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An Introduction to the

Personal Leadership Insight Curriculum In this document‌

Overview and Pricing

The Navigator The Introduction Section, Vision Section, and Vision Venture

The Leadership Locator The Introduction and Vision Sections

www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.com


leadership Curriculum

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The leadership Locator The complete student guide The Navigator The comprehensive teacher’s guide

Find the leader within...

Personal Leadership Insight www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


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the navigator Rhett Laubach & Ryan Underwood

find the leader within.

v

help t

hem


the navigator Copyright Š 2008 PLI, Inc. ISBN# - 0-9728345-2-4

All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form. For information on how to license the right to duplicate and teach this curriculum, send an email to info@PersonalLeadershipInsight.org.

Special thanks to Kelly Barnes, Ashley Laubach, Carrie Underwood and Amy Gallimore for their long hours of hard work, creativity and inspiration.

PLI, Inc. 1210 Roosevelt Street, Suite 200 Edmond, OK 73034 405.216.5050 www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

THE NAVIGATOR SECTIONS Introduction to Personal Leadership Insight Section one is designed to quickly get you up to speed on how the PLI curriculum is structured and to provide you with a quick leadership primer. The Navigator has over 200 hands‐on leadership concepts, ideas and activities and, combined with your desire to help the students move closer to becoming Expert Leaders, will make the students’ Leadership Locator come alive. Their journey begins with your understanding of what Personal Leadership Insight is all about.

Increase Your Facilitation IQ The PLI curriculum is a highly‐interactive, leadership education system. Section two gives you additional insight into the art of facilitation. Utilizing these techniques will help the students not just learn leadership, but do leadership (which is the true power play of the PLI curriculum).

The PLI Essentials There are 10 Personal Leadership Insight Essentials. This is the heart of the PLI curriculum. The Navigator has ideas on how to teach each curriculum piece in the students’ Leadership Locator, Hall of Fame members you can use to add a historical and iconic element and additional quotes for discussion material or classroom eye candy.

The PLI Ventures Each Essential has a PLI Venture designed to take the leadership application outside of your classroom. These 10 projects could each take up to two weeks. Include them whenever you deem appropriate during the year.

The PLI Activities Fifty leadership exercises that will make the PLI curriculum fun, memorable and “rememorable!” There is an index by length of time and by Essential to make it easy for you to insert the activities into your lesson plans.

The Leadership Locator You have an exact copy of the student workbook. The only difference is the Locator has four notes pages after each Essential. Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Introduction to

Personal Leadership Insight Our understanding of how to positively influence people and situations to create value and growth.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 Š PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

An Overview of the PLI Philosophy…

Personal Leadership Insight

1.

Everyone is a leader because leadership is influence and everyone has some level of influence. The question is not whether you are a leader or not. The question is what type of leader are you?

3. 4.

2.

Everyone is either a Leader‐in‐ Waiting or a Leader‐in‐Gear. You are a Leader‐in‐Waiting if your influence is random and non‐ purposeful. Your task is to become a Leader‐in‐Gear.

All Leaders‐in‐Gear are not the same. There are four levels ‐ Entry, Emerging, Engaged and Expert. Studying and applying the Personal Leadership Insight curriculum will move you from an Entry to an Expert Leader!

The Personal Leadership Insight curriculum is comprised of the 10 PLI Essentials. These are 10 areas of leadership excellence that need to be developed to become an Expert Leader… Vision, Integrity, Innovativeness, Wise Judgement, Service Mindedness, Goal Processing, Skill Assessment, Emotional Maturity, Fostering Relationships, and Masterful Communication.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator

Understanding PLI

An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Personal Leadership Insight

[

]

Personal Leadership Insight is our understanding of how to positively influence people and situations to create value and growth.

Let's break down this definition to find the meaning behind it... Understanding: As you teach PLI, you will be working on each student’s intellectual and emotional understanding of leadership. However, your disclaimer should be, "This material only works if you do." You can learn about golf by reading a golf book, but you can only improve by picking up a golf club. The PLI curriculum will challenge the students to do leadership by putting their understanding to work.

Positively: Leadership has both a positive and negative effect. By studying and applying the PLI Essentials, your students learn how to maximize the presence and the impact of their positive influence. Expert Leaders focus on, encourage, expect and draw out the positive.

