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A publication of the York County Economic Alliance January/February 2017

YCEA Welcomes Our New President KEVIN J. SCHREIBER

| OPEC, Energy and You | Restaurant Week York


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ISSUE: 1611 1701 ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance


TABLE OF CONTENTS

144 Roosevelt Avenue York, PA 17401 P: 717.848.4000 F: 717.843.8837 146 Carlisle Street Hanover, PA 17331 P: 717.637.6130 F: 717.637.9127

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2017 Restaurant Week York

LEADERSHIP STAFF Kevin J. Schreiber President & CEO Katie Lentz Executive Vice President Nancy Barry Vice President, Operations & CFO

CONTACT INFORMATION

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W  elcome President Kevin J. Schreiber

Publisher, Tracy Hoffmann Hoffmann Publishing Group, Inc. 2921 Windmill Road Reading, PA 19608 HoffmannPublishing.com 610.685.0914

ADVERTISING Sherry Bolinger, 610.685.0914 x202 Sherry@Hoffpubs.com View the Digital Version of York County Connect online at www.ycea-pa.org The opinions expressed in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced electronically or in print without the express written permission of the publisher. York Chamber Connect is published bi-monthly.

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The Innovation Imperative in Higher Education

Also In This Issue: Wish You Were Beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Wine in 2017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 YCEA Welcomes New Staff Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Advocacy Priorities 2017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 OPEC, Energy and You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Veterans' Expo & Job Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 YCEA 2017 Small Business of the Year Award Nominations . . . . . 21 Welcome New Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Community Resource: Government Office Phone Numbers & Websites You Should Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Cover photo by Harrison Sallada, Marketing Coordinator The York County Economic Alliance is the place to start for companies seeking a competitive edge. As York County’s official chamber and economic development organization, it is the resource center that connects businesses to specialized funding, business services, advocacy programs and events that will help their business thrive. The mission of the York County Economic Alliance is to lead economic growth, connect local businesses to resources and each other and advocate for business and the community to create a prosperous York County.

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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LETTERPRESIDENT’S FROM THE CHAIRMAN MESSAGE

Turning a Chapter in One’s Life… BY KEVIN J. SCHREIBER| PRESIDENT & CEO, YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE

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his is my first Chamber Connect submission as the President & CEO of the York County Economic Alliance. Thank you to the confidence and trust of the leadership and team at the York County Economic Alliance for permitting me such an amazing opportunity. As I turn a page in my life and flip to the next, I am incredibly excited to join the YCEA. This esteemed organization exists to enhance and improve York County. The YCEA has a stellar team of employees, board leadership and an army of volunteers. It is alongside all of these individuals, I look forward to the work ahead to continue to position York County as the premiere place to do business, to reside in, recreate and ultimately, to invest in. YCEA is a lead agent for positive change and growth in York County as well as the chief celebrant of all her attributes. YCEA not only bolsters business but it serves as the chief connector, spotting occasions to connect people or business to opportunity. We are the clearinghouse for development and did you know we have a pretty strong finance portfolio to assist in business expansion? We have so much going in our favor that I am excited and incredibly optimistic for what lies ahead. Undoubtedly, there will be challenges but the York

community has consistently proven that it can surmount any hurdle and best any challenge. Check out our social media to see all of what we are up to. We are on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and maybe someday we’ll figure out Snapchat. To work within one’s community to improve that community is a special charge in life. As I view the lens of my life and ask myself where can my efforts be the most impactful, I am ever more eager, excited and grateful for the opportunities and work that awaits at the YCEA. We cannot be successful if our members are not successful. As I reach out to hear from you, please don’t hesitate to provide us feedback, as well. York has given me so many amazing opportunities. I received my education at York College and then further at Penn State, I met my wife, I served our City and Commonwealth, I have made some incredible friendships and worked alongside tremendously talented people. Collectively, as a County we continue to accomplish great things with only more ahead. I am forever grateful, York, for the chance you’ve given me to continue serving you. I won’t let you down. n

“As I view the lens of my life and ask myself where can my efforts be the most impactful, I am ever more eager, excited and grateful for the opportunities and work that awaits at the YCEA. — KEVIN J. SCHREIBER

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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Presented by Fulton Bank

It’s about the food. by Meagan Feeser, Chief Marketing & Development Officer, Downtown Inc

THE TASTIEST TIME OF THE YEAR IN YORK CITY RETURNS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 THROUGH SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2017.

