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#59

CONTENTS

MARCH 2012

From The Ed

An

Tecla Ciolfi

opinion is a funny thing. We all have them. Some are objective, some critical and others, just plain biased. Our day-to-day opinions are what make us unique as individuals but in this journalistic profession, which I and so many others have chosen, our opinions are what label us and in some cases, define our careers. Now I’ve been called pretty much every known adjective in the English (and quite possibly several other) language and so have most of the writers who’ve contributed to this issue, but I’m sure that majority of them will agree with me when I say that no matter the status of your opinion, if you do not articulate it properly, you’re screwed. If you can’t give valid, sound reasons as a journalist as to why you like or dislike something, you might as well quit while you’re ahead. Angela Weickl (Toya Delazy pg 4) and Adrian Davies (Audiophile 021 pg 14) know what I’m talking about because they do it, sans pseudonyms, better than most. In some cases, first-time contributor Max Barashenkov (PHfat pg 6) is flawless at it. And Piet Smedy, well, he makes a living outta it. Now here’s an opinion for you – I really don’t like Skrillex. And I’ll bloody well tell you why. a) Because he’s popularised a genre that honestly, I quite enjoy, Rusko among one of my preferred dubstep DJs. b) Because he collaborated with members of The Doors on a track called ‘Breakin’ a Sweat’ and by doing so, messed with one of the holy grails of rock music. c) Because after the EDM community decided to needlessly crucify Dave Grohl for his Grammy Award winning speech, the current king of rock was forced into confessing his love for good ol’ Skrilly. d) Because admittedly, he’s good at what he does and he’s probably going to be messing with a whole lot more than just one Doors track in years to come. But that’s just my opinion. And as other free gig guides masquerading as magazines pop up here and there (yes, I see you doppelganger cover) I heartily welcome your opinion to the table. Just make sure you have a valid one. See you at the MK Awards, facebook.com/yourlmg

04 TOYA DELAZY A WORD WITH

05 BANDWATCH CT: DEAD LUCKY

Photo by Laura McCullagh

06-07

PHFAT ON THE ATTACK

08-09 10-11

CONTACT US

Email info@yourlmg.com Website www.yourlmg.com Send your comments feedback@yourlmg.com For a complete list of Your LMG outlets visit our website. Advertising enquiries 071 355 9626 DISCLAIMER: The views expressed in YOUR LMG are not necessarily those of LMG Media CC, its management, editor, or advertisers. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted electronically or via any other means without the written consent of the publisher (LMG MEDIA CC). Plus all the other wank stuff that other magazines usually put here.

LIVE REVIEWS

Photo by Michael Ellis

12 13

@yourlmg

GIG GUIDE

BANDWATCH JHB: YO GRAPES

ALBUM REVIEWS

14 PIETS COLUMN / AUDIOPHILE 021 Publisher Mike Smith Editor Tecla Ciolfi Design Storm Farrell Gauteng Correspondent Jean Jordaan Writers Girl Banned, Greg Evans, Al, Max Barashenkov, Adrian Davies, Rick Bosch, Jake Rubinstein, Angela Weickl, Piet Smedy Photographers Jono Wood, Ticky Box Media, David Schacht, Laura McCullagh, Leonard Miller, Zenn van Zyl Printing Signet Printing On The Cover PHfat Cover Photograph by Laura McCullagh


Less than a year ago no one knew who Toya Delazy was but today she still knows who Latoyah Buthelezi is, a tall order for a 21-year-old swept up in such an overwhelming whirlwind. Her age neither betrays nor inhibits her as she approaches me with a beaming smile and quiet confidence. Born in Mahlabathini, Zululand in KwaZulu Natal, Latoyah Buthelezi’s upbringing was humble and conservative. Her great grandmother was an influential composer of ethnic music, a talent clearly inherent in the family’s bloodline. Raised on a diet of classical and orchestral music, it would be years before Letoyah discovered hip hop, jazz or anything more leftfield than her childhood influences. Boarding school awaited young Letoyah and at the age of 9 she began studying classical piano. In 2008, with her high school career barely behind her and the prospect of studying jazz piano at Howard College ahead, Letoyah suffered the loss of her mother. From the darkness, Toya Delazy emerged inspired by the memory of her mother and empowered by the musical freedom achieved through her jazz studies. First performing with a band, and later in 2009 branching out to solo performances, Toya recalls her debut at The Winston in Durban – most notably that she got paid R100. It was one fateful night out at this very pub that Markus Els happened upon her. He subsequently helped her put a demo together and made sure that she got noticed by the right people, who just happened to be Sony Music Entertainment Africa. Flash forward to today and the kid sitting in front of me is more modest and unaffected than you’d expect. Yes, she has major radio airplay and a slick music video doing the rounds on local channels, but somehow the hype just doesn’t touch base. Toya whips out her iPod and asks me to listen to some of her other work, as well as the original ‘Pump It On’ performed on the piano. What I hear is a pure voice, full of strength and character. The path from her piano composition to the self-proclaimed jazz electro hop pop (J.E.H.P.) version is paved with prestige. Her production team includes, among others, Jax Panik and Johnny De Ridder both prolific, accomplished musicians and producers in their own right. Toya’s J.E.H.P. music style encompasses all her influences and creative desires, but what we all want to know is what else Toya has up her sleeve? Her debut album is due for release in late March/early April and boasts the diversity of upbeat tracks like ‘Pump It On’ as well as stripped down piano-based tunes that exude power through emotion. Recently, Rolling Stone South Africa featured Toya as a style icon. Her emphasis on individuality and her outward expression of that gets her as much attention as her music. Reebok has made her their 2012 brand ambassador alongside the likes of Swiss Beatz, an endeavour that will keep her constantly on the move. As we veer the conversation away from the same old boring questions everybody has been asking for the last few months, Toya reveals, as the basslines reverberate around us, that she would love to do vocals on a dubstep or drum ‘n bass track. Her ability to successfully collaborate with other artists was displayed on a track called ‘With You’, which she recorded with Sowetan acapella/ beatbox group, The Soil. But her ultimate goal and heart’s desire is to work with Kanye West – the glint in her eye as she talks about it drives the point home. ‘Pump It On’ is a great audition tape to get his attention, and if she keeps churning out tracks like it she may succeed. As ridiculous and far-fetched as it sounds, stranger things have happened, I mean, Usher found Justin Bieber and Toya Delazy is streets ahead of that drivel. As we wrap things up, I find myself caught up in the idea of how exciting Toya’s life must presently be. How all the opportunities she is now afforded are doors opening to other endless possibilities. I keep telling her not to waste a moment of it because she may never get another chance. All the while she stares back at me, cool and collected, and I realise that I got swept up and she’s still just waiting for the pin to drop.

four


CAPE FARMHOUSE SAVE THE

RESTAURANT

S

aturday afternoons in Scarborough have long been synonymous with a relaxed ambience and great music supplied by the legendary Cape Farmhouse and the musical guests it plays host to.