Influence: Leadership is influence. This is the core mechanism allowing leadership to work. Expert Leaders are very aware of their influence type and size.

People: Leadership is a team sport. Leaders come in all different shapes, sizes and personality types. Some are extroverts and some are introverts. The constant in leadership is that it involves people. Five out of the ten PLI Essentials are either totally or partially about understanding human relations. Expert Leaders love people and love leading people.

Situations: Although leadership is primarily about motivating people, there are many instances when a leader's impact is made through their projects. Expert Leaders understand how to maximize their positive impact in a variety of situations. Your job is to put your students in as many of the situations in the PLI curriculum as possible. Each one exercises an important leadership muscle.

Create Value: Throughout the PLI curriculum, your students will learn how to be more valuable to their organizations (family, friends, job, clubs, community, etc.). Expert Leaders constantly have their "how can I add value here" radar on. The ultimate test of your teaching and of this curriculum is if the students actually become more valuable to their organizations during this journey. Growth: This final portion of the PLI definition provides context for value creation. Expert Leaders invest their emotional, intellectual and physical energy in growing their organizations, people, resources, skills, and influence. Your basic job description as a PLI Navigator is to help your students understand there is always room to grow and then help them clearly see how to get there. Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

The PLI Essentials Defined

Personal Leadership Insight

Vision To passionately pursue valuable opportunities.

[3

]

Web Resources additional buckets of PLI specific content.

The PLI Website

Integrity

www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org

To be guided by character and lead by example.

Oc

Innovativeness To creatively add value.

Co m tob ing er ‘08

Wise Judgement

The PLI website has Essential‐specific video clips of our authors training and teaching PLI, downloadable posters, additional curriculum and more. The website will continue to grow in size and value.

To leverage talent, intuition and expertise.

The PLI Blog

Service Mindedness To operate primarily for the benefit of others.

The PLI blog has over 250 Essential‐ specific posts. There are also general posts highlighting leadership books, event ideas, and much more.

Goal Processing To complete a plan with excellence.

Skill Assessment To act upon clear understanding of your and your organization’s core strengths and challenges.

Emotional Maturity

The PLI Del.icio.us Tags Delicious.com/pliblog

To effectively manage and control emotions.

Fostering Relationships To value and connect with diverse individuals.

Masterful Communication To firmly command the right tool at the right time with the right message.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.com

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org

Delicious is a social bookmarking site allowing people of similar interests to share “Internet Favorites” with each other. The PLI Delicious Tags system has over 600 Essential‐specific sites, including blog posts from a range of leadership experts, activity possibilities, and a ton of content ideas for deepening and enriching your students’ PLI journey.


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PLI Natural Laws Personal Leadership Insight

Each PLI Essential is really just a bucket where a variety of leadership and life skills concepts live. Take Masterful Communication for example – within the study of this Essential, you can teach speaking, conversation, active listening, or writing skills. The following list of Natural Laws provides you a creative concept to work into each Essential study. Learning how each Natural Law relates to its corresponding Essential would deepen the students’ PLI understanding.

Vision Integrity Innovativeness Wise Judgement Service Mindedness

Purpose Trust Imagination Connectivity Meaning

Goal Processing Skill Assessment Emotional Maturity Fostering Relationships Masterful Communication

Inertia Awareness Responsiveness Charisma Transfer

Basic Questions

Just a few insightful, simple questions to get the students connecting each Essential with their personal journey.

Vision Do I have a clear picture of what my life will look like in 5 years? Integrity What is the condition of my credibility? Innovativeness What challenges am I facing today that require more solution thinking? Wise Judgement Who do I consult before I make major decisions? Service Mindedness Do I have enough volunteerism in life? Goal Processing Am I doing something today to move closer to my big goals? Skill Assessment What is my core strength and do I engage it everyday? Emotional Maturity What is my jingle and would others want to "catch it"? Fostering Relationships When I am with my friends, do I talk up or down to them? Masterful Communication When was the last time I sharpened my listening skills? Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Heroic Acts

Small, everyday tasks the students can do to model their PLI understanding.

[

What team members desire from their leader.

Vision ‐ Talk optimistically about the future. Integrity ‐ Follow through on every commitment you make. If you're not going to follow through, don't promise you will.