It’s the Seventh Annual Restaurant Week York, presented by Fulton Bank, and it’s your chance to experience the best food that York City has to offer with special menus just for Restaurant Week. Restaurant Week York is the biggest culinary celebration our town has ever experienced. It’s the time to visit the restaurant you’ve always wanted to try and return once again to the neighborhood spot you’ve loved for years. No matter where you rest your fork, you’ll be part of a city-wide celebration of our great establishments and talented chefs who serve up fresh, innovative cuisine every day. When it’s Restaurant Week, it’s all about the food.


FOOD & RESTAURANTS

Otto's Kitchen and Cocktails

HOW IT WORKS:

Go global with a stop at Mi Caldero (605 S. George Street) — Restaurant Week attendees go mad for the empanadillas, Mofongo and of course, flan for dessert! Continue your global food journey at Esaan Thai Restaurant (30 N. Beaver Street). Whether you go the curry or stir fry route, you can’t miss with their Restaurant Week lunch and dinner specials.

Start your Restaurant Week mornings off with breakfast or brunch at spots like Central Family Restaurant (400 N. George Street) and their famous Banana Bread French Toast or Steak and Eggs Breakfast Specials. You can also start your Restaurant Week mornings off gluttonously with the 8th Deadly Cinn from Pepper’s Grille at Central Market (34 W. Philadelphia Street): a Maple Bacon Wrapped Cinnamon roll, cut like a sandwich and stuffed with bacon or sausage, a fried egg and melted cheese, then topped with cream cheese icing. Or try out one of York’s hottest new restaurants for brunch: Otto’s Kitchen and Cocktails (19 N. George Street). Their Steak and Eggs Benedict is a new downtown favorite.

Fine dining restaurants like The Left Bank Restaurant and Bar, Roosevelt Tavern, Tutoni’s and York Blue Moon offer three course tasting menus featuring an appetizer, entrée and dessert at the $40 price point. Starting with The Left

Enjoy breakfast and lunch specials at participating restaurants for $5, $10 or $15. Dive into dinner specials for $20, $30 or $40. This year, Restaurant Week York participants will also offer at least one menu item that is a “Restaurant Week only” item, available only during Restaurant Week!

Enjoy breakfast and lunch specials for $5, $10 or $15. Dive into dinner specials for $20, $30 or $40.

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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FOOD & RESTAURANTS Bank’s tater tots, candied peppered bacon, onion fig jam and truffled hollandaise aioli and ending with their chocolate mousse cake? That’s Restaurant Week York done right. Downtown bakeries and cafes join in the Restaurant Week fun too, with spots like The Green Bean Roasting Company (100 S. Beaver Street) offering Restaurant Weekonly specialty coffee drinks like their legendary Nutella Mocha: Decadent Nutella blended with espresso and steamed milk, topped with whipped cream. Restaurant Week York is also the time to try Restaurant Week-only exclusives, only available this time of year! Visit York City Pretzel Company (39 W. Market Street) for their fan-favorite Pretzel Wings, famous cheese sauce and a pinch of cheddar stuffed inside a two-bite pretzel nugget served with house-made blue cheese dip, and Pretizzas: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano and a hint of garlic wrapped in signature pretzel dough served with scratchmade pizza sauce. Make sure to join in the Restaurant Week York feeding frenzy on social media by posting photos of your Restaurant Week York adventures to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #rwyork. Visit www.rwyork.com for full details. Restaurant Week menus will be revealed February 1, 2017. Be sure to Like Restaurant Week York PA on Facebook for real-time updates. n

2016’S RESTAURANT WEEK “WINNERS,” AS VOTED BY DINERS Best Breakfast: TIE! The Copper Crust Company & Glazin’ Best Lunch: York City Pretzel Company Best Dinner: The Left Bank Restaurant & Bar Best Bang for Your Buck: Coomb’s Tavern Best Dessert: Glazin’ Best Place for a Quick Bite: Baron Von Schwein

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YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


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FOOD & RESTAURANTS

It will be a Brewtiful year for York County… wish you were Beer!

