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youruci A billion ways to Shape the Future CAMPUS LAUNCHES COMPREHENSIVE CAMPAIGN TO RAISE $1 BILLION BY 2015

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Gold Medal Performance

See the story on page 9 with John Speraw, Team USA assistant volleyball coach and head coach of UCI’s Men’s team

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youruci

Fall2008 Issue

www.alumni.uci.edu

9 TIRELESS SUPPORT

UCI coach, alumnus improving Nicaraguan community

10 ELECTION 2008

Political science faculty discuss upcoming general election

16 BILLIONS OF WAYS

UC Irvine launches first campus-wide fund raising campaign

13 MAPPING THE FUTURE

New engineering dean taking in the landscape of UC Irvine

27 ON FIRE

ICS alumni develop VOIP company

31 ATTENTION, PLEASE

COMMENTARY: Liz Toomey talks politics and getting out to vote

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER UCI NEWS ATHLETICS

24 28 30

Publisher Jorge E. Ancona Editor Michelle Williams Administrative Intern Writer Diana Thai Contributing writers Kathy Bold, Patricia DeVoe, Allison Dolan, Kristen Hughes, Bob Olson, Michael Reza, Bill Ross, Blake Stone, Heather Wuebker and Liz Toomey Graphic Design Intern Katrina Dikitanan Your UCI is published quarterly for members of the UCI Alumni Association and friends of the University of California, Irvine. You can reach the association by phone: 949-UCI-ALUM (824-2586) or toll free 888-824-2466; by fax: 949-824-7383 or by e-mail: alumni@uci.edu.

CLASS NOTES UCIAA MEMBERSHIP UCI CALENDAR

UCI ALUMNI ASSOCIATION STAFF Jorge E. Ancona Executive Director Michelle Williams Associate Executive Director Allison Dolan Associate Executive Director Kristie Kee Director of Programs and Chapters Helen Little Director of Finance and Administration Michael Reza Membership and Marketing Manager

Jeff Minhas ‘04 Programs Coordinator Blake Stone ‘05 Alumni Relations Coordinator www.alumni.uci.edu | page 3


UCI Alumni Association BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Jenny Doh ’91 Immediate Past President Steve Capps ’69 Secretary/Historian Cathy Stites ’92 VP Advocacy Ed Raskin ’02 VP Development Anne Rosse, M.A. ’90 VP Finance Rick Evans ’69 VP Membership Kent Yamaguchi ’83, ‘84 VP Programs Jen Cole-Gutierrez ’97 VP Scholarship Johanna Wilson ’98 VP Volunteer Relations David Fanous ’03 DIRECTORS-AT-LARGE Michael Adams ’04 Rebecca Kanter ’00 Christine R. Lee ’90 Manfredo Lespier ’81 Dennis Nguyen ’94 Serafina Raskin ’02 Rita Santangelo ’86 Salvador Sarmiento ’73 Sabra Smith ’92 Brett Williamson ’86 CHAPTER REPRESENTATIVES African-American Chapter Cosmos Eubany ’00 ICS Chapter Farshad Farhand ’94 Santa Ana Alumni Chapter Charles Dobson ’70, MS ’79

letter from the publisher Welcome Anteaters! In your hands is a piece of Anteater history, the firstever issue of Your UCI, the new magazine of the UCI Alumni Association. While the name has changed, the theme has not. Your UCI will continue to share with you stories about UC Irvine and about our most amazing university “product” — our alumni. This issue marks the beginning of another first, the University of California, Irvine’s first campus-wide fund raising campaign. The “Shaping the Future” campaign is designed to do just that, shape the future of UCI, Orange County and the world around us. We’ve dedicated an entire section in this inaugural issue to sharing with you the details of this historic campus undertaking: A billion ways to Shape the Future. Because of the generosity of alumni and friends, UC Irvine is able to begin the “public” phase of its campaign having already raised more than $400 million toward our $1 billion goal. We at the association know that not only are our alumni and friends generous in their financial support of the campus, but also in giving of their time and talent to the university and the world at-large. In this issue, you will learn about assistant coach David Kniffin’s ’03 housing project in Nicaragua; details about branding global companies from Wright Massey, M.B.A. ’92; the end of an era as Charlie Brande ’69 retires and the entrepreneurial spirit that sparked a group of ICS alumni to create CallFire. Working on a university campus, one could take for granted all of the expertise and resources that are a stone’s throw away. UCI is overflowing with expert faculty and staff who, if asked, gladly help us navigate today’s national issues. With the Presidential election quickly approaching, we’ve asked faculty from the political science department to highlight some key election issues including voter turnout and the breadth of the next President’s powers. You’ll also hear from a dear colleague, Liz Toomey, assistant vice chancellor for government and community who asks “Are you paying attention”? to the election and state of U.S. affairs.

EX-OFFICIO

She is, and so should we.

Chancellor’s Designate Tom Mitchell, Vice Chancellor

And speaking of attention, thank you for giving us yours. We hope you enjoy this first issue of Your UCI and we look forward to sharing more of our story with you in future issues.

UCIAA Executive Director Jorge E. Ancona, Assistant Vice Chancellor ASUCI Representative Megan Braun

Best from campus,

AGS Representative Carrie Carmody Student Alumni Association Aylin Zafar

Jorge E. Ancona Assistant Vice Chancellor, Alumni Relations Executive Director, UCI Alumni Association page 4 | fall ’08 your uci


the wire:

news from the community rehabilitation for patients with fractures and nerve and tendon injuries involving the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder, as well as chronic problems such as carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis.

Top hand surgeon joins UC Irvine One of the nation’s most acclaimed hand surgeons has joined UC Irvine to start the Center for Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery.

where he was director for 15 years. He serves as an orthopedic surgery professor with a second affiliation with Children’s Hospital of Orange County.

Dr. Neil Jones comes to UCI from the renowned UCLA Hand Center

The center will provide comprehensive diagnosis, surgical treatment and

Jones’ research has focused on limb transplantation and nerve transplantation, areas that may lead to improved techniques for reconstruction of severe upperextremity injuries. He has been recognized in the “Best Doctors in America” since 1992 and is president of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery.

UC Irvine’s first employee, L.E. Cox, passes away at 94 Lavonne Edwin Cox, better known as L.E. Cox, was the first vice chancellor of business and finance. His job: To oversee the $30 million

campus construction. Cox died in August from complications of a fall. “He was very proud of being the first employee at UC Irvine,” said his son,

Allan Cox. Cox, who had helped build 24 air bases for the Army Corps of Engineers, arrived at the future site of UCI in

Institute explores “m-banking” The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation awarded UC Irvine a $1.7 million grant to create a research institute focused on the growing use of mobile technology in providing banking and financial services to people in developing countries. The Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion is the first to explore how the world’s poorest people spend, store and save money. The institute will study how these habits are affected by the emerging mobile banking

1961 driving a station wagon stuffed with office supplies. He set up his desk in a secondfloor bedroom of the Irvine Ranch house, which was located across Irvine Boulevard from The Irvine Company’s agricultural headquarters. The family home became an eclectic mix of its cowboy past and its high-tech future. “The bunkhouse lunches were almost an institution,” said Raymond Watson, vice

industry, known as “mbanking,” which could make financial services and the security they provide available to millions of poor people for the first time. It also funds research in developing countries, hosts conferences and provides scholarships to those who conduct such research. UCI anthropologist Bill Maurer is the institute’s founding director. The Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion is housed in UCI’s School of Social Sciences where Maurer chairs the anthropology department. continued on page 6

president of The Irvine Company at the time, who worked downstairs from Cox. “Everyone wanted to be there. Nixon came by, and Ford... There were lots of ranch hands, but only 10 of us working on the planning side.” Cox continued to oversee building, landscaping and other facilities projects until his retirement in 1978. He is survived by his wife, Edna; sons Allan and Stephen; and four grandchildren. 

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 5


news wire Student housing to combine amenities, green features Construction has begun on a $221 million student housing project that combines desirable amenities with many green features and will allow UC Irvine to lead the University of California system in the percentage of student population housed on campus. In addition, the project will enable UCI to move closer to its 50 percent on-campus housing goal. The community will optimize energy and water efficiencies and is situated on campus to promote the use of public transportation, bicycles and walking. Additionally, it will reduce light pollution, waste water and construction waste, and utilize regional materials. At move-in, students can expect fluorescent lighting, low-flow plumbing fixtures, tankless water heaters, and droughttolerant landscaping irrigated with reclaimed water. The project will be a part of UCI’s green building education program that includes

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sustainable curriculum and building tours. 

Ovarian cancer drug trial reveals promising new treatment Women with recurrent ovarian cancer can be helped by an experimental therapy using a drug already touted for its ability to fight other cancers, a finding that provides hope for improved treatment of this deadly disease. Dr. Bradley Monk, a UC Irvine gynecologic oncologist who led the worldwide phase III clinical trial, said trabectedin is the most recent addition to a short list of active drug therapies for recurrent ovarian cancer. “These are exciting results because positive trials in recurrent ovarian cancer are rare and have almost always led to federally approved treatments,” said Monk, an associate professor who studies and treats ovarian cancers at the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UC Irvine. “This treatment undoubtedly will be evaluated carefully by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and, if approved, will give women with ovarian cancer another much needed

option.” Phase III studies are multicenter trials on large patient groups designed to be the definitive assessment of a drug’s effectiveness. Such a study is often the last step before a drug is reviewed by a regulatory agency like the FDA for approval

as a safe, effective treatment. When ovarian cancer is detected early – when it is confined to the ovaries – more than 90 percent of women will live at least five years, according to the American Cancer Society. Only about 20 percent of cases are

detected that early. If the cancer is detected after it has spread, only about 30 percent of women survive five years. Each year, approximately 20,000 American women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and about 15,000 die of the disease. continued on page 7

Scientists to study synthetic telepathy A team of UC Irvine scientists has been awarded a $4 million grant from the U.S. Army Research Office to study the neuroscientific and signal-processing foundations of synthetic telepathy. The research could lead to a communication system that would benefit soldiers on the battlefield as well as paralysis and stroke patients, according to lead researcher Michael D’Zmura, chair of the UCI Department of Cognitive Sciences.

