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#70

04

THE NEWS

March 2013

From The Ed

Tecla Ciolfi

Question: would you rather spend R560 on a ticket to go and see an international artist when they’re in SA, or would you spend R50 each weekend to go and watch a 3 band line-up at a quality live music venue in and around where you live? If you chose the international, congratulations, you are 1 in hundreds of thousands of people who’d probably do the same. What I want to know is, why? Sure, Linkin Park and RHCPs might never return to SA and Rodriguez ain’t going to live forever, but would you not want to treat your ears to something new as opposed to something you’ve heard a gazillion times before? Maybe your bank balance allows you to spend money on both, in which case, good for you. But most people in this country don’t have the luxury of affording both and so are faced with an inevitable choice. Now I know you’re going to argue that seeing your favourite band perform live is a once in a lifetime chance and you’d be right, but when I go to these overflowing concerts, I can’t help but think that if our venues were filled each weekend with just a fraction of a percentage of this kind of attendance, the current state of our industry would be a very different affair. Seeing concepts like Cape Town’s Pysch Night grow from DJs spinning in the upstairs section of LBs to a fully-fledged event at The Assembly, is testament to how a simple idea, flanked by various like-minded support, can flourish. The point that I’m trying to make here is one of sustainability. Next month Your LMG Magazine turns 5 years old. Anybody with basic business acumen will tell you that if your business lasts 5 years, well done, the worst is over. That sweet, big, 5 – it’s a milestone for us and you can be sure that we’re going to be making a big sing-and-dance of it in the form of various kick-ass events and giveaways around the Cape Peninsula, so keep those eyes readily peeled.

06-07

THE FUTURE PRIMITIVES Photo by Ronnie Belcher

10 CAPTAIN STU

CT GIG GUIDE JHB GIG GUIDE

12-13 14

14 15 18

BANDWATCH CT: CROSSFIRE COLLISION

20-21

LIVE REVIEWS

BANDWATCH JHB: FLINT MEET SPARK SOLMS-DELTA HARVERT FEST

See you round the bar.

facebook.com/yourlmg

@yourlmg

CORRECTION Our article on Rozzano Davids in LMG’s Feb 2013 issue contained an inaccurate statement. While Rozzano was closely linked to the history of the hip hop group Prophets Of The City, he was never officially a member. Our apologies to Rozzano and anyone else who may have been offended by this claim.

CONTACT US

E: info@yourlmg.com W: www.yourlmg.com Send your gigs to: gigs@yourlmg.com

P: 071 430 7635

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed in YOUR LMG are not necessarily those of LMG Media CC, its management, editor, or advertisers. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted electronically or via any other means without the written consent of the publisher (LMG MEDIA CC). Plus all the other wank stuff that other magazines usually put here.

Photo by Laura McCullagh

22 ALBUM REVIEWS Publisher Mike Smith Editor Tecla Ciolfi Designer Storm Farrell General Manager Dale Smith Accounts Manager Kyle Gray Gauteng Rep Jean Jordaan Coffee Bitch/Minute-Taker Stephanie Ungersböck

Thank you to this month’s contributers Writers Greg Evans, Tecla Ciolfi, Warren Glam, Adrian Davies, Monique Commandeur, Angela Weickl, Photographers Laura McCullagh, Michael Ellis, Annie Klopper, Timmy Henny, Chelsea MacLachlan, Jessica Kramer, Nick James, Ronnie Belcher, Samarie Smith Printing Signet Printing Cover Photograph by Ronnie Belcher


ISSUE #70

04


PAST AND PRESENT WITH

THE FUTURE PRIMITIVES

WORDS by TECLA CIOLFI PHOTOS BY RONNIE BELCHER

Having been around since late 2011, this garage rock trio are at their best when they’re onstage, revelling in their fast-paced riffs, lyrical hooks and their vocalist’s idiosyncratic yelp.

W

but we also like new stuff if it sounds good.” Their fascination and appreciation for everything vintage, in terms of the process of recording as well as its particular result, make The FPs a rare case amongst SA bands today.

Their name, an oxymoron of sorts, originates from a book that Johnny Tex (vox/guitar) was reading called “Boonville” around the time of the band’s inception. “The Future Primitives were a group of crazy people who acted like animals in the book,” Johnny begins to explain. “I just liked the name and thought it would apply to our sound – like old, yet new. There’s a lot we like about old recordings and old analogue gear,

While this might be the first band that Warren Fischer (drums) has played in, two out of three members of The FPs are no strangers to the scene. Heino Retief (bass) and Johnny started a punk-rock garage trio in 2010 called The Revelators, which achieved a large degree of underground success in Cape Town courtesy of their high energy gigs and quality low-fi recording. Johnny tells how their drummer at the time moved to England before detailing shift in his music

ith a new-age mentality towards oldschool music mediums, The Future Primitives pay daily homage to the multiplicity of genres that have supplied the backbone for their definitive sound and artistry as a group.

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subconscious at the time saying, “I started writing quite different sort of stuff and didn’t really want to have different sounding songs and a new drummer, still calling ourselves The Revelators.”

You buy a CD, copy it onto your computer, and then what?”

Heino picks up where Johnny left off stating, “He had already started writing a bit differently. Ending The Revelators meant that we could start over, it gave us room to experiment with a new approach.”


This “new approach” gave them a chance to incorporate a range of influences into their style that was previously unexplored in The Revelators. Inherent now in The FPs’ melodies is an array of modicums from rockabilly to surf to ‘60s garage as well as the wafting of psych. So with a hotchpotch of influences brewing in The FPs’ cauldron, what can we hold out for on the follow-up to their 2012 debut album, “This Here’s The Future Primitives”? Should we put good money on it being a drastic departure from their staple, revved-up garage rock, or will they be keeping it more a less in the same vein with their current style? “It is definitely in the same vein musically,” Johnny says, “just a bit more melodic and could possibly appeal to a broader audience, but I don’t think we will be disappointing anyone who likes what they are hearing at present. It’s actually a decent blend of fast and mid tempo stuff.” When it comes to current recording mediums the band believes that the CD is dead. “You buy a CD, copy it onto your computer, and then what? Listen to it on your iPod? The CD itself collects dust in its brand new state until eventually it ends up in the bin, used once,” Johnny states matter-of-factly. “Vinyl is analogue, it’s real,” Johnny declares, “our ears understand or can relate to this far better than a bunch of 0s and 1s. Cassette, of course, is also analogue and appreciated for the same reasons. I think the future is online releases, vinyl, and cassette.” Regardless of online downloads seemingly taking over, Johnny’s assertion supports the fact that there will always be a consumer-driven want for the physical body of an album, be it CD, vinyl or cassette. As of late it seems that more and more bands are adopting a D.I.Y. ethos when it comes to their recordings. The FPs have long embraced this trend and are sticking to it on their second album. “We do all the recording ourselves,” Johnny begins. “I bought a reel-to-reel tape machine and an old mixing desk, and got hold of some decent mics so we just use what we have. And then I do all the mixing and mastering.”

ALBUMS THAT INFLUENCED THE FUTURE PRIMITIVES Johnny: The Pixies “Doolittle”. I don’t even know where to begin with this. I remember my brother (who is 8 years older than me) and his friends listening to this really loudly in our lounge when I was a kid. I would run in there and pretend I was playing guitar and they would kick me out because I was annoying them. These are like some of my earliest memories. It has been an album that has come with me all the way through my life. The Gun Club “Fire Of Love”. For the exact same reasons as above. I’m actually really glad I grew up with an older brother that was into such great music. I could have been a totally different person today if it weren’t for him. They say your biggest influence, or the things that determine what kinda stuff you are gonna write, is what you have heard before the age of 18. It’s like the core of your musical brain.

Heino:

Being self-sufficient when it comes to the technical aspects of a record also allows a certain amount of room for experimentation through trial and error, which Warren duly notes saying, “I think a lot of time we are learning as we record, going against the book and that’s what makes it interesting for me. Getting sounds we wouldn’t normally get if we had stuck to the rules.” A primary and shining example of this kind of trialling can be heard on “Songs We Taught Ourselves” – an album of covers that The FPs put out late in 2012. “We just felt like making an album really. I just bought some new gear and we wanted to try it out,” Johnny smirks.

Ah man, I wasn’t that lucky. In fact, it was my sister’s shitty taste in music that forced me to find an alternative. This led me to bands like The Clash that really made an impression on me. From there on out, my journey began. “Velvet Underground & Nico” is one of my favourite releases – it really opened my mind to music from the ‘60s. “The Psychedelic Sounds Of The 13th Floor Elevators” then came along and blew my mind – it’s truly a garage rock classic. Johnny introduced me to Gun Club, and “Fire Of Love” will always be one of my favourite albums by one of the greatest bands.

