Page 1

SPRING 2018

FEEDING THE HUNGRY THE MUSTARD SEED STEPS UP ICELAND

UNFORGIVING BEAUTY LIFTING YOUR SPIRITS WITH COLOUR

HARD WIRED

MAKING A LIVING OUT OF PASSION


SPRING 2018

CONTENTS

04

PUBLISHERS NOTES

06

ABOUT YOUR

08

FEEDING THE HUNGRY

12

5-3-1

The Mustard Seed Steps Up

5 Questions, 3 not-for-profits in this 1 great community

16

ICELAND

Unforgiving Beauty

BRUSSELS WITH MUSCLES. Brilliantly fresh cuisine by the ocean.

20

THE CHANGING NEEDS FOR YOUR FINANCIAL LEGACY

22

HARD WIRED

24

LIFTING YOUR SPIRITS WITH COLOUR

26

RUGBY CANADA

Making A Living Out of Passion

29

LARRY’S PICKS

30

YOUR HERE

250 598 8555 | marinarestaurant.com | 1327 Beach Drive at the Oak Bay Marina YOUR SPRING 2018 3


YOUR CONTRIBUTORS

YOUR PUBLISHER’S NOTES

W

ith signs of spring popping up all over Greater Victoria I find myself looking ahead to the summer and upcoming community events. While I would be remiss to not wish you all a Happy New Year with this being our first issue of the year, it seems far too late so instead I hope that everyone is enjoying a healthy and happy 2018. The spring time always has me reflecting on the past year, more so than New Years does, as it represents new beginnings. It means time in the garden, beach adventures with little Ginger, and bumping into friends that you maybe haven’t seen over the winter. I believe that this also provides a great opportunity to reconnect with your community and make commitment to give your Time, Talent, or Treasure to an upcoming event or fundraising campaign. I often advocate that you need to find an organization that carries value to you; be it what they do or who they help, these organizations and the people behind them are what keeps Victoria vibrant, supportive and unique. While sometimes I wonder whether the organization or the volunteer gets more out of the relationship, the time, talent or treasure that you give has many meanings. For me, before YOUR, I gave my time to Oak Bay Fire Fighters Charitable Foundation, and I continue to do so. They raise funds, while creating meaningful events for the Oak Bay community such as Sausage Fest, and then grant the funds back to the community that supports them. As an Oak Bay resident, I’m proud to be a part of the organization, and through this support I have been fortunate enough to be welcomed into their community. Community has so many meanings; there is a global community, a greater community, a local community, and even a family community. Here in Greater Victoria we are so fortunate to have so many smaller pockets that make up vital communities or families that build a stronger region. So, my challenge for this issue to all my readers, new or returning, is to find a community that you want to be a part of, one that you want to support and grow with. Dedicate even an hour of your week to building relationships within a not-for-profit that speaks to you, then tell me which party gets the most out of the relationship.

Community has so many meanings; there is a global community, a greater community, a local community, and even a family community.

If you are a loyal reader I thank you for choosing to spend time with the YOUR community, and if you are new, welcome. We hope to hear from you. As always, I encourage reader feedback, comments and especially submissions to YOUR Here.

CHRISTOPHER KELSALL

BOB WORTH

Christopher Kelsall is the founder of Athletics Illustrated, cofounder of Victoria Sports News, race director of the Victoria Run Series and run coach. Married for 25 years, with two kids, and a passion for sports.

Bob Worth retired as Executive Director of Financial Services at UVic and has continued serving on numerous pension and endowment boards and investment committees. Bob is a keen golfer and enjoys travel and kayaking with his wife Laurel.

CAROLINE MITIC

DANIEL PALMER

Caroline is a graphic designer, photographer and artist who secretly wishes she could spend her whole life traveling the world with nothing but a backpack and a laptop. Being nomadic has it’s disadvantages, however, so instead, Caroline lives close to her family in Victoria, and dreams of exotic places. She tries to go abroad at least once a year.

Daniel is a writer and communications professional based in Victoria, B.C. His work has appeared in Monday Magazine, Metro News and The Province among other publications. Born and raised in Newfoundland, Daniel has a deep attachment to oceanside living. He attended the University of Victoria and has a postgraduate certificate in journalism from Langara College.

BEN BRENNEN

MARYAM MORRISON

Ben is the owner and principal designer at Bespoke Design Ltd - a design boutique offering Farrow & Ball paint, wall coverings, window treatments, fine linens and furnishings made in Canada and North Carolina. He has an Honours Degree in Commerce from Carleton University and 25 years of experience in the design and paint coatings industries.  Ben has taught courses in Interior Design for the Calgary Board Of Education, Bow Valley College and most recently for the Pacific Design Academy.

Growing up Maryam was always told, “people who live in Victoria were chosen to live here,” and after travelling the world she knows this to be true. Maryam is a visual storyteller who uses photography to capture not only the love and relationship but the very essence of the families and people she photographs.

DEVON MACKENZIE Devon is a Victoria-based writer who also dabbles as a social media & marketing coordinator for a local business. Devon attended UVic for her BA and went on to pursue a post graduate certificate in journalism from Langara College. After working as a reporter for a handful of years, she hung up her reporter hat and decided to embark on a new adventure as a freelancer.

Dianne McKerrell, Publisher

4 YOUR SPRING 2018

YOUR SPRING 2018 5


YOUR ABOUT US Cover Back

YOUR

FALL 2015

Back

The Concept Behind YOUR Magazine In the Capital Region there are close to 1,000 registered notfor-profit organizations, and one of their largest challenges after finances, is getting their stories told. Media coverage for them is oversubscribed. Because of this, there are a multitude of great causes but not nearly enough opportunities for these organizations to reach a wide audience to share stories of the valuable work they do on a daily basis, work that enhances the community and the lives of the people who call it home. Some of these not-for-profits started from the ideas of a visionary, such as the Victoria Foundation, others by a collection of like-minded people, and some by a grant from the public or private sector. Not a single one has the same story. Victoria needs to be more aware of all the great people and unique organizations that help to make this city remarkable. YOUR Magazine believes that right now we can help raise the awareness of such organizations, and shine a light on the philanthropic opportunities within organizations in this community. YOUR community. The story of each not-for-profit is engaging and distinctive and these stories are all around us. YOUR magazine will encourage the reader to share with us what is or isn’t happening in your community, what the issues are on your mind and how can we help to share information and connect you better to your community. In order to get these stories heard, not-for-profits need to find a way to connect with those who are willing to help them grow. They need people to support them through volunteering any of their 3 T’s.