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by Matthew Davis, Uncle Traveling Matt’s Brewing Expedition

URE, YOU CAN PLOP DOWN AT YOUR FAVORITE WATERING HOLE and order the beer of your choice but don’t you deserve something a little better? Something a little...tastier? I’ve done several beer-pairing events and dinners, and the secret is, you can pair almost any beer you like with almost any food you like and it’s going to taste good. However, if you aren’t convinced, here’s a list of things you can do this year that bring those things together. Sometimes paired, sometimes not, but always delicious and refreshing (trust me, I’ve enjoyed all of them).

THERE’S GUINNESS IN IT FEBRUARY 2ND Take a dozen local restaurants, give them one beer and one year to figure it out and this is what you get. Discover a variety of sweet and savory Guinness-inspired delicacies as you roam through historic Central Market. Guinness BBQ sauce, Guinness chocolate infused drizzle, Guinness marinades… it’s all here and it’s all very tasty.

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WHAT THE FOOD TRUCKS

SWEETEST PINT

LABOR DAY SUNDAY

MARCH 25TH & NOVEMBER 11TH

One of the largest food truck gatherings in the country, What The Food Truck is 40 regional trucks in beautiful Penn Park with a surprisingly curated and plentiful craft beer selection in the middle (curated by yours truly). The burden of pairing is on you this time, but you can grab a beer and roam around to all the trucks so I’m confident you will find something amazing.

Hosted by Downtown Inc, Sweetest Pint sets you and your group on a tasty tour of downtown eateries with specially prepared dishes and beer pairings. The guides are great (especially when it’s me leading), the beer is paired well, you get a souvenir glass, and samples of some of the best oneoff food creations of the year.

YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


FOOD & RESTAURANTS

Wine in 2017 Ted Potter, W  inemaker, Naylor Wine Cellars

S WITH EACH HARVEST YEAR IN SOUTH CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA, IT IS UNIQUE, SOME BETTER THAN OTHERS. The spring was cool and wet and then things warmed

up and turned dry. It grew hot and the vines did not have a chance to respire, ripening which originally was thought to be early backed off and seemed to fall into its’ normal range. Soon more rain came occasionally and it warmed up again. What is the bottom line you may ask? Operating as a winery since 1978 to date, there isn’t much of the weather patterns that hasn’t been seen before and thank goodness for that. The experience has taught us not to be to zealous and not to be too down on the results of growing grapes under these conditions. Rosés do grow in many environments. Some of the highlights to be mentioned at this point:

1. The 2016 NOUVEAU was released on November 1, 2016, just in time for the holiday season

2. The long awaited ESSENCE, a “port style” dessert wine, was released no later than December 15, 2016

3. A sparkling Bubbles Galore Niagara, sweet and grapey, will dance lightly on your palate and is ready for your enjoyment

4. A “Super” Riesling Blend has been released just before the

Christmas Holidays (this is a blend of White Riesling, Kerner, Scheurbe and Ortega) What a gift for holiday friends!

The 2015 Chambourcin is one of the finest that has released in many a year. You must taste this dry, full bodied red wine to believe it was produced right here in southern York County. Another treat is the new Rosé, done in the old world style, off dry and fit for holiday fare! Thank goodness for experience, Mother Nature and our Lord and Savior! Start the new year off right with a taste from Naylor Wine Cellars in southern York County.

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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ADVOCACY

YCEA Welcomes… KYLE R. JOINES AS COMMUNITY RELATIONS & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Kyle grew up in York, PA and graduated from York County School of Technology (YCST) in June of 2008. “At YCST, I studied Computer Programming, where I learned advanced computer skills and programming techniques” Kyle R. Joines he said. “I'm grateful for the opportunity to have learned a trade in High School. The knowledge I've gained has helped me become a more well rounded professional." Through leadership opportunities and extracurricular involvement at YCST, Kyle found his passion for writing and working with people. He went on to graduate from York College of Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations. As a local Yorker, he fell in love with the York Community and turned his focus to giving back and making a difference in York. During his time at YCP, Kyle found himself getting involved with numerous campus and community organizations. During his senior year, Kyle was elected President of the Student Senate and utilized the position to build a strong relationship between York College and the City of York. "As a senior, I attained the position of President of the Student Senate. The student body was eager for the college to have a strong relationship with the City of York" he said. "I envisioned a community where students would walk about downtown, check out the local shops and boutiques and truly become a part of the downtown experience. We brought this vision to a reality by hosting and supporting events throughout downtown York for students." During Kyle's senior year at York College he interned with the then Director of Economic and Community Development for the City of York, Kevin Schreiber, and worked on Kevin's campaign for State Representative of the 95th Legislative District. After Kevin's victory, Kyle went on to work for the 95th Legislative District for over 3 years. Kyle is looking forward to working to make a difference in the York Community which has always been one of his greatest passions. “We are blessed with a vibrant county