The brain-computer interface would use a noninvasive brain imaging technology like electroencephalography to let people communicate thoughts to each other.  For example, a soldier would “think” a message to be transmitted and a computer-based speech recognition system would decode the EEG signals. The decoded thoughts, in essence translated brain waves, are transmitted using a system that points in the direction of the intended target.

D’Zmura will collaborate with UCI professors Ramesh Srinivasan, Gregory Hickok and Kourosh Saberi as well as researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland. The grant comes from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative program, which supports research from both science and engineering disciplines. Its goal is to develop applications for military and commercial uses.


Environmental stress threatens global security, UCI study finds Environmental stresses such as climate change and resource scarcity pose enormous threats to global stability. Armed conflicts over food and water and the effects of increasingly severe storms and flooding might be avoided if the private sector, nonprofit and government entities partner to take action, according to a new report prepared for the International Peace Institute by Richard A. Matthew, director of UCI’s Center for Unconventional Security Affairs. The solutions to problems created by scarce natural resources, ecosystem damage, climate change and other forms of environmental degradation are often within our grasp, says Matthew. Drawing on more than a decade of climate change and environmental security research by economists and social scientists, Matthew came up with recommendations to lessen the impact of water, food and fuel shortages on the world’s poorest communities.

“The challenge,” he says, “is bringing together a critical mass of groups with a variety of interests to create enough momentum to make a difference. The thousands of micro-level actions being taken around the world are important and often courageous, but now is the time for a step up in scale.”

a third year – and will receive $30,000 annually to continue his research in precipitation estimation using remotely sensed satellite images. Behrangi is the first student from The Henry Samueli School of Engineering to receive this distinction.

Doctoral student earns prestigious NASA fellowship

Women over 90 are significantly more likely to have dementia than men of the same age, according to UC Irvine researchers involved with the 90+ Study, one of the nation’s largest studies of dementia and other health factors in the fastest-growing age demographic.

Ali Behrangi, a third-year civil and environmental Ph.D. student, has been awarded NASA’s Earth and Space Science Fellowship, which aims to ensure the continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines required to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Behrangi was selected from a highly competitive pool of students in the area of Earth Science research to receive a two-year award – with the option to extend the fellowship to

Women over 90 more likely to have dementia than men

The UC Irvine study, conducted in Laguna Woods, Calif., is among the few to look at dementia in people over age 90. It found that the likelihood of having dementia doubled every five years in women after reaching 90, but not in men. The results also showed that women with a higher education appeared to be as much as 45 percent less likely to have dementia compared to women with less

UCI choirs win international honors UC Irvine choral ensembles, under the direction of music professor Joseph Huszti, won top awards at the International Eisteddfod competition in Llangollen, Wales, one of the world’s most prestigious choral competitions. Dozens of choral groups participated from universities and music conservatories representing 34 countries. The Women’s Chorus won first place in their division and won prize money for best performance of the piece required of all contestants, “Wellspring,” commissioned by revered Welsh composer Hilary Tann. The Concert Choir

education. With women comprising three-quarters of the 90-plus population, the study raises questions why these women nonagenarians are more

placed second in the youth choir competition and sixth in mixed choirs. “This is the equivalent of winning an Olympic medal,” Huszti said. “The top choirs all audition and are invited to participate in the top six divisions. It’s a big deal all over the world – there were choirs from Argentina, Belarus, Malaysia, India, Denmark, Algeria, the Philippines. We don’t have anything like this in the U.S.” The UCI choir students paid most of their own trip expenses, and scholarships covered the rest. To watch videos of the UCI choirs, visit: www.llangollen.tv/en/clip/172.

likely to have dementia than men. The study appeared in the July 2 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. 

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 7


sports news

Brande to retire at end of season Charlie Brande ’69 has announced his retirement, effective at the conclusion of his ninth season at the helm of the Anteater women’s volleyball team. Brande, a member of the Anteaters 1965-66 basketball team, is a 1969 graduate of UC Irvine from the School of Social Sciences, where he studied economics.   While he is retiring from his coaching duties, Brande will remain in a

ward to continuing as a member of the Anteater family,” Brande said.

fundraising capacity with UC Irvine Athletics. “I am extremely proud to have been a part of the growth of both the men’s and women’s programs at UCI and I look for-

In 2007, Brande led the Anteaters to a third-place finish in the Big West and had five Anteaters named to All-Big West teams for the first time in the program’s history. As the program’s fourth head coach, he has produced 27 All-Big West Conference selections, two American Volleyball Coaches Association All-Americans, a Big West

Player of the Year and an AVCA Freshman of the Year. Brande began his UCI coaching career as the head coach of the men’s

program and served as the Director of Volleyball from 1999-2002. In 1999, he was awarded Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Coach of the Year honors .

Coach never tires of helping people, environment By Kristen Hughes UCI Athletics

Coaches are always floating in and out of the offices at UC Irvine, hustling from practice to the next recruiting trip, from one tournament to the administration building. Tracking down a coach can be a job in itself. To track down Men’s Volleyball Assistant Coach David Kniffin, one sometimes has to go to even greater lengths.

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Kniffin ’03 often disappears to Central America during his time off to help develop a sustainable housing community in rural Nicaragua. Kniffin, who earned his de-

gree in humanities with a major in philosophy, has had an interest in sustainable housing and community involvement. So when friend Tim Kelly mentioned that he was going to begin investing time and money in a Nicaraguan community, Kniffin jumped at the opportunity to volunteer. Kelly purchased 140 acres of land outside of San Juan del Sur, a costal Nicaraguan fishing town known for its surfing, and parceled off six lots for an experiment in sustainable development. Kniffin calls it “Casa Llanta,” which translates to “Tire House.”

The land is meant to support socially sensitive houses, referred to globally as Earthship buildings, that catch drinking water, create electricity, cultivate food and treat sewage without impacting the local municipalities. As the Casa Llanta name implies, recycled tires are used in the construction process; specifically they are stacked and rammed with dirt and used in place of traditional concrete block or wood framing. In addition to re-using tires, Earthship homes continued on page 25


UCI hoops on ESPN, Fox

UC Irvine will have three regular-season men’s basketball games on ESPN and Fox Sports Net West. The Anteaters’ home game with UC Davis Saturday, Jan. 17 will have a 1 p.m. start time on FSN PRIME TICKET. UCI hosts Cal State Northridge Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 8 p.m. on ESPNU and travels to Cal State Fullerton Saturday, Mar. 7 for a 5 p.m. tip on FSN WEST. Coach Pat Douglass’ squad opens its 200809 schedule Nov. 8 with an exhibition game against Cal Poly Pomona at 7 p.m. in the Bren Events Center. UCI travels to USC for the regular-season opener Saturday, Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. UCIAA is hosting a pre-game reception in Los Angeles before the game. See page 14 for details.

Women’s basketball hires new head coach Molly Goodenbour, 36, comes to UCI after two successful seasons at Chico State, where she compiled a 52-11 record. Last season, Goodenbour was named California Collegiate Athletic Association Coach of the Year after guiding the Wildcats to a 28-6 record, tying the Chico State single-season record for victories. Her 2007-08 team ended the year ranked 17th in the final USA Today/ESPN Division II Coaches Poll, won the CCAA regularseason and tournament titles, as well as advancing to the semifinals of the NCAA Division II Women’s West Regional.

PROCRASTINATION PAYS IN GOLD By Michelle Williams UCI Alumni Association

John Speraw is finally home. After nearly two years on the road as an assistant to Hugh McCutcheon and the U.S. Men’s National volleyball team, Speraw is enjoying his own bed – finally. Speraw, often found by Olympic videographers pacing the floor during the men’s matches, just completed his first trip as an Olympic coach. “I’m not sure if everything has sunk in yet,” Speraw says with an easy laugh. Rightfully so, the seventh-year head coach of UC Irvine’s Men’s Volleyball team returned from China just to catch a flight to Argentina where he led the Anteaters as they competed in a rare overseas tournament. Exhaustion aside, Speraw couldn’t downplay the impact the Olympic Games left on him. “The Olympics actually live up to the hype,” Speraw says. While acknowledging that his Chinese experience wasn’t terribly authentic, spending his time in the athletes’ village and inside the gym working with the team, the allure of the Olympics wasn’t lost on him, “I think the Chinese did a remarkable job. The Olympics are truly an amazing feat.” And to think, a little less procrastination on his part, and John Speraw might be “doctor” today instead of the coach who helped the U.S. men’s team earn its first volleyball gold since the 1984 Los Angeles Games. While finishing his bachelor’s degree in microbiology and molecular genetics at UCLA, Speraw took his time scheduling his MCAT test. It was during that downtime that he found his life’s passion -- from the end of a college bench. Having just completed his final season as middle blocker under legendary Coach Al Scates and, in his words, being the lone Bruin not headed for a pro volleyball career, Speraw took Scates up on his offer to help out; handling statistics and some coaching duties on the UCLA sideline. “I enjoyed being on the bench and eventually grew into a role where I was helping affect the team’s outcome based on giving the guys feedback,” Speraw recalls. “I really enjoyed that and a year and a half after I graduated, I decided that coaching was something I wanted to do.” continued on page 14

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 9


Election

2008 By Heather Wuebker, School of Social Sciences

It’s an election year and the entire country is abuzz with talk of who will become the nation’s 44th President. As we get ready to elect a new leader to the Oval Office, numerous questions arise surrounding the political process and its potential outcomes. For some help in deciphering answers to the 2008 election puzzle, such as voter participation and the impact of race on the election why not turn to the UC Irvine political science department which is ranked among the top 35 programs in the nation? bout more a n r a le o T science olitical UCI’s p isit ment, v depart sci.uci.edu. oli www.p