Support and Sustainability In this issue, YOUR is excited to share about the rebirth of Mustard Seed. While our hope, as always, is to share a story of a great not-for-profit doing something unique in the community, this feature is especially interesting, with a fresh outlook on support and sustainability. YOUR is able to support them with a portion of our ad revenue from this issue. YOUR’s goal is that as the magazine grows so will the opportunities to give back more within the community. The larger we get the more we can give back, not only to our featured not-for-profit but also to the greater community. A win-win; a meaningful commitment to the community paired with a collection of great untold stories 4 times a year.

The Three T’s Everybody has a cause close to their heart; one in which they would be willing to be a more active participant. What’s yours? Victoria is an incredibly fortunate community; filled with vibrant and active youth, a giving work force, and an incredible group of retired and semi-retired skilled individuals who have chosen Greater Victoria as home and a vast group of entrepreneurs of all ages. Each issue of YOUR will help raise awareness of a selected organization, connect people to their neighbours, share event information, and hopefully inspire members of the community to give one or two of their 3 T’s: 1) TIME – Although everyone has a hectic schedule the gift of your time to an organization can be incredibly rewarding whether it is an hour a month or a day a week. This time is invaluable to an organization, as people power is often the largest cost for a not-for-profit and time is in the highest demand. Volunteering can give seniors an opportunity to be back in their community filling a meaningful role, while many students can often obtain credits in both high school and university for their time. Bottom line, your time is a gift to any not-for-profit, and you will most likely benefit just as much! 2) TREASURE – There has been much written about the financial benefits of giving treasure to a registered charity. The monetary benefit is a tax receipt while the personal benefit can range from the great satisfaction of gifting funds anonymously and to seeing your dollars at work in your community and having ‘your name up in lights’. Without private financial donations few organizations in your community would survive.

E GLASS TH CAN BE HALF EMPTY

If you have a great story idea for YOUR or would like to contribute content please contact us at stories@yourmagazinevictoria.ca.

MELANIE MAHLMAN

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GENERAL INQUIRES info@yourmagazinevictoria.ca ADVERTISING INQUIRES ads@yourmagazinevictoria.ca PUBLISHED BY MDM Publishing Ltd. info@mdmpublishing.ca Victoria BC

For advertising inquiries: ads@yourmagazinevictoria.ca (250) 858 9189

3) TALENT – Everyone has skills or knowledge to offer the community whether they realize it or not. Your gift of talent could range from driving seniors to appointments, serving food at one of our community shelters or food banks, writing reports, helping with strategic planning, guiding financial decisions, helping clean a local beach or park, swinging a hammer at a community housing project, or taking a seat on a board. Any one of these or other ways of donating your skills could benefit the organization and the community, while making you feel good as a contributing member; plus you never know what may happen or who you might meet.

CONTRIBUTORS WELCOME

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PUBLISHER Dianne McKerrell publisher@yourmagazinevictoria.ca CONTRIBUTORS Ben Brennen Christopher Kelsall Devon MacKenzie Caroline Mitic Daniel Palmer Bob Worth

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S

uch is the case with the Capital Regional District’s purchase of a four-acre industrial warehouse in Esquimalt. Back in 2013, the $17-million sale was intended for a portion of the CRD’s now-defunct Seaterra sewage treatment project. Today, the site is helping to save 4,000 pounds of produce, grains and dairy products from the landfill every day.

FEEDING The Mustard T H E Seed steps up H U N G RY:

DANIEL PALMER

8 YOUR SPRING 2018

“Because the food is actually mostly organic, it has a shorter shelf life. So we’re feeding in-need communities with fresh, organic food,” Boice said. “You’d be amazed at the quality of this food if you came by.”

Since 1975, the Mustard Seed has been fighting hunger and restoring faith to a large portion of people living in poverty — including the working poor, fixed-income seniors, and the street community. The Food Rescue Project is just “This is really about dignity and food Since 1975, the Mustard Seed has been the latest evolution off an organization whose security,” said Janine Boice, Director of fighting hunger and restoring faith to a large programs are nearly 100-percent community Development at the Mustard Seed Street funded. Initiatives include the food bank, Church, which operates the largest food portion of people living in poverty a Family Centre, hospitality programs, and bank on Vancouver Island and is a key addictions recovery and rehabilitation at Hope Farm Healing Centre, partner in the burgeoning Food Rescue Project. a 36-acre mixed-use farm in the Cowichan Valley. In keeping with its For the past few months, many of the Capital Region’s grocery chains roots, Mustard Seed also hosts weekly church services for the street have been diverting food that would normally end up in the green bin, community. and delivering it to the Food Rescue Project’s warehouse. From there, the “Hope Farm is mostly run on social enterprise — they sell their own food is cleaned, gleaned and distributed by a small army of volunteers to chickens and eggs. We’ve also launched our own coffee company, 60 different programs across Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, Mustard Seed Coffee, through a partnership with Oughtred Coffee in including First Nations communities in need.

Sometimes, a bad decision can lead to something wonderful.

YOUR SPRING 2018 9


Vancouver. Oughtred roasts the beans, which are then shipped to the farm to be processed and bagged before they’re sold in Thrifty Foods,” Boice said. By collaborating with community pillars like Thrifty Foods, Country Grocer, the Victoria Foundation, the Rotary Club of Victoria, and other social agencies in Victoria, the Mustard Seed provides food hampers to 5,000 people each month, and rely on up to 100 daily volunteers to keep their collective programs running. That’s in addition to the 43,000 individuals impacted monthly through the Food Share Network and Food Rescue Project. In keeping with their “hand-up, not hand-out approach,” Mustard Seed is also leading the charge to launch a processing kitchen at the Food Rescue Project warehouse, to be installed in the spring.

