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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The guidance and support received from all the members who contributed to this project, was vital for its success. We would like to take this opportunity to express our gratitude to the people who have been instrumental in the successful completion of this project. First and foremost, we would like to show our greatest appreciation to Prof. Dr. Ashraf Abdel Mohsen. We cannot thank you enough for your tremendous support and help. Also, Prof. Somaya Bahy El Din, Prof. Walid Shoura, Eng. Amr Hassib and Eng. Raef Fahmi, your guidance and support is what kept us going throughout this project. We must not also fail to mention our TAs who have been nothing but encouraging and believed in us at all times, Eng. Mohamed Abdel Aziz, Eng. Heba Soliman, Eng. Mariam Mourad and Eng. Somaya Rajab, thank you. We also send our gratitude to Dr. Mohammed Gabr, the Dean of the Architectural Department, who has allowed this educational experiment to take place this year and has embraced it with nothing but words of encouragement. Last but not least, a special thanks goes out to our families. Words cannot express how grateful we are to our mothers, fathers and siblings for their constant support and encouragement. We would not be where we are today without your sacrifices and love.

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INDEX Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................1 Chapter I: Introduction & Design process.......................................................................................................5 Introduction...........................................................................................................................................6 Planning.....................................................................................................................................................8 Vision.............................................................................................................................................8 Mission.......................................................................................................................8 G o a l s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Action plan..................................................................................................................................................................................9 Design process........................................................................................................................................................12 Research phase.......................................................................................................................................................12 Workshop...........................................................................................................................................................15 Design phase 2........................................................................................................................................................16 Design phase 3........................................................................................................................................................18 Project plan..............................................................................................................................................................19 Chapter II: Research Summary......................................................................................................................21 Prefeasibility study.................................................................................................................................................22 Site analysis.............................................................................................................................................................24 Urban and architectural samples.........................................................................................................................32 Landscape design...................................................................................................................................................38 Interior design........................................................................................................................................................39 Sustainability and eco system..............................................................................................................................40 Learning system.....................................................................................................................................................42 Design standards criteria......................................................................................................................................42 Chapter II: The Project...................................................................................................................................53 Vision and learning system...................................................................................................................................54 Design concept.......................................................................................................................................................58 Project master plan................................................................................................................................................62 Zoning.............................................................................................................................................65 Circulation.............................................................................................................................................66 Levels.............................................................................................................................................67 Solid and void.........................................................................................................................................................................68 2

Green areas..............................................................................................................................................................................69 Schools Zone...........................................................................................................................................................70 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................73 Architectural concept...........................................................................................................................................................75 Landscape concept...............................................................................................................................................................86 Interior study...........................................................................................................................................................................91 Technical Zone........................................................................................................................................................92 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................95 Architectural concept...........................................................................................................................................................97 Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................102 Interior study........................................................................................................................................................................107 Colleges Zone.......................................................................................................................................................108 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................111 Architectural concept........................................................................................................................................................113 Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................118 Interior study.........................................................................................................................................................................123 The Downtown Zone...........................................................................................................................................124 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................127 Architectural concept........................................................................................................................................................129 Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................142 Interior study.........................................................................................................................................................................147 The Farm Zone......................................................................................................................................................150 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................153 Architectural concept........................................................................................................................................................155 Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................158 Interior study.........................................................................................................................................................................162 Sports Zone...........................................................................................................................................................164 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................167 Architectural concept........................................................................................................................................................169 Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................171 Interior study.........................................................................................................................................................................175 Residential Zone...................................................................................................................................................176 Orientation.....................................................................................................................................................................................179 Architectural concept........................................................................................................................................................181 3


Landscape concept............................................................................................................................................................184 Interior study.........................................................................................................................................................................186 Physical Model......................................................................................................................................................188 Project initial cost.................................................................................................................................................190 Total Cost.................................................................................................................................................................................197 Summary.................................................................................................................................................198 Project members.........................................................................................................................................200

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION AND DESIGN PROSSES

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INTRODUCTION A Nation’s Development starts with raising its educational value.

and that’s because of his inability to accommodate all the project requirements compared to his potentials , we’re talking about extra financial burden on parents too .

That’s why, Faculty of Engineering Department of Architecture Ain shams University, took the step to initiate the educational system development plan. Graduation project 2014 was chosen to be the first executive step, with a vision of extension to all universities and colleges of Egypt.

On the other hand we find that the resulting experience from such projects far from what is needed in labor market as teamwork experience and working under pressure of coordinating between several parties. Moreover, these projects are mostly unenforceable and don’t serve the community in anyway.

LOCATION has been chosen near Qattara Depression in an effort to solve overcrowding problem & transfer population creeping outside Cairo.

Those problems aren’t the only, they are just the ones that were visible and in need for quick intervention, new graduation project system seeks to solve not only them, but flexible enough to solve any other problems.

The region has been divided into 5 zones so that each zone represents a separate graduation project studio. There were 2 different work styles that have been applied. Thus, the work within each of the four studios which are the cultural, commercial, healthcare and sports is based on the division of each studio to separate working groups, each group of 5-4 members with a specific task for each member knowing that it’s allowed to switch tasks throughout the project phases if needed.

We, as members of educational studio, are honored to be working on the first project of its kind that is executable and serves such a great vision.

THE EDUCATIONAL STUDIO was based on integrated team work to combine the abilities and

talents of 28 students into one team to present a homogeneous detailed large scale project allowing the students to choose the most appropriate task for their abilities, so that each student is being put in his proper place to reach the required efficiency in such projects. In the application of the idea, we also find that it achieves the experience needed for the real work such as group work experience and exchanging experience with staff and well-experienced experts in different work aspects, there comes experienced students in different fields goes along with what is needed in the market. Another positive aspect is that the project cost is no longer the responsibility of a one single student, but is the responsibility of an entire group work of 28. Finally, quality and applicability of the project has become a concern, instead of producing unstudied amount of outputs that is not executable.

THE NEW GRADUATION PROJECT system aims to decrease the gap between the education system and the labor market, encourage students for teamwork, put each student on his appropriate place to reach the greatest possible efficiency, last but not least, reduce the financial burden on each student. Back to the old Graduation project system which has always been a burden to all its stakeholders from several aspects. We find the student seeks to finish the project even by illegal ways as accepting help for a fee 6

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PLANNING IS BRINGING THE FUTURE INTO THE PRESENT SO THAT YOU CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT NOW.

VISION «EGYPT DEVELOPMENT THROUGH BEING TRANSFERRED FROM A CENTRALIZED STATE TO A DECENTRALIZED ONE .»

MISSION • Create new cities that change the perspective of centralization. • Motivate the government to distribute Non-sovereign ministries all over the republic.

GOALS • • • • •

Create the first educational city in the Middle East. Aim to build a healthcare city to be the main node for treatment discovery and applying it. Have the biggest sport complex aiming to attract Athletes from all over the world. Egypt, to become the industry castle in the Middle East region and the continent of Africa. Set up new residential environments suit the elements and the huge potentials of Egypt, depends on local materials and new techniques compatible with the environment. • Build new tourist cities covering all tourism attraction aspects in an effort to become the highest ranking globally. • Aim to have a Cultural city that aims to raise cultural awareness in the first place, and seeks to extend its role to the art birth all over the world.

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ACTION PLAN » Build the first educational city in the Middle East that reflects a new integrated educational system. 11. Study the different learning systems with the highest ranking internationally. The first step that was found the best to start with was understanding different educational systems applied all over the world, such a step was to help us know where we exist and which step is the next. The search came up with learning systems applied in schools and colleges in different countries, each with its advantages and disadvantages, a comparison between them was made to make the maximum benefit of each piece of information gathered. At the end of this research we were able to make a recommendation for a system that suits our needs by which we can later put a system that represents us. 22. Make a detailed study for the current situation in Egypt. Knowing where we are is the most important step to define the problem. To make this study it needed to gather information from trustworthy parties in the country such as ministries and other governmental agencies. Then comes the analysis, each problem needs to be well-understood and all data need to be analyzed well, at the end of this stage we have a conclusion of what educational problems we are facing and which are the best solutions for it, this is an integration between the study of top ranked learning systems and the current situation. 33. Create an educational system that fits the needs and the requirements of the country and its citizens. Starting this step with a recommended learning system has shortened a lot of effort would be done just to understand the base by which we will establish a system for our own. As the current situation clarified outlines for problems we face, so the next step was a brainstorming workshop that aims to figure out the best solutions for this problems, to make alternatives for learning systems that fit the society needs. It was meant to end up with an educational system integrated from the different alternatives, to be approved by concerned authorities.

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44. Collect information about the chosen site and any necessary data. In an attempt to start the project it’s a must to have all the data about the site, the conditions that characterize it and how it will affect the design process, the potentials located there to be well-exploited, and even the history that might be an inspiration for architecture, landscape and interior design later. Analyzing this data is one of the most effective steps to get ready to the design process. 55. Begin putting the design concept outline. A new learning system in an educational project requires an identity for itself, this is showed up through the design concept of the project which might be applied on the building 3d form or any other design element. And in order to reach for the project concept, a research for inspirational data should be made, and after reaching for the main idea of the project, we should go deeply in the research to gather reliable information about the concept. 66. Start the design process of the city with all its contents. After specifying the project design concept, it comes to the design process itself where we go deeply into the project through its architectural data and details in order to achieve the maximum benefits for the user through using resources of the project site.

1111 Preparation for the project execution. Or (Take all the necessary actions to start the project execution.) A more detailed action plan that sets the small steps needed to execute the project must be determined, knowing the requirements of each step to be provided so that the project will be executed on time. 1212 Start the execution as it was agreed in the schedule. Here is the step where we meet the result of our efforts and deal with the project on the ground. 1313Prepare for the next phase as an expansion for the project idea all over the country. As it was decided to expand the idea all over Egypt, so the next step is to figure out the steps we need to replace the learning system of schools, colleges and technical institutes with the new learning system and also with the new architectural and urban design that expresses our vision and identity. Graduation project 2014, this is by no mean the end, it’s just the first step to solve the problems, the way is still too long.

77. Design development phase where we work deeply in the project so it become executable. Reconsider the architectural problems that was found in the design process to be developed In order to solve these problems, so that the project gets closer to the opportunity of being executed. 88. Make a well-prepared feasibility study and an initial cost for the project. In the end of the design process and after knowing all about the project and its contents, a feasibility study should be done in order to define space program that represents the project concept and the new learning system, and also to determine the initial cost needed to start the project. 99. Determine a clear timetable for the project execution phases showing the logical sequence of its phases. Before starting to execute the project a schedule that clarify a dead line for each phase should be done to know the sequence of executing phases and how that will benefit the project. 1010Looking for sponsors to encourage and support us financially. After finishing the project design and in order to execute it, stakeholders must search for sponsors that will help in funding the project through its execution phases.

