pathways-innovation-center-roosevelt-alternativehigh-school/ 18- https://www.archdaily.com/972151/scion-innovation-hub-rta-studio-plus-irvingsmith-architects?ad_source=search&ad_medium=projects_tab 19- https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/latest/127216986/scion-innovation-hub-byrta-studio-and-irving-smith-architects-wins-at-world-architecture-festival 20- http://www.isarchitects.nz/projects/scion-timber-innovation-hub 21- https://www.archdaily.com/317945/huaihua-theater-and-exhibition-center-proposalunited-design-group 22- https://www.pinterest.com/pin/230105862203752117/ 23- https://www.pinterest.com/pin/16677461105497481/ 24- https://www.pinterest.com/pin/81838918219304574/ 25- https://i.pinimg.com/originals/23/c0/2a/23c02a942c05d3cdcd3d8ecab1ea3389.jpg 26- https://www.archdaily.com/924772/cinema-de-riom-tracks 27- http://www.johnlsayers.com/Pages/Left_Bank.htm 28- http://www.secretgardenrecording.com/about/ 29- https://www.archdaily.com/952090/pantera-filmes-studio-matuarquitetura?ad_source=search&ad_medium=projects_tab 30- https://www.archdaily.com/353207/santa-monica-animation-studio-gwynne-pughurban-studio

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31- https://www.archdaily.com/55686/performance-capture-studio-kanner-architectslorcan-o%25e2%2580%2599herlihy-architects 32- https://www.world-architects.com/en/architecture-news/reviews/santa-monicaanimation-studio 33- https://jcastillotheoreticaldesign.blogspot.com/2012/09/uses-and-circulation.html 34- Time Saver Standards For Building Types 2nd Edition (Joseph De Chiara & John Callender) 35- Time Saver Standards For Architecture Design Data ( Donald Watson Michael J. Crosbie John Hancock Callender ) 36- Neufert Architect’s Data 3 rd Ernest And Peter Neufert 37- Neufert Architect’s Data 4 th Edition Ernest And Peter Neufert 38- Time Saver Standards For Building Types 3rd Edition (Joseph De Chiara & John Callender) 39- Space Planning Basics 3rd Edition ( Mark karlen ) 40- The Metric Handbook Architecture , xford auckland boston johannesburg melbourne , David Adler 41- https://egy-map.com/project/%D8%AC%D8%A7%D9%85%D8%B9%D8%A9%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D9%86%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84%D9%8A%D8%A9 42- http://www.mhuc.gov.eg/Programs/Index/133 43- http://www.mhuc.gov.eg/Programs/Index/133 44- https://www.presidency.eg/ar/2030%D9%85%D8%B5%D8%B1/%D8%B1%D8%A4%D9%8A%D8%A9%D9%85%D8%B5%D8%B1 45- https://www.capmas.gov.eg/

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