… Meaning

Innovativeness … Fresh Ideas

than problems.

make a mistake.

Vision

Integrity … Inspiration

Innovativeness ‐ Talk more about solutions Wise Judgement ‐ Admit quickly when you

]

Team Needs

Wise Judgement … Realness Service Mindedness … Appreciation

Service Mindedness ‐ Give your time,

Goal Processing … Order

money or both for the benefit of a complete stranger in need.

Skill Assessment … Expertise Emotional Maturity … Calm

Goal Processing – First thing in the morning, identify one thing you will do that day to move closer to a big goal.

Skill Assessment ‐ Learn something today

Fostering Relationships … Belonging Masterful Communication … Clarity

to move you one step closer to being excellent at an everyday task.

Emotional Maturity ‐ When you get mad, step away from the situation before you respond.

The “X” Explained

Fostering Relationships ‐ Be nice.

The “X” represents the 10 PLI Essentials.

Masterful Communication – If you are

The four circles in the middle represent the four PLI Leader Levels – Entry, Emerging, Engaged and Expert.

talker, listen more. If you don’t talk much, start.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PERSONAL LEADERSHIP INSIGHT

Impact Grid

This grid highlights the negative impact when a leader is missing one of the 10 PLI Essentials. V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Positive Influence │ Growth │ Value

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Confused │ Lost │ Misdirected

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Discredited │ Fake │ Self‐Doubt

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Problem‐Focused │ Inefficient │ Bland

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Self‐Denial │ Obstructed │ Infantile

GP

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Self‐Centered │ Unfulfilled │ Insignificant

SA

EM

FR

MC

=

Undisciplined │ Procrastinator │ Incomplete

EM

FR

MC

=

Fearful │ Defensive │ Frustrated

FR

MC

=

Negative │ Conflicted │ Insulting

MC

=

Lonely │ Stagnate │ Weak

=

Disconnected │ Vague │ Isolated

V V

Int.

V

Int.

Inn.

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

V

Int.

Inn.

WJ

SM

GP

SA

EM

FR

The Ten PLI Essentials Key

Personal Leadership Insight V – Vision

Goal Processing – GP

Int. – Integrity

Skill Assessment – SA

Inn. – Innovativeness WJ – Wise Judgement SM – Service Mindedness

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

Emotional Maturity – EM Fostering Relationships – FR Masterful Communication – MC

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Vision to passionately pursue valuable opportunities.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 Š PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Vision

The PLI definition of Vision highlights four critical components of real leaders. Leaders are passionate, opportunistic, always in pursuit of something and interested in creating value. Conceptually, Vision is very similar to Goal Processing. The difference in the PLI structure, is Vision focuses on where you want to go and why. Goal Processing is about how to get there. Your task during the Vision section is to help the students understand the power of this statement, “Everyone ends up somewhere… a few people end up somewhere on purpose. Be a part of the few.”

Hall of Fame Members Curriculum Elements The Turtle Principle: This is the core principle behind the power of a leader following a clear and powerful Vision – that their “short term” decisions are influenced and directed by the long term. Each student should make a list of short term decisions they make and connect them to a long term good and/or bad outcome (depending on the decision). The CLEAR Leader: Use this as a source for discussion questions. The Three Elements: After they draw these elements in their Locator, which could be personal, educational, or professional in nature, have each student create a poster that you display in the class. The Map It Out page would be a good addendum exercise for this piece. Success Definition: This ultimately becomes each student’s Vision statement. The students write their personal definition and share it in class. A visual option is for each student to find an object, draw a picture or print a picture that embodies their definition.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org

Have your students study these historical figures and how they modeled Vision in their personal or professional lives… Thomas Jefferson is celebrated for his writing skill in the crafting of the Declaration of Independence. During his term as U.S. President he doubled the size of the U.S. and extended America from the Atlantic to Pacific Ocean. His ability to see opportunity, articulate the importance, and strategize to secure funding is a prime example of Vision. Clara Barton is known as the “Angel of the Battlefield” for her volunteer efforts in distributing medical supplies for soldiers during the American Civil War. Beyond her great sense of service, her Vision allowed her to see the need for the creation of the American Red Cross. George Lucas is the mastermind behind the Star Wars films. Knowing his passion, he first earned two university degrees in film production. He formed the company Lucasfilm, and then created two subdivisions specifically to meet the needs of his audio and visual goals. His Vision, combined with his talent for storytelling, keeps Lucasfilm on the forefront of the film production industry.