Over the years the venue has built up a solid reputation and provides surrounding residents, as well as those that travel from around the peninsula, with a homely location to kick back and enjoy some of the finest live acts around. However a few weeks ago the Cape Farmhouse was temporarily shut down due to noise complaints from “neighbours” in the area. The Cape Farmhouse had this to say on the matter:

This area is not for the chosen few only. We are lucky enough to have land that has had no other activity on it for years, so we have destroyed no fynbos or wildlife. Our restaurant is peaceful. The people who visit us are pleasant and love to visit. Our concerts are fun and don’t interrupt anyone’s nightly slumbers. It’s one of the few places locals and tourists can come and enjoy some real local life and some fun, SA style. Sorry, COULD come... We have temporarily been halted with our music activities until such time as the council decide we aren’t a threat to humanity, won’t cause sleep deprivation and won’t trample the fynbos.

ing to put a stop to something as passive as a farm-like venue that puts on Saturday afternoon concerts open to all ages, is simply ridiculous. Join us and take a stand against The Man to help keep the Cape Farmhouse alive!

This venue has done nothing but support the community and artists who are attempting to make a living from their craft. As a small business enterprise they, like so many hardworking South Africans, are simply trying to make a decent living and endeavour-

C

AP

O ET

To support the Cape Farmhosue please visit www.capefarmhouse.co.za and sign up with the petition at the top of the page. Alternatively, you could write a letter of support to info@capefarmhouse.co.za

B A N DWAT C H : D E A D L U C K Y

WN

Who is who and who does what in the band? We’ve got Kyle in the driver’s seat upfront, Jean banging sticks at the back, Alex supplying the finger-work and Striker keeps us all walking. Why should we listen? We’re good. Very good. Who do you think you sound like?

go on next and do a full set with blood running down face and the back of my throat.

just released. But keep checking our Facebook page for updates on that and upcoming gigs.

Hobbies? Interests? Perves? Peeves?

Are you online?

Tattoos, good music and chicks.

https://www.facebook.com/deadluckyrocknroll and for downloads: http://www.soundcloud.com/dead-lucky

Where ’n when can we see you? We’re taking it easy right now, writing some new material and planning videos for our singles we have

This band called Dead Lucky. What’s up with your band name? Kyle: I have a tattoo on my hip that says Dead Lucky. It was done by Mark “Dirt” Houston when we were both fuck drunk one night in Stellenbosch. Another drunken night at rehearsal it was the topic of countless jokes and it ended up sticking as our name. Who/what stands in your way of fame and fortune? Sheep. Local props? The Great Apes, Taxi Violence, Van Coke Kartel. If you could share the stage with anyone, living or dead who would it be? Well, it would be this massive show. Us opening, followed by: Queens of the Stones Age, Motorhead, Priestess, The Black Keys, Nirvana, AC/DC, Alice Cooper, ASG and ended off with Stones and Zepplin. Greatest rock & roll moment so far? Kyle: I fell off stage once during a Half Price set. I landed on my face and broke my nose and then had to Photo by Zenn van Zyl

Any famous last words? We’re much better than the last band you saw.


“I think

I hate this album,” Disco says as PHfat leave the 2OceansVibe radio station. He isn’t being serious, but there is a grain of honesty behind his hungover demeanor. Their second offering, ‘You Are Going To Die’, is a difficult record to say the least, both for the band and those attempting to approach it from a critical angle. Earlier, with the band arrayed on the radio station’s couches, under the smirking eyes of a three-metre tall poster of Paris Hilton, their predicament becomes apparent.

PHfat are essentially a punk band, dropping half-sane raps over compelling beats, who have stumbled upon a commercially viable sound. It was their DIY, street ethos that propelled them into the spotlight, allowed them to capture the imagination of thousands and traverse clique boundaries that, on our shores, often leave bands without an audience. Their live shows have turned many a sweat into mayonnaise, fueled by punk rock energy and schizophrenic stage antics. They dropped ‘Dinosaur Blood’ in our faces with unpolished ferocity, coming out as barking mad underdogs with a sound that intrigued, appealed and challenged. Now though, after countless tours all around the country, real fame is knocking on their door, that sweet promise of making it truly big. It, naturally, doesn’t come alone, dragging behind it a whole baggage train of expectations, pressures and commercial compromises. It’s no secret that the second record often chokes even the best of bands and, by the weary way they talk about ‘You Are Going To Die’, it is evident that they felt every ounce of that weight. Yet, despite all the odds, PHfat released an EP that not only builds upon the foundations that established them on the music scene but also opens them up to completely new artistic avenues. As Disco offers, “we’ve gone and produced the typical darker, more self-indulgent second album.” The crowds will rapture their derrieres to the new

six

material, but the band themselves are already almost over it. They have their sights set on some new shit. “I’m just enjoying creating right now,” says Mike, “which is a rad place to be. It’s so easy to be trapped in making what people expect you to make.” And, indeed, ‘You Are Going To Die’ is a record that is very different to Dinosaur Blood. If their first album was a manifesto of hugs, animals fucking and space jams, the second is a personal exploration of the directions the three members want to take their music. They could have cut an EP filled with dancefloor smashers, that populated ‘Dinosaur Blood’, and it would have gone down like a treat. Instead they offer us a record with brooding tracks like ‘The Dark’ and the down-tempo ‘The Radio’, a direct and humorous attack on the very notions of fame and radio-friendliness. The bass explosions are still there, the fountains of laser fire and other such PHfat tropes all rear their heads. Yet, even those are more mature and less one-dimensional. “This one (‘You Are Going To Die’) for me was more refined,” explains Narch, “it’s a more conscious step towards developing my own style.” From purely an aural perspective, ‘You Are Going To Die’ is much more lush. Narch employs different tones and sounds, as opposed to the unified bass crunch of ‘Dinosaur Blood’. Take ‘1989’ and ‘Kill The Universe’ for example – the tracks are driven by catchy synth riffs that stand out against the meaty low tones that form the backbones. ‘You Are Going To Die’ is a record of defined melodies, of nearsing-alongs. Narch attributes this to his experimentation with proper music theory, to the employment of scales, as opposed to the songs on ‘Dinosaur Blood’, many of which were built on only a few notes. It certainly works; the tracks popping out at the listeners, making them notice this part or that riff, and one can only imagine the chaos that will ensue when they play the magnificent ‘Breakfastloopjam’. While the first record was dominated by spazz raps, on ‘You Are Going To Die’, the music takes center stage. This is not to say that the lyrics are lacking, quite on the contrary, the EP brims with pearls of humor and offers the most personal looks into the characters of the two frontmen to date – ‘1989’ and ‘The Dark’, penned by Disco and Mike respectively. Just what exactly are PHfat trying to say with ‘You Are Going To Die’? Their first record defined them as tongue-in-cheek freaks, so does the second ground them in something more serious? More jaded and cynical? “If anything, our second EP is even more tongue-in-cheek, though perhaps that’s a bad phrasing,” says Disco, “we are constantly questioning things in our music. We had this idea that we are scientists that do these bullshit experiments just to confirm things. We’re out for the truth and the closest we’ve come to it is ‘You Are Going To Die’. It’s the only true fact we can preach to the people. We can’t preach ‘we’re so fucking cool’ or ‘you���re so fucking stupid’. We can only say ‘you are going to die’ and ‘electricity exists’.”