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ccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, 64 percent of U.S. citizens of legal age and status voted in the 2004 Presidential election. This may not appear to be a large turnout rate but it is significant when considering that many factors may reduce the motivation and opportunity for individuals to vote. One factor, associate professor Carole Uhlaner explains, is obligation. “Often when people join together,” she says, “they have been moved by a sense of obligation triggered by a candidate or leader they feel will represent their individual interests.” In the U.S., she says, this obligation often involves identifying with a candidate based on like ethnicity. WHAT FACTORS DETERMINE HOW DIFFERENT RACES AND ETHNIC GROUPS VOTE? Looking at the electoral behavior of African Americans, Professor Katherine Tate says, “In the past, race has been a divisive factor both between and within political parties. Now, you see 40-60 percent of Blacks supporting policies that staunch liberals would be hard-pressed to support.” She cites a move toward increased support of welfare, immigration, mandatory sentencing reforms and more. “Blacks have become much more politically incorporated, not only as voters, but as key leaders in political organizations and as candidates themselves,” says Tate. “Blacks have never been closer to the Democratic Party than they are today,” she adds; a factor which will have an impact at the polls. Also showing up in record numbers to vote in primaries across the country are Latinos, the fastest growing ethnic group in America. “Historically, however, Latinos have a low voter turnout record on election day when compared with other ethnic groups,” Louis DeSipio, Chicano/Latino studies department chair, explains pointing to surveys conducted by the U.S. Cen-

Anteaters in public service I

n each issue of Your UCI, we will highlight alumni in their workplace. The following alumni are just a few of the Anteaters who have made public service their career. — Compiled by Blake Stone ‘05

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Janet Nguyen ‘00, is a member of the Orange County Board of Supervisors. Upon her election, she became the first woman to represent the First District, the first

Asian-American and the first VietnameseAmerican to serve on the Board of Supervisors, and the youngest Supervisor elected in Orange County. She is only the fifth woman to serve on the Board of Supervisors, and was named one of OC Metro

Magazine’s 2006 “25 Hottest” People in Orange County. She was awarded the We Give Thanks 2004 Women of Vision Award, recognizing outstanding women who have provided exceptional services to the community.


sus Bureau. When they do vote, DeSipio says that Latinos generally gravitate toward the Democratic side due to the party’s focus on education, healthcare and other social services. DeSipio argues that lackluster attendance of Latinos on Election Day may not be directly linked to ethnicity, but rather to those factors responsible for bringing others to the polls. “Generally speaking, the typical individuals who go to the polls are older, more educated citizens with higher incomes,” says DeSipio. “Latinos as a whole have a greater concentration of younger, less educated citizens who earn below-average incomes.” WHAT STRATEGIES WILL BRING VOTERS TO THE POLLS? DeSipio’s point is well-founded; previously, candidates have failed to mobilize growing key constituent groups and have instead focused a majority of their efforts on the average voter. Voter turnout results from the primary season, however, may indicate change in the trend as record numbers of minority and non-traditional voters are “turning out the vote.” In other UCI studies within Latino and minority communities, findings suggest that come Election Day in California, face-toface canvassing of low-income and minority communities directly contributes to dramatic increases in voter participation within these populations. The study shows that ignoring lowpropensity voters can be a risky oversight – or opportunity – for any politician seeking votes from marginal communities. Professor Russell Dalton says youth participation also is changing. “The efforts of Presidential candidates – particularly in the Democratic Party – to mobilize young people are transforming the political landscape,” says Dalton. “As a population that lives in the digital age, technology-driven tactics to reach young voters via Web sites, ‘viral’ e-mails, YouTube and Facebook

have certainly hit their mark. “ HOW MUCH INFLUENCE DOES THE PRESIDENT HAVE AT HOME AND ABROAD? On November 4, the American public will choose a new President to lead the country, and after spending the past eight years under the same leadership, this changing of the guard will be felt around the world. Matthew Beckmann, assistant professor, studies the Presidency and leadership styles different Presidents bring to the Oval Office. “During his/her tenure, the President is the dominant force in American politics, the one person citizens consistently look to for policy leadership,” says Beckmann. “A President’s greatest impact on the country is helping decide which of the nation’s problems will receive the lion’s share of pundits’ and politicians’ attention.” What matters, he adds, is not only which policies Presidents support or propose, but also which policies they will fight to achieve. WHAT ROLE DOES THE PRESIDENT PLAY IN PROTECTING HUMAN RIGHTS? One of the top issues our next President will face the fight to end global terrorism. The underlying premise behind this fight is that all people have basic human rights deserving of protection. Professor Alison Brysk says, “Human rights involve a number of factors including diplomacy, foreign aid disbursement and refugee policy.” “Examining the global citizenship of other countries will better enable the United States to reshape policies to positively impact human rights,” she adds – the act of which would directly relate to the U.S.’ combat against global terrorism, an issue very much at the forefront of the 2008 political debate.

State Assemblyman focuses on improving schools, preventing gang violence, creating jobs and maintaining a strong infrastructure. As a senior at UC Irvine, Jose Solorio ‘92 got his first taste of politics when he was elected student body president. Today, the California

Solorio serves as Chair of the Assembly Committee on Public Safety and as a member the education, transportation and appropriation committees.

Lindsay Hopkins ’07, serves as director of the Democratic Party of Orange County’s Santa Ana headquarters. Hopkins honed her cam-

paign skills while getting her bachelor’s in political science. She got her first exposure to politics her junior year through the political science department’s Public Affairs Internship Program. She hopes to someday become a chief of staff for a key political office. First, though, she plans

to take the GRE in 2009, “when it’s not an election year,” and go to graduate school. “I’ll probably float between politics and nonprofits,” she says. “I want to work for something I believe in, and be sure I’m trying to make the world a better place.” www.alumni.uci.edu | page 11


Election 2.0:

Web site helps voters select next president By Ted Gaulin UCI Doctoral Student

Generally speaking, the American electorate is not well informed. Voters often know more about leaders’ personal foibles and political missteps than they do about their policy positions. This is especially true of younger Americans, who are less politically knowledgeable and less likely to vote. Last fall, as the 2008 presidential campaign was beginning, psychologist and Calit2 researcher Robert Beck wondered if information technology could reverse this trend and reinvigorate political participation. Young voters, Beck reasoned, might be less politically engaged, but they are tech-savvy and drawn to online communities. Beck assembled an interdisciplinary team of researchers from UC Irvine, including myself, and Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisc. to create an interactive Web site that encouraged voters to focus on issues rather than personalities. page 12 | fall ’08 your uci

MyElectionDecision.org is the result. Launched in October 2007, the site gives users a “blind taste” of the presidential candidates. Users complete questionnaires in which they rank pressing national issues. Next, they read policy statements on these issues without knowing who authored them and “score” them on a Likerttype scale, indicating their level of agreement. The software tallies and weights this data, and presents users with their candidate preference in rank order. Overall, the project has been well received. The most inspiring feedback came from users commenting that they were surprised by their results and interested in learning more about a candidate they had not previously considered. This indicates we have succeeded in separating the attributes of the candidates from their specific policy proposals. The project design, we believe, leads users to suspend their politi-

cal biases and preconceptions, and see the candidates anew. Two aspects of the project surprised us. The first was the site’s popularity with nonacademic users. We envisioned the Web site as a way to supplement course material in class. While the site is being used in that capacity, 70 percent of our users are logging-in from noneducational domains. Equally interesting are the foreign users — they’re from more than 30 different countries and each of the seven continents. The quality of dialog on the Web site’s discussion forum also surprised us. Users seem genuinely interested in pursuing some of the topics raised in the surveys. Lively debates spanning the war in Iraq, the viability of bio-fuels

as an energy alternative and whether Mike Huckabee’s proposed flat tax would hurt the poor have populated the discussion forums Participants marshal sophisticated arguments for their views and often provide links to other Web sites with supporting data. In one instance, a member of Ron Paul’s campaign staff weighed in to answer a question that had been raised about his boss’ energy policy. One challenge has been keeping up with the evolving policies of the candidates. Even slight changes in position require site updates.

Our findings? Political engagement is very high for this election. We plan to conduct an extensive survey of users after the general election in November to determine its impact. What we can say at this stage is that our data appears to be representative of national trends. We invite readers – even those firmly committed to a particular candidate – to test drive the Web site. You might be surprised at your results!

Ted Gaulin is a doctoral candidate in political science with a keen interest in politics and technology. He serves as political consultant for the Calit2-supported MyElectionDecision.org.


Mapping the future New dean takes lead in engineering change By Diana Thai UCI Alumni Association Having spent the last few weeks unpacking, Rafael L. Bras, Sc.D. goodnaturedly chuckles about his move from MIT to UC Irvine. He and his wife, Patricia, who have been taking things out of box after box in no particular order, find themselves in awe over all they’ve amassed after nearly 32 years in the same place. When Bras finally found his map collection among the boxes, the Puerto Rican native knew a negotiation was in the making. Finding space for his 100+ treasures in their University Hills house, Bras admits, likely will require some compromise with his wife. “My wife gives me limits, tells me what space I can have for them,” Bras chuckles. “Otherwise, I’d fill the entire house with maps.” His affection for maps should come in handy as he plots the future of UCI’s engineering school from his new post as its dean. Bras is replacing Nicolaos G. Alexopoulos, Ph.D., who retired in June. “The UC Irvine campus

has done very well over the past ten years,” Bras says of Alexopoulos’ tenure. “The people here are young, driven and willing to try new things.” What exactly those new things are, Bras hasn’t yet decided. He believes he has much to learn about the UCI campus before suggesting changes. His initial plan is one of listening and learning; spending his time discovering where he is most needed before stepping in. “I realize there are areas in which my help probably isn’t needed,” Bras explains. “I see, and hope that everyone who works with me sees, that my role, that our role, is to facilitate.” That is not to say the 57-year old is lacking a vision for the school. Bras says he was most taken by the university’s almost innate collaborative nature. One area he foresees growth and increased global excellence is in the science and technology of human health, and in particular biomedical engineering, where there are opportunities for collaboration with

ABOVE: Rafael L. Bras, Sc.D. distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering, was named dean of The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, effective September 1. Photo by L. Barry Hetherington.

the School of Medicine, Beckman Laser Institute and with local industry. That type of new challenge was behind his 3,000-mile move. “It was time for something new. I needed some engagement that enables me to build, to bring people to their best,” he explains. And striving to be his best is something of a calling card for Bras. As a student in Puerto Rico, Bras consistently found himself at the top of his classes. What he didn’t know was he would be a small fish in a much bigger pond once he began his college career. “So much so, that I failed

my first physics test,” Bras says of his first days at MIT. He took those early hurdles in stride and went on to earn three degrees from MIT: a bachelor’s in civil engineering (1972), a master’s in civil engineering (1974) and a doctorate in water resources and hydrology (1975).

ing and forecasting floods and precipitation.