“Not everyone knows what to do with an eggplant,” Boice said. An education environment also builds community, and allows staff and volunteers to connect people with additional services: everything from legal advice to family counselling to financial planning.

“We also provide tutoring for kids to nourish them at school, and we’ve helped guardians set up 300-plus Registered Education Savings Plans (RESP). Many low-income families aren’t aware they’re eligible to access thousands of dollars in educational savings for their kids,” Boice said. “All of our programs are about Mustard Seed operates at a relationships. It’s about changing their future and 1:12 staff-to-volunteer ratio, a their children’s future.”

remarkably lean administration for its five robust organizations

“We’re already down to 8 percent waste, and with the kitchen, we’ll be able to take what would otherwise become compost and turn it into soups, sauces and canned goods, with this we hope to lower the waste percentage to less than 3” she said. The processing kitchen creates opportunities for food literacy, education around nutrition, ecology and the importance of the local food economy. In other words, the rescued food will be used for skills development, and to teach families how to make nutritious meals from the varied food they receive.

Mustard Seed operates at a 1:12 staff-to-volunteer ratio, a remarkably lean administration for its five robust organizations. Volunteers at the Queens Avenue location provide meals, setup and cleanup, food hamper distribution, and assistance with clothing donations. “We run on a 70 percent volunteer base, and many of our volunteers have been involved for years, if not decades. If I could encourage anybody to come out and see what the Mustard Seed does, it’s more than meets the eye,” Boice said. Another transformation underway right now is Dignity Market, which allows food hamper recipients to select their own items in a grocery storestyle setting. Thanks to grants from BC Food Bank, food selections can

be made not just based on allergy and religious restrictions, but also on personal preference. “This is about the empowerment of the person,” Boice said. “Even picking the type of cracker you want does wonders for a person’s identity. It also gives our staff and volunteers a chance to get to know these people, and it’s the beginning of taking individuals out of the cycle of poverty.” Boice, who only joined Mustard Seed a year ago, continues to be amazed at the changes she’s seen in people who access their services. She recalls a young girl who received a Dora the Explorer umbrella on a rainy day, and when the girl stepped outside, offered the umbrella to a rain-soaked Boice. “It was such a simple gesture of giving what she had. Her family’s arms were full of food, and she had a huge smile on her face. It was a beautiful moment,” Boice said. “People authentically know their value and their worth, and we simply show them that it’s still there.” Non-perishable food shelves begin to thin out in the months following the winter holiday giving season. Monthly donor opportunities are an excellent way to ensure Mustard Seed can maintain its high level of services throughout the year. Those interested in volunteering can join a scheduled tour of either the Queens Avenue or Viewfield Road facilities. Find out more by going online to mustardseed.ca, or by calling 250-953-1575.

Since 1920 Jennings Florists has proudly served the Victoria area. We are a fourth generation, family owned and operated business. 2508 Estevan Ave. 250 477-9538 www.jenningsflorists.com 10 YOUR SPRING 2018

YOUR SPRING 2018 11


YOUR 5-3-1

YOUR 5-3-1

Transportation, we are confirmed to be in at least 9 stores so far. So short term, we will need volunteer support to ensure each store has adequate volunteer coverage. Long term, we want to spread the event across all of Vancouver Island so we can help as many Islanders as possible. This will require more corporate donations, volunteers and leaders up-island to help launch TP the Town in their community.

When was your not for profit founded, what is your mission statement? TP the Town was originally founded in Kingston Ontario in 2014 by Shaun Cerisano and Morgan Pierce. When Shaun moved to Victoria BC in 2015, he brought TP the Town with him along with the help of the Prodigy Group. The mission locally in Victoria is to help give people in need dignity by donating toilet paper to The Mustard Seed Food Bank.

Briefly describe your program or organization? Back in 2014, Shaun and Morgan learned that one of the most desired commodities in a food bank is toilet paper. As families who are on social assistance reach the last few dollars of the month, they are often times forced to choose between food and toilet paper while at the grocery store. As you can imagine, food always wins. These families can go days or weeks without toilet paper. So TP the Town was created to work with local grocery stores who will put toilet paper on sale for the day and allow TP the Town volunteers to encourage their customers to buy toilet and donate it to the cause. The event has blossomed to acquire corporate donations from Kruger products to add to the total we are able to give the Mustard Seed.

What are your organization’s long and short term needs? In 2017, TP the Town had 5 participating grocery stores. In 2018, thanks to the work of our new event lead Andrew Wilson from Wilson’s

Describe your contribution to the community and what outcome the organization has within the community. 2017 was our biggest year yet, thanks to a major corporate donation by Kruger Products, TP the Town was able to donate over 115,000 rolls of toilet paper to the Mustard Seed Foodbank. This equates to over $75,000 worth of product, and is forecasted to last Mustard Seed, and the other local foodbanks the Mustard Seed supports, up to one calendar year. That means for one year families in need in Victoria don’t have to make the choice of food vs toilet paper. For one whole year families can have dignity and not have to worry about the embarrassment that not being able to afford toilet paper brings. For one whole year we stocked foodbanks all across Victoria with toilet paper. The outcomes are less stress on mental health, and more dignity for the people of our great city.

What is the best way to get involved and where can I get more information about your organization? The best way to get involved is to sign up to be a volunteer for our next TP the Town event day which is October 13, 2018. You can sign up or get more information by contacting TP the Town Co-Founder Shaun Cerisano at shaun@forzapromotions.ca or TP the Town event lead Andrew Wilson at Andrew.wilson@prodigygroup.ca. You can also work with your company or business to challenge one of your competitors to see who can raise the most toilet paper. You can learn more information by going by visiting Facebook.com/ TPtheTownVictoria or by typing TP the Town Victoria in YouTube to watch our informational video.

