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Yousef Awaad Hussein Selection of Works

01

The Sock Hotel 02

Little Boxes Library 03

NOCC

Conditioning Center 04

In, Within, Without* Urban Masterplan

05

Between East & West: A Gulf* Kuwait Pavilion Venice Biennale


The Sock Advisor: Jeffry Bouchard . Fall 2015 Harvard University, GSD, Core III a comprehensive twelve-week studio project

Within the Sock the continuous exchange of flows through elements occur at the macro scale of the building within the structure as it is continuously experiencing the transfer of loads through members. Innovative structural solutions are introduced to negotiate between the spatial requirements and structural demands of different programs. These require different structural solutions because as these spaces intersect, the transfer of loads becomes essential. The sequence of spaces, movement, access and benefits from adjacencies with other programs are all taken into consideration creating the pregnancy at the center of the tower. The manifestation of these principals transparently feeds the formal result as it forces the envelope to stretch in order to accommodate these needs. The articulation of this idea resulted in the introduction of a singular core embedded deep into the ground which diminishes as it grows to allow for the form to sway and create special differences. Surface columns line the entirety of the building, splitting at the point of least resistance to buckling in order to thicken and reattach to the core. This allows for all programs above the swell to have a load path through the core, but then create long span open spaces for the larger programs within the swell. Finally, Gothic references for structural solutions, arches and inverted arches, are introduced within the pregnancy to assist in supporting and distributing the loads from programs like the pools.


05

04

06

07

03

08

02

01

Level Twenty Four

Level Eight

Program: Hotel Rooms +

Program: Hotel Rooms

420.00 feet

+

180.00 feet

Level Eight : Hotel Rooms

03

03

08

08

+ 210.00

04

06

07

07

04

06

05

05

Level Twenty Four : Hotel Rooms

02

02 Admin Offices

Sky Lobby Viewing Platform

Sky Lobby

+ 210.00

+ 210.00 + 195.00

Storage + 200.00

+ 192.00

01

01

Gallery

+ 210.00

+ 205.00

Lobby + Reception + 190.00

Viewing Room

Level Ten

Level Twelve

Program: Sky Lobby and Viewing Platform +

Program: White Cube Gallery

210.00 feet

+

240.00 feet

Level Twelve : White Cube Gallery

Level Ten : Sky Lobby Viewing Platform

(A)typical Plans This series of plans show the programmatic elements in the tower that cause the swell. Their particular set dimensions force the skin of the building to stretch in order to accommodate their size and area. The consistent plan of the hotel units consists of a faceted exterior edge at the skin, but a smooth edge at the end of the room. The rooms remain the same type unless space/area requirements require redesigning the plan.


+ 675.00

+ 420.00

+ 330.00

+ 285.00

+ 240.00

+ 210.00

+ 60.00

- 45.00


Sky Bar

+ 675.00

Mechanical

Hotel Rooms

+ 420.00

Mechanical

Lap + Physio Pool Changing Rooms

Black Box Theater Diving Pool Changing Rooms

Gallery

+ 330.00

+ 285.00

+ 240.00

Viewing Platform

Sky Lobby Reception Cafe

+ 210.00

Mechanical

Hotel Rooms

Kitchen Breakfast Cafe Gym Spa

Parking Loading

+ 60.00

- 45.00


0 1 2

7

4 2

3

1

6

5

10

Laminated safety glass, 2 No. 10 mm, coated Glass fixing, stainless steel, rigid Glass fixing, stainless steel, non-rigid Silicone seal Stainless steel rectangular section, 100 x 40 x 4 mm Steel rectangular section, 60 x 40 x 4 mm Bracing, round steel bar, 20 mm dia. Stainless steel sheet, 2 mm, bent to suit thermal insulation Stainless steel panel, thermally insulated, 83 mm Hinged stainless steel grating Stainless steel sheet, removable Cover to drainage, stainless steel grating, 35 x 35mm

9

11

8 12

Detailed Section Facade Detail Section Th facade of the building consist of a double 1’ = 1/3�skin the works as an both an envelope and as structure. It creates a space frame that encapsulates the entirety of the tower and allows tension and compression ties to pass through them.


1/32 model, arch detail


1/32 model

1/32 model, arch detail


1/16 section model


Little Boxes Advisor: Luis Callejas . Spring 2015 Harvard University, GSD, Core II a six-week studio project

This project allows the learning about a building outside it’s apparent boundaries, how the city (and the landscape) influences an architectural problem, and in turn how the building changes the landscape and at it’s best, is capable to catalyze unexpected urban effects beyond the required program. The library as program is an excuse and a beautiful classic architecture problem. At the core of the course is how the library is more than a hermetic container of books, and how architectural form is a tool for defining landscape as much as other techniques like planting and land forming. One park, multiple characters. The overall program distribution is essential to the project, thus an extensive analysis of each of the programs; their relative sizes, their subdivision and their physical/conceptual relationships become the initial step in site allocations. There then exist a reciprocity between the selected sites and the structures which they support in turn offering insight to an urban response. The characters may be independent but exist together as one holistic park defining a library.