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

Vision

Additional Quotes Curriculum Elements Success Words: Pretty simple exercise. A powerful extra (and a way to add some wall art to this Essential) would be for each student to take their Three Elements poster and turn it into a full “Banner of Success.” Decorate a poster with their name, their Vision statement (definition of success), their success words (in either words or pictures) and their Three Elements. Long‐Term Context: The students hold a 3‐5 minute conversation with someone talking about subjects, events, etc. that won’t happen for years. This can be a class exercise or a take home assignment where they report back the details of the long‐term context conversation. Optimistic Language: Have them list out the negative (but clean) words either they use or they know their peers use. Then have them create a list of positive replacement words. iVision: The instructions for this section are built into the section itself. You can either have the students do this in class collectively, where you control the station changing, or have them do it on their own and report back to class with their experience. Just Lucky I Guess: Before you cover this piece, have the students play any type of game where luck is involved. A simple game of dice or a card game would work fine. Believing is Seeing: The students can list out reasons why they could and should be optimistic. You can reference the writings of Zig Ziglar, Napoleon Hill, or Dr. Martin Seligman. Optimism, in particular an optimistic Explanatory Style, would be good for the students to Google and report back their findings in the context of why it is so important for leaders who are working toward a clear Vision.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org

Dream lofty dreams, and as you dream, so you shall become. Your vision is the promise of what you shall one day be; your ideal is the prophecy of what you shall at last unveil. James Allen Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world. Arthur Schopenhauer Your vision will become clear only when you look into your heart. Who looks outside, dreams. Who looks inside, awakens. Carl Jung The most pathetic person in the world is someone who has sight, but has no vision. Helen Keller Vision is the art of seeing the invisible. Jonathan Swift You've got to think about big things while you're doing small things, so that all the small things go in the right direction. Alvin Toffler We can chart our future clearly and wisely only when we know the path which has led to the present. Adlai E. Stevenson


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PLI Ventures make Personal Leadership Insight more than a curriculum… make it an adventure!

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PLI Ventures OVERVIEW:

Success Tips…

The PLI Ventures take the curriculum out of the classroom and into the real world. They are 10 big, bold and interesting projects the entire class will work on either individually, in teams or as a class.

Make certain every student is clear on the objective of each Venture. They will put a large amount of time and energy into each Venture so it is vital they are headed in the right direction. Once you are in the middle of a Venture, periodically ask for status updates. Most of the Ventures will require them to do a little every day, instead of a lot all at once. Set realistic, but firm deadlines. Expert Leaders always have more to do than they have time to do it in. Help your students identify “non‐essential time consuming activities” they have in their life that they will need to stop doing to make space for the Ventures. Put up some artwork in your classroom to remind the students which Venture they are currently working on. Make it big, bold and interesting – just like the Ventures.

They are also your opportunity to help your students take tangible leaps in their journey to becoming Expert Leaders. There is one Venture for each of the 10 PLI Essentials and each one challenges the students to engage a significant leadership muscle. The PLI Ventures can be used at any time, but they are most effective as an introduction piece to each PLI Essential study. Some of the Ventures are designed to be the only thing the students are working on for a set number of days (i.e. they require both in class and out of class time). The remaining Ventures can be running while you are teaching that particular Essential in class because the bulk of the Venture work is out of class.

Your students will create a number of visuals during their PLI Venture experience. Please take pictures and email them to us. Thanks!

info@PersonalLeadershipInsight.org Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PLI Venture

iNOVEL

Vision

OBJECTIVE: Each student will create a book that represents their life ‐ their “iNovel”. It tells where they have been, who they are today and where they are going. MATERIAL:

Construction paper, typing paper, three‐hole punch, glue, scissors, string, and a misc. assortment of newspapers and magazines (although the students will be asked to find their own pictures.)