YOUR will ask 5 questions to 3 organizations in this 1 great community with the goal to give our readers a snapshot of some smaller and lesser known not-for-profits, societies and organizations making a difference within the Greater Victoria community. 12 YOUR SPRING 2018

YOUR SPRING 2018 13


SAANICH VOLUNTEER SERVICES Nevertheless, we rely on donations for our services and operating costs, so donations are always welcome. We are a registered charity and do provide Tax Receipts. Saanich Volunteer Services has a pressing need for on-going funding, so we can continue to serve our community and grow our services to match the increasing need.

Briefly describe your program or organization? REACH! Performing Company currently includes 30 members, ages 15 to 70. Half of the members have a significant disability. The others are members of the community with huge hearts. A number have significant training and experience in performance, including graduates of the Canadian College of Performing Arts and the UVic School of Music.

When was your not for profit founded, what is your mission statement? REACH! Performing Company is the hallmark program of West Coast Reach Association (WCRA). Founded in Victoria in January 2017, WCRA celebrates inclusion and diversity of ages, cultures and abilities through the performing Arts.

What are your organization’s long and short term needs? In just one year REACH! has grown to be a unique and vibrant organization and program, truly inspiring its participants and countless audience members. We are currently looking for a corporate sponsor that would love to support and benefit from our special energy and significant profile in the community. We are still accepting new members, especially additional singers as soloists and mentors. We could also use volunteer help in organizing “PerformAble!”, a significant community event and show including many different performers and groups in December (to commemorate the UN International Day of Persons With Disabilities).

Describe your contribution to the community and what outcome the organization has within the community. Many of our “abled” and “differently-abled” participants say that REACH! is the highlight of their lives – and it shows in our shows! Through our rehearsals and our performances at significant community events, REACH! is touching hearts and changing how people view disability. Every person has something special to contribute, and we can all learn from each other. REACH! is living, moving proof of this. How important is that?

What is the best way to get involved and where can I get more information about your organization? •

View our website: www.westcoastreach.org/ or call our Director, Anne-Marie Brimacombe, at 250-882-4339. Send us an email message: westcoastreach@gmail.com. Enjoy our performances (i.e. Oak Bay Tea Party, Sidney Days, PerformAble…) (see our website for upcoming dates). Check out one of our rehearsals (please call Anne-Marie)

When was your not for profit founded, what is your mission statement? In 2017, Saanich Volunteer Services Society celebrated 25 years providing one-to-one direct volunteer services to Saanich residents over the age of 19 years. Our services are delivered by a team of dedicated and passionate volunteers. It is the strength of the partnership between the organization’s staff and volunteers that truly fulfills our mission: promoting independent living and enhancing the quality of life for Saanich residents by providing coordinated volunteer

Briefly describe your program or organization? Saanich Volunteer Services matches people who need help with people eager to provide it. Driving to appointments, visiting for companionship, helping with light yard work, doing minor home repairs and preparing income tax returns are just a few of the ways we contribute to a healthy Saanich. Our volunteers offer support to adults who need a hand to continue to live independently, and our staff provide clients with access to a wealth of information about community services and programs that meet the client’s unique needs. We are known as “community neighbours helping neighbours.”

What are your organization’s long and short term needs? Our short and long term needs fall under two categories; volunteers and donations.

Describe your contribution to the community and what outcome the organization has within the community. Saanich Volunteer Services contributes directly to the health and well being of Saanich residents. Saanich Municipality reviewed senior’s needs and found that accessing services and effective transportation options were very real challenges for them. Without the free, direct volunteer services we offer, more Saanich seniors would be isolated and lonely or placed in a position of choosing to drive when they shouldn’t be driving. Saanich Volunteer Services believes in the importance of community and participates in locally hosted events such as the Saanich Strawberry Festival and the Cadboro Bay Festival, where we have an opportunity to connect with community partners, potential clients and volunteers. We value our partnerships with the Municipality of Saanich and non-profit and community organizations. To better meet the growing needs of our residents, we are always looking for opportunities to collaborate and voice the impact of our services.

What is the best way to get involved and where can I get more information about your organization? We welcome people to join our volunteer team at any time. Currently, we have an urgent need for volunteer receptionists and volunteer drivers. To learn more about volunteering, becoming a client or making a donation, check out our website, www.saanichvolunteers.org or visit us at our office located in the McRae Heritage House at 1445 Ocean View Road.

Volunteers: Saanich Volunteer Services is always looking for talented, dedicated people to join our volunteer team. We offer a variety of engaging opportunities and recently formed Volunteer Advisory Council. We provide extensive volunteer orientation and ongoing training to ensure our volunteers are supported and able to provide the highest quality of direct services for our clients. Donations: Saanich Volunteer Services relies on the generous financial support of donors to provide the much needed services to the residents of Saanich. Saanich residents have been very generous and appreciative of the services we provide to the community, and we are extremely grateful for the donations we receive from community, clients and volunteers, and the bequests from past clients and volunteers. Our staff numbers are small. We have four part time employees who are dedicated to ensuring volunteers are confidently trained, clients are assessed for their needs and the two groups are connected. By working with volunteers to deliver our services and employing only four, dedicated, part-time staff, we are able to operate very efficiently.

14 YOUR SPRING 2018

YOUR SPRING 2018 15


YOUR TRAVEL

ICELAND:

Unforgiving Beauty

“Iceland is home to the most unforgiving landscapes I’ve ever experienced, and it was incredible to see the difference in terrain between geographical areas.”

CAROLINE MITIC

D

on’t be fooled by the ridiculously cheap flights to Iceland, because the eight days I spent there were some of the most expensive I’ve experienced. That being said, once you’ve paid for your flight, food, and accommodation, almost everything else is free. I visited Iceland in October, a trip I’d booked with three girlfriends. It turns out that a group of four was an excellent choice. It meant we could split our car rental and hotel rooms four ways instead of just two. We landed early in the morning after an easy, direct, seven hour flight from Vancouver on Iceland Air. Our plan was to get started without wasting much time, and so the first thing we did was head over to the car rental depot, and grab the pre-booked SUV we’d ordered online. We were taking turns paying for things, and booking the vehicle was my responsibility. I was less than thrilled when the attendant started trying to sell me all sorts of extra insurance. Thankfully my friends talked me into going along with it, because eight days of rugged terrain taught us that cars don’t have long lifespans in Iceland. The additional gravel and sand insurance that seemed like such a scam in the early hours of our first day sure came in handy when we returned the car, covered in dirt, mud, sand and pebble scratches.