“I guess it also has something to do with our love for garage comps,” Heino chimes in. “This was our chance to not only compile a selection of our favourite songs, but perform and record it as well – almost like The Cramps used to do it.”

The Strokes “First Impressions of Earth”. When I first put it on I didn’t really get it in a sense, but it grew on me slowly. That sort of thing seems to reoccur quite a bit with me and those kinds of albums tend to have a great effect on my life. I actually bought it to impress some girl, it didn’t work out.

A crucial factor in ensuring the longevity of any band is making sure that they keep themselves fresh in the mind’s eye of those who enjoy their music. There’s nothing more heart-breaking than a band that out-gigs itself and sees the attendance of their crowd dwindle in front of them. The FPs know

Warren:

Kasabian “Kasabian”. This album was an awakening, a realisation of what I’d like to do with myself. It was the first album I really dived into and couldn’t pull myself out of. Stealing it from my sister was definitely one of my better decisions.

this better than most as Johnny explains, “We just feel that in a small town with limited venues, playing shows every week at the same venues with the same bands, people are going to get bored.” Now while some bands are content to sign with the EMIs, Sheers and Just Musics of the world, The FPs signed to Groovie Records – a garage label

Getting sounds we wouldn’t normally get if we had stuck to the rules.”

from Portugal that has an impressive host of ‘60s garage, surf and rock ‘n’ roll acts on their roster. Turns out a guy named Chris Jack (vox/guitar for a band called The Routes) whose band was fortuitously signed to Groovie, heard The FPs’ EP and was sold on their sound. He immediately sent their EP off to Groovie and soon after Johnny received an email from the record label asking if they’d considering putting their EP out on vinyl. “We don’t really find it strange that Groovie was interested in us because they release bands from all over the world actually,” Johnny comments nonchalantly. “The funny thing is,” Heino interjects, “The Routes are based in Japan. So our EP seems to have made its rounds all over the show.” Currently one of the most rousing bands on the scene, The Future Primitives’ live show is a mustsee, regardless of how you feel about their recorded sound. And for a band that has only begun to explore their potential, it’s comforting to know that in the age of the global village, The Future Primitives is keeping well-worn musical traditions alive.

UPCOMING SHOWS MAR

8th – Ramfest Main Stage at 8pm 28th – Assembly for Fokofpolisiekar’s 10 year celebration 29th – Lion’s Head with Black Lung 07


All Roads Lead TO

In 2003 a couple of high school friends started a band. Ten years and a handful member changes later and Captain Stu is still thriving. It’s no easy feat for a band in this country to exist and be successful for ten years or more. The ones that have done so are considered heroes and have supplied us with the soundtrack to our untamed youth, some, the inspiration for us to pick up an instrument and jam. As Ryan McArthur and Jon Shaban relay anecdotes with candour, there is a hint of serendipity – fate, luck or maybe just good old, honest hard work. It all began with Ryan McArthur (bass) and Josh Watson (drums) jamming in Josh’s garage, soon after Nick Key joined on vocals with James Klopper (guitar/vox), Clem Carr (sax) and Hugh Lashbrooke (trumpet). Practicing in the music room at school and the garage when school was out, Captain Stu took shape and readied itself to meet the world. With every member being under the age of 18, naturally, acquiring gigs was going to be a challenge. They managed to play three times at a venue in town before being busted. JP Arrow (trombone) and Jon Shaban (sax/guitar) joined the band and the now eight members strong Captain Stu boasted a powerhouse four-piece brass section that would make any ska band wet. Captain Stu’s tireless gigging and self-promotion piqued the interest of Lee Thomson and Ross McDonald from Hog Hoggidy Hog – a band that Captain Stu were inspired by and with whom they now often shared a stage. Lee and Ross headed into studio with Captain Stu in 2005 to help them produce their debut album. A couple of teenagers were suddenly flung into studio without the faintest clue of what would happen. Under the guidance of their mentors and a sub-standard studio with less than competent engineers, they produced their debut EP. Ryan recalls missing his Matric Final Exam Registration Day and several classes prior to that in order to be at the studio. Their debut album, “The Untold Tales...” was the embodiment of all their hard work and perseverance of the last two years and wen all the shitty high school bands had broken up, Captain Stu was still going. Later, a chance sponsorship funded the 25 000 flyers that resulted in 1 200 people attending their album launch at The Valve. Captain Stu enlisted the help of scene heavyweights The Rudimentals and Half Price as supporting acts on the night. The album’s sound was a cocktail of each band member’s musical taste which meant at any point you would hear a combination of afro-jazz, ska, post-hardcore, metal, hip hop and pop. Their album, as well as a great, low-budget music video, secured them performances at the Long Street and Obz Festivals but shortly after that Josh left the band. He was replaced by Dylan Hichens whose father is a member of the famed Lancaster Band. This meant an immediate upgrade to a better rehearsal space and sound equipment. Finally of legal age, a marathon stint of gigging helped them build relationships with touring bands like Fuzigish, Sibling Rivalry and City Bowl Mizers and by 2007 Captain Stu hit

the road on their first national tour to Johannesburg and Uprisings Festival in Durban. Flying eight band members, one roadie and a cache of instruments around the country was a logistical nightmare. Returning from tour, Sophie Doherty (a graduate from the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts) was introduced to the band. She has since become the much-needed guiding force for Captain Stu, who at that point had been selfmanaged for almost two years. Dylan Hichens decided to leave the band and was replaced with Devin Jones just in time for MK 3de Avontoer in 2008. Two weeks of drunken debauchery and countless performances ushered in a new era for the band. Captain Stu slimmed down to six members and made it to the finals of the Road to V Band Battle which led to them opening for Maroon 5 and One Republic at the Coca-Cola Dome in Johannesburg. They played their first Splashy Fen, left on their second MK Avontoer and by the end of 2008 had completed recording of their second album. When Clem Carr and Devin Jones left the band to pursue other musical interests, Ryk Otto jumped on the drums just in time for the launch of “The Adventures Of...” with Raiven Hansmann stepping in on brass for Easter Oppikoppi. Matt Willis, who had been in the high school jazz band with Jon and Clem, joined shortly after and has remained as the trombone player for Captain Stu. The departure of Clem meant the loss of a songwriter whilst the subsequent loss of lead singer Nick Key required an adaptation of the band’s entire sound. James, who had been one of the two lead singers at the outset of Captain Stu, stepped up to the mic once again. Capitalizing on the new dynamic, the band headed on tour once again. New material with James as lead singer was vital and with the help of Neil Snymann, Captain Stu churned out their “FREE Music” EP. A Cape Town and Johannesburg launch followed with first single ‘The Day’ being playlisted on 5FM. Radio play, a line-up that was air-tight and a perpetual tour calendar indicated that an overseas tour was the only way forward. At the end of 2010 Captain Stu headed east to Australia on tourist visas with their instruments in the cargo hold of a ship – they were “illegal” musicians on their first international tour. In 2011 a tired, albeit successful, Captain Stu stopped for a moment to decide what the future would entail. A decade later and Captain Stu are more gungho than ever after signing an A&R deal with an American agency that secured them radio station playlisting across the USA. Once they have the funds they plan to head over to North America and take Captain Stu further than our local industry will seemingly allow. This band has achieved more than they could have imagined without compromising their sound and will always seek out the people who love the music they make.

Captain Stu’s 10th Anniversary gig is on Saturday 13 April at Zula Sound Bar 10

STU WORDS by ANGELA WEICKL PHOTOS BY Annie Klopper, Timmy Henny, Chelsea MacLachlan

These teenagers were suddenly flung into studio without the faintest clue of what would happen.”


Win a pack of every single LMG ever printed that’s 70 issues!

Do you remember those very early black & white issues, starting in March 2008? And in those early days they were published every 2 weeks! How about our very first cover picture that appeared on issue #3? Who else but Francois Van Coke! Seether (#4), K.O.B.U.S. (#5) and The Dirty Skirts (#11) appeared on the covers of the early issues. Do you remember the very first colour cover on our 1st birthday (#24)? That quirky group photo of three of our biggest home-grown stars, Inge Beckmann, George Van Der Spuy and, once again, Francois Van Coke – in boxer shorts!

And in keeping with our big star theme on our birthdays, our 2nd (#36) - in 2010 - featured none other than Jack Parow. At the time a number of commentators were saying “he’s just flavour of the month - he’ll blow over very soon ”. Well we simply didn’t believe that and look at him now. Later that year, we went into new territory with a fold-out cover (#42) that showcased 8 of our most promising up and coming female musicians. Out of that batch, 2 have since made our cover on their own (Sannie Fox and Kanyisa Mavi), one has released her debut solo album (Black Porcelain) and another has toured the Middle East with a bunch of world class musicians and continues to make waves in the Blues scene at home (Natasha Meister).