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Ask the students to journal on all their major life experiences to date. Include places, names, feelings, etc. These could include birth, accidents, moves, special family occasions, etc. This info will become their “Then” section. 2. Ask the students to journal as many words as they can to describe who they are (values, beliefs, etc.) and what they are involved in today. Include educational, personal, and job‐related experiences. This info will become their “Now” section. 3. Ask the students to journal on what they want to do in the future. Have them think as far out as they can, but make sure to include major time markers – 5 years, 10 years, 25 years, etc. Where do they want to live, where do they want to go to college, what job do they want, where would they like to travel, what type of house would they like, what is their perfect spouse, how many children, etc.? This info will be their “When” section. 4. Once they have completed their “word dump”, they will go on an image hunt. They need to find as many digital pictures (print them out), actual pictures, magazine/newspaper pictures, etc. as they can that represent their past, present and future. 5. They take whatever paper type they have chosen for their book and start coloring, drawing, writing, cutting/pasting words and images to describe as many of the experiences for each of the sections that they can. Have them create their own cover page for the book and cover page for each of the three sections. Once they are done, they can bind it however they would like: use staples, holes and string, holes and a binder, etc. 6. Each student will present the highlights from each section of their iNovel in front of the class.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the navigator An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching PLI

PLI Activities put the leadership puzzle together.

Consult the PLI blog and the PLI Delicious tags for additional content ideas.

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


PLI Activities

PLI ACTIVITIES Table of Contents 26. That’s Me 27. SPG 28. Rocks All Day Long 29. Word Association 30. Inspiration Circle 31. Challengers 32. Letters 33. Super Sundae 34. Over the Top 35. You Make the Movie 36. Tetrasodium Towers 37. Grab it 38. Invention Convention 39. Collages 40. Bear‐Mosquito‐Trout 41. Detective 42. Buddy Tag 43. Clothespin Tag 44. One Duck 45. Nametag Swap 46. I am Famous Find 47. Leadership Anaconda 48. Isolate by the Numbers 49. Movie Trailer 50. Finger Joust

1. Table of Contents 2. Clumps 3. Circle of Names 4. Captain is Coming 5. Mattress Company 6. Focus Ball 7. Lap Lolly 8. Back Snatching 9. Fill the Circle 10. Balloon Toss 11. Create‐A‐Game 12. Thumbs Up 13. Table Topics 14. Charades 15. Charades (Group Version) 16. Standing O 17. No Hands Stand 18.Table Challengers 19. Name That Tune 20. Table Topics 21. Leadership Circus 22. Super Shaper 23. Monkey in the Corner 24. Rock‐Paper‐Scissors 25. This Way/That Way 26. That’s Me

Index by Essential Index by Time

1

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


PLI Activities Clumps PLI Essential – Fostering Relationships Objective – To get into the right clump Time Needed – 10‐20 minutes Material Needed – N/A Best Case Scenario – An open area with 15 – 100 students When not to do it – N/A Debrief Possible – It teaches how people are different in many regards and how we shouldn’t judge people on their differences. We should instead recognize and appreciate differences and find points of similarity to create mutual interests, points of conversation and friendship building blocks. Step‐by‐Step Instructions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11.

12.

Everyone gets up in the open area. The point of the game is to get in a clump. A clump is a circle of people with their arms interlocked. You know how to clump up based on the “descriptor” the activity leader gives. You know which clump to get into based on communicating with others to find people that are like you. For example, when the activity leader yells out eye color, all the blue eyes get in a clump, all the green eyes, brown eyes, etc. There cannot be “split clumps.” For example, if you are doing shoe size, all the 10’s have to be together, all the 9’s, etc. You cannot have two clumps of 6’s or two clumps of 8’s, etc. Once all the clumps have been formed, you then give another descriptor. You can also use numbers to form the clumps instead of descriptors. You can say 5 and everyone gets in clumps of 5 people. You can take the game one step further and once the clumps are made, you can have everyone go around and briefly introduce themselves to the other people in their clump. The brief intros can be name, hometown, and favorite hobby. Once you feel like the game has gone long enough, a great way to end it is to have everyone get in one big clump (by using the descriptor of “who is here today”). Once they are in one big circle, you can stand in the middle and talk about how everyone is different, but there are certain points of similarity. Point out the fact that everyone in the room has what it takes to be a positive leader. This is also a good time to preview what you will do next as you will have their attention. You can also add an element of competition to this game by having everyone get in a clump before you say Stop. All the people who are not in a clump or are in an illegal clump (like a split clump) have to sit down. So, you would say get in clumps by your age. Then you say go, let them scramble, and then say stop. Everyone not in a clump has to sit down. You keep going until you narrow the group down to 3 or 4. You can also use clump size as the descriptor (i.e. Get in clumps of 3).