“We are so unsure of ourselves,” expands Mike, “unsure of what we enjoy, unsure what’s next and what we think is best for next. And being unsure is a good thing for us. Every time I’ve been sure about something, it always fucked out.”


Despite this admittance, PHfat find themselves on extremely sound footing. They sold out the Assembly for their launch and, being a part of the new wave of South African bands that are embracing the ‘free music’ model, are reaping the rewards. In less than a week after its release, ‘You Are Going To Die’ was downloaded more than 2000 times. What band could have shifted that amount of physical records in our tiny sandbox? “As a musician, you just want people to hear your music, and selling it is basically just a barrier to that,” explains Mike, “copying music lets people hear it and allows you to build a following.” “It’s not like we made money off ‘Dinosaur Blood’, so it’s pointless,” laughs Disco, “we’ll sell albums when we are world famous.” That kind of ambition is admirable and PHfat have all the potential of taking their bass-rap circus overseas. They confirm interest in Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Switzerland and are currently hammering out plans for a European tour. The band itches to play new stages, to have new crowds hear their music. It’s almost a drug to them. “It is really important! For a band to have any longevity in South Africa they need to get overseas,” Mike is almost twitching at the possibility, “A highlight of last year for us was playing Street Cred. Playing to a completely new crowd that has never heard us before. That was the most refreshing thing ever seeing people react to it the first time. That’s why I want to go to Europe. I want to be in a place where no one knows us.” ‘You Are Going To Die’ is but a harbinger of things to come, a multi-faceted and mighty offering. Their next material, which the band promises will come within the next few months, will be a very different beast. But for now, get your ass to a PHfat show and jump, motherfucker, jump because the bass-rap kings are back.


3RD WORLD SPECTATOR Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay

DUSTLAND EXPRESS + CROSSFIRE COLLISION Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

ISOCHRONOUS + JUKE ROYAL + RED TAPE RIOT

HOLIDAY MURRAY + LA.VI Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

CALEB EASTWOOD + KATELYN CONVERY + ALAN EVANS + FIONA HARE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

BIG BLUES FESTIVAL feat. DAN PATLANSKY + VUSI MAHLASELA + BOULEVARD BLUES + CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES + NATASHA MEISTER + MORE Kleinmond Harbour

BEATENBERG De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

30 FROM ACE + THE INSIDE JOB + CHASING SANITY + KENITH MINOR R.O.A.R., Observatory

WILD EASTERN ARCHES + THE FUTURE PRIMITIVES Kimberley Hotel, Roeland St

SAT 3

RHINO 4 A CAUSE feat. WE SET SAIL + FOX COMET + SOUTHPAW Zula Bar, Long St

PIET BOTHA & THE LIZARD KINGS Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay UNGA DADA The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

JANIE BAY & JOSH GRIERSON Alma Café, Rondebosch

PEACHY KEEN + THE PITS + LONGTIME CITIZEN Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

DEAN FUEL + NICK MATTHEWS +

NOMADIC ORCHESTRA + MANOUCHE The Melting Pot

VUSI MAHLASELA + KAREN ZOID Paul Cluver Forest Amphitheater, Grabouw

THE LENTIL COLLECTIVE De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

SILVERCREEK MOUNTAIN BAND Villa Pascal, Durbanville

RUB A DUB Mercury, Zonnebloem

VALIANT SWART Alma Café, Rondebosch

ALL GUNS FULL AMMO

BICYCLE THIEF + LIKE KNIVES Mercury, Zonnebloem

SAT 24

GIAN GROEN BAND Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay THE ROOM De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch WITNESS TO WOLVES + TAPE HISS & SPARKLE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

SPENCER MBADU TRIO + KHOITRANS The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

SHADOWCLUB The Assembly

7TH SON Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SAT 31

JITSVINGER The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

DJ VOODOO + FRESH + ROGER GOODE + TWINS ON DECK Trinity, 15 Bennett Street. Green Point

DIE GUNSTONS The Stage, Durbanville

MISSISSIPPI DISCO Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay

TRIBUTE TO CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL Villa Pascal, Durbanville VALIANT SWART & BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

HAGGIS & BONG ALBUM LAUNCH TOUR + MEGALODON R.O.A.R., Observatory

BEATENBERG Zula Bar, Long St

SHANNON HOPE Alma Café, Rondebosch

WOODSTOCK MAFIA + SIXGUN GOSPEL + FOX COMET Mercury, Zonnebloem

TOMBSTONE PETE + BLACK SOUTHEASTER Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

FRI 30

THE PRETTY BLUE GUNS Bohemia, Stellenbosch

KOMBAT FUDGE Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

JOHAN ROOS Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

IKE MORIZ V&A Waterfront Amphitheatre

CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES (album launch) Mercury, Zonnebloem

THU 29

OPEN MIC The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

TOUCHWOOD & JOHANNINE Alma Café, Rondebosch

NIANELL Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

NATASHA MEISTER BAND Pakalolo, Hout Bay

NATALIE & THE CONFEDERATES Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

JUNKYARD LIPSTICK & FRIENDS R.O.A.R., Observatory

BOULEVARD BLUES BAND + CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES + THE STUDEBAKERS Mercury, Zonnebloem

WOODSTOCK MAFIA + TOMBSTONE PETE Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SAT 17

K.I.A.T. & FRIENDS Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

JUST JINJER + AKING + LOUISE DAY Trinity, 15 Bennett Street. Green Point

BILDERBERG HOTEL Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

JAZZ FESTIVAL LAUNCH The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

FLAM JANGLED TEA PARTY Contermankloof, Durbanville

SINDULGENCE & GUESTS R.O.A.R., Observatory

SCHALK JOUBERT & SCHALK VD MERWE Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

NICKY SCHRIRE, BOKANI DYER & FRIENDS Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

FRI 23

BLUESTOWN SESSIONS Mercury, Zonnebloem

THU 22

STAND UP COMEDY WITH RUSTUM AUGUST & FRIENDS Mercury, Zonnebloem

SHANNON HOPE The Red Herring, Noordhoek

PETE VAN HEERDEN & MANNY WATERS Alma Café, Rondebosch

NOMADIC ORCHESTRA De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

WED 21

SHADOWCLUB Jolly Roger, Plumstead

PEACHY KEEN + RED TAPE RIOT + JUKE ROYAL Mercury, Zonnebloem

FRI 16

MUSIC LOUNGE The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

SHADOWCLUB Bohemia, Stellenbosch

CHRIS CHAMELEON Die Boer, Durbanville

THU 15

BARLEYCORN MUSIC FESTIVAL feat. NATASHA MEISTER + TOMBSTONE PETE + STEVE NEWMAN + THE STREMES + LONDI GAMEDZE + SIXGUN GOSPEL + BLACK SOUTHEASTER + THE BROTHERS STREEP + MOTHER CITY MOJO + MORE Maynardville Open Air Theatre, Wynberg