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DESIGN PROCESS The work within the project started with a RESEARCH made in order to gather all the information needed to start the design process. The research was done in several aspects in parallel to reach the maximum valuable data in less time. Studio members were divided into 12 groups, 8 of them were meant to make the full detailed research that represents all the data needed later in the project.

The site analysis group started to figure out the potentials in the site and all about its conditions whether nature or climatic conditions. Another group was meant to search for architectural and landscape standards and to collect the needed data for spaces to be designed in our project, such a data wasn’t found in data books so it took an effort to reach up-to-dated data. A research about sustainable systems made to figure out the best that suites the site potentials, also to know about sustainable materials fits the site conditions, and up-to-dated and futuristic structure systems. And one of the most important researches was about the top ranked learning systems all over the world and a comparison between them shortened the effort done to suggest a new learning system for the republic. Other researches made for examples, landscape and interior gathered information needed for the design process for our new educational city. Then pre- feasibility study was made as a first step to go deeply in the design.

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In order to bring out the best of the research, a coordination team was formed of 3 members whom job was to coordinate between researches to avoid repeating effort of searching for a piece of information for 2 or 3 times separately, that when sustainability team needs data about the site conditions to find out the best systems that suit it, they don’t have to search for it, they just contact with coordination team in order to get them the needed data from site analysis group. To make sure the research comes up with the best quality it could be, a documentation group of 5 members worked as a quality control team, responsible for checking data collected and make sure nothing is repeated, such a huge research exerted a lot of effort to ingather it in a one integrated meaningful research. Documentation group was also responsible for documenting all phases graphically and also written, also they check each member’s work to make sure all the members fulfill their tasks and guarantee for all their rights. Last but not least they were meant to present the work done by the rest of the group by making templates for all to work on, then gather it all to present it well as a whole.

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A WORKSHOP was held for 2 weeks as a brainstorming to a learning system that expresses our identity

and solves our own educational problems. experts from various fields participated in the workshop to benefit us with their valuable experiences, it took the most time to discuss about educational problems we face and the best way we see to solve it, also discussions about the way we want Egypt to become, how we see it before, now and in the future, all these discussions led us to conception for the learning system we would like to have in Egypt. Analyzing data that was gathered in the learning systems research was the next step to get closer of what we want, we came up with two visions for suitable learning systems for the republic, each with its positives and negatives, so it was logical to compare between them to come up with a learning system that reflects the most our identity and flexible enough to solve our own problems.

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At this stage, some of us were working on the initial space program of the whole project in parallel with the learning system creation and in cooperation with coordination team, a space program that represents our vision and imagination for the future was made, and at the workshop closing a learning system with its space program was done and an outline for the design concept of the project was made.

Both documentation and coordination team kept doing their job as in the first phase and that was a good enough to evaluate the whole phase, that’s why At the end of the phase there was a criticism made to know our positives to go for it, and our negatives to be avoided next phases.

IN THE BEGINNING OF PHASE 2 of the project, the design expert helped us in developing the design concept through several follow up, till we reached the concept that applies the vision, we started to get deeper to understand about how the concept will be applied as a function, a division into 7 groups working on 7 zones representing the idea of the flower of life, we kept working on the zones in parallel with developing the design concept and the master plan. The design was going back and forth between the concept and the function, it took us back to the research phase to improve the design concept based on reliable information and then applying this concept on a purely functional project. Also the master plan design was being done in parallel with the 7 zones design. Through the phase it was required to make a physical Maquette including all the 7 zones, all the studio member worked on it so it represented a really great effort.

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Then we found ourselves into the very deep of the design process. Where the design took a massive step ahead.

THIS WAS PHASE 3, it was for developing the design to represent the idea of the project. Coordination team with the help of teaching assistants, thought it would be better changing the teamwork division in order to avoid facing the same obstacles we faced in the previous phase which was working on master plan in parallel with the 7 zones. That took a very long time and effort to reach a product. So it was decided to work in a division of new 5 teams, a 2D team who is responsible for all the 2D drawings of the project including plans, sections and layouts. A 3D group was meant to work on all the exterior 3D models, master plan 3d and combining them all as a one 3D to render it with the same quality. Another team for landscape working on landscape details for the whole project to be done with the same spirit, there was also an interior team working on the interior of some important spaces in the project such as classrooms, lecture halls, kindergarten and many other essential spaces. the last one is the book team which is responsible for documenting the idea of the graduation project, the whole project with all its phases, the journey it took us through, and the final project itself with all its details, inside this team there were 2 different tasks, the 1st is to design the book with all its contents and the other is to present the whole experience in light words to the point, or writing down the experience itself. Passing through several follow ups through this phase, we were put on the right track to reach the best physical output in the end.

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WHEN WE GO DEEPER INTO THE PROJECT, A MORE SPECIALIZED PLAN COMES INTO COUNT.

VISION «DEVELOP THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN EGYPT TO MEET WORLD STANDARDS OF QUALIT Y EDUCATION AND CONSEQUENTLY DEVELOP THE ENTIRE NATION.»

MISSION • • • • •

D EVELOP THE CURRENT EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM. EXCHANGING EXPERIENCES BET WEEN STAFF AND STUDENTS (DIFFERENT SKILLS). PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNIT Y FOR STUDENTS TO GAIN MARKET EXPERIENCE. EXPLOIT STUDENTS EFFORTS TO BE EXERTED ON A REAL PROJECT. BUILD A SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN AROUND THE WORLD TO MAKE THEM READY WITH DIFFERENT KNOWLEDGE.

GOALS • DEVELOP WELL ROUNDED INDIVIDUALS THAT ARE CAPABLE OF FINDING AND SERVING THEIR ROLE IN THE COMMUNIT Y. • BUILD A SUSTAINABLE EDUCATIONAL VILLAGE CAMPUS • PROVIDE THE RESIDENTS OF NEFERTARI WITH JOB OPPORTUNITIES • AT TRACT INVESTORS TO START PROJECTS IN NEFERTARI AND TAKE PART IN ITS SUSTAINABLE DE VELOPMENT.

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CHAPTER II RESEARCH SUMMARY

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PRE-FEASIBILITY STUDY A prefeasibility study (P.F.S) is a preliminary study undertaken to determine if it would be worthwhile to proceed to the feasibility study stage. So in order to start our pre-feasibility study for the Educational Project, we needed to look at specialized researches made in this field as this is the first time that we deal with it, we looked at several examples and that’s how It became clear to us of what we should do and what is it for. In order to understand the examples we are viewing, we started to study and analyze the site deeply, also made a study of the project goal for all economic, social, political and cultural aspects, then understanding the aim of the project from the same mentioned aspects. the main aim of The P.F.S results provided in this research was to demonstrate a technical platform and economic justification To set up the project On the basis of all the engineering studies, cost estimates, price scenarios and economic analysis performed as part of this P.F.S, we believe that the main objective of the establishment of the project is the production of a new education system with new concepts. We started to work in that study through doing a summary for the project that includes A simple explanation for project introduction, Property Description for the site , Property Ownership for the land as it’s owned by the government till now, summary study for Project Location, its Accessibility, Climate and local recourses to explain Current status of the site, roads and transportation up to the project and its future status in 2050 that will pass by international roads and railway lines and some new airports. Local recourses study was made as Archaeological and cultural tourism, Beach tourism, Medical Tourism, Safari tourism. Then we started to make a schedule for the work on the project during the coming period. Moving to the second phase of the P.F.S which is a complete introduction to the project includes an explanation of the project scope, and also includes the current status of education in Egypt compared to South Korea to show the shortcomings of the Egyptian education system Compared to some of the top ranked countries in the world and how to begin facing these problems. The comparison included the Population of 2 countries, STATISTICS, PHASES OF EDUCATION, Average class size in primary education, Average educational days, NEGATIVES of 2 system, state of TEACHERS in 2 countries and the exams techniques. Then came the third phase which is about PROPERTY DESCRIPTION for location, A detailed study of the site by maps provided by the Ministry of Environment and the Ministry of Transportation and also Introduction 22

maps of vision 712 To view the (Location- Current status of the site, Access, Road network that will serve the project, Future status of the site -Physiographic- Climate and Local Resources-Infrastructure. Then the most important step came into account, the SWOT analysis of the current status of the project, this was to understand the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threatens of the project in order to know what should be done and what should be considered. And then we had to decide a Proposed Capacity so we had to look at the population pyramid of Egypt that determines the number of students applying for each stage by the population pyramid of the city. Based on this pyramid made in (2010), nearly 30 million are enrolled in the educational process (aged 4-23) equivalent to 39% . Using the same ratio for a city with 3 million population, nearly 1,17 million students should be enrolled in the educational process the result is this city will be: • Nearly 600,000 students should be enrolled in primary schools • Nearly 270,000 students should be enrolled in preparatory schools • Nearly 190,000 students should be enrolled in secondary schools • Nearly 110,000 students should be enrolled in universities Based on the ideal students/class ratios: • Nearly 24000-30000 classrooms needed for primary schools • Nearly 15000-18000 classrooms needed for preparatory schools • Nearly 15000-16000 classrooms needed for secondary schools So we had to limit the number of students at every stage in our project, this was done through the study and analysis of similar projects in the area and vision.The most important examples was ( Branksome Hall Asia Jeju Global Education City ), the result is based on the ideal example ratios & proportions . Project Site : 670000 m2 • Nearly 10000 students should be enrolled in our educational project • Nearly 5000 students enrolled in primary schools • 200-250 primary classes needed • Nearly 2400 students enrolled in preparatory schools • 135-160 preparatory classes needed • Nearly 1600 students enrolled in secondary schools • 130-140 secondary classes needed • Nearly 1000 students enrolled in universities 23


SITE ANALYSIS the first step to solve a problem is to understand it well. That’s why the site analysis for a project is considered as the most important step where we could understand the site and know how to deal with it. In order to understand the site a SWOT analysis was made to clarify the strengths and weaknesses of the site, which will help in knowing the best way to make use of the site and its resources, also to know the site opportunities and its threatens to be able to take design decisions based on reliable information. based on Nefertari ( 1 ) 712 vision, The selected location has lots of potential including economic, industrial and agricultural. It is located near the New Delta region which will be formed using the old Delta deposits dismissal in the western desert. It is considered one of the most promising areas for agricultural use with reclamation area about 300 thousand feddan and a large industrial area. The site is located on Qattara Depression and the new Delta, area is 70000 feddan, 294 million m2,It is situated 200 km west of Cairo, 80 km south of Alamein, The center of the city is about 3000 feddan.

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Access to Nefertari The site can easily be accessible by some international highways that connect different countries and pass by the project site such as Morocco to Jordan, Saudi Arabia to Congo and Nefertari to South Africa. • The National roads network of the project are To Cairo, Alexandria, Alamein, Fayoum, and Nefertari 2. • Airports: Alamein, Burj Al-Arab, Maatan frin and Nefertari. • Harbor: Alamein and Alexandria.