Today, Bras is using his expertise in water systems to lead an international panel of experts with the charge of constructing a $7.9 billion development to protect Venice, Italy from floods during unusually high tides.

Finding a temperate climate in his own life, Bras shares his simple, yet effective, strategy. “My strategy has always been to eliminate the things that you do not like. Pick something you enjoy and do it.

His research spans soilvegetation-atmosphere system modeling, and he is world renowned for his innovative work describ-

His landscape-river basin-evolution models are widely used in hydrology and geology. Bras also has pioneered ideas about how the deforestation of the Amazon will impact regional and continental climates.

“Never look back.” For more about Dean Bras and the engineering school, visit: http://www.uci.edu/uci/features/ feature_bras_081006.php www.alumni.uci.edu | page 13


Lauds & Laurels Nominations

continued from page 9

Nearly a decade later, Speraw was named an assistant coach to the U.S. National team. “I jumped at the opportunity to coach in the Olympics,” Speraw says. “I jumped knowing that it would be a tremendous sacrifice, no downtime, no vacation for two years.” But the two year’s on the sideline with the U.S. Team will pay dividends to UCI’s men’s program. It was while in the gym and watching the competition that Speraw earned an appreciation for the difference between collegiate and pro players.

UCIAA is seeking nominations for its 39th annual awards celebration. Since 1971, UCIAA has been honoring alumni, students and friends for their extraordinary support of the university. Benched: Speraw, right, enjoys a photo opp with U.S. National head coach Hugh McCutcheon (center) and first assistant coach Ron Larsen (left).

“I’ve learned what it is to be a professional athlete and an Olympic athlete, and therefore, have seen how to

better prepare our athletes to reach that level,” Speraw explains. “We are now able to look at what we’re

doing as a program and make it a hard and fast goal to produce future Olympians and professional athletes.”

’Eaters vs. Trojans

Help us recognize outstanding members of the Anteater community by submitting your nomination. Deadline for nominations packets is Friday, Dec. 19. For nomination forms, visit: www.alumni.uci.edu

Join UCIAA as the UCI Men’s Basketball team tips off an exciting year in its season opener against Sporting News pre-season #11 USC Trojans in Los Angeles. Prior to the game, UCIAA will host a reception for alumni and friends before heading to Galen Center to cheer on ’Eater Nation. Longtime UCI Men’s Basketball Coach Pat Douglass will be stopping by to give a preview of the game and the upcoming season.

Saturday, Nov. 15 11 a.m.: Reception Davidson Alumni Center, 3415 S. Figueroa St. 1 p.m.: Tip off USC Galen Center Tickets: $20 members; $25 non members. R.S.V.P.: www.alumni.uci.edu Reception menu: Hosted quesadilla and salsa bar, beer and sodas *The tickets will include price of the basketball ticket and reception. Parking is not included.   page 14 | fall ’08 your uci

UCIAA EVENTS Saturday, Feb. 28 Homecoming Saturday, April 18 Wayzgoose Thursday, May 14 Lauds & Laurels


Giving Back: Students learn about giving from UCI alumni “Anthropologist Marcel Mauss wrote that a gift has three parts: the obligation to give, the obligation to receive and the obligation to reciprocate,” writes Megan Braun, UCI student body president and UCIAA Distinguished Anteater awardee. “I will only be able to truly thank you when I reciprocate your gift by making a similar gesture later in life.” Braun is one of 18 students UCIAA has chosen to honor through its scholarship program. For more than three decades, the association has been awarding merit-based scholarships to outstanding Anteaters – those who are both leaders in the classroom

Hao Chen Major: Biology Hometown: Irvine Kattie David Major: Anthropology Hometown: Modesto Michelle Dyo Major: Psychology and Social Behavior Hometown: Torrance Nicholas Gerda Major: Political Science Hometown: Valencia Daniel Kim Major: Political Science Hometown: Fresno Madiha Shahabuddin Major: Political Science Hometown: Walnut

The anteaters are coming … The Tierre de las Palmas exhibit at the Santa Ana Zoo is currently out to bid and the contract will be awarded in November with habitat construction starting before the end of the year.

and on campus. In 2008, more than $80,000 will be awarded to UCI students through the association’s two programs – the UCIAA Scholar program, awarding $2,500 per year to incoming students and the Distinguished Anteater Award that honors outstanding current UCI students with a $1,500 award. Besides supporting current students, the UCIAA scholarship program

helps cultivate future philanthropists. “Undoubtedly, your contributions are a key factor in my success of becoming a UCI alumnus where I can follow in the footsteps of alumni before me and contribute to the success of future Anteaters,” writes UCIAA Scholar Isaac Thornton. To learn more about the scholarship program, visit: www.alumni.uci.edu/uciaa_ services/scholarships.html

2008-09 UCIAA Scholarship Recipients UCIAA Scholars

GET INVOLVED

Kelsey Skaggs Major: Arts and Humanities Hometown: Lodi Isaac Thornton Major: Elec. Engineering Hometown: Missouri City, Texas Maryjane Vennat Major: Biology Hometown: Irvine Amanda Wong Major: Biology Hometown: Cypress Chun Hei Wong Major: Math and Economics Hometown: Fountain Valley Distinguished Anteaters: Graciela Arguelles Major: Chicano / Latino Studies and Sociology Hometown: North Hollywood

Rachel Bell Major: Biology and Engineering Hometown: Escondido Megan Braun Major: History and Philosophy Hometown: St. Paul, Minn. Yetunde Fatunde Major: Biology Hometown: Nigeria Andy Hoang Major: Neurobiology and Comparative Literature Hometown: Garden Grove Arin Torabian Major: Biology Hometown: Tujunga Monica Trigoso Major: Sociology Hometown: Long Beach

The zoo is currently in talks to obtain a pair of anteaters, scheduled to arrive at the zoo before the exhibit opens. The anteaters will need to go through a 30day quarantine like all new neighbors at the zoo to make sure they are healthy and happy. Then they will be given time to get used to their new home before the grand opening next year. Watch the Santa Ana Zoo Web site for updates: www.santaanazoo.org

Social Ecology mentors needed! The School of Social Ecology is looking for alumni and friends with professional experience in Social Ecology related fields, such as criminology, psychology, social work or community planning. Sharing your knowledge and direct experience would be a wonderful way to stay connected to your alma mater. For more information, visit: www.socialecology.uci. edu/mentor or contact Patricia DeVoe at: 949-8241278 or pdevoe@uci.edu.

Ralphs updates charitable giving program Ralphs’ Supermarket has created a secure Web site for registering your Ralphs Rewards Card. If you have already registered your card, but have not created a login and password, please do so that UCIAA continues to receive funding from Ralphs. If you have not yet registered your Ralphs Rewards card, please consider it. By registering your card and designating UCIAA has your charity of choice, Ralphs will contribute a percentage of each purchase you make back to the association to help support our programs and events. To date, Ralphs has contributed more than $3,000 to UCIAA from its charitable giving program.

continued on page 26 www.alumni.uci.edu | page 15


A billion ways to


o Shape our Future S parking breakthrough discoveries and tackling issues that matter to people in their daily lives will be the goal of UC Irvine’s just announced $1 billion fundraising campaign.

The “Shaping the Future Campaign” was announced by Chancellor Michael V. Drake, M.D. at the Bren Events Center on Oct. 4 during “A Celebration of Stars – The 2008 Medal Awards.”

The announcement kicks off the public phase of the campaign. The quiet phase, which took place during the past three years, has already seen donors give more than $405 million. “The challenges we face in the world today have not overwhelmed hope, and solutions can be found. That’s what great universities do,” said Chancellor Michael V. Drake, M.D. as he announced the initiative that will raise $1 billion by 2015. continued on page 20


Multi-year campaign aims to transform campus, region continued from page 15

The campaign will focus on increasing private support for five key areas: health, the environment, sustainable energy, educating tomorrow’s leaders and embracing global opportunities on cultural and business levels. Every school and unit on campus, from health affairs to the sciences; from the humanities to arts and athletics; is represented in the campaign. By increasing funding through the campaign, the campus will increase its ability to make improvement in people’s lives in addition to helping drive regional economic growth. The campaign launched a new Web site, www.UCIFuture.com, to tell the stories of community leaders, alumni, students, parents and faculty who are involved in the campaign. An ongoing advertising effort to introduce the campaign to the community has also begun. “We are one of the best public universities in America, and more students want to come to UC Irvine than ever before,” Drake said. “We’ve just completed our new hospital, which already is ranked among America’s best. We have half-abillion in capital improvements under way for our students, and we’re opening the first new public law school in California in more than 40 years. I can’t imagine a more exciting time to be at UC Irvine.” The campaign will encourage donors to support more scholarships and graduate fellowships; add new buildings,

page 18 | fall ’08 your uci

equipment and labs; create and enhance academic programs; and fuel interdisciplinary collaborations to address global challenges. It also will provide funding for campuswide priorities, including attracting and retaining worldrenowned faculty. Additionally, the campaign will further the campus’ capacity to play a leadership role in supporting Orange County as a national center of business and a gateway to world economies and global cultures. The university ended the 2007-08 fiscal year with a recordbreaking $130 million in gifts and pledges – the third consecutive year the university has seen donors contribute more than $100 million. “Our campus is an innovative and dynamic university, and it is also among the youngest universities ever to embark on a $1 billion fundraising campaign,” said Thomas J. Mitchell, vice chancellor of University Advancement and president of the University of California, Irvine Foundation. “Our alumni, community friends and donors share the conviction that supporting UCI is a great investment in human potential. Their participation in this campaign will help us solve issues that matter to us here in Orange County and around the world.” Now, more than ever before, UCI is focused on shaping the future by finding hope in opportunity, innovation and the aspirations of our students and faculty.