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS 1. We ask 21 questions - one every day between March 1st and 21st – on our Facebook page 2. All questions will be related to LMG in some way – and most answers can be found on our website at www.yourlmg.com 3. The first person to answer correctly goes into the draw for the pack of all 70 issues 4. You can only be entered into the draw once – PLEASE don’t spoil the fun by answering further questions once you’ve made it! 5. Final draw will be made on Fri 22 March and a photo of the winner will be published in the April issue of Your LMG – the 5th Birthday issue!


HOLI ONE COLOUR FESTIVAL

MONITOR + TOBACCO VAMPIRE The Rabbit Hole, Durbanville

BIG BLUES FESTIVAL Kleinmond

THEM TORNADOS + THE RATROD CATS + TH’DAMNED CROWS Carnival Court, Long St

ISSY SEMPILL Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

KESIVAN & THE LIGHTS The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

SILVERLAND Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

BUCKFEVER UNDERGROUND Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

PRESSURE DRUM & BASS Mercury, Zonnebloem

DESMOND & THE TUTUS The Assembly, District Six

SAT 2

ROGER LUCEY Alma Café, Rondebosch

BIG BLUES FESTIVAL Kleinmond

JAMES “ELVIS “ MARAIS Villa Pascal, Durbanville

DAVID KRAMER & SCHALK JOUBERT Die Boer, Durbanville

HUGH MASEKELA & LARRY WILLIS The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

EVELYN HART + GLEN HARTMAN + GREER BELL Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

ROLLING STONE FRIDAY feat. TAXI VIOLENCE + ANDY LUND & THE MISSION MEN + MR SAKITUMI & THE GRRRL Mercury, Zonnebloem

DESIGN INDABA MUSIC CIRCUIT FEAT. 10SUI (UK) + SPOEK MATHAMBO + HAEZER + GAZELLE + NISKERONE The Assembly, District Six

FRI 1

FEYA FAKU The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

SCHALK JOUBERT Alma Café, Rondebosch

DAVE FERGUSON On A Roll, Mowbray

ANDRIETTE & BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

LEGGO LOOPS The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

LARRY JOE Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

OXY + NO.15 + SKULPIL Jolly Roger, Plumstead

DIE CROTS COMPANJE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

CLASSICS feat. DJ’S FALKO & AZHUL Mercury, Zonnebloem

ASHTRAY ELECTRIC + AGENDA Bohemia, Stellenbosch

THU 7

DAN PATLANSKY 213 High Level Rd, Sea Point THEM TORNADOS &Union, Bree St MARK DANIELS Dizzy’s, Camps Bay STUDENT NIGHT The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

S.Y.N.W. The Assembly, District Six WAXING LYRICAL Mercury, Zonnebloem

WED 6

ROCCO DE VILLIERS Die Boer, Durbanville

PAIGE MAC + EVELYN HART The Waiting Room, Long St

BLUE TUESDAY Die Boer, Durbanville

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

ALICE PHOEBE LOU &Union, Bree St

TUE 12

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 11

THE SLEEPERS + BLACK MOSCOW Mercury, Zonnebloem

WILLEM MOLLER WITH FRIEND FROM FARAWAY Alma Café, Rondebosch

JAMIE JUPITER (3:30PM)

ECKART BORUTTO Barrydale Karoo Hotel

MARION HOLM Die Boer, Durbanville

FEYA FAKU The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

MY DARK FUGUE + SET FOR THE SKY + HIGH VOLTAGE Jolly Roger, Plumstead

JACKANORY STORY + CALEB Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

SILVERLAND Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

JAPIE VAN GRAAN Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

NATASHA MEISTER + PHILIP MALAN Alma Café, Rondebosch

DAVE FERGUSON + THEM TORNADOS + CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES + DIXIE PRICKS Roodebloem Studios, Woodstock

SABRETOOTH + CROSSFIRE COLLISION (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

FLAMJANGLED TEA PARTY Contermanskloof, Durbanville

SAT 16

DAVE FERGUSON (3PM) La Vie, Sea Point

PIET BOTHA & LYZYRD KYNGS Red Herring, Noordhoek

ARMCHAIR SUNDAY COMEDY NIGHT Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

NATASHA MEISTER BAND (6PM) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

STEF KRUGER Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

PAIGE MAC (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

JEREMY LOOPS Kirstenbosch Gardens

NICK TURNER Grand Daddy Hotel, Long St

NIK RABINOWITZ Die Boer, Durbanville

BLACK SOUTH EASTER Red Herring, Noordhoek

MARK HAZE + LOCNVILLE Sexpo, Cape Town

SUN 10

THE BEAR Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

THE TOMBOYS - ROCKIN USA Villa Pascal, Durbanville

AF.BOTZ &Union, Bree St CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES The Shack, Zonnebloem

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

PHASE 4 Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

TAILOR + GLEN HARTMANN The Waiting Room, Long St

PECHA KUCHA (5PM) The Assembly, District Six

RAMFEST Circle of Dreams, Riviersonderend JAN BLOHM Die Boer, Durbanville

TUE 5

CAPE TOWN & SURROUNDING AREAS

NIANELL Die Boer, Durbanville

ALAN & SHELLEY Jolly Roger, Plumstead

AMY WANN Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

HASH Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

MANOUCHE The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

ALBERT FROST Alma Café, Rondebosch

PERFECT CIRCLE feat. REBURN + SAINTFEARLESS + LUCY KRUGER Mercury, Zonnebloem

FRI 22

BOULEVARD BLUES Alma Café, Rondebosch

MEAN BLACK MAMBA On A Roll, Mowbray

NIANELL Die Boer, Durbanville

GORDON VERNICK QUARTET The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

SHADOWCLUB Bohemia, Stellenbosch

THU 21

MOTHERCITY MOJO Alma Café, Rondebosch

CHRIS CHAMELEON Die Boer, Durbanville

LIONEL BASTOS Red Herring, Noordhoek

OXY + SKULPIL + SMUGG JUGLER Jolly Roger, Plumstead

MARK DANIELS Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

LANCE HERMAN &Union, Bree St

LUNA PAIGE & SCHALK JOUBERT Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

WAXING LYRICAL: JON SHABAN & FRIENDS Mercury, Zonnebloem

LOVEGLOVE PYROTECHNICS Bohemia, Stellenbosch

THE DIXIE PRICKS On A Roll, Mowbray

SPLASHY FEN Southern Drakensberg, KZN

NATALIE CHAPMAN BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

WE SET SAIL The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

DAVE FERGUSON + MEAN BLACK MAMBA Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

BLUESTOWN SESSIONS Mercury, Zonnebloem

FOKOFPOLISIEKAR – 10 YEAR TOUR The Assembly, District Six

THU 28

ELECTRIC CORVETTE Nameless, Somerset West

WILLEM BOTHA Die Boer, Durbanville

STUDENT NIGHT The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

ROOM OF PHONICS + NO.15 + FEMURS Jolly Roger, Plumstead

SABRETOOTH &Union, Bree St

MARGARET’S DAUGHTER Alma Café, Rondebosch

COMEDY SHOWDOWN Mercury, Zonnebloem

S.Y.N.W. The Assembly, District Six

WED 27

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

CRIMSON HOUSE BLUES + TIM PARR The Waiting Room, Long St

MOVING HOUSE &Union, Bree St

TUE 26

MARCH 2013


PEBBLEMAN BAND Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

S.Y.N.W. The Assembly, District Six

GORDON VERNICK QUARTET The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

WED 20

CHRIS CHAMELEON Die Boer, Durbanville

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

JOHNNY BUD The Shack, Zonnebloem

3RD WORLD SPECTATOR &Union, Bree St

TUE 19

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

MON 18

RINGO MADLINGOZI Kirstenbosch Gardens TOUCHWOOD + FRIENDS (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay BOULEVARD BLUES BAND (5PM) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay ARMCHAIR SUNDAY COMEDY NIGHT Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory LINTON KONEMANN Red Herring, Noordhoek SOULBIRD The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St DAVE FERGUSON (3PM) La Vie, Sea Point HOT WATER De Waal Park STEVE LOUW Alma Café, Rondebosch