Africa Super-Fast Train: 1,200 Km Egypt - 8,200 Km total

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Resources Getting to know the resources of the site was an important step taken to construct the best solutions for the site conditions, it guided us in our search for our suitable systems and design standards that fit the site and its resources to make the most out of it . This study also helped us determine the types of colleges we need in our campus that would exploit these resources and help develop functional solutions. Resources were clarified as networks to make it easy for being understood. • Water recourses network

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• Agricultural Resources Wheat, Olive, Barley, Palm. • Water Resources: Rainwater, Groundwater, Water transferred from the River Nile. • Mining resources Petroleum and Natural Gas. • Tourism resources Archaeological and cultural tourism, Beach tourism, Medical Tourism, and Safari tourism. • Energy recourses network

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Neighborhood context The project site is located in the city center. It lies next to the central park, the entertainment zone, the business park and a residential area. This wide variety of activities works in favor of the project as it helps connect it to different types of users stressing on the importance of integrating with the community.

Dimensions Area = 160 feddan = 672000 m² The project site is almost a square in shape which guided the architecture of the master plan in a centralized manner. Also there was a green plot to the east of our project which we used for the farm zone.

Sensory The Educational Village campus has visual access to the central park which is a great advantage. However, it also has audible access from the entertainment zone which is perceived as a disadvantage and must be treated with a buffer zone that prevents noise coming from that area.

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Climate analysis The climate of the region can be considered as an example of the dry climate of the desert areas, which is characterized by lack of rain, high temperatures in summer and sunshine intensity, the average temperature for the hottest month is 36 째C in July and the coldest month is 14 째C in December. Wind prevailing in this region is from the North and deviates a little bit to take the direction of the Northwest which affects the orientation of buildings. It was found that for linear buildings, the long side should be oriented towards North for maximum natural ventilation and minimum heat gain.

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URBAN AND ARCHITECTURAL SAMPLES In parallel with gathering information for the project, we had to search for similar examples to get to know what has the world come up with. So we started searching for schools and universities examples that are well-designed visually. But then we discovered that we must have other criteria that affects the design of these educational buildings. The learning system and its effect on design and the students’ needs in the space were good criteria to start with. This was the keyword that helped us to go deeper in the research. We first searched for schools examples and University campuses in the top ranked Countries in learning systems. Then we chose 4 school examples, two of them were boarding schools and the other two were day schools, and 3 examples for university campuses. The next step was starting to analyze each example, this was through several points, and the First was a comparison about the world ranking of each school/university, the location of each example, the architect that designed it and in which year it was completed. Also we talked about areas, land budget, land uses, facilities and student capacities, this analysis was made as charts in order to read and use it easily when needed. 2nd we talked about the Architectural concept for each example, also viewed the effect of learning system on the Philosophy of architecture which will help us when we start to make our own design philosophy. We displayed also the new architectural and urban spaces with their purposes and the effect of Materials and structure on learning environment. Finally we made conclusion charts on schools/colleges campus which included the average land budget for schools / University campus , land uses and also included recommendations for new spaces which can be used in our project and some design concepts for architectural and urban spaces In schools and colleges.

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Schools

Colleges

2250 = 25-30% Academic 4500 = 40-50% Urban Spaces 2500 = 20-30% Housing 45 = 4-5% Services

2250 = 25-30% Academic 4500 = 40-50% Urban Spaces 2500 = 20-30% Housing 45 = 4-5% Services

Land budget boarding schools 65-70% Land budget schools 40-60%

Land budget universities campus 30-40% ( changes according to extension areas)

New features: • Group work classrooms pods. • Central areas classrooms (atriums or as part of wide lobbies or outdoor classes). • Sports facilities as a part of learning system enhance the competition skills, body and mind health of students). • Afterschool day school can be used as community center. • Multiage classrooms. • Outdoor classrooms.

New features: • Group Discussions halls. • Community can access certain parts of the colleges (library). • Environmental Impact of the site on students (open study areas-open leisure areas). • Facilities play an important role in university ranking: »» Research facilities and researches types needed in country. »» Post graduate studies lecture halls. • Min. car roads using eco cars and bikes using greens to minimize heat gain. • Olympic sports complex. • Outdoor areas (gathering plazas - stepping – theaters- study areas galleries).

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Schools Branksome hall Asia- South Korea

UWCSEA – Singapore

• • • • • •

• • • •

Total area is 95,000 m2 and total Footprint is 69,000 m2 It is world-class international girls’ boarding , and considered the 3rd on boarding schools Boarding 450 student grade8-grade12. 4% of the school facilities is commercial, 19% residential, 25% educational and 52% parks and greens. 30% of its students from other countries. The vehicles road is the minimum and doesn’t interfere with the pedestrian paths or the campus and the sports facilities are near to schools

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Total area: 76,000 m2and total footprint:52,000M2 Ranking: TOP 10 on boarding schools A world-class international boarding and one of the top 10 on boarding schools. It is divided into two campuses, dover campus and east campus, Dover campus 50% of it is academic spaces, 30% sports, 16% urban spaces and 4% service spaces, while the East campus has 25% academic spaces, 40% sports, 30% urban spaces and 5% services. Cars and traffic paths is completely separated from pedestrian ones. The building is elevated 9 m from the ground and it is wheel chair users friendly.

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Colleges UTM - Canada

A.U.C. - EGYPT

• • • • • •

• • •

Total area: 910544m2 built 1967. Land budget 89,000m2, It occupies the 1st in Canada and 20th in the world, Learning system is through courses. Residence is close to the educational zone to make it more comfortable area. Enhancing the campus sense of community through sensitive scaling and positioning of new buildings.

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• • • •

Total area: 186 855 395m2 Land budget: 1 052 183 m2 Schools (Business-Continuing Education-Humanities and Social Sciences-Global Affairs and Public PolicyGraduate School of Education-Sciences and Engineering) 30% educational spaces, 20% sports facilities, 35% urban spaces, 5% housing and 54% extension part. built around design themes that combine a local architectural spirit with a unique urban character linear layout extracted from Islamic culture streets. The buildings design provide a suitable environment considering Egypt’s hot environment( using deep windows to break the light entering the spaces and mashraya concept and thick walls).

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LANDSCAPE DESIGN As we first started to search for landscape, we figured that landscape isn’t just ordering elements as trees and lighting units, we learned that landscape design is to create a practical, pleasant outdoor space and convert it into a place which best suits the users and meets their needs. It was also found that we have to create a beautifully landscaped environment to be suitable for living, learning, meditation, recreation and overall human health and well-being. Through the search we learned more about landscape design benefits and how it can make people healthier, also that it has a positive impact on children in school and adults too. We learned more about landscape elements and how it can influence the design whether these elements are hardscape elements such as street furniture, pavements and lights, or soft-scape elements which are the plants, shrubs, turfs‌etc. The research helped us choose some landscape elements to be used in our design; some of which are Soft scape elements that include different components as Palm Trees, Trees, Shrubs, Flowers & Roses. The second element for landscape was the Hardscape which includes flooring and Lighting. After knowing about the landscape elements whether the soft or hardscape, we searched about landscape systems and irrigating methods; from these systems is the Xeriscaping system which is a landscaping and gardening system that reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental water from irrigation. It is promoted in regions that do not have easily accessible, plentiful, or reliable supplies of fresh water, and is gaining acceptance in other areas as water becomes more limiting. Xeriscaping may be an alternative to various types of traditional gardening. Landscape research as a whole, shortened the effort needed in the design process for the project landscape, where we used the elements that we searched for and that best suites the site and the project concept.

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INTERIOR DESIGN As a first step we started by determining the spaces that need thorough and unique interior design through an idea or a concept that clarifies the main vision. Then we collected general data about the function and interior design criteria for each space. We divided this criteria into specific interior design elements to create something like a ruler to help us in the design process. This ruler identifies materials for each space that suits its function, achieve environmentally friendly aspects, durability and maintenance issues. Data gathered includes types of floors, walls, ceilings, windows, furniture ...etc. It also contains textures with its types and what each one represents as each texture coveys a different impression about the space or the used material, which differs according to space function and its users. Color is also an important element that represents the space, so we clarified each space with the color that best represents it according to its function, orientation and users of the space. Also lighting is considered one of the important elements of interior design. The required amount of light for each space and general mood resulted from the amount of illumination is divided into two types, natural light and artificial light, each with its properties, requirements and suitable fixture type. As furniture affects the interior design, it was important to research the different types of suitable furniture. Throughout the search we find out that furniture can be considered as a functional element with specific features and properties or as a decorative element that adds specific qualities to the space.There is also acoustical treatments needed for each space according to its function and surrounding spaces and activities. Finally we applied this criteria on each space to collect data that we will need in interior design phase.

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SUSTAINABILITY AND ECO SYSTEM As the current trend of the worlds’ development vision is the green, sustainable and environment friendly aspects, so it should be an essential element in our project to be sustainable and futuristic at the same time. In order to do this, we started to make a research about sustainability and eco systems. To start off, we looked into national and international certificates concerned with energy savings and green buildings to know what their rating system depends on, including Green pyramid certificate, LEED and many others, analyzing their advantages and disadvantages. Then we viewed the site analysis of the project to know its resources. Our goal was to know how to best use these resources by searching for systems, structure systems and materials that would serve our project and at the same time achieve sustainability. We thought of ways of generating energy from the site and techniques for saving water, native structure systems and building materials. We also searched for different types of solar panel, how they work and which type best suits our environment. We also researched different ventilation principles and systems to ensure maximum natural ventilation, new cooling techniques, as well as using geothermal heat in producing hot water instead of using electricity or fuel, and techniques for water saving.

In Hawaii example, the designer used photovoltaic panels to collect solar energy and he used three different types, each for a certain position. He also used sensors to control artificial lighting and natural air flow to provide a comfortable environment for the occupants, screens on the facades, automated louvers to maintain temperature and relative humidity to maintain interior comfort and using materials from the site, we found the whole building is naturally ventilated. In China example, the designer used building material from the site, he used mud bricks which helped in thermal and sound insulation, and he depended on day lighting for indoor spaces and kept the heat away through using double glazed glass. In Spain example, tthe most unique feature in the building is its ceramic façade; it is a screen that has been created out of stoneware ceramic tiles to afford passive protection from the sun on the south side of the corridors that lead to the primary classrooms. All these examples helped us to understand the application of systems and techniques of sustainability and to imagine where and how to use it in our project.

New materials that we found the most appropriate for our site were palm wood for light structure, limestone in manufacturing cement with less co2 emission while production and for materials finishing, kershef that keeps indoor-air temperature, sand bricks & co2 bricks, also recycled materials as rice straw brick , CAF , Gigacrete, waste paper, recycled cardboard and so many others. After gathering all the data we started analyzing examples for schools and colleges which have top ranking in educational system, but it wasn’t of much value as they are located in very different climates. So we went on to search for schools in a similar environment, like tropical and hot environments, and we reached three schools in three different countries; preparatory academy energy laboratory in Hawaii, Maosi Ecological demonstration primary school in China and Martinet primary school in Barcelona in Spain.