2

2008 © PLI, Inc. www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org


the leadership locator Rhett Laubach & Ryan Underwood

find the leader within.


the leadership locator

find the leader within.

Copyright Š 2008 PLI, Inc. ISBN# - 0-9728345-1-6

All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form. For information on how to license the right to duplicate and teach this curriculum, send an email to info@PersonalLeadershipInsight.org.

Special thanks to Kelly Barnes, Carrie Underwood and Amy Gallimore for their creativity and inspiration.

PLI, Inc. 1210 Roosevelt Street, Suite 200 Edmond, OK 73034 405.216.5050 www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.org

2


Rhett Laubach

Ryan Underwood

meet the authors.

Rhett is the Chief Executive Officer of

Ryan is the Chief Executive Officer at TRI

YourNextSpeaker, LLC and a Leadership Fellow

Leadership Resources, LLC and an Associate

at TRI Leadership Resources, LLC. For the past

Speaker at YourNextSpeaker, LLC. Over the past

17 years he has been a speaker, trainer, and

two decades, Ryan has helped individuals and

consultant in the field of leadership development.

organizations of all sizes make a difference. He

He is an author, blogger, and presentation

is an inspiring speaker who delivers practical

coach who has inspired over 750,000 people

and effective tools to leaders of all ages. His

throughout North America with his leadership

effectiveness has established his company

expertise, professional development techniques,

as one of America’s top providers of training

and unique insights into team effectiveness.

and development, event management, and

Rhett is a graduate of Oklahoma State University

association leadership services.

where he received his degree in Agricultural

graduate of Pepperdine University where he

Economics. He lives in Edmond, Oklahoma with

received a degree in Business Management and

his wife and business partner Ashley and two

Marketing. He lives in Owasso, Oklahoma with

daughters Vivian and Addison.

his wife and business partner Carrie Underwood.

rhett@yournextspeaker.com

Ryan is a

ryan@teamtri.com 3


the leadership locator

what’s inside.

6

Introduction to Personal Leadership Insight

12 Vision 23 Integrity 35 Innovativeness 45 Wise Judgement 56 Service Mindedness 66 Goal Processing 76 Skill Assessment 88 Emotional Maturity 98 Fostering Relationships 108 Masterful Communication

4


How To Get the Most Out Of YourLeadership

Locator

Study the Leadership Locator from front to back to gain a complete understanding of Personal Leadership Insight. Review each PLI Essential when you have a need to apply the lessons immediately. Research the PLI Blog (www.PersonalLeadershipInsight.com) to get even more PLI content. Research the 500+ PLI Del.icio.us tagged pages from the PLI Blog to complete your PLI studies. (delicious.com/pliblog)

Personal Leadership Insight copyright c 2008

5


understanding

Personal Leadership Insight is our of how to influence people and situations to create and

value growth.”

Introduction to Personal Leadership Insight

10

You are a leader because you have influence. The question you need to answer before embarking on this journey is, “Am I ready to learn how to be an Expert Leader?” The purpose of the Leadership Locator is to help you…

Vision

1. Locate where you stand on the long and rewarding

Integrity

Leadership Essentials

journey to Expert Leadership.

2. Locate where to focus your leadership development

Innovative

time and energy.

Wise Judgement

The Personal Leadership Insight curriculum is designed

Service Minded

to help you learn how to have a large, positive

Goal Processing

influence on the people and projects in your life.

Skill Assessment There are literally hundreds of variables impacting a

Emotional Maturity

leader’s influence. Our leadership research reveals

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those hundreds of skills organize into ten primary areas we call the

Personal Leadership Insight copyright c 2008

Fostering Relationships

Essentials of Leadership.

Masterful Communication

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Introduction to Personal Leadership Insight The Leader’s Journey Locating where you are on the road to Expert Leadership begins with understanding the difference between entry level leadership and expert level leadership.

Entry Leader to Emerging Leader This occurs when an individual decides to use their influence positively. •

Everyone is an Entry Leader because everyone has influence.