FLAMJANGLED TEA PARTY Contermanskloof, Durbanville

SUN 17

Constantia Waldorf School

FRI 29

MARK HAZE (6PM) Amphitheatre, V & A Waterfront

SPLASHY FEN Southern Drakensberg, KZN

BEATENBERG The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

VALIANT SWART (6PM) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

NOMADIC ORCHESTRA (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

MI CASA + NATASHA MEISTER Kirstenbosch Gardens

FRI 29

THE SUITCASE HEARTS Alma Café, Rondebosch

DAVE GOMMERSAL Red Herring, Noordhoek

IN THE DEEP END + ROB THOMPSON BLUES TRIO Jolly Roger, Plumstead

ELEVATED MOTION Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

SILVERLAND Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

SPLASHY FEN Southern Drakensberg, KZN

STEVE DYER & BOKANI DYER The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

SAT 30

VERNON BARNARD –SONGS OF CAT STEVENS Villa Pascal, Durbanville

STEVE DYER & BOKANI DYER The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

GIAN GROEN BAND Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

TAPE HISS & SPARKLE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

SPLASHY FEN Southern Drakensberg, KZN

VISIT www.yourlmg.com FOR UPDATES SEND YOUR GIG INFO TO: gigs @yourlmg.com

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

GANGS OF BALLET The Waiting Room, Long St

MON 25

VALIANT SWART Alma Café, Rondebosch

DAVE FERGUSON (3PM) La Vie, Sea Point

STEVE NEWMAN & CHRIS TOKALON The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

BARRECODE UNPLUGGED Red Herring, Noordhoek

ARMCHAIR SUNDAY COMEDY NIGHT Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

BLUES BROERS (6PM) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

THE LITTLE KINGS + THE CITY (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SHADOWCLUB + GANGS OF BALLET Kirstenbosch Gardens

SUN 24

ELEVATED MOTION + BRAND NEW COLONY + SAINTFEARLESS Jolly Roger, Plumstead

ROB THOMPSON + STUART REECE Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

AFRIMENTZ Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

SHAKE SOME ACTION Mercury, Zonnebloem

SHADOWCLUB (UNPLUGGED) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

BARLEYCORN FESTIVAL Maynardville Theatre, Wynberg

TIM BURNZ + JON SHABAN (5PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SAT 23

THE RATROD CATS (6PM) Truth HQ, Buitenkant St

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18.

Tickets for hightlighted events available at www.webtickets.co.za

ROGER LUCEY The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

JAZZ JAM Swingers, Wetton

LES JAVAN Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

CONDUIT (ALBUM LAUNCH) + LONGTIME CITIZEN Mercury, Zonnebloem

DAVE KNOWLES Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

MR. CAT & THE JACKAL + BIG DADDY CROW Jolly Roger, Plumstead

PH FAT The Boardhouse, Table View

FLAMJANGLED TEA PARTY Contermanskloof, Durbanville

FRI 15

SONS OF SETTLERS Bohemia, Stellenbosch

THE RATROD CATS On A Roll, Mowbray

NIK RABINOWITZ Die Boer, Durbanville

FEYA FAKU & MIKE ROSSI The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

SET FOR THE SKY + GEHEIME SKADUWEE + JESSE & THE PROCESS + THE CONFEDERATES + MATT O`KELLY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

BLUESTOWN SESSIONS Mercury, Zonnebloem

THU 14

NIK RABINOWITZ Die Boer, Durbanville

ROOM OF PHONICS + SMUGG JUGLER + FEMURS Jolly Roger, Plumstead

MARK DANIELS Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

HOLIDAY MURRAY &Union, Bree St

COMEDY SHOWDOWN Mercury, Zonnebloem

S.Y.N.W. The Assembly, District Six

WED 13

AFRIMENTZ Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

MISSISSIPPI DISCO Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

BARLEYCORN MUSIC CLUB Villager Rugby Club, Claremont

DAN PATLANSKY Die Boer, Durbanville

ANDRE SWIEGERS & DIE TUINDWERGIES Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

MON 4

LOVE & LIGHT DAY PARTY Mountain Shadows, Paarl

KOOS KOMBUIS & DIE SKYNMAAGDE Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

DAVE FERGUSON (3PM) La Vie, Sea Point

ARMCHAIR SUNDAYS COMEDY Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

GAZELLE (7PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

SAT 9

JON SHABAN + DAVE KNOWLES Octopus Garden, St James

LAURIE LEVINE + JOSIE FIELD Alma Café, Rondebosch

MEAN BLACK MAMBA (6PM) Truth HQ, Buitenkant St

ANDRIETTE & BAND Die Boer, Durbanville

ALAN & SHELLEY Jolly Roger, Plumstead

FIRE N STYX Dizzy’s, Camps Bay

THE ORANGE STILETTOS Dorpstraat Teater, Stellenbosch

MR CAT & THE JACKAL Obviouzly Armchair, Observatory

DIRTY TRIO feat. ZAKHILE MOLESHE The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

DAVE FERGUSON (6PM) Grand Daddy Hotel, Long St

RAMFEST Circle of Dreams, Riviersonderend

FRI 8

JAMIE JUPITER Alexander Upstairs

DAVID KRAMER & SCHALK JOUBERT (2PM) Die Boer, Durbanville

AMANDA TIFFIN & DEBORAH TANGUAY The Mahogany Room, Buitenkant St

LUNA PAIGE & JOSE PARDO (ARG) & GUY COLLINS (6PM) Bertie’s Moorings, Gordons Bay

THE BARKING FAMILY TREE Alma Café, Rondebosch

MARK HAZE (4PM) Zevenwacht Wine Estate

ARNO CARSTENS De Waal Park

RED HUXLEY + FRIENDS (6:30PM) Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

GOLDFISH Kirstenbosch Gardens

SUN 3

THE SHABEEN Brass Bell, Kalk Bay

ROGER LUCEY Alma Café, Rondebosch

NIVA BIG DAY OUT Southeys Vines

Grand Parade, Cape Town


GAUTENG

SUN 15

GAUTENG & DURBAN

GLASKAS + DIE TUINDWERGIES Firkin, Centurion

RAMFEST JHB Riversands Farm

FRI 1 FOKOFPOLISIEKAR Firkin, Centurion DESMOND & THE TUTUS + SHORTSTRAW + YO GRAPES + HALF ‘N HALF Arcade Empire, Pta

SAT 2 SHADOWCLUB + CRASH CAR BURN + MAN AS MACHINE Arcade Empire, Pta THE WARM UP ft MATT MASTERS Citilec Building, Jhb

THU 7 TOYA DELAZY + PRIME CIRCLE Wanderers Cricket Grounds

MR. CAT & THE JACKAL + HAGGIS & BONG Arcade Empire, Pta

NEWTOWN KNIFE GANG + SESLING + ONLY WHEN IT RAINS Arcade Empire, Pta

MON 16

KABAAL (KLANKBAAN) + NICO SHEVRON Vissi Darte, Akasia, Pta

FOKOFPOLISIEKAR + AKING Emperors Palace, Jhb

WED 20

THU 28

SLIPPERY ‘N’ WET PRESENTS: NEELIX & SEAMUS HAJI ESP, Jhb

THU 21 PUBLIC TELEPHONE Wolves, Jhb

FRI 8

FOKOFPOLISIEKAR Baryard Theatre, Parkview

WED 13 HOLLY & THE WOODS + ONE DAY REMAINS Rumours Lounge, Jhb

LUNA PAIGE Asbos Teater, Pta

SAT 23

KABAAL (KLANKBAAN) + JUSTIN SERRAO + JESSIE PRESTO Café Barcelona, Pta

SHOTGUN TORI Wolves, Jhb PASCAL & PEARCE + JEREMY LOOPS + TIDAL WAVES + SOUTHERN GYPSEY QUEEN Arcade Empire, Pta

JACK PAROW Siverstar Casino

BOUWER BOSCH Wolves, Jhb PH FAT Arcade Empire, Pta

DURBAN SAT 2

FRI 22

SAT 9

MARCH 2013

METAL MASSACRE Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN WED 13 ROLAND INSTRUMENTS SHOWCASE Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN FRI 15 FARRYL PURKISS + ASLEEP IN TRANSIT Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN SAT 16 NIBS V D SPUY & GUY BUTTERY + THE HINDS BROTHERS Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN SUN 24 TANGA PASI (ZIM) + MORE Rainbow Restaurant, Pinetown You can now read this issue (and previous ones) of yourLMG on our website at: www.yourlmg.co.za/latest-issue

DECEMBER STREETS + CHEAP BAD HABITS + ANALOGUE THIEVES Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN

DIE HEUWELS FANTASTIES + VAN COKE KARTEL + AKING + FOKOFPOLISIEKAR Standard bank arena, Jhb

FRI 8

MOVING HOUSE (ALBUM LAUNCH) + YESTERDAYS PUPIL + ALAN! LET’S MOVE ON Arcade Empire, Pta

SPLASHY WARM UP feat. CITY BOWL MIZERS + THE CAR BOOT VENDORS + HABIT TO Live The Venue, Stamfordhill Rd, DBN

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18.