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LEARNING SYSTEMS To start off our Educational Village Project, we needed to look at the very core of education to get a good understanding of what we were dealing with. We began by looking into educational systems around the world, analyzing and comparing them along the way. Being the top rankers in education, Finland, South Korea, Hong Kong and Singapore served as our case studies for the school’s learning system while The United States of America, Canada and Switzerland were our main focus for colleges, all in comparison with the current system in Egypt. We studied many different aspects of the system including the stages of education, curriculum, assessments, teachers, class size and cost of education. We also looked into the amount of money spent on education in each country in relation to its GDP and population. What we found was that, for schools, although the 4 countries ranked among the top ten countries in education [based on PISA test; Program for International Student Assessment], their systems varied greatly. Some of them focused their efforts on results (evaluation based learning) while others worked on the learning process itself. This comparison gave us a clear vision of what we dream to achieve with our new educational system. As for colleges, we found that the system was almost the same for most of the top ranking countries and that it can be implemented in Egypt through a smooth process. However as we worked on gathering information about the new educational system we were putting together, we found that it was necessary to set certain milestones for reaching this new system. We needed to divide this development process into phases that were achievable, so we decided to study countries that are currently working on the advancement of their educational system but are not necessarily top rankers. As a result, we added the Turkish model in the school’s study and the Indian one for colleges. As a whole, this research helped us understand the process of education better and left us determined to come up with what fits our country best. The tables below show the conclusion we reached in this research

A. SCHOOLS 1. Statistics Country

Finland

South Korea

Hong Kong

Singapore

Turkey

Egypt

Population

5.414 Million

50.00 Million

7.155 Million

5.312 Million

74.00 Million

80.72 Million

GDP

$247.5 Billion $1.130 Trillion $263.3 Billion $274.7 Billion $789.3 Billion $262.8 Billion

GDP Per Capita

$38,220

$30,970

$52,190

$60,110

$18,190

$6,450

6.4%

7.6%

4.5% = 79.1 Billion

-

2.5%

3.5 %

Student Cost

$9,463

$7,434

-

-

$2,008

$902

Teacher’s Salary

$35,000

$52,699

-

-

$25,189

$200

Finland

South Korea

Hong Kong

Singapore

Turkey

Egypt

19.4

26.3

38

35

26.3

-

Education % of GDP

2. Average Class Size Country Class Size

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Finland

South Korea

Hong Kong

Singapore

Pre School 1 Year [Ages 6-7] ---------------Basic Ed. 9 Years [Ages 7-16] ---------------Secondary 3 Years [Ages 16-19] ---------------University Bachelor’s Degree 3 Years ---Master’s Degree 2 Years ---Doctorate Degree ----------------

Pre School 3 Years [Ages 3-6] ---------------Primary 6 Years [Ages 6-12] ---------------Junior 3 Years [Ages 12-15] ---------------Senior 3 Years [Ages 12-15] ---------------University Bachelor’s Degree 4-6 Years ---Master’s Degree 2 Years ---Doctorate Degree 3 Years ----------------

Pre School 3 Years [Ages 3-6] ---------------Primary 6 years [Ages 6-12] ---------------Junior 3 years [Age 13] ---------------Senior 3years [Age 17] ---------------University Higher Diploma / Vocational School / Work ----------------

Pre School 3 Years [Ages 4-6] ---------------Primary 6 Years [Ages 7-12] ---------------Secondary 4-5 Years [Ages 13-16]

Turkey

Pre School 3 Years [Age 3-5] ---------------Primary 4 Years [Ages 5.5-9.5] ---------------Junior 4 Years [Ages 9.5Secondary / 13.5] Specialized / ---------------Integrated / Secondary / Specialized Vocational Independent / 4 Years Ages Private Schools [13.5-17.5] ---------------- ---------------PostUniversity / Secondary Vocational 1-3 Years School / [Ages 17-19] Work Junior College / ---------------Polytechnic / Technical

---------------University/ Work ----------------

Egypt Pre School 2 Years [Ages 4-6] ---------------Primary 6 Years [Ages 6-12] ---------------Preparatory 3 Years Ages [12-15] ---------------Secondary 3 Years [Ages 15-18] ---------------University 4-5 Years ----------------

Country

Curriculum

Phases of Education

Country

44.Curriculum Finland

South Korea

Hong Kong

Singapore

Turkey

Egypt

Curriculum framework ---------------Balance between academic and nonacademic subjects ---------------Flexibility between courses in secondary school ----------------

Core subjects ---------------Basic problemsolving abilities ---------------Optional Courses ----------------

Curriculum Core Subjects framework + Cca + ---------------Knowledge Key learning Skills areas ------------------------------Flexibility New Senior between Year: courses 4 core ---------------subjects + liberal studies + 2-3 electives ----------------

Finland

South Korea

Hong Kong

Singapore

Turkey

Egypt

Only 1 formal Exam at each exam taken phase at the end Several tests of upper through a secondary year school

1 formal test(results) [Key Tasks]

Tests at each stage [Results Oriented]

Use of academic selection to select and sort students into specific pathways at an early age

Two written exams per year

Revised new Core Subjects curricula was ---------------claimed to Religious be based on Subjects constructiv- ---------------ism with the emphasis on encouraging high level thinking skills and creativit ----------------

55.Exams Country

Method

33.Phases of Education

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B. COLLEGES Elements that contribute to how higher education institutions operate in the USA and Sweden

66.Teachers

Qualification

Country

46

Finland

South Korea

Must have Master’s degree ---------------Selected form top 10% ---------------Teacher Training Schools ---------------Special Teacher ---------------Weekly Professional Development ----------------

Highly trained ----------------

Hong Kong

Singapore

Turkey

Egypt

Initial Teacher Initial Teacher Weak initial Trained at Training Top 30%of education the Faculty of ---------------- High School and training Education Academic ---------------- ---------------- ---------------Research 4 year Degree Lack of expe---------------- ---------------rience Professional 22 weeks of ---------------Development practice Must have 150h/3 years ---------------- a Bachelor’s ---------------- Professional degree and Development pass the ---------------public staff Academic selection Research for exam promotion -------------------------------

Point of Comparison

USA

Sweden

Art, Business, Communication, Computers, Education, Engineering, Health, Hospitality, Science

Art, Business, Communication, Computers, Education, Engineering, Health, Hospitality, Science

Law, Library Sciences, Medicine

Law, Library Sciences, Medicine

Associate of Arts/Science (AA/AS) Bachelor of Arts/Sciences (BA/BS) Master of Arts/Sciences (MA/MS) Doctorate/Ph.D. Certificates

Filkand Magister Licensure/ Ph.D.

Public/Private

Both available

Both available

Coed, not coed

Both available

coed

1773 public 2472 private

61 Universities or Colleges

Different Labels of Institutions of Higher Education

Community College College/University/Institute Vocational School Specialty School (i.e. Law school, Medicine, etc.)

School University/InstituteHögskola Universitet Yrkes Skola

Financial Assistance

Available on need basis as well as through private scholarships

For books and living Costs

Sample Majors/Subjects Available

Specialty Programs Degree Equivalents/Levels

Number of Institutions of Higher Ed

47


Point of Comparison Funding

Oversight Governance

Study Terms

USA

Sweden

Public – funded by Federal & State Gov’t, Military, Corp Partnerships, Foundations, Trust, Donations Private – funded by Federal & State Gov’t, Military, Corp Partnerships, Foundations, Trust, Donations, Tuition Paid by students

Public: Government Private: Trusts, Privately owned Companies

Public – Board of Governors (controls accountability and academics) and the State Legislature (controls budget) Private – Board of Regents (controls accountability and academics)

Public and Private – Swedish National Agency for Higher Education or Högskoleverket

Semester (16 weeks) and Quarter system (11 weeks)

40 weeks annual, 5 – 20 weeks at a time

Point of Comparison

USA

Sweden

Optional per instructor

Optional per instructor

Letter scale with Plus/Minus system A = 4.0 A- = 3.75 B+ = 3.25 B = 3.0 B- = 2.75 C+ = 2.25 C = 2.0 C- = 1.75 D+ = 1.25 D = 1.0 D- = 0.75 F = 0.0

V.G (Pass with distinction) G (Pass) U (No Pass)

Forms of Assessment

Mostly testing, some application

Testing

Importance and Availability of Extracurricular Activities

Extremely important and encouraged. Vast variety available to students.

Not very important

Lecture is still the most prominent method used in the classroom. Also used: mixed mode, interactive, distance education, online.

Textbook Use

Grading System

Class Length

50 min to 4 hours per course per week

Class Delivery/Methods of Teaching

Distance Education Prevalent

Yes

Importance of Student

48

Yes

Learner-centered

Teacher-centered learning

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DESIGN CRITERIA IN SUMMARY, we found that the Hong Kong model is the most appropriate one for Egypt. However, the early childhood education system in Finland included strong qualities that we recommended for the new learning system. Also the teacher selection and development process was chosen from the Finnish model. All in all, we tried finding in each model not only what is best but also what is most suitable for Egypt. We were inspired in the new learning system we had by the early childhood educational system in Finland which involves children’s parents participation in the learning process since they are responsible for teaching him basic principles until the age of seven before he/she become qualified to enter primary school. For that purpose, we started our first stage of the project by constructing a rehabilitation center to qualify the parents for that role.

To design, we first needed to look into the design guidelines and standards for the main spaces we have. Besides using the traditional design standards books we decided to study examples of modern day schools as we realized that those standards are ever changing due to the nature of education and its constant development. We mainly focused on schools and colleges from the top ranking countries in education. We found that the designs highly promoted the concept of flexibility in the classroom and emphasis on the need for spaces where students work in groups. Through studying the design criteria for the educational setting in these countries, we were able to reach solid data that would later serve as a base layer for the design phase. Below is an example of the data we found.

Schools

Colleges

The Finnish model was also very inspiring regarding teachers selection and development. One of the most powerful points of the Finnish system is the respectful social status of teachers and professors in addition to their comfortable salaries and development courses which makes them academically successful. On the other hand, it is considered a big problem for the existing educational system in Egypt; therefore teachers depend on private lessons and are not getting the attention they deserve which in turn led to the great deterioration of the existing system.

3600 = 36% Classrooms 100 = 10% Laboratories 100 = 10% Library 100 = 10% Open Spaces 100 = 10% Services 2400 = 24% Residence

3000 = 30% Classrooms 100 = 10% Laboratories 100 = 10% Library 100 = 10% Open Spaces 100 = 10% Services 3000 = 30% Residence

On another note, the Turkish educational system is very close to the Egyptian one and was not that good from a short period of time, but with some development and implementations to that system, they achieved great things. That is a proof that we don’t have to eliminate our system totally and replace with a different one, it just needs the required attention and development and to put our hands on the reasons for that deterioration to overcome them. All in all, we tried to find in each model not only what is best but also what is most suitable for Egypt.