16 YOUR SPRING 2018

Renting a vehicle gave us so much freedom, and we managed to cover a vast area of Iceland called the large circle. From Reykjavik, the country’s capital, this took us south along the coast and then up the east side. From there we cut through the middle of the island - where Highway #1 becomes a gravel road - and wound our way up to the top northern area, and back down the west coast. Each night was spent in a different accommodation, which ranged from the four of us sharing an eight-bed hostel room, to a self-contained apartment with a view of the local graveyard. Tourism is booming in Iceland, and they haven’t quite caught up yet, so hostel and hotel rooms are often just pre-fab buildings that look like portables. While we couldn’t afford to experience any frills, we were warm and comfortable, which is all that mattered. Iceland is home to the most unforgiving landscapes I’ve ever experienced, and it was incredible to see the difference in terrain between geographical areas. On the south and east coasts, black, prehistoric cliffs jut out of the water at strange angles, their sparse vegetation bent over to prove that the wind is constant and only blows in one direction. Water falls with incredible ferocity into self-carved canyons, covering us in mist. An angry ocean pounds against the sand, black because it is actually fine volcanic rock. YOUR SPRING 2018 17


The middle of the island feels altogether like a place other than earth. Like a gigantic gravel pit, we lost site of any forms of life for hours, and the temperature dropped below freezing. We then happened upon an area where the earth became a brilliant red, and hot, stinky mud burped to the surface into little pits. It felt like Mars. On the west coast, the golden hills roll gently towards the horizon, as horses, shaggy in their winter coats graze lazily along the side of the road. Everywhere we went we had to watch for sheep, since they are more plentiful than anything else in Iceland, and like to escape into the road. Hit a sheep, and you’ll supposedly be slapped with a substantial fine. Funny enough, I was never offered insurance for that.

if for only avoiding the sand that whips into your face on the Black Sand Beach, a must-see destination. You can’t go without a rain jacket. Even if the forecast calls for only a spatter, the waterfalls will throw more precipitation at you than the sky. Iceland feels like a teenager with growing pains, and it was an incredible place to experience. We saw glaciers, waterfalls, giant icebergs, volcanos, lava fields and more. While it has a very prehistoric feeling, it is actually quite young compared to other places on earth, and that is one of the reasons why it experiences so much terrestrial unrest.

We packed a lot of warm clothing, and we wore all of it sometimes all at once.

We decided to avoid the famed “Blue Lagoon” in favour of a less popular (read, less expensive) lagoon near a place called Myvatin. It was an incredible experience, and we spent an entire afternoon there enjoying the warm water and view. At about half the price, the Myvatin Lagoon doesn’t restrict your bath time, and we took full advantage. And since they let you drink alcohol everywhere in Iceland, we were able to order beer and wine right in the lagoon.

October is an excellent time to visit Iceland but you have to be prepared. We packed a lot of warm clothing, and we wore all of it - sometimes all at once. Gloves and a snug-fitting toque are mandatory, as are sunglasses

We had hoped to meet more Icelandic people along the way, but being in such remote areas didn't allow for much socializing outside of our own group. We spent our last night in Reykjavik, and managed to experience a bit of nightlife. The local brewery was a great place to stop, as well as a few other pubs and bars. Two of us stayed up all night waiting to experience the northern lights, and even though the forecast was good, we never saw them. If you go, you must visit the Sólheimasandur plane crash, Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon and Gullfoss, which is Iceland’s largest waterfall. Look for the word “foss” on signs because it means waterfall. Book your accommodation in advance or you won’t have any. Rent an SUV and buy all of the additional insurance they offer you. And, hopefully you’ll have more luck seeing the northern lights than we did!

Terry@ThisIsTLC.com | 250.589.6247 ThisIsTLC.com 18 YOUR SPRING 2018

YOUR SPRING 2018 19


IN CANADA, FEWER THAN 50% OF ADULTS HAVE A WILL

Weekly Specials

YOUR MONEY

MONDAY

THE CHANGING NEEDS FOR YOUR FINANCIAL LEGACY BOB WORTH

“Life is what happens when you’re making other plans.” John Lennon

F

rom dependency during childhood we develop our independence with ever-changing financial needs and the resources to meet them. Summer jobs to help pay tuition and gas money lead to graduation, two week travel vacations, weddings, mortgage payments and children’s day care costs. Through a contributing work life, with a discipline for saving, prudent investment and utilizing the several tax-favoured savings vehicles like TFSAs, RRSPs, RESPs and the appreciating equity in a principal residence, our assets can grow to support a satisfying retirement and leave an estate to be shared. But life is not so predictable or controllable. Few individuals and families avoid encountering unexpected challenges, some with significant financial impacts. With appropriate life, property, auto, critical illness and travel insurance we can help guard against the risk of becoming a financial burden on others. Even then, layoffs from a good job, divorce, bad timing of certain investments, serious illness in the family or other misfortunes are not at all uncommon. On the positive side, windfalls can occur such as inheritances, having your high tech company bought out or stock portfolio outperform. Accordingly, both financial planning and estate planning require review and adjustment as we move through life’s phases and as the needs of

20 YOUR SPRING 2018

ourselves and others change. In Canada, fewer than 50% of adults have a will yet, just as serious, is that too many who have wills have not updated them to reflect their current wishes. Some of the many factors to re-evaluate include: •

have there been deaths or changed circumstances of any named beneficiaries or the births of children or grandchildren you would like to benefit from your estate?

the financial needs of your adult children, whom you love equally, are different to the point that some will need extra financial support to meet a basic standard of living while others are financially successful far beyond their foreseeable needs. Do you continue to give them equal bequests?

is your executor still willing, sufficiently informed and capable of managing your affairs and executing your wishes? If the executor is your spouse and your estate has some complexities, have you considered naming a co-executor or professional advisor to support them during the very difficult period between funeral and probate?

are your succession plans for a family business or recreation property still appropriate?

should some of your estate be distributed before you and your spouse die or some of the assets be sold using your own knowledge of their value to simplify the tasks of your executor?

has the direction or leadership of a named charity changed from what prompted you naming it as a beneficiary?