CA

PE

W TO

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B A N DWAT CH:

CROSSFIRE COLLISION

If you’ve never heard our music we rate we sound a little bit like Pennywise, Rise Against, someone said Sum 41? Whatever, we just try to keep it fast and fun, and we try to write choruses you can’t help but sing, with and without us. Our music will make you - Hopefully get amped to jump around and punch and hug people at the same time, and sing and shout “Heyo!” Before a gig we usually - Sit quietly by the fireplace, hold hands, and whisper Kumbaya while staring at an unfinished Sudoku puzzle, then we… nah we just have shat loads of tequila. After a gig we usually - Bat off the groupies with a 10-foot iron rod so we can make our sweaty way back to the bar to get some much needed toxins: booze and nicotine.

Photo by Nick James 14

We think the SA music scene is severely lacking - Punk rock. We want to see more punk rock in SA. Especially young punk rock bands. There are a couple drizzled throughout our land, but we want more people to get amped about this fast-paced, melodic genre. Joburg also needs some fucking venues. If our band ethos were a song it would be - Bacon egg rolls and Myprodols. Our favourite venue to play at is - The Winston in Durban. Mercury. ROAR. Ragazzi… Live, jeeze if you’ll take punk rock, we’ll take you. But we had the most fun at the 2012 Synergy festival where we played on the LMG stage. You should come watch us because - You’re gonna have a good time. We love playing live, and we’ve been scrunched up in the studio for a while now so we’re ready to rear our lovely heads and stretch our rugby legs. Our next gig is at - We just had our album launch at Ragazzi but we’re also lining up a set at a well-known skop in the foothills of the Drakensberg, possibly an acoustic show in Kalk Bay – lekker by die see – we’re also trying to get our broke arses up to Gauteng. And before we go we just wanted to say - Thanks to LMG for having faith in the local music scene, respect. We’re thankful to all our friends and supporters (local and abroad) that have given us encouragement; we’re only aiming higher. Decay Clothing keeps us well-dressed. Marti, our manager, keeps us cool and organised. We shot a music video at a place called The Boardbox – get your surfboards sprayed and your dings repaired there – with Adam Donelly. Order our album Panic Face online. Tuna us on the interweb. We’ll tuna you back. facebook.com/crossfirecollision twitter.com/XfireCollision

CROSSFIRE COLLISION IS...

Matthew James sings and plays the git. Devon Martindale is our composer, lead guitarist, backing vocalist. Craig McKune plays bass and Jimmy McGregor hits the drums – Craig and Jimmy both sing and shout a bit too.


J

U OB

RG

B A N DWATCH:

FLINT MEET SPARK

If you’ve never heard our music we rate we sound a little bit like - A mix between a folk band (probably along the lines of Angus and Julia Stone, if they were optimistic, South African, and NOT brother and sister) and a British African band (which doesn’t exist, so you’ll have to come hear us to find out what that’s like). Our music will make you - Want to move to a South American village and dedicate your life to caring for orphans. Or make you strive for world peace. Or both, simultaneously. Before a gig we usually - Pee. And look at each other strangely while doing vocal warm-ups. After a gig we usually - Pee again. And then have a quick chat about how we thought it went. This is promptly followed by listening to some rap music. We think the SA music scene is severely lacking - In supporting and bringing out unique and fresh sounds. It’s risky, but so worth it. If our band ethos were a song it would be - ‘Bootylicious’ by Destiny’s Child. Catch us on a serious day and it’d probably be ‘Life In Technicolour’ by Coldplay (that musical interlude). It’s really hopeful to us. We need some of that.

Photo by Jessica Kramer

Our favourite venue to play at is - Generally wherever the food is good, so we loved &Union in Cape Town and Wolves in Joburg. Also, old people seem to really like us, so old age homes. You should come watch us because - We are funny looking people, and are super friendly so even if you don’t like our music, you should come say hi (and chat about politics and Nacho Libre). Our next gig is at - You gotta like us on FB and Twitter to get deets on that. Your backyard, maybe. And before we go we just wanted to say - We think all of you reading this are, firstly, beautiful people (Josh is looking for a wife, so holla ladies), and secondly, we’re quite excited to share our music with you, so hopefully some tangible stuff will be coming your way soon.

FLINT MEET SPARK IS... Josh Pretorius – vocals and guitar Adelle Nqeto – vocals and guitar


EMPOWERMENT REIGNS AT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ESP AFRIKA

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FEST The 2013 Cape Town International Jazz Festival, which takes place in April, will be a hub of both empowerment and world class entertainment spread over eight days.

This festival is now far more than just two days of music,” Rashid Lombard (Festival director and CEO of leading event company espAfrika) commented when questioned on how far the festival has come since its inception. “We hold a variety of events and programmes that expand the love of music amongst the broader communities of Cape Town and develop musical talent and other skills in the South African music-entertainment industry.” Now, we all know that any well-oiled event requires an equal amount of passion, dedication and funding, and this year, the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) as well as the South Atlantic Arts and Culture Trust has come on board as a principal funder of the T&D arm. They join the Department of Arts and Culture, the SABC and the City of Cape Town festival, who have long supplied the backbone of the T&D Programme. “The involvement of our sponsors is crucial as our extensive range of programmes continue to expand year after year,” Lombard explained. Kaizer Kganyago, spokesperson of the SABC was proud to state that, “The SABC has a long history with the CTIJF and during 2012 entered into a three year partnership with Cape Town’s grandest gathering.” The SABC, like all the other sponsors involved in the T&D programme recognise that they’re changing lives by investing in the future of our country’s youths. “In order for measureable progress to take place from the T&D initiative, the focus should not be based upon short term results only – developmental work requires longer time frames to deliver meaningful and lasting impact. The Sustainable T&D Programme for the 14th CTIJF includes the following: • Gigs for Kids: an interactive show for pre-schoolers that incorporates music, dance and drama, and that allows children to explore the sounds and rhythms of different musical instruments. • Sustainable Training and Development: Youth Arts Programme that equips high school learners with relevant

skills and knowledge in order to make a meaningful contribution to the Arts and Culture economy. It covers live performance and rehearsals as well as event management.

• Jazz Master Classes: aimed at established musicians concentrate on techniques and skills through various music dynamics, intermittent discussions and interaction with Jazz Masters.

• In addition, event management professionals share their experience and knowledge with young learners in special workshops for developing careers in event management. The workshops cover basic technical principles, hospitality, logistics, health and safety, security, compliance and marketing.

• The Fusion Master Class: an informal panel discussion and an interactive platform for artists to share their professional and personal experiences with the public. The audience is free to ask the panel questions about living and working as professional musicians.

• Intyholo Jazz Development Project: a workshop held in Gugulethu at the Ray Alexander Simons Memory Centre and is aimed at primary and high school learners with a focus on musical performance, arrangement and composition, as well as music business • The Berklee College of Music in the USA uses the CTIJF to recruit candidates from Africa. Auditions and interviews for young musicians are held the week before the Festival begins and the College offers a summer school scholarship to one of the Youth Arts Program learners. • A five-day Photographic Workshop: this affords a select group of working photographers and photo-journalists access to the Jazz Fest performers both on and off stage. • The Arts Journalism Programme: aimed at qualified journalists, freelancer writers and journalism students,

The involvement of our sponsors is crucial.”

this is the longest running training initiative of the CTIJF and has become one of the country’s leading initiatives in raising arts journalism standards. • The Music Business workshop: here business skills in the music industry are cultivated and developed. It also deals with changes in the industry, providing tools for upand-coming business people to adapt and sustain their businesses.

In line with the T&D policy of sustainability to participants who attend the workshops for “careers in event management”, the programme is dedicated to providing skills to eager individuals. The “Golf with a Cause Day” (which takes place on 4 April) is another empowerment highlight of the CTIJF. Held in support of the Caddie Foundation, it sees business and government leaders take to the course supported by some 60 individuals who are employed as caddies for the day. Four aspiring golfers will be selected from the group of caddies to play with the festival’s golfing patrons, a rare opportunity to test their skills next to high profile delegates. At the end of the day, the remarkable finds and success stories of the individuals who emerge from the CTIJF’s Sustainable T&D Programme, are proof enough that this is a workable, noteworthy initiative. Take Thabo Mswela for example, a 22-year-old ex-convict from Langa in Cape Town, who joined the programme in 2000. Mswela was recruited by the China Dyirha as part of the China crew. Mswela is now based in Norway as a production co-ordinator after being handpicked by the Norwegian Youth Organisation, the Change Makers. Both educational and entertaining, the Cape Town International Jazz Festival is so much more than an event, for many, it’s become a life changing institution. For more information on this year’s event go to www.capetownjazzfest.com

Don’t forget the Free Community Concert on Wednesday 3 April at Green Market Square, 5pm, proudly sponsored by the SABC.