Area/Student: Educational Spaces 10m2 Service Spaces 5m2 Open Spaces 15m2

Area/Student: Educational Spaces 20m2 Service Spaces 5m2 Open Spaces 30m2

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CHAPTER III THE PROJECT

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VISION & LEARNING SYSTEM OUR VISION for the new learning system had been set to be executed on the 3 phases. That gradual execution would make it easier and more realistic to be implemented on the current learning system since it is impossible to suddenly eliminate the old system and carry on with a whole new one. PHASE 1 The existing faculty of education will be used as rehabilitation center for teachers’ education and parents’ courses as obligatory rehabilitation for parents whose children will enter the preschools is required. Initial teachers would be fully qualified with wide range of soft skills & qualification courses for pre-graduate teacher. While existing teachers would pass a test to measure their qualification level and teaching skills, then Credit hours profession courses will carried on for teachers according to their qualific ation level as well as soft skills courses profession development courses. Regarding existing schools, curriculum and learning system development and new learning system will be implemented but the number of years in new learning system is the same as the previous system, in order to be applicable in the existing system. While the existing colleges learning system should be developed and credit hours system will e applied.

PHASE 2 Nefertari Schools A Rehabilitation center will be constructed to give parents and teachers rehabilitation courses and specific teachers are graduated from normal colleges as there will be no faculty of education. Preschool education will be for 5 years (for children aged 3-7 years). Parents will come with their kids to the rehabilitation center to take courses related to how to deal with their kids in order to convert learning at this stage to home education and cancel the preschool stage. Kids from age 3 to 5 will be monitored at this center to know their habits and to know how to deal with them, also at this age kids should be trained how to separate from their parents. While kids from age 5 to 7 will be directed to their favorite activities and taught to repel from their bad habits, so kids will enter the school without fear. Class zero will be a class for kids at age 7 for 3 months to teach them how to be independent, they will learn how to prepare their food, how to clean their places…etc. The essence of the pre-school stage is to teach children life skills and how to learn. 54

Grade 1-6 Six years for students aged from 7-12 years and the will be taught arts & science mainly. At these stages kids will be observed to know their favorite arts and take advanced courses in them and should take at least 2 languages (English will be one of them). We will concentrate at this stage on outdoor learning and exploration techniques to know the meaning of science alongside technical subjects and soft skills in addition to community services summer courses at rehabilitation center. Sports will be the main concern at these stages to help kids to build their body and kids will practice most sports if not all to be able to know what sport they prefer. Brilliant students will take special classes to give them advanced courses for example UCMASS. This educational stage (grade1-6) is intended to produce talented students, good in at least two languages, have the ability to explore new things and aware of the importance of science. Grade 7-8 Two years for students aged from 13-14 years. Arts and languages subjects at this stage will remain as basic and essentials subjects but will have more advanced curriculums. Science will be branched at these stages to physics, chemistry, biology... etc. These subjects will be alongside technical subjects, soft skills and community services summer courses at rehabilitation center. Concerning sports, students will have professional trainings at the sports they prefer and brilliant students will take special classes to give them advanced courses for example UCMASS. At this stage, special attention will be given to students’ general knowledge and every week a topic will be discussed in classes so children have to make a research about this topic. Students after this stage should have strong independent personalities, have the ability to make decisions and choose what they need by themselves, knowing the meaning and importance of teamwork and how to finalize their tasks accurately and perfectly. They should get used to research work and have a good database about advanced sciences and general knowledge. Grade 9-10 (rotary classes) Two years for students aged from 15-16 years and credit hours system will be applied unlike the previous grades (1-8) where normal system is applied. Core subjects at this stage will be English, Math, Science and arts alongside introductory collegial subjects and introductory technical subjects. Also concentration on soft skills and community services in summer courses at rehabilitation center will still be resumed. Advanced research work and advanced sports training will still be taken into consideration. After this stage, students should have known exactly their intentions and skills to be able to choose their preferences which will determine their future careers. 55


At this point an admission test will be carried out in introductory collegial or technical subjects for students to be specialized in grade 11 and 12. Grade 11-12 Two years for students aged from 15-16 years and credit hours system will be applied, but shifting courses will be stopped at this stage. After this stage, students will be able to face real life obstacles and they can choose whether to admit for college or work. Students at this stage can choose between normal education and technical education. Technical education Curriculum containing high level technical subjects (advanced level) accompanied by community services and sports aspects. After these years, students can enroll in technical institutes for three years and then start their working careers or apply for summer courses and join a university. Normal education (credit hours system) Curriculum containing high level specialized subjects (advanced level) accompanied by community services and sports aspects. Students will also take subjects from the university (according to the student’s GPA) and compulsory summer training in different companies. The objective of this stage is getting students to know more about their major colleges and making sure they are capable of entering universities. After this stage, the student has the freedom to choose between entering university or doing a diploma and getting ready for professional work. Higher Education Higher education will be an optional final stage of formal learning and no specific age will be required. A specific criteria for admission is set which depends on students grades in high school courses and students GPA, class ranking, standardized test scores (such as the SAT or the ACT tests), in addition to some other subjective factors such as a commitment to extracurricular activities, a personal essay and an interview. Technical Colleges The curriculum will involve mainly technical subjects that need workshops and also core subjects to allow students to admit to colleges. The curriculum main objective is strengthening students’ proficiency in English and Mathematics. Studying will be for two years to obtain an initial degree (Diploma). After these 2 years, graduates will have a diploma allowing them to start a career as a profession or admit to college. 56

Normal Colleges (credit hour’s system) University will apply the credit-hour system and the academic year is divided into two semesters -- the first (the fall) and the second (the spring) with an optional summer session. In each semester the student usually takes specific number of hours according to course requirements. The credit-hour system allows the students to distribute the University and Faculty requirements over the years of their study; it allows them to mix with students from previous and subsequent years allowing them to take a major and minor degree. If one fails a course, he will have to repeat this course alone if it is a compulsory course or take a substitute course if it is an elective. Students will have the flexibility to enroll in double majors or “minor” in another field of study. After the university stage, students will be able to start their working career and the top 10% of students will pass by skills tests to be appointed as TAs or researchers and prepare their masters degrees in order to obtain their PHD.

PHASE 3 Nefertari Schools Preschool stage will be cancelled and replaced by home education like Finland. Parents will take rehabilitation course and the educational stages will be the same as phase 2.

GENERAL NOTES Special Education Schools will include disabled classes with specialized teachers in all educational stages in the same school but with different circulation. Children with severe or multiple disabilities are placed in special classes for more intensive support under the recommendation of the specialists/physicians and with parents’ consent. Operating classes providing places for children with visual impairment, hearing impairment, physical disability, emotional and behavioral difficulties and intellectual disability. Technical Education Technical education students will teach schools and colleges students technical courses and subjects, in order to solve the social problem technicians face as they feel embarrassed and not having the appreciation they deserve in society and at the same time, this will raise the society’s cultural aspect towards technicians as they will know their important role and effectiveness in any cultural evolution.

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DESIGN CONCEPT

The idea of the design concept that is considered as a multilayered concept that can be concluded in some main keywords: (Unity & Growth) – (Identity & Self Awareness) – (Dynamic Network).

Introduction

Unity & Growth

The essence of the project is to improve the educational system in Egypt and to construct an educational system that can be implemented in the near future considering the fact that the educational system is the base for the development of any country.

It is expressed through the flower of life which is considered the scared geometry representing the generation of life, the creation of a living creature from flower of life generation beginning with a spirit or seed which is the source of life (seed of life).

This requires preparing students that are not only technically and academically successful but also developed personally and capable of handling difficult situations and overcoming real life obstacles. Therefore, this system should develop both students’ spirits & minds. The spirit is reflected in the downtown zone which is considered the heart of the project where students interact with the public and get exposed to real life situations. This is considered the most unique feature of this educational village project and system as it plays an important role in forming students’ characters. On the other hand, the mind or brain is implemented through the horizontal grid in the layout that embodies the system which is considered as the most common and known characteristic of the brain. The main goal of this project is to create an educational atmosphere mainly focused on the student as the seed of the whole educational process. In this process we provide the suitable and proper atmosphere (input) for the students (seed) in order to make them capable of benefiting their country (output).

The spirit of the educational zone is represented in the downtown (community center, research center & library), breaking down the horizontal grid of the land as if forces created cracks downwards.

Identity & Self Awareness The circle of life consists if seven circles together creating one unit which is then repeated in the same way together with other 6 units creating a whole big unit and so on. Thus the educational zone is divided into seven zones together creating the whole unit where every student shall pass by all these zones throughout his educational career therefore contributing in recognizing his identity & self awareness.

These seven zones are: (Schools, Technical School, Colleges, Downtown, Farm, Sports, and Residential).

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Dynamic Network The educational process is not a one way process, it should be considered as a dynamic network between all its components (colleges, schools…etc.) This dynamic network is expressed by a magnetic field whose strength depends on the forces affecting each zone which are expressed through the zone areas & position which in turn depends on its function, eventually creating the layout paths.

Functional Concept Downtown zone is considered the heart and spirit of the project where all forces pour into that heart. Accordingly we decided to change its level to emphasize its role as the heart of the project. However we found that it was preferred to push it downward rather than raise it in order not to overshadow other educational facilities as it is only considered the spirit of the project but not the main functional objective of the project. The downtown zone consists of three main buildings that form a triangle representing the strength and connection of the heart of the project. These three buildings are the community center, the research center & the library. Their locations are determined according to their functions and relations with other educational facilities. The library is nearest to the schools zone where students are encouraged to explore it and regularly use it at an early age. While the research center is located near the colleges’ zone where student are required to conduct researches and work in labs to further pursue their studies and become in charge of their learning process. The sports zone is given more importance and space than expected due to its necessity in the new educational process. Since the new system is more dependent on forming the student’s personality, therefore learning athletic manners and principles is essential such as: teamwork, motivation, enthusiasm….etc. as well as exploring the children’s athletic talents and capabilities at a young age.

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PROJECT MASTER PLAN

The master plan is a product of the integration of a functional layer that implements the new learning system with a conceptual layer that targets the mind and spirit of the user. The product is a well-rounded master plan with zones that are intricately connected with each other and with the community outside carrying its effect to Nefertari and beyond.

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ZONING

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CIRCULATION

LEVELS

Our project has 4 main entrances to make it easier for students and visitors to access our project from different parts of the city and to ease circulation traffic during rush hours. A ring road outlines the master plan and each entrance leads to a vehicular path which connects these entrances with each other and also helps in circulation between the different zones of our project. These vehicular paths act as pedestrian paths as well alongside bicycle paths to connect internally between all the zones and extends to reach the city’s park in the western area and the farm zone to the east. Every zone has its own secondary pedestrian paths branched from the pain pedestrian path of the project.