The Three Typologies James Turrell’s models of Autonomous Structures are freestanding chambers designed for experiencing ephemeral phenomena. The water towers serve both to invoke and reinforce the sculptural properties of the architecture showing no contextual identity. Ducks are symbols themselves, they can’t be anything but what they are as their shape foretells and often blur the line between building and sculpture.


Collection Collection Rare Books Library Collections Offices Conservation Facilities

Scholarly Areas

43,592.6 ft2 60.80 %

Scholarly Areas 15,679.0 ft2 22.40 %

Reference Desk Research Carrels Large Reading Room Small Reading Rooms Computer Research Station Book Scanners Reproduction Facilities Meeting Conference

Rare Books

14,814.8 ft2

34.80 %

Library Collections

24,691.4 ft2

58.00 %

Offices

1,543.2 ft

3.60 %

Conservation Facilities

1,543.2 ft

3.60 %

Reference Desk

987.7 ft2

6.30 %

Research Carrels

1,234.6 ft

7.80 %

4,938.3 ft

31.50 %

Small Reading Rooms

2

2,963.0 ft

18.90 %

Computer Research Station

1,851.9 ft2

11.80 %

617.3 ft2

3.90 %

617.3 ft2

3.90 %

Book Scanners Reproduction Facilities Meeting

11,728.4 ft 16.80 % 2

2

2

1,234.6 ft2

7.80 %

1,234.6 ft

7.80 %

Lobby/Reception

617.3 ft2

5.30 %

Book Shop

2

1,851.9 ft

15.80 %

Café

1,851.9 ft2

15.80 %

Gallery

1,234.6 ft2

10.50 %

Small Auditorium

6,172.8 ft2

52.60 %

Service Areas Service Areas

2

Large Reading Room

Conference

Lobby/Reception Book Shop Café Gallery Small Auditorium

2

2

Conservation Facilities Reference Desk Research Carrels Book Scanners Reproduction Facilities

Rare Books Library Collections Offices Small Reading Rooms Computer Research Stations Meeting Rooms Conference Rooms Café Gallery

Fragmented

Autonomous

Grouped

Expandable

Library Collection

Rare Books

Public/Private

Climate

Architecture History Geography Biology Chemistry Physics Mathematics English Lit. Physiology Design Technology Art Economics Business Sociology Medicine Engineering

The Americas Europe Asia Africa and Oceania Ancient World Contemporary Photography Prints and Drawings Musical Instruments Jewelry

Conservation Facilities Reproduction Facilities Offices Rare Books Small Auditorium Conference Rooms Meeting Rooms Computer Research Stations Research Carrels Book Scanners Small Reading Room Gallery Large Reading Room Library Collections Reference Desk Book Shop Café Lobby

Café Book Shop Reference Desk Lobby Conference Rooms Meeting Rooms Small Reading Room Large Reading Room Research Carrels Small Auditorium Computer Research Stations Book Scanners Offices Gallery Library Collections Reproduction Facilities Conservation Facilities Rare Books

Controlled

Offices Large Reading Room Small Reading Room Computer Research Stations Meeting Rooms Conference Rooms Lobby/Reception Book Shop Café Gallery Small Auditorium

More Public

Rare Books Library Collections Offices Conservation Facilities Small Reading Rooms Computer Research Stations Book Scanners Reproduction Facilities Meeting Rooms Conference Rooms Book Shop Café


02 01 03 28 31 05 06

09 07

08

37 34 11 10 15

36 12

35

14

13

16

27 17

19 33 20

32 21 22 01-15 16-25 33 34 26 32 28 29 35 31 27 30

Library Collection Rare Books Small Auditorium Book Store Cafe Large Reading Room Small Reading Room Multi Purpose Room 1+2 Lobby Gallery Research Stations Offices

25 23

31

29

04 18

30 23 24

Programmatic Distribution An abstract grid is initially superimposed onto the park in order to unite disparate parts that exist within it. The landscape is then organized through an introduction of structures as anomalies to the grid and their locations respond to their program and the geographical/ecological aspects of the landscape.