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which possesses strong industrial roots and is full of truly incredible people. I’m looking forward to utilizing my background in State Government and Community Relations to help serve the community through my role at the YCEA” he says. n

SULLY PINOS AS COMMUNITY OUTREACH & MULTI-CULTURAL AFFAIRS MANAGER Sully, pronounced like Julie with the letter S, grew up in Brooklyn, NY. She attended St. John’s University to study Political Science. She moved to York four years ago to work on President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign. While out on the campaign trail, she fell in love with Sully Pinos the concept of being able to help people and the opportunity to truly make a difference in someone’s life. Most recently, she served as the Chief of Staff for then State Representative Kevin Schreiber for three years after working on his campaign. With a strong commitment for the community, she serves on several boards and coalitions all aimed towards improving our York community and the commonwealth as a whole, such as York County Literacy Council, Community Progress Council, York County Hispanic Coalition, and Junior League of York among others. “Getting involved in the community is one of the most important parts of civic engagement. With such a diverse and caring community, it’s incumbent on us to give back” she says. She looks forward to establishing new relationships throughout the York community & supporting workforce development efforts to attract, retain and grow a diverse and employable workforce. In her free time, Sully enjoys running and recently completed her first marathon, the New York City Marathon, raising funds for Parkinson’s Research in her grandfather’s name. Sully lives in the City of York with her two Shih Tzu dogs, Sandy and Luigi. Sully has a strong relationship with her family and visits them in New York as frequently as possible. n Kyle R. Joines Sully Pinos kjoines@ycea-pa.org spinos@ycea-pa.org www.ycea-pa.org 144 Roosevelt Ave, Ste 100 | York, PA 17401

YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


ADVOCACY

Advocacy Priorities 2017 by Shanna M. Terroso, RCE, e -PRO® Chair, YCEA Advocacy Committee

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hat happens in your local municipality, in Harrisburg or in Washington D.C. can have an immediate impact on your business and on York’s economy. The Economic Alliance is your voice advocating for the policies that foster economic growth, jobs, and new opportunities for your organization.

In addition an Advocacy Priorities survey went out in December to gauge membership concerns and direct our advocacy efforts for 2017. Stay tuned for our focus areas in future communications.

We advocate for businesses of all sizes and across all industries. Whether it’s workforce development, tax competitiveness, healthcare reform, or economic development, we’re engaged in every step of the legislative process to ensure that your voice is heard.

In addition, the following are examples of demonstrated advocacy in action, from our support of alcohol sales expansion, the Pennsylvania Fairness Act, and reporting to the Public Utility Commission our findings from the 717 area code change survey that was distributed to members. As a direct result of our involvement, we are happy to report the PUC heard our member’s concerns and York County will be maintaining our 717 area code, saving businesses thousands of dollars.

For the year ahead we are looking to form a regional agenda with Harrisburg and Lancaster so that our chamber voice is stronger in Pennsylvania and the federal level. The hope is for the regional agenda to be launched at the start of 2017.

As we move forward into the New Year, I would encourage all of our members to reach out to the Economic Alliance staff or myself on advocacy issues that are important to your organization. Let’s work together to make our chamber voice stronger than ever in 2017. n

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1701 ISSUE: 1611 YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017 ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance

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ADVOCACY

Innovation Imperative The

in Higher Education

Dominic DelliCarpini 

Dean, Center for Community Engagement and Naylor Endowed Professor of Writing Studies, York College of Pennsylvania

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YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


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ADVOCACY

n the midst of the various forms of uncertainty that face the higher education community, one thing is certain: innovating the methods we use to prepare students for their futures as citizens and workers is an imperative.