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The Solms-Delta Harvest Festival: WORDS by Greg Evans PHOTOS COURTESY OF SAMARIE SMITH

A music festival with soul

The Franschhoek valley near Cape Town is a popular spot for hosting festivals, and it’s really not hard to see why. The area’s unspoiled natural beauty and its accessibility from the Mother City make it an obvious first choice.

On

23 March 2013, ATKV Franschhoek Oesfees (harvest festival) will welcome a variety of musicians to the Solms-Delta Wine Estate, including headliners Die Heuwels Fantasties, Claire Johnstone – yes, and Mango Groove! – as well as Emo Adams. The highlight, though, is something completely unexpected. The festival will showcase a number of local Boland bands who will perform as part of the Rural Cape Music Project (aka “Music van de Caab”) that provides training to promising musicians. Adriaan Brand, the project’s musical director, explains that the initiative provides the local farmworkers with an opportunity to explore their rich musical heritage. If the director’s name sounds strangely familiar, that’s because Adriaan is also a member of Springbok Nude Girls. So what is a member of the Nudies doing on a farm in Franschhoek? Well, it turns out that there’s a lot more going on down in the valley than first meets the eye. Adriaan feels very strongly about giving back to the community and he participates in the project as a music teacher. The project mainly serves the communities residing around the Solms-Delta farm, and he’s made it his mission to develop their talent. He’s immensely proud of

through a trust to improve the lives of its farmworkers. Part of this initiative has been aimed at nurturing the already existing, but poorly supported, rural music of the Boland. What, you might wonder, is the rural music of the Boland? If you’ve lived in the Cape for any length of time then you will no doubt recognise it as the soundtrack to the cultural life of the region. Brand explains that the timeless rhythms contained in a song like ‘Die Alibama’ pervades much of the broader Afrikaans, and South African, musical heritage. Its simple beat can be discerned in almost every form of boereorkes and regional rural music from its inception several centuries ago right up to the present date. The cultural interconnection has been so complete that, for a while, staunch Afrikaner nationalists tried to lay claim to it themselves! These days this music, which originates from the Cape slaves, can be regarded as a means of bridging

…the words came and it was through music that the workers found their voice.”

the progress that project participants have made. It would be difficult to overstate his enthusiasm, and it is clear that he is profoundly committed to their upliftment. The story of Solms-Delta really begins with Mark Solms, who bought the farm with a little help from a few likeminded friends in 2001. They felt that something needed to be done to help redress the injustices of the past, so, while Solms-Delta is a working wine estate, it also operates

18

the divide that was created by an oppressive system of Apartheid. That’s easier said than done though. Brand is assisted by Nick Turner of Sons of Trout fame. Nick tells me how ‘Die Alibama’ has even managed to cross oceans. It turns out that sometimes the best way to become acquainted with your roots is to get as far away from them as possible. While in New York, Nick was increasingly drawn to the rhythms of home. Local New Yorkers were naturally intrigued by the sound. Ironically, he found that the audiences there had a greater appreciation of the music than South African audiences did. One of the most important aspects of the project lies below the surface. The social history of farmworkers is not a pretty story. This is especially true of those labourers who were forced into the “dop system” and received their wages not in cash, but as rations of the wine that they toiled to produce. This arrangement created a devastating cycle of alcohol dependence that fractured families and destroyed lives. Needless to say, trust between farmworker and “baas” has been in short supply ever since.


gest of which boast a 70-strong membership. They were helped along by the late, great SA jazz trumpeter, Alex van Heerden, and have since performed to public acclaim. The Delta Langbroek Band comprises the project’s 20 best brass players and theirs is a performance that is not to be missed. The Delta Optel Band is a kind of “youth vastrap pop band”, Brand declares mischievously, and it serves as the seedbed for emerging talent. Leonore Bredekamp meanwhile leads the provocatively named Delta Soetstemme, an all-female group of choristers who have collaborated with several local recording artists. The success of the music project has allowed the organisers to extend its reach beyond the borders of the Franschhoek valley. This year’s festival will include performances of the “rieldans”, an almost forgotten ritual which forms a part of Khoisan culture - and which Brand refers to as “not quite breakdancing”. Rieldans has become a sensation with the local youth of the area.

One of the project’s greatest challenges, Brand explains, was to convince the local farmworkers that he and the farm owner were sincere about making a difference in their lives. This took persistence, patience and a good ear. The way forward involved just as much give-and-take from Adriaan as it did from them. What he discovered in the process was that underneath the farmworkers’ mistrust was a desire to express themselves in their own words. For many, this was perhaps the first opportunity that they’d ever had to do so; naturally the newfound freedom took some getting used to.

Gradually, though, the words came and it was through music that the workers found their voice. Brand tells of how the farmworkers hauled out an old beat-up guitar from under the bed of Oom Hannes, an elderly farm hand who’d kept the music alive during the years of oppression. The instrument was restrung and the music of the Boland once again strummed out its familiar rhythm as voices joined in. It’s several years on now, and those voices have acquired pride and confidence. Last year’s festival was sold out and there is now a wide range of ensembles, the big-

But it’s not all moonshine and roses. The Rural Cape Music Project needs public support. The musicians need an appreciative audience and the word needs to be spread. Perhaps most importantly, the project needs to be seen to be workable. By providing a sustainable community, the good that has been done here will have a greater chance of taking hold elsewhere and making a real difference. The Solms-Delta trust has released two CDs, ‘Hiervandaan’ and ‘Bamboesbos’. The recordings explore questions of culture and identity through traditional as well as more edgy musical modes. In addition to ‘Hiervandaan’ garnering a SAMA nomination, ‘Bamboesbos’ features the talents of Anton Goosen, Karen Zoid, Pieter van der Westhuizen, Valiant Swart and others.

Visit solms-delta.co.za or facebook.com/SolmsDelta and for pre-booked tickets - R120 on www.ticketbreak.co.za. Or R140 at the door.


UP THE CREEK FESTIVAL Breede River, Swellendam , Fri 30 JAN – Sat 2 FEB My experience at the most picturesque festival in SA kicks off at the 4th Street Main Stage with It Girl, Tailor. Her set is an exorcism, it’s staggering the amount of soul she puts into each song. Her sound’s a bit thin though, she could benefit from the backing of a full band. A short while later she’s back onstage with Shotgun Tori and Lucy Kruger who spearhead UTC’s Tribute To Woman. They cover 4 Non Blondes’ ‘What’s Up?’ and Joplin’s ‘Piece Of My Heart’ as random girls from the audience are asked to join the “celebration” onstage. But as they sway from side-to-side, arms wrapped around each other in a hippy-ish kumbaya chasm, it becomes more farce, less fun. Machineri and Beast deliver rock-solid, entertaining performances, but it’s The Mysticcs over at the Rolling Stone Stage that nab the night. Ebi Johnstone puts lead guitarists double his age to shame, both on and off stage which a meek demeanour that masks his demonic shredding skills. I spend Saturday morning in the river draped over

a Bos Ice Tea doughnut before an Afrikaans man masquerading as a Scotsman christens the MK River stage, making a few jokes and strumming a few chords. Truth be told, it’s really the quieter, in-between moments that are the most rewarding at this festival. I join in a jamming session at the tented sanctuary of the RS Stage where members of The Mysticcs, Crimson House Blues and Jeremy Loops have gathered, to the delight of drunk, sunburnt onlookers. Later, I take my place on the grass for Yoav, who looks overjoyed to be playing, despite squinting through the setting sun to see his loop pedals. His set-list is a textbook balance of old and new, of which ‘Karaoke Superstar’ evokes the best response. Jeremy Loops, the piped piper of this plaas, does well, despite a technical glitch here and there, to build the crowd up for The December Streets, who are musically solid, but bore me bitterly. But then – HOLY GOD OF ROCK ‘N’ ROLL – Black Cat Bones crash onto stage and blow every band before them out the Creek. Kobus De Kock Jnr bulldozes his way through every lyric, with their cover of

NOONTROPICAL DAZE: + SONS OF SETTLERS + AL BAIRRE + OXYGEN THIEVES Ragazzi, Fri 9 Feb

N

oontropical Daze was straight hipster crack and Ragazzi was the daily dope dealer, but in amongst all the fringed girls in cut-offs and all the “intellectual” banter about being philanthropic, some seriously decent music was about to be played. As the tequila shots starting adding up, so did my understanding of this curiously captivating venue space. Starting off a good