+ 4.00

+ 3.00

x: - 01 y: - 08

x: + 00 y: - 06

Multi Purpose Room

L. Reading Room

+ 3.00

+ 3.00

x: + 10 y: + 02

x: + 01 y: - 04

S. Reading Room

Small Auditorium

+ 3.00

+ 1.00

x: + 00 y: + 06

x: - 02 y: + 07

Book Shop

Gallery

+ 4.00

+ 5.00

x: - 01 y: - 02

Computer Stations

x: + 01 y: + 00

Lobby


The Ducks The typology of structures relate to the autonomy of the programs they house and redefine the typical folly by designing how they land on the landscape.


gallery plan + render

The Integration The overall integration into the landforms and organization of vegetation is designed for the quality of the spaces and controlling the entry sequences into each structure.


1:200 final model


1:500 site model


The Conditioning Center Advisor: Luis Callejas . Spring 2015 Harvard University, GSD, Core II a four-week studio project

In spirit of the Boston Olympic bid and in effort to increase community support, the development of the Neighborhood Olympic Conditioning Center is to serve as an ancillary conditioning ground for events, as well as a recreation/exercise facility for the community. The Conditioning Center contains a heterogeneous mix of program with characteristics approaching extremes, as such, the athletic center typologically embraces an indeterminate organizational strategy and imparts no obvious hierarchical clarity. The Conditioning Center is located in Charlestown, Boston, and bordered by two major streets: Bunker Hill and Mead Streets which offer two independent street frontages. The parameters are rectangular property line and a dynamic cross section due to the dramatic overlook facing southwest.


Exploded Axonometric The exploded axonometric shows all the elements of the building; the ramp, the levels, the windows, the walls and the roof exploded off the full form within the context.


Ground Floor Plan

Primary Section


Interior view from east end

The Ramp The ramps cuts through the building and allows accessibility from both east and the west. The center of the ramp becomes the transitional space where one view the internal activities and/or access the Conditioning Center.


First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


1/16 model

1/16 model, elevation

Sunken Center The ramp, the faces of the building are folded planes of the same surface. The Conditioning Center is almost completely sunken and the folded faces open slight views into the interior.


Third Floor Plan

Roof Floor Plan


*completed by Yousef A Huusein


In Within Without* Advisor: Luis Callejas . Spring 2016 Harvard University, GSD, Core IV a comprehensive twelve-week studio project *completed with Sasha Bears and Grace McEniry

The city is made of its streets and its squares, its blocks and its buildings, but also of its dwellers. The project investigates the spatial organization of the city and its effects on its social fabric. The city is the field of inquiry of many contemporary disciplines but the uniqueness of the approach consists of the understanding of the city through its transformation. The proposal forms a decentralized net with articulated internal nodes and acquires its identity as a figure against an established background. Rather than creating a new footprint as a sense of order to expand on the existing fabric, the project asserts its identity in opposition to that background. It needs it as much as it needs its own context. It stresses its difference from the existing reality by existing within it. The project is based on a tight grouping of mutually opposing moments, each expressing their own desires into the surrounding. Set within this background, it has the capacity to reorder the context and the system of living without destroying it. The project is a gathering of sculptural forms of architecture, landscape (and infrastructure): buildings and open spaces placed in proximity to one another to redefine intimate interstitial spaces. The scale never exceeds that of a pedestrians walking radius, within which it generates a sense of centrality. In this frame, the center is in the vicinity, but always fleeting, always where one is not. Thus, the perception of the project oscillates between a grasp of the whole and a recognition of its different individual elements.


NORTH

NORTH - EAST

NORTH - WEST

393

4000

527

3000 4000

3000 381 234

1700

302

1700 516 231 161 +/-

129

4000 3000 333 207

1700

EAST

WEST 701 363 920

338 363 +/-

1500

1723

3000

3000

4000

4000

SOUTH - EAST

SOUTH - WEST

SOUTH

990

*completed by YSG

NORTH

NORTH - EAST

NORTH - WEST

9416

10200

8039

8669

7730 7974

7516

8128

EAST

WEST 7600

7750

7989

8399

8825

8840

8268

SOUTH - EAST

8071

SOUTH - WEST

SOUTH

*completed by YSG

Boston, Mexico City The Boston, Mexico City analysis looks at the conditions of the block, their densities, distributions, and disruptions of each city. The lessons learned from the creations of the Mexico City blocks assisted in the techniques used to infect the South Boston Fabric.


*completed by Grace McEniry

Site Plan The distribution of the master plan is a regular grid imposed onto the site. Every other block is selected to act as either a landscape, a housing mat, or a museum. This distribution along with the infills produces net over the context in which one cannot conceive the project as a whole.


*completed by Sasha Bears


*completed by Sasha Bears

*completed by Sasha Bears

The Mat The mat units measure at 400ft2. In such a tight space, the most private element within a living space - the toilet - is isolated and reduced to the ground floor where there is solely the entrance and the spiral staircase, leaving the ground floor open across the mat.