As former Secretary of Education Richard Riley famously suggested, we are educating students for “jobs that don’t yet exist” and for “technologies that haven’t been invented… in order to solve problems we don’t even know are problems yet.” To educate students ready to take on these challenges, colleges and universities must themselves become hubs of — and for — innovation. Of course, innovation is impossible without risk. As Educause, a nonprofit organization committed to advancing higher education through the use of information technology, has pointed out, the “improvement” mentality is different in kind from “innovation.” Innovation does not build incrementally upon past attempts (often with “diminishing returns”); it risks crossing chasms, taking leaps that are inherently dangerous — but which at the same time offer the

potential for transformative change. Such leaps are not natural for the time-worn institutions of higher education, which have long relied upon a successful — but relatively unchanging — model of education. Indeed, over a century ago, the American pragmatist John Dewey noted that “education is almost entirely dominated by the medieval conception of learning” and does not appeal adequately to “our impulses to make, to do, to create, to produce, whether in the form of utility or art.” That, however, is beginning to change with a new generation of students, with new forms of technology, and with our broader understanding of higher education. So, what should we be looking for in higher education in the year(s) ahead? Here are some of the most likely innovations:

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We will see more attention to what Dewey called the impulse to “make” and to “do” — attention that is being demonstrated by higher education’s interest in developing interactive, hands-on learning and makerspaces. In those spaces, we will provide students the physical and technological tools to solve problems and create new products, often in groups.

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We will see an “unbundling” of educational offerings. While there is little doubt that defined programs of study will continue to exist (at least in the near term), we will continue to see smaller, more point-of-need offerings that allow both traditional and non-traditional age students to learn specific skills, techniques, and ways of thinking. This will take the form of certificate programs that combine targeted courses, seminars, and individual courses, offered both online and in residence to individuals at all stages of life and career.

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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ADVOCACY

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We will see silos breaking down between disciplines, helping students see the connections between their areas of study through courses and programs that help them solve problems by applying several modes of thought to the same problem. For example, sustainability is a topic that requires thinking processes of ethics, science, business, and human behavior.

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We will see more collaboration across institutions, both through formal mergers and by offering the expertise available through the human resources of one college to students attending other institutions. This will make education at once more efficient and more effective. Already, we have seen consortia of schools forming to offer a wider range of possibilities.

We will see a renewed attention to the core thinking skills of the Liberal Arts. While STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math) have received the most attention in the last decade, a movement toward including the creative thinking of the arts (recently dubbed STEAM curricula) is growing. Even beyond that, colleges and employers are beginning to see the limitations of narrow training as we face problems that “we don’t even know are problems yet.” A return to core skills — critical thinking, communication, global awareness, and wide literacies — will allow for nimble workers.

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We will see an even greater attention to experiential and community-based learning, with the boundary between the campus and the community growing ever more porous. Our students will learn in both locations, bringing their experiences with local companies and organizations to our classrooms as case studies, and their classroom learning out into the community. With this, a new version of the “apprentice” model will emerge, as called for by Richard P Keeling and Richard H. Hersh in We’re Losing our Minds.

We will see a rich blend of residential and online learning. While online courses can add a great deal of value to the educational picture, we are also finding that many desirable job and personal skills still require face-to-face learning. From this combination will emerge a new model for higher education that neither sees time-in-seats as a central measure of credits, nor eschews completely the need for physical interaction in spaces that are reserved for focused learning on our campuses.

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We will see a greater focus upon teamwork, helping our students to see that learning is not an individual pursuit, but one that is enriched by interaction with diverse participants in conversation, shared goals, and shared problem-solving.

YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


ADVOCACY

The students who are coming to us in higher education bring with them new attitudes, new goals, and new skills. They are not receptacles for information, but rather strive for what Dewey called “productive activity.” “The tragic weakness of the present school,” wrote Dewey over a century ago, “is that it endeavors to prepare future members of the social order in a medium in which the conditions of the social spirit are eminently wanting.” On the other hand, Dewey went on to say, “where active work is going on, all this is changed,” resulting in “a spirit of free communication, of interchange of ideas, of suggestions and results” where both successes and failures are valued as tools for innovative thinking.

For those institutions that innovate toward the goals of active, interdisciplinary, community-based, and collaborative forms of learning — and who nurture innovation in our students — the future is bright. For those who cling to old ways, perhaps not so. We will see in the year(s) ahead, just what (and who) emerges from this brave new world of higher education. n Dominic DelliCarpini is Dean of the Center for Community Engagement and Naylor Endowed Professor of Writing Studies at York College of Pennsylvania. Incoming President of the National Council of Writing Program Administrators, he has published four textbooks on writing, including most pertinently Composing a Life’s Work: Writing, Citizenship, and your Occupation.