SAT 10

SILVERCREEK MOUNTAIN BAND Villa Pascal, Durbanville

CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES Grandaddy Hotel, Long St

KUDALADALA CHARITY EVENT feat. LA.VI + JON SHABAN + ROSEMARY TOWNSEND + TOBY 2SHOES Mercury, Zonnebloem

FRIDAY NITE LIVE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

BILDERBERG HOTEL + THE GREAT APES + KOMBASS Mercury, Zonnebloem

THE STRING COLLECTIVE feat. GARY THOMAS + FARRYL PURKISS + MACHINERI + TOMBSTONE PETE + ANDREW JAMES + DAVE KNOWLES The Dream Factory, Orphan St, CT

FRI 9

BIG BLUES FESTIVAL feat. BLACK CAT BONES + BLUES BROERS + NATASHA MEISTER + MORE Kleinmond Harbour

FRI 2

TIDAL WAVES + THE LITTLE KINGS Zula Bar, Long St

ISOCHRONOUS Bohemia, Stellenbosch

THU 1

FRI 9

THU 8

SAT 17

FRI 16

SOUTHERN GYPSEY QUEEN Die Liedjie Boer

3RD WORLD SPECTATOR Arcade Empire

WED 21

3RD WORLD SPECTATOR Cool Runnings Benoni

TUE 20

WALDORF STING BAND Tanz Cafe

ST. PADDY’S DAY- TIDAL WAVES + HOLIDAY MURRAY + FIRE THROUGH THE WINDOW + CHIBA FLY Arcade Empire

DUBSTEP SA Arcade Empire

HOLIDAY MURRAY Wolves

THU 15

RAMFEST JHB. Riversands Farm, Fourways

JESSE CLEGG Tanz Cafe

SAT 10

SOUTHERN GYPSEY QUEEN Cafe Barelona

SON OF A 1000 Tanz Cafe

WRESTLERISH + FULKA + SHORTSTRAW Arcade Empire

FLOAT PARADE Wolves

MARCH 2012


MANOUCHE De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

DAN PATLANSKY TRIO Die Boer, Durbanville

MOTHERCITY MOJO Alma Café, Rondebosch

HARPDOG FROST De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

DETONATION TOUR feat. FLESHGOD APOCALYPSE Mercury, Zonnebloem

WED 28

DEAN FUEL + HEADROOM + DANALOG + SHIFT + BROKEN TOY Trinity, 15 Bennett Street. Green Point

KOOS KOMBUIS & SCHALK JOUBERT & MELISSA VAN DER SPUY Die Boer, Durbanville

ACOUSTIC TUESDAY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

THE PRETTY BLUE GUNS The Waiting Room, Long St

SAINTFEARLESS &Union

TUE 27

MANIC MONDAY Mercury, Zonnebloem

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

SAT 3

CORNETTO LOVE IS IN THE AIR WITH LOCNVILLE + THE DECEMBER STREETS + JAX PANIK JHB Botanical Gardens, Emerentia Dam

JACK PAROW Presley’s, Boksburg

THE BROTHER MOVES ON + FRIDGE POETRY Tanz Cafe

JUST JINJER Tanz Cafe

NEWTOWN + FUTURE LIFE (NATHAN SMITH PROJECT) Arcade Empire

FRI 2

JOSIE FIELD & LILLY Tanz Cafe

JANIE BAY Wolves

PH FAT (ALBUM LAUNCH) + NARCH + DR KHUMALO + MOEJOE + HUGS ON DRUGS Arcade Empire

THU 1

GAUTENG

ARNO CARSTENS The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

HOMEGROWN DRUM & BASS Mercury, Zonnebloem

SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION BLUES BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

PLUSH De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

NATASHA MEISTER BAND V&A Waterfront Amphitheatre

MACHINERI + TALESWAPPER Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

FALLING MIRROR Alma Café, Rondebosch

THU 22

GRAEME WATKINS PROJECT + THE DECEMBER STREETS Tanz Cafe

ARCADE EMPIRE FIRST BIRTHDAY PARTY Arcade Empire

SAT 31

BLACK CAT BONES + SHADOWCLUB + SOUTHERN GYPSEY QUEEN Tanz Cafe

DAVE VAN VUUREN Firkin, Centurion

NEWTOWN KNIFE GANG + PESTROY + KNAVE + FEED THE WOLF Arcade Empire

FRI 30

FLINT & TINDER Wolves

THU 29

PARK ACOUSTICS feat. 3RD WORLD SPECTATOR + MR CAT & THE JACKAL + FLOAT PARADE + FULKA Voortrekker Monument Heritage Site, Eeufees Road, Groenkloof, Pretoria

SUN 25

NEWTOWN KNIFE GANG + 3RD WORLD SPECTATOR + SILENT SNEAKERS Tanz Cafe

MK AWARDS AFTER PARTY Arcade Empire

SAT 24

DAVE VAN VUUREN Tanz Cafe

MK ONDERGROND PRESENTS: THE NARROW + NOT MY DOG +SESLING + ONLY WHEN IT RAINS Arcade Empire

FRI 23

JOSHUA GRIERSON Wolves

MR. CAT & THE JACKAL + SHORTSTRAW Tanz Cafe

SEND YOUR GIG INFO TO: gigs @yourlmg.com

NICKY SCHRIRE, ANDREW LILLEY & FRIENDS Trinity, 15 Bennett Street. Green Point

ACOUSTIC TUESDAY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

LEGATOS &Union

TAXI VIOLENCE The Waiting Room, Long St

PRETTY BLUE GUNS + MACHINERI + JOSHUA GRIERSON Mercury, Zonnebloem

TUE 20

MANIC MONDAY Mercury, Zonnebloem

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 19

VALIANT SWART Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay

FLAM JANGLED TEA PARTY Contermankloof, Durbanville

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 26

BOULEVARD BLUES Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay

FRESHLYGROUND (5:30PM) Kirstenbosch Gardens, Newlands

SAUDIQ KHAN De Waal Park, Oranjazicht

BLACKSMITH Alma Café, Rondebosch

THE LITTLE KINGS + CHIBA FLY (PTA) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SUN 25

TRIBE OF BENJAMIN & UMTHWAKAZI The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

ZAMAR Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

TRIBUTE TO CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL Villa Pascal, Durbanville

GERALD CLARK De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

VALIANT SWART & BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

SIXGUN GOSPEL + NATASHA MEISTER Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

TAXI VIOLENCE + NIC OLSEN Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

HUGH MASEKELA (5:30PM) Kirstenbosch Gardens, Newlands

SUN 18

NICK SUPPLY + PROTOCULTURE + DEAN FUEL + DANALOG + CHIS JACK Trinity, 15 Bennett Street. Green Point