16

deal later than expected, The Oxygen Thieves was an ideal act to begin the night. They draw a crowd with their energetic and directional vibes and even though the venue’s sound quality was rather thin and tinny, I enjoyed watching them. Al Bairre is like that girl everybody wants to be friends with in high school, and once they kick-off, it’s impossible to fight the smile off your face. The shoulder-shaking music they make is just unequivocally fun and easy. ‘Youth De Freitas’ and ‘Right Here In July’ had me dropping it low on the dancefloor but they should ditch the cover tracks because their original music is so much better. I can unapologetically say that Sons of Settlers was

Photos by Michael Ellis

Neil Young’s ‘Rockin’ In The Free World’ along with living legend Piet Botha, the standout colab of the fest. Woodstock Mafia has the unenviable task of following BCB. They start on uneasy ground but the successors to Taxi Violence’s crown give their best performance todate. And speaking of Taxi… the four-piece’s 2-hourlong set forces us down memory lane. They even rock ‘In Loving Memory of Photosynthesis’, which they haven’t played in 4 years. And it’s flawless. A testament to talent. I watch as Woodstock Mafia’s frontman joins Taxi and looks completely starry-eyed belting ‘Livin’ It Up’ next to George Van Der Spuy. Cute. Sunday slaps a bout of rain on us from the early hours of the morning which forces the acts relocate from the MK Stage to RS one. I sit in a dazed haze watching fellow Creekers waft by in various degrees of brokenness and as Janie Bay & The Beard serenade our savage beasts with another cover, I force myself to face the inevitable packing monster.

Tecla Ciolfi

my favourite band of the night – the energy completely shifted when they started playing, respect is the prize when people do what they love without fuss and fanfare. Gerdus Oosthuizen is a ludicrously good frontman and all their tracks are beautiful, interesting and transitional. The heat was killer though and not even ‘Former Lover’ could get me back inside. Bittersweet for the headliners Beach Party, as many opted out because of the unruly temperature. If a surfer, a punk, a pilot and Lars from Darkthrone fused to form one super unit, Beach Party would be it.

Monique Commandeur


CAPE TOWN ELECTRONIC MUSIC FESTIVAL

Photos by Laura McCullagh

Breakwater Boulevard Rooftop, V & A Waterfront, Fri 15 FEB – Sun 17 FEB

T

he Cape Town Electronic Music Festival was undoubtedly one of the highlights of my 2012 calendar, which made the anticipation for round two almost unbearable. Adoration for our scenery can at times become reason for contempt, but we really are a bunch of lucky fools to have an urban music festival flanked by the mountain and the sea. I arrived on Friday to the sounds of Liver, our prodigal son on loan from Joburg for the day. The crowd was tiny but dedicated. Ruffest followed with an inspiring and energizing performance. Tommy Gun proceeded with pure class and even had his grandparents dancing amongst the revellers. Richard the IIIrd and Jakobsnake delivered a combination Afro/UK set that riled me up to a point of no return. The rest of the night provided the warm-up for international headliner Richie Hawtin. Not quite my cup of tea, but a stellar performance that had the now heaving crowd partying until the dying minutes. I rushed back on Saturday to ensure not a single minute was missed. Teh Synes delivered a near flawless performance to a like-minded few. Christian Tiger School, Mix n Blend, Ready D and Youngsta educated us all – true artists in each form, enriching every person that chose to listen. Red Bull Culture Clash Champions, African Storm Sound System proceeded to insult our intelligence with The Admiral playing Rihanna, Sean Paul and

PSYCH NIGHT:

+ BLACK LUNG + THE DOLLFINS + HOLIDAY MURRAY + WILD EASTERN ARCHES + THE VERY WICKED The Assembly, Fri 9 Feb

B

lack Lung begins with Justus Kotzé blowing some blues-ish notes on his harmonica before his bandmate, Melissa Williams, launches into a thumping drum beat. It’s vaguely bluegrass, it’s definitely brutal, and it sends vibrations through every listener’s bones. Frontman Dylan Rooibokkie explodes onto the stage with vicious guitar lines and wild vocals. He owns the stage as he busts a lung into the microphone, his eyes hidden behind his blonde locks. They’re followed by The Dollfins – possibly the cheekiest band on the Cape Town circuit right now. Everything about the trio dares you not to like them. Their sound is a dirty, slightly de-

EARKILLER:

+ THE MYSTICCS + THE DIXIE PRICKS + THE PITS Mercury, Fri 8 Feb

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ith the event title “Earkiller”, I’m expecting a fullfrontal assault at Mercury tonight. First up is The Dixie Pricks, who are kinda like the Dixie Chicks only they are dudes. That’s where the favourable comparisons end though. For starters, their lead guitarist has pulled a runner and this leaves the band struggling to find its shape. The frontman tries hard but it’s a lost cause. It’s not all the guitarist’s fault though; this self-styled gunk-punk rockabilly outfit never takes itself too seriously but even so the sound they put out hurts in all the wrong places. Liam McDevitt on his flaming double bass is the standout but I’d rather catch him in his role fronting Th’ Damned Crows. Kicking it next is The Pits who, despite their name, do a pretty decent job of lifting the vibe. Their rock ‘n’ roll

a medley of Bob Marley original tracks while Jah Seed “MC’d” nonsensically over the music. They delivered a sub-par performance unworthy of the peers with whom they performed. Faith was restored by Crazy White Boy and an outstanding show by Shangaan Electro – their debut on SA soil. The laurels however, rest comfortably on Sibot after an incredible performance with Sayyid from Anti-Pop Consortium. Not even technical difficulties could mar the quality. Watching a homegrown hero and an international hero perform together kicked my bucket list to the curb. Sweltering heat and a breathless sky greeted last night’s survivors and Sunday’s predominantly house line-up. A grooving and succinct sundowner set by Terrence Pearce laid the perfect foundation for the man we’d all been waiting for. The legendary master of house, Black Coffee, took us on a journey that was technically and musically indisputable, even treating the crowd to a brand new and exclusive Culoe De Song track. CTEMF provided a line-up that was representative of the broad spectrum of electronic music in SA, along with clean and maintained amenities, friendly and efficient bar staff, visible - and more importantly, accessible -emergency services and effective access control that was well worth the ticket price.

Angela Weickl

mented ode to ‘60s and ‘70s garage rock. It’s a little creepy, but they really don’t give a shit. Their garb is super trashy – hot pants with black boots – but show me someone who doesn’t dig it and I’ll show you a liar. Next up is the progressive folk outfit, Holiday Murray, a complete contrast from The Dollfins. Their look is more clean-cut, their sound is sweeter, and the connection they make with the crowd is more about beauty than debauchery – harmony-style singing plus the interplay of melodies. When they’re done, everybody drifts away from the mosh pit, revealing beer spillage, empty bottles and the odd bro-

GUY BUTTERY + NIBS VAN DER SPUY

Mahogany Room, Thu 7 Feb

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he two artists performing tonight have been collaborating on and off for over 10 years, but it’s taken them this long to make an album together. “In the Shade of the Wild Fig” is the result. The combination of Guy Buttery, with his eclectic and experimental style, and Nibs Van Der Spuy, who plays in a more conventional folk style, makes their set fascinating to listen to. One of them jokes that they are like an old married couple. Somehow, despite the differences, they find the spaces in their togetherness to produce a richly textured sound. Part of the instrumentation includes a traditional African thumb piano, or kalimba, which produces sweet metallic tones. Between duets, each artist takes turns to play solos. Nibs plays ‘Counting rhythms are catchy and entice the small crowd enough to get out onto the dancefloor. Mili Duncker is getting her rockstar on as she swings low on her bass guitar. Time to refuel before The Mysticcs take the stage. It’s been a while since I last saw these guys perform but Ebi Johnstone is still a guitar god. He’s also still playing lots of psychedelic rock which is good and loud. For the first time tonight, I’m feeling like I’ve got my money-to-decibels’ worth of musical mayhem, and

ken glass, however the ranks come flooding back as soon as Wild Eastern Arches start. And the psych rock band produces another bit of magic. Their energy moves like mercury towards the audience, oozing over flesh and caressing eardrums; part layered psychedelia, part groovy rock ‘n’ roll. The crowd loves them. They also love the night’s last act, The Very Wicked, whose bluesy, neo-psych rock material is supremely seductive in its hypnotic quality. All in all a great success. I’m psyched for the next one.