Shaping the Future: Addressing issues that matter to you Your Health We are fundamentally improving health and access to health care for our families and our community by creating 21st-Century diagnostics and treatments. We are focused on three vital areas to improving medical care for all of us. We must pursue exceptional medical research and provide the most up-todate medical technology. We also must establish efficient business models that provide affordable and sensitive care. UC Irvine is demonstrating how these key elements of health care can work hand-in-hand. UC Irvine is tackling some of the world’s toughest diseases and conditions: Alzheimer’s, cancer, Parkinson’s, blindness, heart disease and diabetes. By combining the power of one of the world’s top research universities with compassionate care, we truly are shaping the future of health care.

Sustainable Energy We’re helping California and the nation find more sustainable and efficient energy sources through hydrogen power, fuel cells and other rapidly evolving new technologies. Energy independence is not just a possibility, it’s our future. And through technologies that tap renewable and available resources, we will help reduce pollution and environmental damage especially important as new economies develop worldwide. These initiatives, combined with UC Irvine’s expertise in computing and

collaboration with industry, will make an invaluable contribution to the entire nation and the world.

Our Environment Mini-malls have replaced fields and forests. Smog sullies our cities and children no longer drink water from the tap. Invasive species inhabit our waterways, and the world’s food supply is at risk from deforestation and erosion. But at UC Irvine, our scientists take on these challenges and find practical solutions. From environmental law to water research, from earth system science to biology, our faculty and students are making a difference. A clean, safe environment is our birthright. Being green isn’t about red or blue states - it’s about living in a healthy state. People may debate global climate changes, but our scientists are discovering ways to better understand the intricacies of the environment so we can protect and restore it. All across the campus, UC Irvine’s people are working together to make the world better. Our priorities are crystal clear.

Tomorrow’s Leaders We’re building enthusiasm for higher education and readiness for careers in a globally focused economy. The future of California depends on how well we prepare young Californians for success in higher education. The university is committed to producing a new generation of continued on page 23

It began with a wood box. Four simple sides with a cover. This wasn’t just any box. It was a Tzedakah box. And it belonged to 5-year-old philanthropist Zofia Kirshbaum. Before the Jewish Sabbath, Zofia would pass the special box around for charitable donations. Zofia’s parents, in keeping with the Jewish imperative to heal the world through good deeds, would fill it with coins and bills. Zofia’s Tzedakah box, in many ways, embodies the values her parents have tirelessly instilled in her: compassion, the importance of family and a responsibility to help the needy. These are the very values practiced everyday at UC Irvine Health Affairs, the recipient of Zofia’s largesse and where she and her younger sister Temma were born by emergency C-section. At UC Irvine, physicians provide compassionate care, while nurses treat patients like loved ones, alleviating their suffering with hugs, smiles and extra pillows. So committed is Zofia to UC Irvine and its vision of nursing the sick to health that she has asked her parents, friends and other loved ones to skip birthday toys and instead to make donations on her behalf to the university. www.alumni.uci.edu | page 19


A

After earning his degree in biological sciences from UC Irvine, Greg Vacca’s career path took a decidedly different turn when he enrolled in the San Francisco Theological Seminary and was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. He became a hospital chaplain in both civilian and military life - including Desert Storm, where he met his wife, Sheryl, who was an army nurse at the time. Greg later entered the financial services industry as a corporate officer and then was a consultant to major insurance companies. He is the founder of a technology company that provides a unique application used in over 200 banks nationally, and he is an industry leader serving on the boards of several trade associations. Following her father’s lead, Vanessa Vacca earned her bachelor’s degree from UC Irvine in 2002 and is now a senior consultant with Deloitte and Touche, LLP. And, like her father, fond memories of UC Irvine have made her want to stay connected. Not long after

page 20 | fall ’08 your uci

Like father, like daughter Greg ’71 and Vanessa ’02 Vacca Greg joined the Chancellor’s Club, he encouraged Vanessa to do the same. While at UC Irvine, Vanessa found great satisfaction serving as a Student Parent Orientation Program staffer. Lately, she has led young alumni workshops and has spoken at Chancellor’s Club events on the benefits of membership. “We feel that the Chancellor’s Club is a great way to network and reconnect with the campus,” says Greg. “It has been great to meet the people working so hard to make it a better place to get an education,” Vanessa adds. “GO ’EATERS!!!”


UC Irvine: Alumni Connections

J

enny Doh, ‘91 spent her early years in Seoul, Korea. But she was born at UC Irvine. “I see the university as something I cannot and will not ever abandon,” said Doh. “It is my family, it is where I was really born.” She came to campus in 1986 as a new freshman straight from Bakersfield, Calif., where her family had settled after immigrating some 10 years earlier and, by her own account, simply fell in love with the campus. “I loved everything about it, even the design. It’s a circle, you could never get lost.”

pride that I can attach my name to UCI, to be associated with such a strong university.” While a student, Doh earned the unrepeated honor of being selected UC Irvine’s first student regent, representing the student body within the University of California Board of Regents and the UC Office of the President. It was during that time that she was taken under the wing of some

of her most influential mentors, including alumna Martha Newkirk. Newkirk, along with Chancellor Emeritus Jack Peltason and his wife Suzie, remain an integral part of Doh’s life today. “They continue to offer me a great level of support. It is because of each of them that I understand my responsibility to the university,” Doh said. “As president of the

alumni association, I am responsible to my fellow alumni in ensuring that our voice continues to be heard. As personnel at the university change, it is the alumni voice that remains constant.” Sustaining the alumni voice isn’t just a onewoman activity. Doh believes that each alumnus can - and should - take part. And, one way do to so is to recognize that the association is the life-

line between university and alumni. “It’s imperative that alumni continue to support the association,” Doh said. “The first step in doing that is to purchase a membership to help preserve our fiscal health. Those dues help ensure that the association remains strong and autonomous. “And the university will become a better place through alumni involvement.”

UCI gives birth to alumna’s passion Jenny Doh ’91

From those first few days on campus, Doh has managed to never lose her way and has come full circle. In July she took over as the president of the UCI Alumni Association, leading the university’s largest volunteer organization. More than 111,000-strong, the alumni family is one to which Doh is unquestionably committed. “As an alumna, I have a sense of obligation to make sure that I continue to support the institution that helped shaped me. It is with extreme

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 21


Gift to impact future of stem-cell research Laguna Beach couple Sue and Bill Gross like to contribute to cutting-edge organizations that have a major impact. In making a $10 million gift to establish the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at UC Irvine, their impact is certain to provide benefits on global levels.

Donors eye future vision advances Ninetta and Gavin Herbert recently made the largest gift ever received by the Department of Ophthalmology - one which will help establish an eye institute on campus that will be named after Gavin. The proposed institute will further the Department of Ophthalmology’s mission of developing educational programs, technologies and clinical solutions to enhance visual health and performance for the people of Orange County and beyond.

mology and its outstanding clinicians and scientists since its inception more than 30 years ago,” Gavin says. “With the completion of the Eye Institute, UC Irvine will host one of the premier eye health research institutions in the country. I am extremely pleased to be a part of it.”

ing research fellowship programs, collaborating with retina clinical research faculty and providing lab space, research materials, mentoring and development opportunities.

A friend of founding Chancellor Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., Gavin was instrumental in designing and implementing the Gavin is founder, chairDepartment of Ophthalman emeritus and the mology - including the former CEO of Allergan, Irving Leopold Chair. He Inc., a global specialty was the first president pharmaceutical and medical device company of the Chancellor’s Club, and he recently received in Irvine. Through his the university’s highest direction, Allergan has honor, the Medal, for his “I have been closely affili- supported the Department of Ophthalmology extraordinary service and ated with the UC Irvine support. Department of Ophthal- at UC Irvine - sponsorpage 20 | fall ’08 your uci

Sue and Bill developed a keen interest in stem cell research after watching a “60 Minutes” program that profiled Hans Keirstead’s work at UC Irvine. The show described his use of a treatment derived from human embryonic stem cells to improve mobility in laboratory animals with spinal cord injuries. The couple was later invited to tour UC Irvine’s Reeve Irvine Research Center, and after learning more about the breakthrough stem cell research being performed by Hans Keirstead, Peter Donovan, Susan Bryant and others, they knew they wanted to get involved. “UCI is at the forefront of scientific research because of the interdisciplinary collaboration among its faculty, staff and departments,” Bill says. “This cross-functional approach has enabled the campus to become a hub of stem cell research in Southern California.” Bill is founder and CIO of the Newport Beach-based international investment firm PIMCO. He is the world’s most prominent bond investor, managing over $700 billion, and the couple is known for their generous gifts to educational and healthcare institutions. “We are grateful for the opportunity to help facilitate research that will save lives and provide vast benefits for the citizens of Orange County and beyond,” Sue adds.