All zones of project are leveled at +5.00 m except the downtown zone which is dropped down to -5.00 m level as mentioned before in the concept. The ring road also is raised to +5.00 but descends to pass below the main vehicular paths at points of intersection at the main entrances of the project.

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SOLID & VOID

GREEN AREAS

The percentage of built areas to the whole master plan is not large. The linear approach we manipulated in positioning the built masses helped in creating many spaces between buildings to be used as relaxation areas, gathering areas for social interaction and even outdoor studying areas.

The green areas in the master plan are designed to be familiar with the architectural theme of the buildings. Therefore, that linear approach was also manipulated in the design of green areas to emphasize on integrating building with nature. That nature integrated design creates a suitable atmosphere and environment for students to reach their maximum potential and get the best out of them.

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SCHOOLS ZONE

The importance of the schools zone exceeds any other zone in the project as it is considered the base of the project accommodating students at early ages. The implementation of the new learning system and its solutions to the existing problems is most clear in that zone as. It is very important to provide the suitable atmosphere which helps in building students characters at an early age, which is the main objective of our project.

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Orientation The schools zone is connected to the residential area surrounding Nefertari’s city center as a high percentage of the users will mostly come from that area. Within the project the schools are connected to the hostel as for the initial phase of the project it will be a boarding school. It is also connected to the technical school zone which is considered a transitional phase between school and colleges. The zone is also linked to the downtown especially to kidzania and the exploration park as well as the farm zone as they all represent an important part of the educational process.

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Buildings

Architectural Concept Nature and transparency The architecture concept was to integrate with the master plan grid which is obvious in the elongated buildings connected to earth by green roof ramps and gathering spaces .The buildings are also connected together by links and shades. Schools zone is visually connected to all master plan buildings through form and direction towards downtown (heart). This Linearity emphasizes on the identity through the form and structure of buildings.

Main unique elements of the zone: • All spaces and the classrooms are strongly connected to nature. • Outdoor educational areas that implement the new eduactional system. • Gathering areas between classes for extra communication. • Using eco systems for better sustainble and clean environment for students.

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Since it’s an educational project it is important that all classes are oriented to north direction with allowable deviation 15o to east or west this is according to the prevailing north wind and the wind coming from the future lake.

Schools applying vision Buildings are raised 5m above ground to increase the area of shaded outdoor spaces used by kids for different activities.

Green roofs and gatherings outdoor classrooms

• •

Skylight is used as daylighting element to allow direct and/or indirect sunlight, via top lighting, providing a visual connection to the outdoor environment. Also it provides passive solar heating, ventilation for passive cooling and fresh air exchange and releasing heat. Green roof and white materials used as reflective surfaces and reduce heat gain.

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•

Courts between the two buildings of each school enhance cross ventilation between the masses.

The greenery would also help to cool the building, contributing to a good indoor climate, while the atrium creates good lighting conditions that minimize the use of artificial light within the building.

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The design of the grade 1 - 8 School is dynamic to reflect the high activity and energy of students at that age while the grade 9 – 12 School is less dynamic as it reflects the maturity of older students.

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SPORTS are included between buildings of the schools to emphasize on the vital role it plays in the educational process and to encourage students to practice sports in their free time.

BREAKOUT SPACES are shared spaces between classrooms to encourage independent learning, small group work and teachers working co-operatively across spaces. These spaces have become secondary instructional areas by allowing an instructor to maintain supervision over more than one area at a time. These are often created out of circulation spaces that were in the past used for corridors.

Indoor OPEN CLASSROOMS without doors and floor to ceiling glass panels to the outdoor gathering spaces achieving the concept of transparency and connectivity with nature. Students are typically divided into different groups for each subject according to their skill level for that subject. The students then work in small groups to achieve their assigned goal. Open classrooms are organized to encourage: Active learning rather than passive learning; Learning and expression in a variety of media, rather than just pencil and paper and the spoken word; and Self-directed, student-initiated learning more than teacher-directed learning.

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MULTIUSE CLASSROOMS

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LARGE CORRIDOR around atrium and lounges used as studying areas to emphasize the role of outdoor education) . The atrium is the heart of the school, with its balconies, hanging greenery, it functions as an informal social gathering space where the students can meet and interact. The greenery creates a relaxing atmosphere and contributes positively to the learning environment.it also is used in connecting the classrooms and breaking down the long and narrow volume.

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85


Landscape concept

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Zone Activities

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Main Activities

Circulation

• Opinion Area: Open space for expressing ideas by speeches and posters. • Theatre and graffiti: Integrated stepping with greens and shaded seats for events, Also there is a wall area for graffiti drawings. • Innovation and Creativity: Open area with tables and seats for creating innovative products. • Science and math garden: Open area containing learning games to teach sciences and math with fun.

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MULTIUSE CLASSROOMS The multi-functional classroom is one of the most important spaces that reflect the implementation of the new educational system. It was designed to cater to the needs of the children at that age and how they learn. The classroom is divided into 2 zones, an active zone & a quiet one. The active zone seeks to emphasize the importance of working in groups, which is reflected in the furniture of that area, while the quiet zone focuses on relaxation and intimacy of the experience. This separation is only highlighted in a visual manner through using different flooring and ceiling material and colors, all in the context of a fully coherent space

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TECHNICAL ZONE

One of the main problems facing the existing educational system is the ignorance of the importance of technical education and its students. The presence and importance given to the technical zone is clear in our project since it is provided with the required equipment and technology to qualify graduated students for the labor market. The integration between normal educational courses and technical courses will help to eliminate the social differentiation and embarrassment felt by technical students.

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Orientation The zone is connected directly with colleges, schools, farm and downtown zones according to the vision set for this project. Technical schools are given the same importance of schools and colleges. Moreover, the zone is placed the south part of the land which connects it directly with the business complex below to serve the zone as investments, it’s also connected with the main road for visitors and services access.

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Buildings

Architectural concept Sand Ripples & Dunes • When a wind current flows across loose sand, the sand is dragged from the bottom and is frequently piled up to form ripples and dunes. • Ripples of fine sand are less curved than those formed by coarse sand. • Sand dunes with regular grid are resembled by the zone’s landscape integrated with flying buildings which represent air winds. Plans and sections • Each school has its own loading dock and goods are distributed through distribution corridors to elevators to be stored in workshops and storages. • The zone has two main services road entrances but buildings which are close to each other have one main service entrance and each building have its own loading dock except the carpentry workshop which has its own service entrance and loading dock. • Each workshop has its own service circulation through elevators and stairs, except the Auto-mobile workshops.

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Heavy workshops (as carpentry, Auto-mobile workshops) are placed on the same level of the services road for easier access and better service.

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The Auto-mobile workshop leads to a small gallery for the produced and modified cars, and have a connection with the main plaza

Technical schools that have functional relations are connected together through bridges or combined in one building.

The bridge is ended with an outdoor gathering area, and there’s another gathering area overlooking to the bridge.

All the buildings have an entrance from the ground floor to the workshops and another entrance through a ramp leading to the lecture halls and classrooms in the first floor …. Etc. The atrium is used functionally to get rid of hot air inside buildings.

There are two bridges one connects the arts school with carpentry school, and the other connects the auto-mobile school with electronics and electrical, both bridges lead to indoor and outdoor gathering areas.

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Solar cells covering the unused ramps and roofs to collect sun light and provide the zone with energy needed. (energy conservation) Skylights in ramps to illuminate spaces and gathering areas below them.

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•

Each 2 workshops have a common storage to minimize storage area and elevators number. Material rooms in arts & crafts school are connected directly to crafts workshops and are connected to storages in the underground floor by elevators.

•

Parametric dynamic Screens on the outer façades that open and close according to the space and illumination requirements. The western and eastern facades are stepped to overshadow spaces below them. These cantilevered masses above the first floor entrance.

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Landscape concept

Zone Activities

Activities studies • • • •

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The open gallery is used to present students’ projects as for selling them, the gallery is close to the downtown zone. The main plaza is in a good connection with all the buildings, it has a multi-media zone where it could have open seminars to encourage students to interact with each other. Gathering areas are distributed throughout the zone so the students could spend more time in the outdoors. The food court to serve the students to not waste time in transferring outside the zone, also to serve the visitors who would present for a gallery or a seminar.

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Circulation The main pedestrian road comes from the main path and enters the zone to pass by most schools’ entrances, having several branches in the area providing easy and functional transporting environment for students. Secondary path connects all building entrances and the zone is overlooking the main road for ease of access

Section studies Longitudinal section which shows the gathering areas and its distribution throughout the project, the multimedia area is centralized to be easily accessed from all the schools.

Lateral section that shows the car parking area which is nearly outside the zone, it also represents the relationship between different urban spaces located in the zone.

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AUTOMOBILE WORKSHOP The design objective was to create a space that reflects the dynamics of the automobile industry. The colors and materials emphasize the masculinity of the space while the sharp edges and light reflect the motion and dynamics of the space.

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COLLEGES ZONE

Our project may be considered an approach to solve most of the learning system problems in Egypt and overcome its deterioration, therefore the colleges are considered as the essence of the project alongside the schools. Providing the desired atmosphere for students’ interaction with each other and with society is clear through the design by providing gathering areas and outdoor educational spaces. The relation between the colleges zone and the research center in the downtown plays a vital role in helping students become more social and independent.

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109


Orientation

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Buildings

Architectural concept The concept is based on the idea of creating dynamic gathering spaces and defined activity zones for students to encourage social interaction and to create a strong connection between students and nature. It also focuses on integrating buildings with nature using a minimalist approach to the architecture created. Plans and sections • •

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Terraces outside classrooms will be used as outdoor learning spaces or gathering areas for the students between classes. The workshops are not separated with walls, but with small translucent partitions to encourage interaction between students.

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• •

A ramp leads directly to first floor and another ramp leads to the gathering area on the first floor roof. Part of the first floor roof is ramped to be used as green areas reducing the heat inside the building and as gathering areas to create a link between the gathering areas on the ground and the ones above the roofs.

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• •

Atriums and skylights to enhance air circulation inside the building. The buildings are raised above the ground level to create shaded areas under the building, which reduce the built spaces and increase landscape areas for more activities.

• •

Dynamic Louvers on the western elevation to control sun rays effect. Air flows around the building mass.

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landscape concept

Zone Activities

The landscape concept is based on creating outdoor dynamic gathering spaces and integrating between outdoor and indoor spaces to emphasize on the connectivity between students & natural surroundings.

Many activities are supposed to be carried out in the zone which affected the design of landscape elements. These activities required special spaces such as quiet reading areas, gathering area and plazas, open exhibition space, areas for recreational & entertainment activities (mazes, chess board & basketball courts), outdoor drawing studios, semi shaded outdoor meeting spaces, open theatre and an open air musical stage.