SONS OF ARQA + VERAZ The Melting Pot

NIVA BATTLE OF THE BANDS FINAL Mercury, Zonnebloem

NICKY SCHRIRE, BOKANI DYER & FRIENDS Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

NATASHA MEISTER BAND (2PM) The Roundhouse Rest., Camps Bay

FLAM JANGLED TEA PARTY Contermankloof, Durbanville

R.O.A.R., Observatory

VISIT www.yourlmg.com FOR UPDATES

KOMBAT FUDGE Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

CHRIS CHAMELEON Die Boer, Durbanville

THE NARROW + WHEN KARMA SLEEPS + DIE GUNSTONS Klein Libertas Theatre, Stellenbosch

SHADOWCLUB Alma Café, Rondebosch

WED 14

CHRIS CHAMELEON Die Boer, Durbanville

BLUESTOWN SESSIONS Mercury, Zonnebloem

THU 8

OPEN MIC The Melting Pot, Muizenberg

MANOUCHE Die Boer, Durbanville

LARRY JOE & DIRK MOSTERT Alma Café, Rondebosch

ALBERT FROST De Oude Bank Bakkerij, Stellenbosch

ACOUSTIC TUESDAY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

TALESWAPPER The Waiting Room, Long St

MERCURY PUB QUIZ Mercury, Zonnebloem

WED 7

FARRYL PURKISS & ANDY LUND &Union

TUE 13

MANIC MONDAYS feat. INLIMBO Mercury, Zonnebloem

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

ELVIS BLUE Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 12

GERALD CLARK BAND Bertie’s Moorings, Gordond Bay

SILVERCREEK MOUNTAIN BAND Alma Café, Rondebosch

GOLDFISH (5:30PM) Kirstenbosch Gardens, Newlands

RAMFEST feat. INFECTED MUSHROOM (ISR) + IN FLAMES (SWE) + THE NARROW + AWOLNATION (USA) +HAEZER + NETSKY + FOKOFPOLISIEKAR + TAXI VIOLENCE + HOG HOGGIDY HOG + SABRETOOTH +NETSKY + HAEZER + NEWTOWN KNIFE GANG + PH FAT + NISKERONE + DAS KAPITAL + MORE Cape Town Ostrich Ranch N7

SUN 11

RICARDO MORETTI + TOMMY GUN

ACOUSTIC TUESDAY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

STEFAN DIXON &Union

NATASHA MEISTER + JANIE BAY The Waiting Room, Long St

TUE 6

MANIC MONDAYS feat. DOWN ON THE FIRST + GIVE ANOTHER GO + BEAT KIDZ Mercury, Zonnebloem

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 5

TIM HUTCHINSON + SIMPLY DEAD + MISS TEXAS + ANDY LUND + MILES SIEVWRIGHT + TOMBSTONE PETE (12PM)

THE BLUES BROERS feat. ALBERT FROST (5:30PM) Kirstenbosch Gardens, Newlands

NATASHA MEISTER (6PM) Pastis Brasserie, Constantia

ANDRE DE VILLIERS Alma Café, Rondebosch

TIDAL WAVES + BLACK CAT BONES Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SUN 4

Zula Bar, Long St


Photos by Michael Ellis

SHADOWCLUB + PRETTY BLUE GUNS + SIXGUN GOSPEL KimberLEY HOtEL, THU 9 FEB The aged Kimberley hotel is quickly filled from balcony to dining room by the time the first note drops. Sixgun Gospel crank out their old school moonshine sound with an authentic feel. They dip into slow melodies and rise into full blown Pentecostal wailing complete with crazed howls from the crowd. Johnny Cash covers come and go, but the original material of this band is accentuated by the clever use of banjos, harmonicas and resonator guitars. If only Sunday school

was this entertaining. Saints are replaced by sinners as the Pretty Blue Guns turn the volume up. They play their own brand of down tempo Stooges-blues to a crowd heating up from continuous swaying. The blonde next to me happily exclaims that this is now her favourite local band, and it’s easy to see why. The reaction of Southern blues techniques along with rock star angst will be entertaining blondes for some time yet. The away team tonight, Shadowclub, has been on the lips of most music fans

TOMBSTONE PETE

lyrics tell stories of love, whores and the solace of whiskey. Lanky and long-haired JJ van Rensburg mooches around onstage as he puts out the bass and the whole joint is rocking and stomping to the mojo. Outside, the blue light brigade is putting on a show of their own and call time on the gig. Why? Shit knows – it’s Obz main road on a regular Friday night. Riaan and the boys finish out with a song played with the volume cranked low. When the moment’s passed, Tombstone Pete fires up his soundcheck. What happens next is almost unbelievable. Pete’s style of music is hard to pin down, and is best described as busking. But what a sound! He dispenses with lyrics entirely and it’s all

+ CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES

Obviouzly Armchair, FRI 10 FEB

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ooking half like vagabond drunks and half like bikers blown in from the Namib, four-piece blues band Crimson House Blues takes to the stage and bust open their set. Frontman Redeye Riaan has a voice so gravelly it could probably be used to lay asphalt. He rasps through the blues like a wayward Southern preacher having a voodoo epiphany. The booze-soaked

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since they opened for the Kings of Leon SA tour last year, an honour well-deserved for the trio. Isaac Klawansky is a spectacle as he annihilates his drum kit and by the time ‘Good Morning Killer’ blasts out of the speakers, Jacques Moolman’s side parting has become lopsided. Confidence is restored in the 3-piece rock band and the Kimbo rocks once again.

Adrian Davies

about the playing. Using a steel-string acoustic, he melds folk and classical styles in a livewire performance. Brassy chords and precise picking are accompanied by syncopated palm-beats which turn the instrument into a djembe drum. At one point he even sits down and plays the fretboard like a keyboard. It’s an understatement to say Tombstone Pete is passionate about his music. One particularly fine C minor chord is enough to give the man a boner, or so he claims. I reckon he’s just happy to see us all. We certainly are, and we get him to play two encores before the night’s over..