Graduate student secures safer future For 12 long years, Jose Romero-Mariona’s family tried desperately to flee war-torn El Salvador, and by the time they were permitted to immigrate to the United States, Jose was already in high school. The relief he felt from no longer having to witness shootings outside his home – or relatives “disappearing” from their neighborhood – was clouded by an apprehension of working at menial jobs to help support his struggling family. His father, a civil engineer in El Salvador, settled for a job as a machinist, and his mother picked up work doing catering and office jobs. At first Jose spoke little English, but he was a fast learner. Even so, his high school counselor told him he should apply to trade school rather than

continued from page 19

educators and leaders who will improve the state’s performance in business, the arts, innovation and entrepreneurship. At UC Irvine, the best and brightest of young Californians are achieving their dreams.

college. But his parents thought otherwise, so Jose took it upon himself to learn how to apply to colleges and fill out the complicated forms necessary to get into school. UC Irvine welcomed him and ultimately became his salvation. Having earned his bachelor’s degree here, Jose is now a fourthyear graduate student working alongside Dean Debra Richardson in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences, because of the financial support he’s been able to receive. His current research involves looking at unique ways of developing software-specific security that is more efficient than the general virus detection programs that most people use today. Without financial help,

That keeps California competitive, creative and prosperous.

Global Opportunities Orange County, California, with its diverse and vibrant cultures, is a microcosm of the world. Here, when we think

Jose believes none of this would have been possible. “My fellowship has helped me so much,” he explains. “It was always a big question as to how

“world,” we also think “family,” since many of us have family in places like China and Vietnam, Mexico and Honduras, France and Russia. That cultural mix brings great opportunity for our university and our region. UC Irvine can be the cornerstone of a new era

With the goal of becoming a university profes-

sor, and the fact that he spends extracurricular time mentoring students from disadvantaged backgrounds – on top of his long research hours – Jose is already giving back in a big way.

of prosperity for California. Imagine tapping into the academic power and cultural knowledge of our incredibly diverse students and alumni.

Our research and academic programs focus on understanding our differences and embracing our shared future.

We are perfectly positioned to take advantage of world markets and advance California’s international leadership.

By working together, our students are building strategic collaborations to benefit our state and the world around us.

I would pay for school, and now that I am able to focus on my research, I hope I can give back to others someday.”

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 23


classnotes: updates from anteaters Births / Marriages Brian [M.A. Hum ’99] and Jacqueline Carver [Hum ’93] welcomed the birth of their son, Freal Wesley Carver, on June 19.

Jeff [SocSci ’04] and Maggie Minhas [SocEco ’05] welcomed Logan Charles into the world on July 10. He was 8 lbs, 1 oz and 20.5 inches. They are thrilled to present the newest addition to the Anteater family! Thuy and Brendan Purdy [Ph.D ’08] announced the birth of

1970s Michael Short [Eng ’74] has been elected vice president at Southern California Edison responsible for engineering, fuel management and decommissioning activities at SCE’s San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Richard Whittaker [Bio ’75, SocEco ’75] received a master’s degree in divinity from the Episcopal Theological School/Claremont School of Theology on May 17 and was ordained to the Transitional Diaconate in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles June 7.

and chair of the department of comparative biosciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, was selected as a councilor to the American Physiological Society.

1980s Houston Arts Alliance announced the appointment of artist and public art administrator Helen Lessick [M.F.A. ’82] as the organization’s director of civic art and design.

Keith Serxner [Bio ’77] climbed Oregon’s Mt. Hood on June 7 to raise money for breast cancer. He is a lifetime member of UCIAA.

CalOptima has named Steve Epstein [SocEco ’83, Bio ’83] director of network management. He will direct and oversee provider relations, network operations, provider enrollment, and provider contracting. Epstein is a lifetime member of UCIAA.

Gordon Mitchell [Bio ’75, Ph.D. ’78], professor

Bradley Evans [PhySci ’84, Art ’00] recently

SHARE YOUR NEWS WITH US!

1990s

We love to hear from UCI alumni! To be included in the classnotes section, send your updates to alumni@uci.edu.

Stephanie Flood [SocEco ’90] graduated with her master’s degree in speech language pathology from San Diego State University on May 23.

You are welcome to send high-resolution photos (300 dpi or greater) with your submission.

Major David J. R. Frakt [Hum ’90], UCIAA Outstanding Senior in 1990, has been voluntarily recalled to active duty for one year to the Office of Military Commissions Defense in Washington D.C. and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

published a new book entitled “Modal Stratification in the First Movement of Symphony No. 5 of Ralph Vaughan Williams.” Eugene J. Kim [SocSci ’84] has joined STV Inc. as western region planning manager with the firm’s transportation and infrastructure division Greg Gutierrez [M.D. ’86] was promoted to associate professor for the department of family medicine at University of Colorado, School of Medicine.

After 10 years in private law practice, John Lee [SocEco ’91] has joined Union Bank of California as vice president, senior counsel for Corporate Real Estate. Lee is a lifetime member of UCIAA. Theodore S. Gonzalves [M.A. Hum ’97, Ph.D. ’01] has been promoted to associate professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in the department of American studies.

Anagrams for Anteaters their first child, son Liam Hao Purdy, on July 2. page 24 | fall ’08 your uci

How many words can you create from the word ANTEATER? We found 43. Visit our Web site to see our list!


alumni notes continued from page 8

in memoriam: Carolyn Kimme Smith [Ph.D. ’82] passed away July 23 at the age of 74. A breast cancer survivor who tirelessly donated her time and energy to many issues, Smith primarily focused on early detection of breast cancer. Smith earned her Ph.D. at the age of 48 from UC Irvine. She resided in Newport Beach with her husband of 32 years, Hal W. Smith, Jr. She is survived by her three children and their families, including four grandchildren. The family request that donations be made to the UCI Foundation/ Center for Citizen Peace Building, Attn: Center for Citizen Peace Building, Paula Garb, University of California, Irvine, 3151 Social Science Plaza, Irvine, CA 92697-5100, www.socsi.uci.edu/~cpb.

Brian W. Carver [M.A. Hum ’99] accepted a tenure-track position as an assistant professor at the University of California at Berkeley’s School of Information.

Rishi Mhapsekav [Bio ’04] graduated with a doctor of medicine degree from the Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science on June 6.

2000s Kimberley Coles [M.A. SocSci ’00] recently had her research published with U Michigan Press as “Democratic Designs: International Intervention and Electoral Practice in Post-war BosniaHerzegovina.” Jamison Power [SocSci ’03] received his juris doctorate from the UCLA School of Law. He will begin his legal career at Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. in Costa Mesa.

In Memoriam William C. Kimpel [M.D. ’54] passed away May 4 at his home in Rolling Hills Estates. Kimpel is survived by his wife, sons, 3 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren.

battle with a neurological disorder. Seapy will be remembered as the first family doctor in Scotts Valley and the founder of the Scotts Valley Medical Center. Willis Pickel [M.D. ’65], a respected Sacramento area ophthalmologist and surgeon, passed away on February 29. Dana Reed [ICS ’74] passed away on June 25 in a bicycling accident. He was 56.

Edwin H. Jacobson [M.D. ’57] passed away March 11. He was 78.

Teresa Hepler [Hum ’74, M.A. Hum ’84] passed away January 30 from heart complication

Donald Earl Seapy [M.D. ’61] passed away on March 27 after a long

Sally Salavea [SocEco ’90] passed away February 9 in Newport Beach.

use recycled plastic and glass bottles to create stained glass-like walls that reflect light into rooms. Water is recycled through rainwater catchments and electricity is produced by using solar panels and wind turbines. The Earthship homes, Kniffin hopes, will ultimately benefit residents in rural Nicaragua by teaching the local community skills to foster their own independence, despite limited economical and natural resources. As an intern for architect Michael Reynolds, a proponent for radically sustainable living, Kniffin learned how to build Earthship homes from the concept’s founder. Reynolds built the first Earthship home in the 1970s. Four decades later, Earthships are being constructed around the world from Zwolle, Netherlands to Negril, Jamaica. Kniffin’s goal is to travel to Nicaragua every couple of months for about three weeks at a time to work on his house with help from the Anteater and local communities. UCI Athletics trainer Mike Burns and Justin Neerhof, UCI Women’s Soccer assistant coach, joined Kniffin on a recent trip. “David has involved the

whole community in the construction of this house,” says Burns. “It was amazing to see the collaboration of all the people in helping to build this house and to grow the community.” Once his first house is built and sold, Kniffin says that he plans to use the funds to build more houses, water systems and sewage systems for the local community. Although these houses can use solar power to provide modern amenities to their owners: dishwashers, washing machines and dryers, computers and printers, the goal for Casa Llanta is to first build a model home as a means of demonstrating affordable and sustainable housing to the local people. “Every time I go to Casa Llanta, I appreciate more and more the two very different worlds that I am involved in,” Kniffin says. “I get so much from both the athletes I help to coach and from the community in Nicaragua. I’m just thrilled to be apart of both worlds.” www.alumni.uci.edu | page 25


continued from page 15

HOW TO REGISTER If you registered on the old Web site between August 4 and September 22, your participation is still in effect. If not, follow the instructions below and get registered today!

1. Log in to

www.ralphs.com

2. Click on Sign In/ Register

3. Click on New Customer? Sign up today!

4. Enter your zip code and click on ‘find’

5. Click ‘Select’ next to

the store you primarily shop at

branded. By Allison Dolan

E

UCI Alumni Association

ver wonder why the Starbucks experience was so popular that the coffee chain has become one of the most recognizable brands in the world? Wright Massey knows, he created it. Massey, who earned his M.B.A. from UCI in 1992, is credited for creating the Synergistic Rollout Program to build one store per day (from 200 per year to 350), which saved Starbucks $20M a year. He is also credited for creating the Creative Service Group with the design of Starbucks’ brand identity and the page 26 | fall ’08 your uci

image for the store design that launched a national and international brand.