*completed by Yousef A Hussein


*completed by Yousef A Hussein

*completed by Yousef A Hussein


*completed by Yousef A Hussein

*completed by Yousef A Hussein


*completed by Yousef A Hussein

*completed by Yousef A Hussein


*completed by Yousef A Hussein


Between East & West: A Gulf* Reporting From The Front Biennale Architectture 2016 Venezia a six-month exhibition

BEWAG began as a series of questions - an exploration of points and territories that asks how the architect can imagine a scale beyond the national. The investigation of the hydrography of the Arabian/Persian Gulf and its islands reveals as a realm forgotten between two coasts. Acting now as the liquid boundary between nations, the Gulf and its islands are the territories in which the identities of the coasts were initially formed. Prior to the discovery of oil, its waters were the source of livelihood for the region which was connected through trade, cultural exchange and commerce. The shallow body of water and low sandbars that form its islands, create a shifting network of isolated and connected nodes. The Gulf island was inextricably linked to the movement of people and resources, yet of a scale and possible containment that allowed it to be planned and experimented upon throughout its history. This mean that the island was the smallest plannable political and ecological space in the region. An invitation was sent out and asked different architectural offices in the region to propose an instance within the larger framework of a masterplan. The notion of ‘masterplanning’ these islands, through variant architectural contributions, suggests that territorial reimagining of a region can occur through the acupuncture structuring of points of contact and exchange. Such a concept runs precisely counter to the top-down planning approach of cities and countries in the Gulf, however such a subversion is necessary where a united effort is an unlikely proposition.


Pre-Opening


Post-Opening


Das Island - Design Earth


Publication Extrusion


Pavilion Space - Arsenale


Farur - Matteo Manini Architects


Education. 2014 - 2018 . Harvard University . Graduate School of Design . Boston, USA Candidate of Masters in Architecture I (M.Arch.I)

2011 - 2014 . McGill University . School of Architecture . Montreal, Canada Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) Architecture . Distinction

2009 - 2011 . Dalhousie University . Faculty of Engineering . Halifax, Canada Civil Engineering

Work Experience. April 2016 - Sept 2016 . LCLA . Architect . Cambridge, USA Modeling, Design and Visualization of Casa Ballen

Feb 2016 - July 2016 . Oslo Triennale . Reseach Assistant . Cambridge, USA Harvard University Research assistant to Luis Callejas

Jan 2016 - Sept 2016 . Venice Biennale, Kuwait National Pavilion . Exhibition Designer . Cambridge, USA Research Architect and Exhibition Designer

Sept 2014 - Present . Harvard University . Computer Resources Group . Cambridge, USA Support for students, faculty and staff at Harvard GSD

May 2013 - Dec 2015 . Emad Al Samhan Exhibitions . Architect . Kuwait Lead Architect . Al-Ghanim Private Villa, Al-Samhan Villa, Sheikh Ahmed Al Fahad Diwan

Jan 2014 - April 2014 . McGill University . Machine Shop Supervisor . Montreal, Canada Laser Cutters, 3D Printers, Project Room and Wood Workshop

Exhibitions + Publications.

. GSD Platform 9: Still Life “Bulbous” and “Archetypes” . Fourteen: The Sports Journal The first sports magazine in Kuwait

2016 2016 2016

. Between East & West a Gulf

Kuwait National Pavilion, Venice Bienanle

. GSD Platform 8 Book + Exhibition “Site, Building, Reciprocity” and “Little Boxes” . Design Miami “Little Boxes” model featured in Design Miami UNBUILT Pavilion 2015 . The Wallpaper Magazine “Little Boxes” featured in UNBUILT Pavilion article 2015 . Tuesday Magazine “Overcast” featured as cover and centerfold 2015 . Frances Loeb Library Design Competition The Brief 2014 . SCG ‘13 Greece Travel Photography and Sketching Exhibition

2015

2015

Awards.

. Harvard University . David Rockerfeller Center for Latin American Studies Conference Travel Grant 2015 . Harvard University . John E. Irving Fellowship Award 2014 . McGill SoA . Derek Drummond Award in Architecture . Outstanding contribution to extracurricular activities 2014 . McGill SoA . Wilfred Truman Shaver Scholarship . Travel fellowship for highest standing in graduating class 2013 . McGill SoA . Philip J. Turner Prize . Highest standing at McGill SoA in Design Studio III 2013 . McGill SoA . Pekka H. M. Erkkila Scholarship . Outstanding student in U2 Class 2012 . McGill Faculty of Engineering . Dean’s Honor List 2012 . McGill Faculty of Engineering . Engineering Scholarship . Placing in top tenth percentile of faculty 2016

Qualifications. Languages . Bilingual in English and Arabic, with knowledge of conversational French Software . Adobe Suite, AutoCAD, Design Builder, Rhino with V-ray, Grasshopper, T-Splines and Diva, ArcGIS


Selection of Works - GSD Core