Warren Glam

Stars’ on a diminutive Puerto Rican Quattro guitar. Simple, repeated basslines embroidered by equally spare melodies accompany husky, meditative vocals as he croons a beautiful hymn to the mysteries of life. Guy Buttery follows on acoustic guitar with a catchy melody, ‘Walking in Both Directions’ and his strumming is interrupted by his technique of unusual slides, bends and staccato cutaways. In the second half of the set, Nibs plays through what he terms “Appalachian banjo music” with an African twist that is reminiscent of the wonderful Putumayo music which first gave contemporary folk artists a showcase. The most interesting performance of the night is a piece called ‘Beautiful Feet’, which is adapted from Brazilian reggae music. The set closes out with a lively instrumental version of the Beatles’ ‘Come Together’. Oddly, this goes well with the otherwise strongly ethnic tenor of the music.

Greg Evans I’m loving it. Johnstone and co. clearly feel the same way and they play with delirious abandon. A good few of the songs they play are either covers or are heavily influenced by Hendrix’s playing style. At one point Johnstone may or may not have been playing his axe with his teeth. Neat as this trick is, the band really needs to work on fine-tuning their original material.

Greg Evans

17


SON OF A 1000 BLUES &Union, Wed 6 Feb

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howling southeaster in the City Bowl makes for a challenging set as Son of a 1000 Blues gets warmed up at &Union tonight. It’s a stripped down gig with only two of the band members performing. Shaun Parsons’ powerful voice rises above the din of conversation and the blustering wind to the tune of ‘Tainted Love’. The vocals change from the rough, dirty tone you’d expect from a nicotine junkie to a dulcimer vibrato which seems to come out of nowhere. Parsons puts on a virtuoso performance that surprises in its range and vocal dynamics. That said, there’s still something a little weird about hearing him sing Adele’s ‘Rolling in the Deep’ as he heads into some serious falsetto before hitting the dirt again. Supporting him on guitar is Federico Fernandez. Although the guitar tones are getting blown around, it’s clear the dude can play. His riffs are tight and played with impressive technical mastery. The duo covers some classic Gold Earring in the form of ‘Radar Love’ before playing their own track ‘Tricky’ which is the highlight for me. The remainder of the set includes covers of ‘Teardrop’ by Massive Attack; ‘Velvet’ which is an original composition but sounds a lot like Led Zeppelin, and, bizarrely, George Michael’s ‘Faith’. There’s little structure to the repertoire. It’s a crazy jukebox mix of sounds which doesn’t really cohere much and, despite the obvious talent of both artists, the set seems uninspired.

ALBUM REVIEWS JACK STONE

Moving House

WALK ONE

SELF-TITLED

IIIII

IIIII

Though garish in its appearance, “Walk On” by Jack Stone (not his real name) is definitely not garish in sound. Based on his AFM interview with Johan Roos – as well as the artwork of the album – Jack Stone is a solo singer/songwriter with accompaniment by various artists of his choosing. Having played for bands such as Cherry and filling in for Reburn on bass, Jack decided to begin his own career in earnest shortly before signing to the US label, Stone Studios. The album is extremely well mastered for a first time offering, probably as a result of international ears and equipment. Jack’s guitar is often accompanied by a vast array of instruments, the complete effect comparable to early Bruce Springsteen, with piano and guitar working together seamlessly against the tight-knit rhythm of the drums, bass and vocals. Speaking of vocals, Jack’s voice is probably the most striking aspect of his sound. One could even be mistaken into thinking his voice has been tampered with by modern technology – but it’s not so; listeners can witness the full extent of his vocal talents during the album’s closing track, ‘Grace’. To top it all off, there’s a CD-ROM video to play on your computer, guaranteed to awaken the ‘90s kid in all of us.

Moving House is a natural progression for Andre Gideon Montgomery Pienaar and Rob Davidson. The amalgamation of their talents has produced a breath-taking product. Formed in 2011, Moving House has taken this long to release an album because the project came to life across the internet – and if my bandwidth is anything to go by, I’m surprised it didn’t take much longer. The first single, ‘Tongue In Cheek’, has a distinct M83 electronica dream pop feel about it, the ambient emotive synths are reigned in by the drum line, with AGMP’s vocals adding further rhythmic nuances to the track. Lyrically, all the tracks are saturated with deep, emotional metaphor, a significant part of AGMP’s songwriting appeal. The anthemic ‘Body for a Hole’ is hauntingly beautiful with powerful, soaring vocal harmonies that guarantee goosebumps when viewed live. The inclusion of ChianoSky on ‘Down There’ is inspired, the maturity of her vocal talent a consummate match for AGMP’s brooding baritone, while RD’s uplifting chord progressions keep the songs strolling on the sunnier side of Melancholy Avenue. My favourite track on the album is ‘The Best Sex’ by far. It wouldn’t be an AGMP composition without the mention of sex. As he so succinctly declares “the best sex is always in excess” it seems, say I, after the twentieth repeat, the same could apply to Moving House.

Adrian Davies

Angela Weickl

Greg Evans

CROC-E MOSES

+ JERI SILVERMAN + LUCY KRUGER + SADHU SENSI The Waiting Room, Wed 13 FEB

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feel like I’ve wandered into a Pulp Fiction rendering of an Arabian love story at Waiting Room for tonight’s Valentine’s Day gig. The decor is a Bedouin mix of damask-patterned cushions and amber lighting, whereas the pre-show music courtesy of Sadhu Sensi is an eclectic playlist of things like Space and Cat Stevens. The evening’s first performer is Croc-E Moses and he looks pretty unassuming in his flops, and checked shorts. However by the end of his first song, the folk performer’s drawn everyone in with his hypnotic guitar lines, the majestic flow of his slam poetry, and his provocative, socio-political words. Anti-folk artist, Jeri Silverman goes on after him and compliments the exotic setting very well with her dark hair and olive green skirt. But more importantly than that, she manages to hook every listener with music that’s catchy, presumably commercially viable but more crucially, sincere. Next up is Lucy Kruger – a talented performer whose live set sounds better than I’ve ever heard it. And that’s largely because after months of adding and subtracting things, she’s found two people who’ve helped her shape her identity as a folk-y rock artist onstage. Andre Leo and Lucas Swart do this through their guitar-ing, backing vocals and the simple percussive elements they lay down. I hope LK sticks with them.

Warren Glam

22

The Bone Collectors BLACK LOVE IIIII

DAS KAPITAL All Trades IIIII

Crazy saxophone, manic vocals and knives: these have been the staples of Cape Town’s favourite unusual musicians. The Bone Collectors’ new full-length has been well captured at Fresh Meat Studios in Durbanville, with even the smallest nuances and sounds brought forth into the spotlight. The mood constantly dips and climbs, from songs about the graveside to ‘The Rhapsody of John Wayne’ – and even a song entitled ‘The Bar Slag Of Your Dreams’. Black Love’s minimalist album cover and inspired artwork by Baden Moir add to the dark-yet-cheery feel of the album. The Bone Collectors sound like the bastard children of Tom Waits and Squirrel Nut Zippers. But their sound is definitely their own, despite obvious influences. The use of bones and knives in conjunction with sax and guitar blend in an astonishingly powerful way, as heard on the track ‘ID Boogie!’ Collaborations with Sixgun Gospel’s mouth organist, Murray Hunter, and Nomadic Orchestra’s Joe Bolton on the Tuba are tasty side dishes to an already full plate of sound. The heavy hitters of the Dirty Bounce family, The Bone Collectors should have no problem punting this album to nearly every crazed music fan across the peninsula, and even beyond.

Das Kapital chose to release his music on his own terms and created a label (with manager Tim Medcraft) called DO WORK RECORDINGS. The first release, Free Trades EP went live on 27 January 2013 with “All Trades” released 3 weeks later. His work ethic is borderline obsessive: he either never sleeps or is a most convincing somnambulist. The result however, makes the aforementioned speculation inconsequential. Unbound by the constraints of genre or conformity, his grasp on sonic creativity is prodigal. ‘PSYCH’ is a prank call directed at the trance heads that are tricked into dancing to a dubstep breakdown disguised by a psytrance intro. Alex Mills features on ‘Reverse & Rewind’, with hints of Durban house flooded by a more commercial electro house progression. It slots this track neatly into Beatport Top 10 style territory and is probably the most broadly relatable track for DK’s burgeoning target market. ‘Amsterdam Rubberband’ is by far my favourite track. Collaborating with Dutch producer Revero it is the track I’ve gotten the best response for, when played in a DJ set. ‘White Room’ stands out on the EP like the really pretty girl with a mouth full of braces. Perfection takes time and perseverance, two things Das Kapital has in excess.

Adrian Davies

Angela Weickl


LMG #70 March 2013  

Latest music news, gig reviews, event venues and features on South African musicians.

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