Greg Evans


JOZIFEST NEWTON, Fri 3 – Sat 4 Feb

Photos by Jono Wood

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he risks are high when sending a Cape Town writer to review a Joburg event. Comparisons will be drawn, bias inevitably creeps in and if we’re lucky, someone gets upset. The inaugural Jozifest event is hosted by the inner-city beacon of hope, Newtown. Live music venues The Woods, Town Hall and Carfax have been combined into one venue, encompassing both indoor and outdoor stages catering for multiple genres. Friday night sees the Monster Stage (the main focus of the weekend) play host to the

WOODSTOCK MAFIA &UNION, Tues 31 Jan

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ever has a TuesOnFire been so eagerly anticipated, mostly because of the effort Woodstock Mafia has put into stripping down their songs to create acoustic majesty. Chatting with the drummer, Owen Ingarfield, before the performance you can’t help but share the excitement. He describes the set as having taken apart all the nuts and bolts and putting them back together in a completely different way. In true form, &Union has a

healthy crowd by the time the band takes the stage, but in even truer form the din of beer fuelled banter overshadows the beginning of WM’s set. Rising to the challenge it only takes two songs before the paradigm shifts in their favour. Heads are bobbing, toes are tapping and it’s not just the rent-a-crowd of friends expressing vocal adulation. WM play a well-balanced combination of familiar favourites, a track they’ve never performed live before, a cover of Red Hot Chili Pepper’s ‘My Friends’ and a sick mash-up of ‘Hey Joe’ with Gorillaz’ ‘Clint Eastwood’. At the foot of the stage is a pile of EPs which, after a bit of encouragement from frontman Joe Theron, are snapped

TAXI VIOLENCE + MACHINERI

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Photo David Schacht

KIRSTENBOSCH GARDENS, SUN 19 FEB

t was a perfect Cape Town summer’s day en route to my very first Old Mutual Kirstenbosch summer concert and I’m happy to report, the weather wasn’t the only good thing about it. Machineri and Taxi Violence were billed to play, but what the audience got was a lot more than that. Machineri took to the stage with their usual confidence and boy, did they deliver. There’s an almost PJ Harveyish sound to Sannie Fox’s voice and hearing her belt it out across the Botanical Gardens was fantastic. I’ve seen them a number of times, but this was my favourite by some distance. I can’t

PRETTY BLUE GUNS + THE FUTURE PRIMITIVES + THE LOTTERY TICKETS AANDKLAS, TUE 14 FEB

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t’s a slow V-Day in the ’Bosch. Only a single inflated condom drifts around Aandklas but there’s enough of a crowd to fill the venue when The Future Primitives start their set. The band’s sound is a cross between retro ‘70s American and British rock influences. Frontman Johnny Tex puts in a solid performance as a Morrison

clone but the vox is amped too low to cut through the growl of the guitars. Distinctive Invasion Band riffs drive the performance through a predictable routine. It’s a promising set but the execution isn’t tight enough and I feel the band needs to evolve its sound more. Everyone bails outside until The Lottery Tickets plug in and a small contingent of fans packs out the front of the stage. Formless guitars and the worst chorus ever doesn’t make for a great start. This wannabe boy band from the ‘burbs needs to find a decent lead vocalist or else consider becoming metalheads. Corny lyrics don’t help their cause much, either. The crowd returns in force when the Pretty Blue Guns fire

best in local and international drum ‘n bass DJs. The UK’s Heist, Subzero and Grooverider are much hyped about, but completely overrated. The Hip Hop stage doesn’t attract much traffic, which is a shame as Joburg is home to two DMC champions. The metal stage feels and smells like Gandalfs with the likes of Facing the Gallows, Vendetta Cartel and Pestroy in full force. The Town Hall stage trio of Damage Inc, Musical Chairs and Double Adapter consecutively bring the noise so evil, funky and thrashy that I won’t be surprised if there are cracks in the floor once the mob disperses. The body count has doubled by Saturday – the line-up is too irresistible. The hedonism, however, has possibly trebled. A girl nearby me shouts out to her friends, “girls, I’m gonna be a slut tonight.” Foto Na Dans play their final show for the Joburg crowd, an emotional performance. The usual suspects aKing, 340ml, Lark, Taxi Violence and Fokofpolisiekar have the crowds on puppet strings and you can’t really expect more. The KillCool stage witnesses a show-stealing set by Kennedy as well as the ultimate in anti-climaxes. The final set of the festival by Joburg DJ, Iamnoize was “allegedly” (according to the Jozifest press release) disrupted by Tasha Baxter’s drunken misbehaviour. Earlier in the day her band’s set on the Monster Stage witnessed a mass exodus of people away from the dance floor. Several times in the night she took it upon herself to MC over DJs sets on the KillCool stage culminating in the abrupt end to Iamnoize’s set. Jozifest had the hiccups any debut could expect but the party was fun and things can only get better.

Girl Banned

up with abandon by the throng of intrigued onlookers. The 5 -track EP includes a voting card so the listener can help decide which track should be used for WM’s first music video. My money is on ‘Electric Light’, the song stays with you long after you first hear it. Woodstock Mafia are well on the way to creating a formidable package. The combination of marketing savvy, ever progressing song writing, performance style and a lead vocalist that is both easy on the eyes and ears makes them a band to pay attention to.

Girl Banned

exactly put my finger on why, maybe it was the sunshine, maybe it was Sannie’s red dress, or maybe it was the fact that they came out, and played their good songs, really well. Taxi Violence was the chief attraction and were right on the money. The band didn’t miss a beat, George Van Der Spuy was his charismatic self and their collaborations added a unique dimension to their live show. Sannie Fox, Inge Beckmann, Murray “The Kid” Hunter (harmonica) and Lara Block (cello) all added to the show and when George invited the kids to the front of the stage for a group hula-hooping session during their finale, I could only sit back and smile because they nailed it, again. Taxi Violence are clearly evolving as a band and their “acoustic” performances are just getting better and better.

Rick Bosch up their set from behind a screen of smoke. It’s the first time tonight a band has tried to create atmosphere and the effect is dramatic. Dark vocals and a relentless jungle beat makes the joint come alive as frontman Andre Leo takes time out to get up close and personal with the crowd. It feels like I’m finally at a real rock show. Brandon Visser on lead guitar drops catchy hooks over a rhythm and bass section that rolls like thunder. The band’s country garage rock sound draws inspiration from the likes of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Nick Cave and The White Stripes but offers something more than just imitation.

Greg Evans

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JO

R BU

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B A N DWAT C H :

YO GRAPES watched live), Shortstraw, Float Parade and Beach Party. If you could share the stage with anyone, living or dead who would it be? I wouldn’t mind sharing a stage with the guy who plays Barker Haines in Isidingo. That way, if my set isn’t going too well he can throw in some dance moves and make it weirder for everyone involved. Greatest rock & roll moment so far? A bunch of girls singing along to all my songs at my first live show. My band name written on the toilet wall of the venue in Durban. I swear I didn’t write it myself, I mean I didn’t even have a koki pen with me that night. Hobbies? Interests? Perves? Peeves?

Photo by Leonard Miller

Who is who and who does what in the band? Yo Grapes is me, Craig Durrant, on guitar and vocals and I run Ableton for live shows. Why should we listen? If you like music then boy do I have a treat for you. I make electro-pop fuelled by the anger that comes from unrelenting invites to join LinkdIn. Who do you think you sound like? Whitney Houston on a good day (too soon?). What’s up with your band name? A friend of mine at school used to call me Grapes and

greet me every day saying, “yo Grapes.” I think if you over think your band name you may end up with a name like Juxtaposition Verb Sessions. And we don’t need one of THOSE band names in our lives right now, do we? Who/what stands in your way of fame and fortune? That dumbass machine that always draws the wrong lotto number balls. Local props? Desmond & the Tutus (I hear the drummer’s quite good?), Eat this, Horse (they were the best SA band I’ve

I really dig being outside. Going on hikes, swimming in the sea, playing golf. I’m really interested in this ‘Internet’ thing, it seems to be doing really well lately. I don’t hate much except for everyone that uses Foursquare. Where ’n when can we see you? I’m playing at Arcade Empire in Pretoria on the 7th of March. Are you online? You bet your sweet ass I am. facebook.com/YoGrapes You can download all my songs for free from that page. Any famous last words? Are you going to sit there and eat rusks or go out and take risks?