That’s why, the landscape was designed as green strips to be familiar with architectural theme and to emphasize on the concept of integration between buildings & nature.

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Circulation

landscape section

Main Activities Outdoor gathering achieve integration because it helps the social networking between colleges and the emphasis on interaction with others, and this in addition to being multi use spaces it is possible to study there or search or use as open work workshops in order to achieve communication between students before & after lectures. Semi shaded drawing outdoor class for students for draw & paint to integrate with nature in order to create environmental that helps students to enhance creativity Also, it has walls for graffiti to increase their talents & to learn new type of artist . Semi Shaded meeting areas for creative discussion & for seminars .

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LECTURE HALL The objective was to create an appropriate comfortable environment for learning. We found that we needed to achieve simplicity and clarity to help students concentrate but still make it a unique space. This is reflected in the soft light and colors used.

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THE DOWNTOWN ZONE

According to the vision and main concept, the downtown is considered the heart of the project. It is the main zone for entertainment and gathering areas in the campus. The downtown also plays a financial role as it should provide income for the project; therefore it contains shops and galleries which sell products produced at the farm. (Independent community concept).

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Orientation

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Buildings

Architectural concept SCIENCE MUSEUM AND FABRICATION LAB The science museum was created to further highlight the importance of learning by doing. It seeks to create a journey for the user taking him through many experiences where he learns about natural and manmade concepts and inventions all through different activities. The building consists of 2 main parts; the museum and the fabrication lab. The museum’s journey consists of 4 main phases which are exploration, adventure, history and science. Each phase includes simulators, holograms, physical models, touch screens and many other items that require user engagement in the learning process. The Architecture Floor Plans

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KIDS’ DISTRICT It is a form of practical education through simulation of a real life city with children in charge of all its facilities. It introduces different jobs such as being a doctor or a banker to children which helps explore their capabilities and interests all while giving them a sense of responsibility and independence. The main focus is engaging children and implementing the “learning by doing” concept in the space.

Architectural Concept • Integration with nature by creating plenty of outdoor areas • The building is connected to the downtown main plaza which is the meeting point of all different ages.

The building has sky lights to enter light and ventilation. The journey detailed 1. Exploration Zone: the students begin their journey by going through a set of exhibitions with activities that engage them in the learning process. 2. Then they choose to continue in either of these zones • Adventure Zone: simulators. • History Zone: space center, driving simulators and flight simulators. • Science zone: experiment labs and natural phenomena simulators. The building has a skylight to entre daylight and ventilation.

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COMMUNITY CENTER The Human Development Center is considered one of the most important buildings on campus. It is the place where existing and new teachers will take intensive training to learn new teaching methods and child psychology. It will also hold training sessions for parent to engage them in the learning process and help them develop healthy ways to deal with children at home. However, training sessions are not restricted to parents and teachers only but it welcomes the entire Nefertari community to attend self-development workshops and sessions on how to take part in the development of the community. Also, it is where the kindergarten classes will be located as it is the initial point of the learning system and it needed to be located at the heart of the project. The building is connected to the downtown main plaza that is the meeting point of all. Architectural Concept As the development center is considered one of the main elements of the project, its existence had to shake up the master plan, to break the monotony of the horizontal grid by creating a vertical grid that intersects with the main one and creates harmony. This vertical direction emphasizes on the entrance of the building. Also the integration with nature is clear through the use of water elements and green areas. Floor plan Parents workshops • Mandatory development sessions for parents whose children are entering preschool. • Parents will take courses on how to home school their kids until they are old enough to enter grade 1. • • • • •

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Initial Teacher workshop: Highly qualified teachers that are trained through intensive courses. Outdoor area for kids Gathering areas: For socializing and interaction Class zero: This class will be for kids at age 7 for 3 months to start teaching them basic skills and prepare them for school. Discovery labs: Focus on outdoor learning, exploration, arts and sports

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The Section

The hotel is integrated with the community center as the community center 4th floor is the hotel main entrance. It is made to accommodate sponsors, visitors, parents and exchange students.

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THE RESEARCH CENTER The Research center is considered as the main building of the downtown zone and the link between colleges zone and downtown. The objective of this link is to show the spirit of our project which is represented by the downtown zone.

This link is achieved through the atrium, which is the main link between the building and downtown zone since the whole building is raised over ground level except the core (including the atrium), so that students in the downtown have a direct approach to the research center without being obliged to pass by the colleges zone. Nature & Educational Spaces According to the new vision and learning system we had set, we aim for an integration between educational spaces and nature to help students communicate with the society. Educational spaces has direct access to outdoor spaces and terraces, transparent interior between educational spaces, corridors and gathering areas to encourage interaction between students.

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Roof garden which represents the outdoor gathering area, is connected directly with some of educational spaces such as labs and research center to be merged directly with gathering spaces, outdoor and roof garden. In the same manner, outdoor gathering areas and roof gardens are connected directly to research laboratories to merge between outdoor and indoor spaces for the same purpose.

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LIBRARY

The main reading area has double height and has direct access from the downtown with some workshops and reading spaces overlooking it in the ground level.

The library is regarded as one the fundamental facilities of our project since it forms one of the sides of the central triangle defining the spirit of the project (downtown).

The building consists of several ramps connecting the downtown with the schools zone due to the difference between their levels and emphasizing on the concept of integrating buildings & nature. Workshops have outdoor terraces to connect between indoor educational areas and outdoor areas. Most workshops contain large transparent walls for the same purpose. Outdoor reading areas for students are connected directly with the main reading hall which is also transparent to integrate educational spaces and nature. Moreover, computer labs are directly connected to outdoor reading areas for the same reason.

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Landscape concept

Zone Activities

The reason for the curvilinear solution is to be different from the whole campus and to break down the horizontal module of the layout making the downtown the unique part of the project.

Many activities are carried out in the downtown zone which require functional spaces such as outdoor reading spaces, gathering areas for social interaction, shops, galleries, food court and an open theatre.

There are 5 entrances to the downtown. The first entrance is from the residential zone and the earlier grades schools (grade 1-8) next to the community center. The second one is from the middle school next to the library and shops. The third entrance is from the technical zone, next to the exhibition. The fourth is from the colleges and next to the food court. The last entrance is next to the theatre and the sports zone.

Many activities are related functionally to some the buildings functionally such as the theatre and the lake (entertainment activities) which are connected with the community center. Reading halls and spaces are connected to the library which in turn is linked with the schools zone according to the vision. In the same manner, the research center is related to the colleges zone. Meanwhile, exhibition areas and community center is connected with the fabrication labs of the technical zone.

Open Reading 142

Street

Fab Lab

Tecnical Educaion Zone

Community Center

Lake 143


Zone Activities

Sports Zone 144

Circulation

Social Area

Downtown Center

Lake

Social Area

Parking

Social Area Shops

Schools Zone 145


KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOM Located in the community building, the kindergarten classroom represents the initiation point of the educational process and of the entire project. The design objective was to create a flexible space that accommodates the different kinds of activities that take place in a classroom while achieving a healthy stimulating environment for the children. The classroom was designed to be warm and inviting mainly by using curvilinear lines and smooth geometric shapes all while incorporating a sense of playfulness into the space.

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COMMUNITY BUILDING MAIN ENTRANCE Located at the heart of the project, this space needed to reflect the diversity of the people within. The design carefully balances material, colors & textures. It focuses on mind & spirit; mind being represented in the straight lines & consistent rhythm while the spirit is embodied through the organic lines and natural elements used. A sense of continuity is given to reflect the educational cycle taking place within from teachers to parents to children.

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THE FARM ZONE

The farm was created for two main reasons; first to serve an educational purpose and teach children at a young age the importance of farming and animals; secondly it is part of the campus sustainability plan as it helps grow products used by the food facilities on campus.

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Orientation The Farm plot was a green area or a park in Nefertari’s master plan, but we thought we could use it as an educational farm for our students, especially because it is near to the school zone, students can learn more about farming and planting, and do some fun activities where there are specialized workshops for pottery, honey making, and milk packing. The farm is linked with the school’s zone, the downtown and the technical zone by a bridge crossing the road to make it easier for students to reach there.

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Architectural concept

Buildings

The farm includes a main building which consists of classrooms and seminar rooms. It also has workshops such as milk, honey, pottery and others that serve as practical application of the lessons taught in the classroom. There is also a barn for different kinds of animals such as cows and chickens and a stable for horses. A large green area is provided for the animals to roam around and for children to visit them as well as crop fields for planting vegetables and fruits. Incorporating this in the learning system was important as it teaches children what cannot be taught in class and it encourages them to value animals and to be in touch with nature and its balanced ecosystem. It also emphasizes on the importance of jobs such as farming or working in factories and workshops that are sometimes looked down on in our society. Main Building Floor Plan

Barns Fields 154

Main Plaza & Activity Areas

Crops Fields 155


THE OPEN CLASSES give children the opportunity to learn through watching and interacting with nature. It is a vital part of the learning process as it creates a unique sensory experience for them.

Workshops Floor Plan There are different types of workshops that all include activities for children to help them learn about honey making, pottery, planting and much more. These workshops illustrate the processes that each item goes through in an easy manner.

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THE MILK WORKSHOP was designed to simulate the full process that the milk goes through from milking the cow to bottling and packaging. It helps children visualize the process and understand every aspect of it. The children move along the space to learn the story of milk and eventually bottle it themselves.

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Landscape concept

Circulation

The farm has a barn which houses the animals, a horses’ stable, a workshop building where most of the activities take place and a main building. Also there is the crops fields, a water stream where people can gather around, and a large open space for the animals and horses.

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Section The levels appears here in the section, the crops fields are distributed on six levels, and the horses track is also raised on a higher level to have a good view of the farm while riding on the horse to enjoy the tour around the farm.

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MILK WORKSHOP The design concept in this space is clear and straight forward as it is a unique fun learning space for kids. It is expressed in a stream of milk that is spilt on the floor and continues on to the wall and ceiling. Also, natural materials such as wood were used to create an outdoor experience indoors.

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SPORTS ZONE

Although the project is focused on the educational facilities, the sports related facilities are given much more importance in our project than expected. The variation in facilities and the presence of unusual entertainment activities is highlighted to help students discover their favorite from a very early age and the facilities are well equipped to help students upgrade their skills through developed professional courses. The objective of sports courses is to help in teaching students sportsmanship and important principles & manners.

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Orientation

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Buildings

Architectural concept The design concept behind this zone shall be considered as a multilayered concept emphasizing the following items. • • •

Openness (linking students approach & public approach visually) & Transparency (large glass facades & open interior). Identity (unique dynamic theme , but still integrating with the theme of the whole campus) . Dynamic Motion (The smooth flow of the shed itself from static to dynamic).