Prior to his acclaimed work with Starbucks, Massey worked as the director of design for Disney Stores: “that was the first time that someone had actually built a brand experience for a retail concept and so I was on the ground floor choosing music, script writing and developing a brand story – working with the stores on marketing and communications as well as packaging and design,” Massey explains. Already an established architect, Massey was 39 years old when he entered UCI’s M.B.A.

program, “I had kind of exhausted my ability to move forward in architecture - I had done basically everything that you can do in that field, so I was looking for someway to expand my horizons… I thought that the M.B.A. at UCI was a good way of doing that.” Massey is now a principal at Brand Architecture in Orlando, Florida and has managed more than a billion dollars of hospitality, retail, marketing and facility design/ construction worldwide. Earlier this year, the Coca-Cola Company and The Museum of Modern Art selected Brand Architecture’s distinctive design for the Coca-Cola sign that is displayed

in Times Square. Since then, Massey and his firm have continued to work with many high-profile brands, including their award winning re-branding efforts for Outback Steakhouse. With so much success, Massey still feels he has a connection to UCI, “ I’m always pleased when I hear UCI in the news, or hear that someone from UCI did well.” Massey still recalls some of his classes and favorite professors at UC Irvine and credits his MBA with opening doors to him in corporate America.

For the complete interview with Wright Massey and his thoughts on branding, visit: www.alumni. uci.edu/

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On fire:

ICS alumni create Voice-over IP solution

By Eric Kowalik, ICS Integrating a 100-yearold medium – the telephone, with a 30-year-old medium – the Internet, rekindled the friendship of four Bren School of ICS alumni. This led to the creation of CallFire.com, a Web service that allows users to send out voice broadcasts to groups, sometimes as many as hundreds of thousands, in minutes. “CallFire.com blossomed from both inspiration and necessity,” says Dinesh Ravishanker ’03, company co-founder. Working as independent software consultants in 2004, Ravishanker, Vijesh Mehta ’02 and Komnieve Singh landed several consulting projects that required the use of VOIP technology, which uses

the Internet Protocol to transmit voice over a network. Several service and custom application contracts later, the team decided it was time to focus on building a product that could handle the recurring issues they experienced on their own projects. CallFire.com was born.

Ravishanker and Punit Shah ’02 both lived in Middle Earth and shared the same friends, including Mehta, whom Ravishanker had met before coming to UC Irvine. TJ Thinakaran ’01 and Mehta were teaching assistants for ICS 21, which Shah happened to be taking at the time.

FORGED FELLOWSHIP

The foursome’s friendship grew during their time at UC Irvine and after graduation Ravishanker, Shah and Mehta tried their hand at some early unsuccessful startups, leading the three to go separate ways and attend graduate school.

The founding partners came together in a way that showcased the tight network that the UC Irvine community fosters.

In 2005, the team began building what is now CallFire.com. By early 2006 CallFire.com beta was made public, and the

Ravishanker and Mehta, however, quickly realized they would need help, and they knew the best people to ask were friends from their undergraduate days in ICS.

company has grown aggressively ever since. “CallFire.com was built after lots of experience in failures and successes,” Shah now says. “If there was one silver bullet in creating a company, I would have to say it is execution.” SWEAT CAPITAL PAYS The group pitched angel investment groups and venture capital firms, but ended up going with no seed capital. The team was able to fully fund the venture using residual profits from existing consulting projects. “There were times funding would have made things easier, but we didn’t need it. By keeping operating costs low and biting the bullet as our own investors, we are now in a great position as owners,” says Shah. The company had a simple mantra for its

product: make it innovative, easy to use and provide a great customer experience. FRUITS OF LABOR After lots of sweat capital, the team launched CallFire.com in May 2006. And with fewer than six full-time employees, the company is on track to see several million dollars of revenue in 2008 and boasts more than 6,000 current accounts. Despite staggering numbers, the team isn’t ready to breathe easy just yet. “I don’t think we’ve quite made it yet,” says Thinakaran, “Whenever we achieve a milestone, we’ll pat ourselves on the back, but then get right back to work . CallFire. com is our obsession.” For more information, including a video profile, visit: www.ics.uci.edu/callfire

www.alumni.uci.edu | page 27


MEMBERSHIP MATTERS UCIAA Members Help Fund Programs

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embers are the lifeblood of the UCI Alumni Association. Dues they pay support scholarship and student programs, alumni chapters and clubs, events, career and online services, as well as this publication. Supporting UCIAA is not the only benefit of membership, it’s just the beginning. Members receive exclusive access to discounts and services, from campus to nationwide partners. Our members also are given opportunities to participate and get involved with events across the country that enrich both the individual and UC Irvine. UCIAA is constantly working to provide its members with new benefits and a reason to stay connected. If you are interested in becoming a member, giving the gift of membership or simply renewing your membership, visit us online at: www.alumni.uci.edu. Friends of UC Irvine also are welcome to become associate members, support UCIAA and take advantage of many of the benefits offered.

Membership Rates ANNUAL

LIFE

Alumni

$50

$500

Student

$30

$400

Recent Grad*

$30

$400

Associate

$55

$600

To learn about our joint membership options and installment payment plans, contact UCIAA at: 949-824-ALUM. * Recent graduate is defined as having graduated in the last two year.

BENEFIT YOUR CAREER UCIAA is partnering with the UCI Career Center to offer our alumni members free access to ZotLink, the career centers’ online job database. Employers from across the country, in all disciplines, regularly post job openings. From entry-level to career, ZotLink is a resource that can help you in your job search. Visit us at: www.alumni.uci.edu and go to membership and benefits to learn more.

page 28 | fall ’08 your uci

Set for Life! The following alumni became life members of the UCI Alumni Association between March 15 through September 30, 2008. UCIAA would like to thank all of our members for their continued support. Muhammad Akmal ’08 Audrey Au ’08 Clare Bayens ’06 Bridgette Berry-Smith ’80 Eduardo Bouzas ’08 Laura Buntrock ’08 Patricia Busch ’87 Andrew Campbell ’08 Mirna Campos ’99 Kathryn Chang Timothy Chen ’08 Tiffany Chinn ’08 Kimberly Chua ’07 Dillon Cone ’08 Daniel Conger ’75, ’77 Paulo Correa ’08 Susan Cotsonas ’71 Brian Cruikshank ’08 Sheryl Cruz ’08 Mark De Jesus ’08 Michael Delay ’08 Vinay Deo ’08 Zlatko Devcic ’08 Satoru Emori ’07 Kaye Evleth ’71 Anthony Fortier ’08 Jessica Frischling ’74 Julie Goldsmith ’08 Alan Gorenberg ’81 Howard Grundy   Deborah Hahn ’08 Alison Haider ’08 Naomi Halili-Dove ’99 Kimberly Hanson ’08 Ladan Hariri ’94 Ryan Healy ’08 Jason Hinchman ’95 Michael Huang ’08 Lincoln Hurlbut ’08 Linda Jenkins ’08 Shawn Jones ’08  Daniel Karpeles ’08 Kelly Kato ’08  Ryan Kielhorn ’08 Jungwook Lee ’08 Kristin Leeper ’08 Shahram Lotfipour   Lisa Lotito-Byers ’91 Jessica Lundquist ’08 Paul Mac Alpine ’08 Glenn Mackinnon ’08 Edward Madokoro ’06

Joyce McClure ’80 Sarah McKearnan ’08 Christopher McKenzie ’95 Aaron Metzler ’08 Mark Miller ’78 Sharageem Mirghanbari ’08 Steven Morris ’08 Douglas Morrison   Catherine Morrison ’88 Tristan Muntsinger ’08 Loren Nakamura ’76 Erik Nelson ’08 Au Nguyen ’08 Patrick Nguyen Huu ’07 Johnny Nhan ’08 Jacqueline Oertli ’93 Lana Oson ’08 Vivek Pai ’08 Victoria Parvin ’80 Curtis Parvin ’80 Frank Phu ’03 Megan Pluth ’08 Susan Ridgeway ’95 Bijan Sadri ’08 Bharat Shah ’08 Angela Shiah ’08 Aditya Sithamraju ’08 Justin Smith ’05 Young Son ’08 Hemanth Sundararaj ’04 Suman Sundaresh ’08 Eileen Surya ’08 Glen Takahashi ’73 Jennifer Tam ’06 Julia Teodorescu ’08 William Thompson ’90 Andrew Thompson ’08 Randall Tom ’08 Shan Tsai ’08 Fiona Tsang ’08 Wei-Yu Tseng ’08 Phillip Van ’05 Peter Van Batenburg-Staffo ’08 Virginie Viaene ’06 Nicolas Voss ’08 Frederick Webb ’08 Timothy Wen ’08 Laura Wetherbee ’08 Brittney Whitaker ’08 Mitchell Winans ’08 Kevin Wiseman ’08 Adrienne Yi ’89, ’92


I LEFT MY HEART IN S.F. Peter the Anteater enjoyed his summer taking a trip to San Francisco’s Pier 39 with alumna Jane Ong ‘03. If you’ve taken Peter on a trip recently and would like to share your photo with other Anteaters, e-mail a high-resolution (300 dpi) photo to: alumni@uci.edu.