ALBUM REVIEWS

BLK JKS + SHADOWCLUB The Bohemian, FRI 17 FEB

Are they not letting any more people in?” Was the first question I asked the door lady as I finally managed to get to the front of the line outside Joburg’s favourite crusty venue, The Bohemian. I arrived at that question for very valid reasons. Inside was way over capacity and outside was home to an anxious bunch hovering around the pavement. Surprisingly they were still letting people in and when I got near the stage BLK JKS had just surfaced above the sea of heads in front of me. Experimental rockers BLK JKS don’t play music, music plays them. They seem like agents through which a musical exorcism is taking place when they are on stage. They are brilliant musicians, but they tend to break into nonsensical improvisation a little too much, and that kind of self-indulgence can become bit overbearing. It’s cool to be experimental but not be too inaccessible, which is what they were for me this time. The mighty Shadowclub were up next and proceeded to cause The Bohemian to drop to its knees with their kingof-cool- blues rock. “This is where we started and we will keep coming back until we die,” blurted Jacques Moolman, Shadowclub’s frontman, to the googly-eyed crowd. I never want to see them play there ever again – not only because they filled the place to an unbearable level, but because it would be a massive disservice to humanity if they don’t chew and spit out every major festival around the globe and reach a level of stardom that will burn them out within ten years. They are the perfect blend of rock n’ roll integrity and commercial viability, which is particularly rare for a South African band. It’s also rare for a bar to run out of beer, which happened too.

Jake Rubinstein

VAN COKE KARTEL + SIGNAL HILL + REBURN MERCURY, Fri 24 Feb

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t’s groot fokkin party time with the launch of VCK’s 4th album, ‘Wie’s Bang’. The show kicks off with some deep bass rhythms and a powerful vocal performance by Rowland Gutsche from Signal Hill. The band blasts out a series of catchy rock ballads that draws the crowd closer. Lead guitarist Paul Clogg’s soloing somehow cuts through the din and reins in the madness. When indie rockers Reburn take over the crowd is stoked. Killer beats from drummer Wade Brown keep the party going as frontman Scottie Moore works the crowd. ‘You Want It All the Time’ has the joint rocking out. Then it’s over to the main event as the men in black, Van Coke Kartel, plug in. Jack Parow’s new release, ‘Hosh Tokolosh,’ is playing over the PA and marks a shift in tone. After tossing a few CDs out and gesturing to the surprisingly modest merch counter, that’s the last we hear about the album launch. For VCK, it’s much more about the live performance. Balls-to-the-wall amped guitars and a drummer with anger management issues is the prelude to Francois Van Coke’s insanely keening power-angst vocals which tear through the venue. Jedd Kossew on lead guitar adds to the mayhem with his Van Halen-style soloing skills. A pack of Oppikoppi veterans go bos upstage as VCK sings of the end of the world, fractured lives and lost hope. This is gritty, visceral music that assaults the senses and leaves you raw and bleeding. Between swinging from the stage set, holding an impromptu beauty contest and making a Kanye West dedication, the VCK frontman and prophet of a doomed generation covers his ground and leaves the pretenders far behind.

Sabretooth SELF-TITLED IIIII Sabretooth rear out of the black tar pit of metal like some shrieking primal beast from the prehistorics. A fearsome mutation of all things Angus with a bit of Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden and Mastodon swirling around the gene pool, this band’s sound is monstrous, magnificent. Best tracks: all. In fact, the instrumental intro track, ‘Night Warrior’, is honestly world-class. They ferociously rip and tear up the hollow carcass of SA alt. rock. And then shit on it. You can even forgive their atrocious album art. Cape Town hasn’t seen anything like this since Doppler Effect. They leave The Great Apes banging rocks together at the far end of the evolution scale. This ain’t no monkey business. Double bass pedal stampeding frenzy, an attack of guitar riffs, Sabretooth own. OWN. They shred like the non-proverbial carnivore, riding the tiger, iron-tusking and any other metal metaphor you can imagine. Power solos rain down like meteors. Where. Have. They. Been! Oh, right, ROAR. Ah, the jokes of life. But really, come out of the cave. It’s time for a headbanger’s ball.

Al

Bouwer Bosch Almal Maak Foute IIIII Bouwer, Bouwer, once content to scream yourself hoarse with the good ol’ Straatligkinders, you are now making music for infants. Literally for infants because I cannot imagine anyone over the age of three actually consuming this ice-cream pop. Barney and Friends. Bouwer en Vriende. Almal Maak Foute. Indeed. But playtime is over. I was told to be “nice” in this review. N.I.C.E. I’m sure that stands for something, possibly Needlessly Irritating and Crap Experience. Or maybe it doesn’t. Maybe this album is ironic. Because irony absolves everything. But still, how, HOW has this collection of trivial sing-alongs morphed into an actual product, replete with Musica-extortionate value? It’s us, your audience, who condone this travesty. Or at least your buddies in Potch. Liefde Wen. And by “Liefde” I mean idiocy. And yet, there’s something else at work here… Oddly, the album becomes progressively more serious. Seems like the joke got stale. ‘(K)anker’ and ‘Vekeerde Note’ are, dare I say, emotional. And you gotta love the Steve Hofmeyer cameo on ‘Sit En Wag’. All in all, this album is no different to something by, say, Tweak, but has the redeeming factor of not taking itself seriously.

Al

Southern GypsEy Queen Delusions of Grandeur IIIII The title of the album saddens me, it is unfortunately a self-fulfilling prophecy. I have never seen Southern Gypsey Queen live, but this offering doesn’t entice me. It’s cute being a band of family members. Kings of Leon do it well but then again Hanson did it, which was not ok. The songs sound like South African rock – not in the unique, hey-big-world-pay-attention kind of way, but in the, I’ve-heard-thisall-before kind of way. One minute it’s grunge, the next they sound like Prime Circle. The indecisive tone of the album is discomforting, I struggled to get to the last track. The cover of ‘99 Red Balloons’ is a seriously overexploited choice. It sounds more like a pub band on a Sunday than SGQ’s own interpretation, it is weak and dissatisfying. I would love to find something good to say about this CD. The artwork and photography is beautiful, the 1920’s styling is particularly charming. But all it does is mislead you. What you find inside could be the soundtrack to a ‘90s teen movie, where everyone wore Doc Martens and best friends realised they were in love as the credits start rolling.