Positive behavior is a prerequisite for Expert Leadership.

EXPERT

Emerging Leader to Engaged Leader This occurs when a positive individual gains followers. •

Having positive intentions is important.  Being others-focused and specific

ENGAGED

with your "others" is just as important. •

“Nice guys finish last" is a popular theory when it comes to movement up the leadership ladder.   However, in the long run, the positive individual gains more respect, more responsibility and more satisfaction.

E M E R G I NG

Engaged Leader to Expert Leader

ENTRY

This occurs when a positive individual creates significant value for their followers. •

Expert leaders are primarily focused on and concerned with creating value.

To become an Expert Leader, you must have all three - positive behavior, followers that trust you and value creation.

Your effectiveness as a leader is based on a composite of the ten Essentials – i.e. I am really strong in the area of Integrity but weak in the area of Fostering Relationships. The Personal Leadership Insight curriculum is designed to help you reach Expert level in all ten areas. This journey begins by understanding where you are today. The TRAX function allows you to rate your ability within a certain Essential. 7

TRAX it Where are you with this ESSENTIAL?

T

R

A

X

entry emerging engaged expert Personal Leadership Insight copyright c 2008


vision

to passionately pursue valuable opportunities.

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“ 1 thoughts on

vis

essential element number

. ion

There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.

Peter Drucker

The future belongs to those who see possibilities before they become obvious.

Vision without action is a dream. Action without vision is a nightmare.

Japanese Proverb

All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence Personal Leadership Insight

John Scully

A leader has the vision and conviction that a dream can be achieved he inspires the power and energy to get it done. Ralph Lauren

copyright c 2008

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Why is Vision important to being an Expert Leader? Expert Leaders are driven by their core beliefs and a clear strategy for aligning their beliefs with their actions. When you develop your Vision, this is the world you are creating. A world where you deeply understand where you are going and why. This clarity also serves as a powerful force for influencing others because people are greatly inspired by a passionate person with a purpose.

How to

Develop Your Vision

EMPOWER DISCUSS THE BE YOURSELF OPTIMISTIC FUTURE Create, believe in and be enthusiastic about your definition of success.

Use positive, optimistic language.

Talk in a “long-term� context with people.

GET SPECIFIC Be clear. The clarity of your vision is just as important as the size of your vision.

2 1 3

Specifically and visually describe THREE elements of your life in FIVE years from now.

Personal Leadership Insight

TRAX it

Where are you with this ESSENTIAL?

T

R

entry emerging

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A

engaged

X

expert


The very essence of leadership is that you

have a vision.

Theodore Hesburgh, Former President of the University of Notre Dame

The Turtle Principle "Make decisions in the short term to satisfy the needs of the long-term." The Turtle Principle comes from the Tortoise and the Hare. It states that Expert Leaders are interested in the benefits of the long-range approach and behave accordingly.

Are you a

C

CLE AR Leader?

L

earn

ommitment

Are you fully committed to your leadership positions?

What do you need to be learning to be a better leader?

Studies show it takes 2.7 hours of practice per day for at least 2 years to become an expert on anything. Are you ready to work on a daily basis to turn your Vision into reality?

What did you learn today and how will you apply it tomorrow?

E

xpectations

Are you clear with your expectations of others?

Are you clear on what others expect of you?

A

ct daily with Integrity

What is the condition of your character?

Are your actions in alignment with your beliefs?

Study the book Remarkable Leadership by Kevin Eikenberry to learn about how and why learning is a leader's most important task.

Do you look to someone to be your Integrity hero?

R

evolutionize

What are you making significantly better today?

You can improve something small today and it will have a huge impact tomorrow.

What is success to you? List as many words as you can that come to mind when you think of a successful person…

Long-Term Context Here is a simple conversational tool that will help you think and act with more vision. When you talk with people, talk in a long term context. Ask yourself this question… when was the last time you spoke with someone about something that wouldn’t occur or come to fruition for at least two years? Now, would the three closest people in your life use any of these words to describe you? If not, start doing them today, and they will soon.

Have conversations like this more often. This will encourage forward thinking from others and put many of your seemingly mundane daily conversations into a broader context.

Personal Leadership Insight

YES

copyright c 2008

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NO


The Rhythm of an Authentic Vision Now, turn the music off.