Walking & cycling paths over the shade of the stadium as this path generate energy as the students walk and cycle on it. It is considered as a passive use to produce energy. The design of the shade serves the main concept of the whole campus, emphasizing the idea of integrating building & nature. Plans & Sections

The idea of the interior of the aquatic center depend on creating an eye contact between the swimmers and the and the spectators stands from one side and the cafeteria from one side emphasizing on the ideas of transparency & entertainment through that open interior.

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The recreational center is characterized by its open interior where some activities can be performed where athletes can have a view on other activities. This design is considered amusing & motivational for athletes at the same time.

Landscape concept Zone Activities

Open courts for exploring children athletic talents and capabilities at young age. Also giving the opportunity for college students to develop their capabilities. Gathering Areas used as interactive dynamic spaces.

Untraditional and new facilities are provided for the entertainment of students making this. For example, the presence of the climbing wall in the middle of the atrium giving the project another dimension.

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Circulation There are three main access to the sports zone, first from the colleges area, second from the downtown with a path that leads directly to the stadium entrance and the third access is for the out comers which also leads directly to the stadium, secondary paths leading to the open courts areas and the aquatic center. Also there are Walking & cycling paths over the shade of the stadium that generate energy as the students walk and cycle on it

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SPORTS ARENA The Sports arena is designed to simulate the concept of constant motion. The staggered stripes and bright colors reinforce that idea. It is an energetic space designed to overlook the gym through a glass wall.

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RESIDENTIAL ZONE

Living in a hostel is one of the experiences that teaches students independence most, whether for college students or those in school. That is why the school in our educational village is a boarding one. Besides being independent, it also teaches them to accept others no matter how different they are and learn to live with them in peace. The residential area also accommodates faculty and staff of the educational village.

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Orientation The residential zone is strongly connected with the schools zone to make it easy for students to walk to and from school and is only a 10 minute walk to the colleges campus. It is also located right next to the sports zone to encourage students to practice sports and go to the gym on a regular basis to maintain a healty life style. Furthermore, it is located near the downtown area to make it easy for residents to use the downtown facilities at any time.

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Buildings

Architectural Concept Horizontality and integration with nature The buildings spread along the horizontal grid of the master plan. The sloping landscape and the building’s sloping roofs merge into one continuous experience no matter if one is inside, outside, on the ground floor or walking across its green roofs. The surrounding landscape does not only serve as an aesthetic backdrop, but is also an integral part of the campus’ focus on nature and sustainability as a key aspect of improving the quality of life. Formed as sloping landscaped bands, the buildings merge with the surrounding nature and allow daylight to stream into every space.

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Floor Plans The floor plans are linear one in order to allow for best orientation and and to integrate with the rest of the buildings on campus.

Unique Features include: • Informal community spaces cross the zone encouraging faculty, students, and staff to gather for casual interaction. • Meditation spaces where students can relax. • Reading zone • Miniature sports zone. ACTIVITY SPACES are created to encourage interaction and communication between students.

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Landscape concept

Circulation

Green strips like the main concept of the master plan “horizontality” and there are urban spaces for students to interact together and ensure the integration between the building and the landscape.

Pedestrian paths are coming directly from the main pedestrian path from the northern main entrance; paths are distributed horizontally and linked together with vertical paths. Vehicles pass in the ring road beside the residential area, and vehicles can only access the residential area only in case of emergency.

Zone activities • • •

Outdoor sports area for daily gymnastics and aerobics. Large. Open, green natural gathering areas where students can meet together to share doing activities together and have fun after school. Reading areas where students can read or study in natural air, with a very relaxing mood.

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SOCIAL AREA IN HOSTEL The purpose of this room is to create a space where college students living in the hostel can socialize and take breaks from studying. It was designed to be a highly active space that contains many different activities. The sharp lines reflect the energy released in the space and the color scheme emphasizes it.

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PHYSICAL MODEL

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PROJECT INITIAL COST As the project came to an end, we found it was necessary to calculate and estimate of the initial cost of the project in order to submit a full report to potential sponsors. We researched the average cost/meter in Egypt for the different types of buildings we have on campus and for landscape elements. Next are the tables including the cost analysis.

SCHOOLS

TECHNICAL SCHOOLS Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Art

4

6280

3,500

21,980,000

Carbentry

4

8511

3,500

29,788,500

Civil workshopes skills

4

5752

3,500

20,132,000

Mechanical

4

3979

3,500

13,926,500

Building cost (L.E.)

Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

School grade 1-8

5

26700

2,500

66,750,000

Electrical & Electronic

4

8415

3,500

29,452,500

School grade 9-12

3

15300

2,500

38,250,000

School grade 9-12

1

5403

3,500

18,910,500

Building cost (L.E.)

105,000,000 Total landscape area is 46400 m2 cost 16,240,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Parking area is 6000 m2 cost 1,500,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 250 L.E.) Total cost for school zone 122,740,000 L.E

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134,190,000.00 Total landscape area is 87200 m2 cost 30,520,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Parking area is 6851 m2 cost 1,712,750 L.E. (cost per meter is 250 L.E.) Total cost for technical zone 166,422,750 L.E

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COLLAGES

DOWNTOWN

Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Humanities

4

4707

2,500

11,767,500

Community

5

15820

Fine art & Arch.

4

11392

2,500

28,480,000

Hotel

11

Business

3

4491

2,500

11,227,500

Research center

4

8879

3,500

31,076,500

Energy & industrial engineering

5

10552

4,500

47,484,000

Library

4

6720

3,500

23,520,000

Technology

4

7173

4,500

32,278,500

Science exploaration exhibition

1

17501

5,000

87,505,000

Adminstration

1

15300

2,500

38,250,000

Fab lap

1

10620

3,500

37,170,000

School grade 9-12

2

9690

3,500

29,070,000

Building cost (L.E.)

169,487,500 Total landscape area is 75340 m2 cost 26,369,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Parking area is 11028 m2 cost 2,757,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 250 L.E.) Total cost for COLLAGES zone 198,613,500 L.E

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3,500

Building cost (L.E.) 55,370,000 161,700,000

425,411,500 Total landscape area is 76776m2 cost 26,871,600 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Parking area is 8704m2 cost 2,176,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 250 L.E.) Total cost for downtown zone 454,459,100 L.E

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FARM

SPORT

Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Main building

1

1377

2,500

3,442,500

Back stage

2

2564

3,500

7,692,000

Main building

1

2420

2,500

6,050,000

Media sector

2

2717

3,500

8,151,000

Horse stable

1

2247

750

1,685,250

GYM

2

5595

3,500

19,582,500

Burn

1

2434

750

1,825,500

Stage1

1000

3,500

3,500,000

13,003,250

Stage2

250

3,500

875,000

Main stage

15950

800

12,760,000

1821

2,000

4,552,500

Shaded swimming pool

911

1,000

911,000

Shaded play grounds

3299

1,000

3,299,000

Main play ground

10105

500

5,052,500

Building cost (L.E.)

Total landscape area is 62829 m2 cost 21,990,150 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Total cost for farm zone 34,993,400

Swimming center

1

Building cost (L.E.)

66,375,500 Total landscape area is 44534 m2 cost 15,586,900 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Parking area is 5460 m2 cost 1,365,000 L.E. (cost per meter is 250 L.E.) Total cost for sport zone 83,327,400 L.E

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RESIDENTIAL Building

No. of floors

Total area (m2) Cost/m

Colleges

3

10400

2,500

26,000,000

Colleges

3

9200

2,500

23,000,000

Colleges

3

8000

2,500

20,000,000

Professors

3

5400

2,500

13,500,000

Professors

3

5400

2,500

13,500,000

Professors

3

5400

2,500

13,500,000

Schools

2

5400

2,500

13,500,000

Schools

2

4500

2,500

11,250,000

Schools

2

4500

2,500

11,250,000

Building cost (L.E.)

TOTAL ROADS AREA IS 67200 M2 COST 16,800,000 L.E TOTAL SERVICES ROADS IS 6700 M2 COST 16,800,000 L.E TOTAL LANDSCAPE & PARKING AREAS COST 166,460,900 L.E.

TOTAL COST FOR THE PROJECTS

2,723,233,401 L.E

145,500,000 Total landscape area is 55350 m2 cost 19,372,500 L.E. (cost per meter is 350 L.E.) Total cost for residential zone 164,872,500 L.E

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TO SUMMARIZE what we have been working on, we started by studying and analyzing the problems of education in Egypt such as standardized testing, outdated teaching methods, under qualified teachers, lack of attention to students’ interests and capabilities and obvious negligence of technical education. In parallel to these studies, we also researched the top ranked educational systems in the world, examined what makes them successful and whether these factors could be applicable in Egypt. By the end of that phase we came up with a learning system that was designed to fix the current problems of our existing system, cater to its every need and develop it to become one of the best in the world. To implement this new learning system we had to start somewhere new, like in Nefertari City and let the model spread across the country so that the existing schools start to embrace the change and implement it. The site was planned with careful consideration to the surrounding zones in a way that would allow for perfect integration. It was also developed through a multi layered programmatic and design concept that guided the architecture of the project. We designed the Educational Village to meet the needs of the learning system with new innovative spaces such as the multi-use classroom in the schools, the open workshops in colleges, the outdoor learning spaces and so on. We also visualized several detailed interior spaces as well as carefully designed landscape that would all serve the learning system. The project went into highly developed stages and is now awaiting funding to commence with the execution phase. We, class of 2014, FEDA, Ain Shams University, will be honored to execute our project one day and fulfill our big dream and crown all our efforts. This is by no means the end, it is only the first step towards real change; it is a step on a road that might be long but is worthwhile.

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PROJECT MEMEBERS STUDENTS

Abd Allah Hisham Ahmed Abdel Rahman Ahmed Fayed Alaa Abdel Aziz Alaa Abdel Moniem Alaa Ashraf Alaa Mostafa Amira Sayed Carol Hany Fady Michel Fares Tolba Jomana Gamal Khaled Mostafa Lina Kadry Mayar Ehab Mohamed Khaled Nancy Magdy Nada Tarek Nourhan Tarek Rana Abdel Salam Rana Ahmed Shaker Rana Hisham Randa Mahmoud Reem Essam Reem Hassan Seba Salah Yasmine Lotfy Youssef Maged

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PROFESSORS

Dr. Ashraf Abdel Mohsen Dr. Somaya Bahy El-Deen Dr. Wallid Shora Eng. Amr Hasib Eng. Raef Fahmi

A S S I S TA N T S

Eng. Heba Soliman Eng. Muhammed Abd El-Aziz Eng. Mariam Dous Eng. Somaya Rajeb

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Nefertari Educational project , Egypt 2020  

A Nation’s Development starts with raising its educational value. That’s why, Faculty of Engineering Department of Architecture Ain shams Un...

Nefertari Educational project , Egypt 2020  

A Nation’s Development starts with raising its educational value. That’s why, Faculty of Engineering Department of Architecture Ain shams Un...

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