Fish n’ Chips COD: 1PC 11.95 2PC 14.95 HALIBUT: 1PC 14.95 2PC 18.95 While self-help guides to drafting and revising your will can be useful in organizing and initially documenting your intentions, it is false economy to avoid having your will reviewed by a competent legal adviser knowledgeable in estate planning. Being well prepared before such a review of your objectives, family profile, asset and indebtedness summary and spending expectations for the future can significantly reduce your advisor’s time and accordingly your fees. An experienced professional can identify income tax and probate cost implications and their possible reduction; the use of trusts for distributions over extended periods to young, aging or disabled beneficiaries; insurance and savings plan beneficiary election, real estate, family law and foreign property issues or any number of other matters which, when resolved now, will provide peace of mind as well as lead to a smoother ultimate execution of your wishes. Communicating your changing wishes to members of the family is too often avoided or delayed. Movies have scenes of the extended family and expected beneficiaries sitting in a lawyer’s office anxiously awaiting the reading of the Will. Much better is to have had family and/or one on one conversations when a will is revised so later surprises and unexplained disappointments are avoided. Difficult decisions such as future ownership of the family home, boat or cabin by the lake; unequal distributions to benefit a less fortunate child or relative; or the allocation of a larger estate amongst family, friends, church or other registered charities deserve explanation in a calm setting where logic, love and mutual respect can be shown. It is not necessary to disclose dollar amounts to be expected since long term care, investment returns or other factors may erode the estate. To help convey your wishes, it may be preferable to have a professional advisor or respected executor present to add recognized wisdom to the discussion. Planning, simplifying, communicating and documenting your financial legacy is a necessary task which fortunately, when we are young with few responsibilities, involves few complications. Upon such a base, provisions can be added as our circumstances change provided we recognize their significance. Set as a goal earning lasting respect from your beneficiaries and executors for fairness, generosity and clarity in your final wishes and their ease of execution.

Your choice of halibut or cod, tempura or panko battered and served with Kennebec fries, house made tartar sauce and coleslaw.

TUESDAY Island Burger 10.95 Our house made beef patty charbroiled & topped with cheddar cheese & Coyote aioli. Served with your choice of daily soup, Kennebec fries or mixed greens salad.

WEDNESDAY 1/2 PRICE WINGS! min 10 per order

THURSDAY Pasta Night Come in for our special pasta creation

FRIDAY 8 After 8 $8 appies after 8pm

SATURDAY Steak Sandwich 14.95 Garlic toast topped with AAA sirloin, sautéed mushrooms & onion rings. Served with a side Caesar salad & Kennebec fries

SUNDAY Roast Beef & Yorkshire Pudding 14.95 Served with rich beef gravy, garlic mashed potatoes & fresh veggies.

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Full weekend brunch menu Available until 2pm Saanich Peninsula’s Best Pub Scene Open 11AM Daily & 10AM Sunday

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YOUR ARTS & CULTURE

Hard Wired Victoria’s Kyla Mackenzie Is Making A Living Out Of Her Passion DEVON MACKENZIE

of wire and I used it make what looked like a drawing by bending it into shape,” she explained. For Kyla, that’s when it clicked. “I knew I didn’t want to make 3-D sculptures like many people do with wire, but I wanted to make drawings that looked like they were almost falling off the page.” After graduation, Kyla spent a ski season in Nelson (one of B.C.’s most prominent arts hubs), and spent a working holiday in Australia. After that, she found herself supplementing her art income with another job in retail, and finally decided a year ago that was ready to take the leap and go full-time with her art. “I set myself a goal of six months to check in with myself and really ask myself if making art for my job was making me happy,” Kyla explained. “Six months rolled around and I was doing well, I had sold everything I had produced, and I had commissions, so I decided to keep on going.” Kyla’s wire art is comprised of a single, continuous piece of steel wire bent into shape. The illustrations can deceive the onlooker with their almost lifelike quality, because of the way the shadows interact with the white background. “It’s that push and pull between the two and three dimensional world that really satisfies me,” she said about her work. “A normal 3-D sculpture already satisfies what we know about the world, whereas the way I present my art, it’s almost unexpected. The reactions from people are so neat, whether they like it or not, they’re always kind of in awe as to how these illustrations are created,” she said. A lot of Kyla’s portfolio so far has featured the female form, but her newest series is one that features west coast-inspired illustrations. Pieces are currently available for rental or purchase through the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

A

rt has always been a part of Kyla MacKenzie’s life, but only recently has she been fortunate enough to turn her passion into her career.

“My next big project has been for One Yoga in James Bay, and I’ve just finished up eight pieces for them which went in on March 1,” Kyla explained.

“I was adamant when I finished high school that I was going to go university for something that was going to be more practical or tangible,” she explained.

The UVic graduate knew from a young age that she loved art – drawing especially – and that she had a knack for it.

So, she attended UVic and studied Earth and Ocean Sciences and Environmental Studies.

“When I was in kindergarten, we had to draw farm animals, and I drew a goat. The teacher asked my mom after school one day if she could keep my drawing and my mom said sure, but asked her why,” Kyla explained.

“It was so interesting, and at the time it seemed like the more responsible choice, but I knew in my heart that I really wanted to study art,” said Kyla.

“The teacher told her it was because I drew the ridges on the horns, which was a detail she’d never seen one of her kindergarten students pick up on.”

So she eventually changed her major, moved faculties and graduated from the Faculty of Fine Art in 2014. It was during that time she was inspired by wire art, her main medium now.

Kyla began to draw and sketch more and really enjoyed it, “whether or not I knew what I was doing in those days,” she laughed, reminiscing about her childhood and teen years.

“I had a drawing class with Professor Laurie Freeman, and once a week she would bring in a figure for us to draw,” Kyla said.