Angela Weickl

Markus Wormstorm Not I, but a friend IIIII Markus Wormstorm is a genius. From The Constructus Corporation to The Real Estate Agents and The Blackheart Gang, I was and am constantly in awe. His current offering is some crazy inception Jedi mind trick shit. Put on a set of headphones and trip out. The three dimensional sound design has tracks darting around in your head. This feels like it could be the score to a Hayao Miyazaki story, Tim Burton’s darker recesses or a 1920’s silent horror film. Each track takes you on a journey, with your heart in your throat as you eagerly anticipate the drop. The eerie tortured vocals on ‘Thief’ are courtesy of Inge Beckmann from Lark, while the entire album plays host to instrumental contributions from several musicians. ‘Beautiful Malema’ opens with a sample from one of the former ANC Youth League President’s many infamous rants. ‘Sleep Ali’ has my vote as the best track on the album, I imagine lying on the grass staring up at a star-filled sky. ‘Lillian’ takes a close second. Do yourself a favour, listen, experience, feel. Then you’ll know.

Angela Weickl

Greg Evans

thirteen


by Piet Smedy There can be no out-hipstering Lana any sooner than there can be out-slutting Kim or out-eating Adele. It’s just not going to happen, pal. Sorry you just got your new shipment of V necks from ASOS, it’s over. Yep, not long now and people will realize that street style is just another hippy handicraft for no-talents and that Black Label actually tastes like ass. Finally people will see Alexa Chung’s hairstyle for what it is: stupid. What I’m saying is, simply put, that the hipster is dead. So, what’s there to do after we throw all the empty black frames into the landfill and pretend to stop reading Nabokov? I suppose something new will take its place. Maybe we’ll all just go shave half our heads, invest in some all-black contact lenses and pretend that we’re part of the 28s. Or, even worse, we’ll get married at 16, stop celebrating Christmas and invest in comfortable walking shoes as we go from door to door. Yeah. That could happen.

…But

what’s next? Anyone who’s been to a MacDonald’s can explain the basics of capitalism to you: find something great, make it cheap, mass-produce it, and sell it like you’re Verimark. And boy, that’s what’s happened with hipster demi-god Lana Del Ray. She’s the quarter pounder deluxe of music. She’s the Pall Mall smoking, vintage-wearing, pouty Ronald MacDonald. She’s the fourth horseman with a Nancy Sinatra obsession and some mighty strong hairspray. But think about it, seriously… Where to from here?

Photo by Laura McCullagh

usic has reached its conclusion, a world where anyone can write a song, put down a beat, pull a sick solo and change the way humanity sees itself forever. Musicians have never had access to such a diverse array of tools in their long history. Whether it’s behind a sixstring Fender Stratocaster guitar or a two channel Denon MC3000 controller.

Most likely, I reckon, we’ll all just find a new era to replicate with reckless abandon. That’s how it works, right? ‘20s will be the new ‘40s, or we’ll just invent some new words to make old shit seem special and not just, well, old shit. Six-seasonsold Balenciaga bag? You might as well carry your Leica and your red lipstick in Tutankhamun’s hollowed-out spleen. Equally gross. But don’t worry too much over there, in-a-cold-sweat Nicci Saint Bruce, I reckon we’ve still got a good run ‘til Lana sells us all out.

@pietsmedy

had a DJ name. It was Steve. It looked really stupid on flyers,” he says frowning, “The Audiophile part came from growing up in a family that appreciated music and sound. It gave me an understanding of what crisp sound was, and I wanted to bring across, and to make it as clean as possible. I adopted the 021 code to express my love for my new home.”

were produced on 2” tape machines and SSL desks that cost millions of dollars. But you couldn’t just get up in the morning and write the sickest hip hop track on the day because you didn’t have access to the gear. And that’s the difference. Now of course digital has taken over, but if you use analogue you can hear that depth and the warmth.”

I first took note of Audiophile 021 at the Red Bull Music Academy’s stop on their world tour last year. His sets are testament to his clean sound maxim, and the diversity of music seamlessly flows into each other. “I started out as a house DJ,” he begins, “you can find music that grabs you and takes you to a different place. I started moving from that to techno and minimal. And then some of my friends introduced me to dubstep. I really got into the wobbling bass heaviness. I come from a rock background so I really liked that heavy feel like Skrillex. My sets usually have about 135 to 145 BPM up to 175 and sometimes going to full on drum and bass. Just for the hell of it.” And does he find genre important? “The beauty of digital music is: forget about genre,“ he begins, “if you can work out a way for a 90 BPM track to drop into a 120 BPM track, go for it. Regardless of what it is.”

“Plus,” he adds, “vinyl sales went up 30-something per cent last year.”

Steve Elsworth AKA Audiophile 021’s interview had to be postponed due to his wedding plans, from picking up dresses for the big day to picking out flowers. My antiquated ways have me surprised that the groom is so involved in this which might be termed “women’s work”. But getting involved is what sets Steve Elsworth apart.

During the ‘90s the club scene erupted out of Manchester, turning warehouses into that all encapsulating plural “raves”. I ask him if it could ever occur here. “The whole idea of the Hacienda has already happened,” he says proudly. “A lot of the older guys driving the scene now, went to raves and warehouse parties. The scene got messed up with recreational drug use and people misunderstanding it. But what has happened is the festival culture. You have huge three day trance parties which are basically that Manchester vibe. There’s something happening this year which will be a nod to those warehouse parties. It’s going to be really cool, but I can’t tell you about it yet,” he concludes cryptically.

We meet Audiophile 021 at the luxurious Vineyard hotel. Originally from Johannesburg with a music teacher as a mom and a techie as a dad, I ask about his name. “I never

I then decided to ask if there’s still room for analogue. “Ah that question!” he exclaims. “Analogue is still the holy grail of music production. There’s a reason why the best tracks

With DJs turning to ever more methods to entertain the crowd, I ask what else the DJ can employ. “Mr Sakitumi and the Grrrl are really pushing that interaction between audio and visual,” he explains. “It helps keep your audience focused. It provides an area of fascination, which your music should do by itself. But a visual element goes a far way.” DJs are often accused of being nothing more than button pushers, mostly by fellow musicians. “Guys in bands, I don’t think they will really ever appreciate DJs for what they are,” he laments. “The funny thing is all the guys who hate on DJs are the ones jumping up and down when you’re playing your set anyway.” With the abundance of programmes able to compose music available at the moment, does he think production value has dropped? “The programmes themselves have nothing to do with production value,” he explains. “I think if your favourite producer says ‘Logik is shit’ then you are going to hate on it. I think the low quality of today’s electronic music is a lack of education and understanding.” We end up talking about the internet, and it seems Audiophile 021 has a measured approach when it comes to this new form of marketing. “I’d be lost without social networking,” he admits. But social networking aside, at the end of the day, Steve shares my sentiment when he says it’s all about the show – you lay a good one down and inevitably, the fans will follow.



#59 March 2012