Change the channel.

Find some good music and listen as you read.

With a new song comes a totally different set of experiences.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the most popular American Poet in the nineteenth century, observed, “Music is the universal language of mankind.”

You are now in a different place with a unique song and a new mood.

Music performs a number of remarkable feats for the human body. It boosts the immune system, regulates stress-related hormones, stimulates digestion and affects respiration. Rhythm is the heart of music. It provides the foundation for the song and defines our basic connection with it. Examples of rhythm are not only found in song. Your vision of the future creates your life’s rhythm. It defines your connection between you and the people, places and things around you. Do they have purpose? Are they taking you closer or further away from your vision?

Back to the song... Listen very, very intently to it, and think about what you hear. What is the singer (if there is one) trying to tell you? How do the instruments make you feel? Is the song popular or classic? Inspirational or entertaining? Familiar or new? If it is familiar, where does it take you in your life? What memories are being recalled? Does the song make you want to dance, reflect, go to sleep or just listen?

Change the channel again and again.

You are presented with a multitude of singers, instruments, moods, genres, writers and rhythms. They were all written uniquely. As you surf the airwaves or your iPod, stop at one that makes you tap your feet - one that you really like. This song, above all the others before, is exactly what you need right now. Your fingers are tapping and it makes you feel good. The song has changed your entire energy level. You have found your rhythm. The song has connected with you. It is this type of energizing connection your vision should be creating in your life today. If its not, change the channel. Create a vision that energizes you, makes you hopeful and deeply connects with you. The most important dynamic of rhythm is inertia. Once it gets going, it naturally continues until something or someone forces it to stop.

ACT

Personal Leadership Insight

The song continues to make your feet tap because you can still hear it in your head. This is the power punch of rhythm in the context of your personal vision. It breeds life, energy and discipline. It makes the activities you work hard at everyday seem natural. Not a part of you, but you in whole. Effortless.

Turn on your radio or iPod.

Rhythm itself has many definitions, but let’s look deeper at this one:

A movement marked by the regular recurrence or natural flow of related elements.

This definition highlights the dynamic of an authentic vision. The key word is movement, but in the context of the regular movement of something natural and authentic. Movement denotes a lack of sameness, an absence of apathy and a physical action producing a change. An authentic vision creates and drives the magic of inertia in your life. It you to act and it gives purpose to that action.

You have to upon your vision for it to have any relevance or IMPACT on your life. An authentic vision leads to authentic action. Your life becomes unique and easily recognizable by others. Just like a great song where the rhythm is a reflection of what the artist, songwriter and listener are all about. Work hard to find your authentic vision and it will continually move you and your actions to reach a genuine rhythm of meaning and greatness.

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Just Lucky I Guess

Believing is

People who think success is just a matter of luck are less likely to

Seeing

enjoy job and life satisfaction. The reason is because the control has been taken out of their hands. If success and failure are just based on pure happenstance, then there is no real reason to work harder or more efficiently or more productively. There is

Entry level leaders operate from a "seeing is

no reason to set goals and work to achieve them. And when you

believing" standpoint. They have to have

extract purpose, direction and motivation from any equation,

things proved to them first and always.

what you have left is much less than satisfying.

Expert Leaders operate from a "believing is seeing" standpoint. They have a genuine

When the risk and mystery are gone (either success is or is not

faith in the goodness of others and they

in the cards for me), then the game is boring and completely

own a healthy, intelligent optimism. They

disengaging. At the same time, any successful person will tell

believe in their own and others’ potential to

you a part of their success is based on lucky situations or turn of

perform and that belief spurs on and actually

events.

encourages the performance to happen. What do you need to “believe in” just a little

This is true to the extent they had to do something either

more?

intentionally or unintentionally to be in the right place at the right time to reap the benefits of those "lucky turn of events." To extract more satisfaction from our work life (whether that be professional work, school work, hobby work or personal relationships work), we need to...

Believe fortune smiles on the diligent in labor.

Be thankful when it does.

Keep an optimistic vision set on a future full of risk and uncertainty. Do whatever we can today to create our own luck tomorrow.

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In the spaces below, map your milestones.

ten years from today.

the past.

one year from today.

twenty years from today. Personal Leadership Insight copyright c 2008

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