Admittedly, she never really took it seriously, and like many young artists, she didn’t believe it was going to be her career. 22 YOUR SPRING 2018

“She decided one day she wanted to challenge us, and she brought in a box of what was basically junk from cleaning up her yard. She asked us to find something in the box to draw with, and I picked up this piece

The series features seven pieces depicting the female form in traditional yoga poses, as well as a larger piece featuring two lotus blossoms. All the pieces are for sale. When she needs a break from her wire art, Kyla spends her time doing commission ink and watercolour sketches of homes for various clients, including realtors, home sellers, and builders. “It’s a nice way for me to take a break from working with wire while still being creative,” she said. Although she’s now realized her goal of making a living out of her art, “I’ll feel the most success when I’ve been doing this for a while, and I’m recognized as a member of the community,” she explained. “I’m already delighted to be providing something to the community that inspires or pleases people, but I want to keep doing that.” View Kyla’s work, shop for prints, or request to purchase an original or a commission on her website at kylamackenzie.com, or follow her on Instagram to see her day-to-day work @kyla.artworks.

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www.studiokanti.ca 1071 Fort St Victoria BC V8V 5A1 778-265-7795 YOUR SPRING 2018 23


YOUR INTERIOR DESIGN

CONNECTED & ACTIVE IN THE GREATER VICTORIA COMMUNITY

Lifting Your Spirits With Colour BEN BRANNEN

YOUR magazine will share knowledge, experiences and stories of the people that make Victoria one of a kind. Each issue will feature a not-for-profit organization within Victoria (which will be granted a portion of the issues ad revenue), while weaving together knowledge and experience of great youth and exceptional seniors, the outstanding wildlife along our coast, as well as life and style within each unique pocket of Greater Victoria. YOUR magazine will be out-and-about at markets, events and fundraisers connecting within the community. For advertising inquiries: ads@yourmagazinevictoria.ca

I

nterior Design often follows the fashion industry - lately the cycle is happening much faster. We have seen in fashion runway shows the resurgence in colour - bold bright uplifting colour. I find it interesting how we treat our homes in many ways like we chose our fashion. Often a conservative dresser will embrace a small change in their dress and also crave a small addition of colour in their home. A more bold fashion follower will embrace colour in an “all in” manner. As a preface - I like to caution anyone from following home trends too closely as a trend is just a trend until it is embraced as a movement and it is then that investing in that trend takes you from being “current” and not “out of date”. Sometimes it’s instinct and sometimes it’s waiting it out but ultimately I never recommend jumping on the trend train unless it resonates with you personally. Sometimes it’s best to let the trend train go by and catch the next one. Design trends tend to be cyclical but eventually lead us to a whole other place. For instance I can remember a time when timeless warm neutrals paired with a touch of black made for a tastefully update home. Now that same warm neutral has turned to a cooler gray tone mixed with soft white. The on trend house is now full of colour and more unique items rather than the timeless tasteful interior you may have grown up with. The feature wall used to be the best way to inject some colour into a room and it is still a good trick for adding colour. Even putting the colour in the rooms we use less like the powder room or the dining

24 YOUR SPRING 2018

room. I am going to suggest you take it one step further and add that colour to cabinetry be it bookshelves or even your kitchen cabinets (for the conservative minded start with a piece of painted furniture or your kitchen island). In the timelessly tasteful room we would have added colour to a living room in cushions and a throw which is still a simple and effective way but today we are happier putting the colour in the upholstery on the sofa or sectional and then throw in some neutral textures in pillows and a carpet. Hint. Stick to bold colours that you feel you can live with longer line navy. They can even act as a neutral when you feel like adding even more colour. The one colour accent colour trick is also a good one. This is where you select your accent colour and sprinkle it through the room or throughout the whole home. Consider carefully the colour you pick. Yellow is very cheerful, Red promotes conversation, Orange is stimulating, Blue is calming, green is earthy and purple is complex. Stick to one consistent colour in this technique and go with lighter or darker shades of the same colour. Trend colours come and go but the general movement towards adding colour to your home seems to be sticking so don’t be afraid! Approach adding colour to your home like shopping for clothes. If you like to add a few pieces, a few new combos or a whole new wardrobe – it all can work.

YOUR SPRING 2018 25


WOMENS SEVENS CHRISTOPHER KELSALL

I

n the competitive landscape of sport entertainment, much pressure has been applied to competitive teams, leagues and sports to capture an audience’s attention and to keep it coming back repeatedly. The evolution of sport entertainment’s value has escalated more recently. Demanding spectators want value not just for their dollar, but also for their time-investment. The pressure has caused sports and tournaments to grasp for the brass ring by re-inventing the foundation that they stand on. Twenty-plus years ago, the National Hockey League added rules that pared off a valuable 10-15-minutes from the three-hour games and got them down to 2:40-2:50. Some measures worked and some failed, all in the name of making the game more television-friendly, as the NHL pursue a major network deal. They have ventured various new rules like the hurry-up faceoff, although that fizzled, automatic penalties like goaltender interference and delay-of-game when shooting the puck over the glass. Goalies no longer get a warm-up when relieving the starter. The league is perpetually trying to improve its product. Today’s game looks very different than it did during the 1980s and the 1990s In 2003, cricket came up with Twenty20, a faster and more exciting version of their traditional multi-day grind, they pared it down to three hours. The Winter Olympics brought in X Game-style sports that are more extreme and shorter in competition time, with quickly-organized elimination rounds. Check out snow cross as well as half-pipe in boarding and skiing. The athletes bring the vibe, but the Olympics are still very serious, it’s an intoxicating mix.