HELP! The UCIAA presidents are lost. Can you find them? (Note: You are looking for last names only; running horizontally, vertically, diagonally and backwards) Q

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1968-69: Michael GOLLONG ‘66

1989-91: Richard EVANS ‘69

1969-70: Jack MCCUE ‘68

1991-93: Martha NEWKIRK ’72, M.S. ‘76, Ph.D. ‘81

1970-72: Dia DORSEY ’67, M.S. ‘73

1993-95: Al DE GRASSI ’77, M.S. ‘79

1972-74: Adreana SOULELES ‘71

1995-97: Greg MICKELSON ‘84

1974-76; 77-79: Cheryl MOORE ’69, C.R.E. ‘70

1997-99: Steve MCHOLM ‘72

1976-77: Robert STEEDMAN, M.D. ‘59

1999-01: Debbie DANIEL ‘73

1979-81: Neil GLEASON ‘71

2001-03: Carl FIELDS ‘73

1981-83: Marie RICHMAN ’70, M.S. ‘79

2003-04: Bernadette STROBEL-LOPEZ, M.B.A. ‘87

1983-85: Doug DAVIDSON ‘68

2004-07: Steve CAPPS ‘69

1985-87: Fred SAINICK ‘74

2007-09: Jenny DOH ‘91

1987-89: Peter STEVENS, M.S. ‘76

IMPORTANT PRIVACY INFORMATION You have the right to control whether we share your name, address and electronic mail address with our affinity partners (companies that we partner with to offer products or services to our alumni). Please read the following information carefully before you make your choice below: Your Rights You have the following rights to restrict the sharing of your name, address and electronic mail address with our affinity partners. This form does not prohibit us from sharing your information when we are required to do so by law. This includes sending you information about the alumni association, the university, or other products or services. Your Choice Unless you say “NO,” we may share your name, address and electronic mail address with our affinity partners. Our affinity partners may send you offers to purchase various products or services that we may have agreed they can offer in partnership with us. Time-Sensitive Reply You may decide at any time that you do not want us to share your information with our affinity partners. However, if we do not hear from you, we may share your name, address and electronic mail address with our affinity partners. If you decide that you do not want to receive information from our partners, you may do one of the following: (1) Complete our online form: www.alumni.uci.edu/ nopartnermailing

(2) E-mail us at: nopartnermailing@uadv.uci.edu (3) FAX us at: 949-824-8516 Regardless of the method, be sure to include your Personal ID number (the 10-digit number above your name on the mailing label), name, address and phone number. WHY DO WE SHARE THIS INFORMATION? One of the ways the UCI Alumni Association generates the income needed to fund programs that benefit UCI is by engaging in partnerships with carefully selected businesses. Partner candidates compete for the privilege of marketing their services and products to highly desirable UCI graduates. We select these partners based on the quality, value, price and appropriateness of their offerings and their reputation. We hope our judgment is sound and you find any partner solicitations useful and relevant. But even if you do not respond to such offers, you’re still helping us simply by allowing us to continue to send these offers to you. We remain committed to your privacy. It is our standard practice to block commercial solicitations to alumni and friends who request such. You may always make such a request by contacting the UCI Alumni Association. On behalf of UCIAA, thank you for your understanding and continued support. www.alumni.uci.edu | page 29


AROUND THE CIRCLE events taking place on and off campus

November 2008 Monday 3 UC Irvine Healthcare Community Education. Diabetic Diet. 4-6 p.m., UCI Manchester Pavilion, 200 S. Manchester Ave., Suite 840, Orange. $20. More: 877-824-3627. Biology. “Learning, Memory and the Brain” with Erin Schuman. 7-8 p.m., Beckman Center. Free. More: 949-824-2500. Extension. “Sneak Previews” with Michael Berlin (6 meetings). 6:309:30 p.m., Theatre #6, Edwards University Center, Irvine. $150. More: 949-824-5414.

Wednesday 5 University Club Forum. “Among the Mud People of PNG” with Dowrene Hahn. 11:15 a.m., University Club. $11-$13. More: 949-824-7960.

Thursday 6 Humanitech. The Future of Writing. HIB 135. Free. Continued through Nov. 7. More: 949-824-7445 Extension. Project Management in a Scientific and Research Environment (3 meetings). 8:30am-4:30pm, page 30 | fall ’08 your uci

UCI Learning Center, 200 S. Manchester, Orange. $675. More: 949-8245414.

atre. $25-$28. Continues through Nov. 16. More: 949-824-6614.

Monday 10

Extension. Fundamentals for Green Spas (2 meetings). 8 a.m.-5.p.m., UCI Learning Center, 200 S Manchester, Orange. $655. More: 949-8245414.

Extension. Visual Studio 2008: Windows Communication Foundation (MS Course 6461) (6 meetings). 6-10 p.m., 4199 Campus Dr, Suite F, Irvine. $950. More: 949824-5414.

Wednesday 12 University Club Forum. “The Great Southern California Shake-Out – Ready or Not?” with Lisa Grant Ludwig. 11:15 a.m., University Club. $11-$13. More: 949-824-7960. Biology. Biological Sciences Mentor Program Kick-Off Reception. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Doheny Beach. Free. More: 949-8244742.

Thursday 13 Newkirk Center. “Danger and Disorder: New Developments in Violence Risk Assessment and Management” with John Monahan. 5:30-7 p.m., University Club. More: 949-824-9336.

Friday 14 Drama. West Side Story. 8 p.m. Irvine Barclay The-

Saturday 15

Monday 17 Music. UCI Wind Ensemble. 8 p.m. Winifred Smith Hall. Free. More: 949-8244281.

Tuesday 18 Calit2. Igniting Technology - H2Ology: Tapping into technology to solve water demands. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Calit2 Auditorium. $20. More: 949-824-3317. Library. Immigrant Lives in “The OC” and Beyond. 5:30 p.m., Langson Library. Free. Exhibit continues through April. More: 949-824-4651.

Wednesday 19

Saturday, Dec. 6 Drama. Clownzilla: A Holiday Extravaganza. 4 & 7 p.m. Claire Trevor Theatre. $10. More: 949-824-6614. ogy. 6th Annual UC Irvine Immunology Fair 2008. 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Calit2 Auditorium. Registration required. More: 949-8249648. Humanities. Friends, Fellows, and Forms of Freedom: Premodern Civil Societies. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., HIB 135. Free. More: 949824-6237. School of Medicine. Symposium in Global Health: Malaria in the 21st Century. Beckman Center. More: 949-8240589.

Saturday 22 Drama. Take Me Out. 8 p.m., Little Theatre. $10$11. Continued through Nov. 23. More: 949-8246614.

Sunday 30

University Club Forum. “The Beauty of the California Coast: Paintings from 1880 to 1930” with Jean Stern. 11:15 a.m., University Club. $11-$13. More: 949-824-7960.

Barclay. An Irish Christmas. 2 p.m. Irvine Barclay Theatre. $22-$48. More: 949-824-4646.

Friday 21

University Club Forum. Nuestra América: Latino

Center for Immunol-

History as U.S. History with Dean Vicky Ruiz. 11:15 a.m., University Club. $11-$13. More: 949824-7960. UCI Jazz Orchestra. Fall Jazz Concert. 7:30 p.m. Claire Trevor Theatre. $11-$13. More: 949-8246929.

Thursday 4 Dance. New Slate. 8 p.m. Winifred Smith Hall. $11$12. More: 949-824-6614.

Monday 8 UC Irvine Healthcare Community Education. Diabetes Management Overview. 4-6 p.m., UCI Manchester Pavilion, 200 S. Manchester Ave., Suite 840, Orange. $20. More: 877-824-3627.

Friday 12 Barclay. Festival Ballet Theatre’s The Nutcracker. Irvine Barclay Theatre. $33-$38. More: 949-8244646.

December 2008 Wednesday 3

For a comprehensive listing, visit: today.uci.edu/calendar


IN CLOSING

Are you paying attention? Liz Toomey

presidential post.

Assistant Vice Chancellor Community & Government Relations

“Kids, are you paying attention?” Hmmm, I wonder how many times I asked my children that question as they were growing up. My daughter is now 33, my son is 31. It was a refrain heard often around our house.

COMMENTARY During the past 19+ months I found myself once again asking them that question. Why and what for? On November 4, no matter which party prevails, the election of ’08 will be historic. Yes, it will be historic for one or the other obvious reason – the first African American elected President of the United States, or the first woman to be elected Vice President of the United States. There

Liz Toomey

Assistant Vice Chancellor Community & Government Relations

is another historical opportunity, one not as obvious and that’s the one most on my mind when asking, “Are you paying attention?” The present state of our union requires a creative re-examination of our national interests. Our next President must have a comprehensive vision, be a leader with the ability to organize and marshal the best people and resources and be the leader with the capacity to communicate this vision to us and the world. If all of us aren’t paying attention, if all of us aren’t exercising our

right to vote, how can we be sure that leader is taking up residence in the White House. Today our 2008 candidates clearly face a dilemma. If they tell the truth to voters about the tough choices ahead – on national security, health care, entitlement reform, climate change, public education and more – they risk losing a

No politician these days likes to talk about sacrifice or higher taxes. But if a candidate wins by ducking the hard questions, it will nearly be impossible to govern successfully. Voters don’t trust Presidents who bait and switch. What to do? Given the magnitude and urgency of choices ahead, surely the best advice is revealed in history: our best Presidents have been those that have taken prudent and courageous risks. If we’re not paying attention, if we’re not exercising our right to vote, that President will not be elected.

America today faces profound challenges at home and abroad. Taken together, they constitute nothing less than a “gathering storm,” the likes of which our nation has not seen in many years. In order to meet these challenges effectively, the next President must unite the nation and both devise and carry out a grand strategy for American renewal. We need an historical number of voters to participate in Election ’08. “Kids, are WE paying attention?” We need your input on November 4. Join me in making sure we are heard this election year.

ONLINE RESOURCES Election ‘08 If you need information about the upcoming election, visit: www.advocacy.uci.edu/vote

Anteater Advocate Find out how you can help advocate on behalf of UC in Sacramento and at home! Visit: http://www.ucforcalifornia.org/ucirvine/home/ www.alumni.uci.edu | page 31


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A note to parents: If this issue is addressed to a daughter or son who has established a separate permanent residence, please notify us of that new address by sending an e-mail to: alumni@uci.edu. Please include your child’s alumni ID number found on the mailing label above.

Receiving duplicate copies? If you are receiving more than one copy of Your UCI please forward the mailing label panel from each issue you receive to: Phineas Banning Alumni House University of California Irvine, CA 92697-1225

Gold medal evening The Papa Doo Run Run entertain more than 700 UCI friends at the 2008 Medal ceremonies that were hosted on October 5 at the Bren Events Center on the UC Irvine campus. Photo by Carlos Puma.

‘Eater Pride: Anteaters young and old came back to campus for the 2008 Homecoming festivities on March 1 and enjoyed an 82-66 win over Cal State Northridge at the Bren Events Center. Photo: Laurel Hungerford


1 - Your UCI, Fall '08