One of the most popular evolutionary projects that has really taken hold is rugby sevens, specifically women’s rugby sevens. Women’s rugby sevens borrows from the traditional 15s game known as Rugby Union, in play, but with just seven players and short, seven-minute halves. In rugby sevens, from a player’s perspective, you are either hyped, ready for action and feeling intense about the upcoming game, or its over before it starts. There is no, feeling out the competition as per traditional sports where you have the luxury of three-plus hours like in football, baseball or tennis. If your rugby sevens team wins, they will be playing again shortly as all matches (being so short) are played tournament style, which makes for an exciting day at the pitch. If your team loses, it’s a merciful short day. The current world champions is non-other than the New Zealand Black Ferns, a traditional powerhouse rugby nation in the 15s. The All-Blacks, with the silver fern are as synonymous with the sport as are the New York Yankees to baseball, Los Angeles Lakers to basketball and Manchester United to soccer. Not too far behind, in terms of commanding respect, is the red and white of Team Canada, a major player on the international scene. They are fast, powerful, talented and well-coached. Team Canada’s women’s rugby sevens, who train out of Victoria (Langford), compete in an entertaining league. Unlike the crass women’s football league, where objectivity is not just a distraction, it’s the show, women’s rugby sevens is just as thrilling sport-wise as any male-oriented game and perhaps even more so.

BALLPARK 5K www.victoriasportsnews.com Also, unlike international hockey, rugby sevens permits full contact, all the time, just like the 15s. Rugby gets their audience. Women’s ice hockey completely misses the queue by leaving out hitting and penalizing players for contact. While hockey (men’s and women’s) grapples with its image, rugby embraces the hitting; each take-down, hit and tackle is skilfully done. Injuries, on a per-hit basis and concussions on a per hit basis are lower than football and hockey and yet the sport requires almost no protective gear.

BESPOKE D E S I G N

Rugby sevens is a violent sport played by women who are tough, talented and skilled. As a fan, you can identify your favourite player, because the athlete is not completely covered up by padding and helmets and shields making it very much a fan-friendly game. The league or “series” that women’s rugby sevens compete in is called the HSBC Women’s Sevens Series, which was started in 2012. Twelve teams currently participate, representing their nation in the global league. New Zealand has won the series championships four out of five years, with Australia winning in 2015-2016. Canada has earned silver once in 2014-2015 and bronze four out of five years. In the Rio Olympic Games, Australia won gold, NZ silver and Canada bronze. Canada finished second during the 2013 rugby sevens world championships. The next world championships will be the 2018 Rugby World Cup Sevens. The tournament is organised by World Rugby, it will be held at AT&T Park in San Francisco. Matches will be played on 20–22 July 2018.

26 YOUR SPRING 2018

1844 Oak Bay Avenue Victoria BC 250.298.1105 bespokedesign.ca YOUR SPRING 2018 27

Fried egg jellyfish


WINE

Larry’s Picks Louis Bouillot Cremant de Bourgogne “Perle d’Aurore” Brut Rosé NV

$26.99

If dry sparkling rosé is what turns your crank but the price of pink Champagne dampens your ardor and you have been disappointed more times then you care to admit by two bit pink fizz and have all but given up hope of ever finding happiness in a flute of bubble then listen up my glum friend, we may have found what you are looking for! Perle d’Aurore is a lovely pink Cremant (fizzy wine made in the Champagne method) produced in Burgundy. It is as lovely to behold, as it is to drink, with a lovely coppery hue and an explosive mousse (frothy bubbles). Very fresh and very clean with good depth of flavour, a creamy texture and a soft, zippy finish!

Farnese Fantini Puglia Primitivo 2015

$10.49

Primitivo is a second cousin, once removed, of the California wine industry’s favourite son: Zinfandel! It is a hearty vine that survives the climatic extremes of the Italian south, producing robust, rustic reds with ample alcohol and sufficient charm to keep the locals happy. Grown on the dusty plains of Puglia, Farnese Fantini is rich and ample with heaps of ripe berry fruit nicely balanced with a patina of finegrained tannins and a firm persistent finish! A very quaffable everyday wine at a price that will keep the wolves from the door!

Kressmann Croix Saint-Martin Bordeaux Rouge 2015

$13.99

If you have never tasted Bordeaux and have been wondering what all the fuss is about, this is your lucky day! We have a winner here that won’t leave you in penury for the joy of a tiny sip. Given the pedigree of the appellation, the price suggests the merely drinkable; at best a simple fruity red. A thought process that has stood you well over the years, but with the first glass hopefully you will agree Croix Saint-Martin has a lot more going on within its inky depths then your initial suspicion. It is not Chateau Mouton Rothschild 1945 but with its appealing nose and subtle fruit flavours, hopefully you will agree, Croix Saint-Martin is the real deal! An easy drinking blend, with black currant, blackberry and violet aromas, generous fruit flavours, nicely balanced with a blush of finegrained tannin and a soft easy finish! Croix Saint-Martin is claret, pure and simple, with a modicum of breed at a bargain basement price!

Green Spot Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey Red Barn Market is a locally owned Victoria business. We source Island Raised, Island Made and Island Grown first. We look to our local growers to provide us with the best seasonal fruits and veggies that our customers have come to expect. Our smoked meats feature a mouth-watering range of incredible flavours, all prepared in-house. We are proud to employ over 400 staff at our 7 locations. Visit our new location in James Bay!

$71.99

Green spot is a single pot still Irish whiskey. It is a combination of malted and unmalted barley that has been triple-distilled in a copper pot still then aged in a combination of used bourbon barrels (75%) and sherry casks (25%) for 8-9 years. Chill-filtered and bottled at 40% ABV it is delicious with a touch of sherry, orange peel and coconut on the nose. Very spicy with a slightly oily texture, good length and a touch of citrus on the finish! Historically, Green Spot has been next to impossible to find on the continent, but availability has improved markedly. Given that it is one of the few, if not only, sherry-matured Irish single pot still whiskies on the planet, Green Spot is worth the effort to find and enjoy!

Come support your Island Grown Everyday Specialty Store! JAMES BAY 325 Menzies St 250-590-2062

28 YOUR SPRING 2018

778-265-0370

Larry’s selection of unique products can now be found online at metroliquor.com. Products can either be picked up at our Metro Liquor Brentwood Bay location, or shipped directly to your door. We offer free shipping on all orders over $200. Keep an eye out for the Featured Wines & Beers on the front page for Larry’s best deals and favourite products. YOUR SPRING 2018 29


YOUR HERE PATRICIA BAY, ANNA-LISA MEIKLE BEN OTHMAN

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YOUR Magazine Victoria - Spring 2018  

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