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

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ADVOCACY

OPEC, Energy and You

Laura Bretz, Marketing Coordinator, Shipley Energy

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he Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is a permanent organization and was created at the Baghdad Conference on September 10–14, 1960, by Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Currently there are 12 membernations: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. The group’s goal is to organize and unite petroleum policies among the Members to keep prices secure and fair for petroleum producers. Another goal is to maintain an efficient, cost-effective, and regular supply of petroleum to nations that consume it, and to ensure that those that invest in the petroleum industry get a fair return. There are several positive and negative points to the latest OPEC agreement.

PROS:

• It is a forum to create decisions and relieves some aspects of potential conflict • Controlling costs allows member nations to develop more quickly. In the case of Algeria, which is a member of OPEC, oil exports as of 2004 accounted for 40% of the GDP and almost 50% of the country’s employment. • A unified effort reduces stress from a chaotic competitive market • Ensures a stable supply of oil for consumers (opec.pbworks.com)

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CONS:

• There is no way to ensure accountability of the members • OPEC controlled oil prices are not subject to natural supply and demand. Since 2008, Iran has been pumping oil close to their maximum capacity and as a result, we have seen the lowest inflation adjusted oil prices in decades. • Increased crude prices have a negative impact on almost every aspect of life in developed countries. Higher fuel costs translate into higher costs of goods and services.

RECENT AGREEMENT IMPACTS SUPPLY AND PRICING

The oil cartel reached a unanimous decision on Wednesday, November 30 to cut its production by 1.2 million barrels per day. This is the first time the group has been able to reach a consensus among its members since 2008. After the deal was created, its impact was felt immediately as crude oil prices soared by almost 9%. One key piece of the agreement relies on the cooperation of major non-OPEC producers who must cut their own production by a combined 600,000 barrels a day for at least six months. Russia, who is not a member of OPEC, has agreed to slash its production by 300,000 barrels a day. This is the first time since 2001 that Russia has joined OPEC in an attempt to boost petroleum prices. According to Reuters, OPEC and non-OPEC producers will be reducing their output by approximately 2% of the total world output.

YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org


ADVOCACY “In the past, buy-in from OPEC member nations has been suspect in making a long-term production cut successful. However, Russia now has joined the fold adding credence and validity to the deal, specifically in the eyes of the member nations,” states Zach Harrell, Manager of Wholesale Operations for Shipley Energy. Mohammed bin Saleh al-Sada, OPEC president, said the agreement had been made “for the general wellbeing and the health of the world economy.” There was fear that a sudden collapse in oil prices would cause a new supply shortage in a few years. The goal of the agreement is to rebalance the market and to entice the industry to reinvest in new production capacity and to ensure that there is supply left for the future. There is concern that the recent agreement will result in higher costs for all petroleum in the United States. The worry is sound, given the sharp increase the day that the agreement was reached. If there is one benefit to the United States, it is that the agreement coincides with the largest deposit of oil ever discovered in the US, near Mammoth, Texas.

NEW DOMESTIC OIL RESOURCE UNCOVERED

Geologists say a new survey shows the Midland Basin of the Wolfcamp Shale area is now estimated to have 20 billion barrels of oil and 1.6 billion barrels of natural gas. It is three times larger than the assessment of the oil in the mammoth Bakken formation in North Dakota. Oil has been produced in the area since the Texas oil boom of the 1980s, but now companies are using horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to tap the continuous oil reserve. More than 3,000 horizontal wells are currently operating, according to the USGS. Morris Burns, a former president of the Permian Basin Petroleum Association, said that the low price of oil — currently around $46 a barrel — means the oil will sit underground for the foreseeable future.

ISSUE: 1701 CORE DESIGN ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance COMPREHENSIVE

HEART AND VASCULAR CAMERA READY: 1701 CARE, CLOSE TO HOME.

Hanover aa HEART Hanover Hospital Hospital is is now now providing providing HEART AD SIZE CONTRACTED: 1/4 V comprehensive comprehensive menu menu of of heart heart and and PCI PCI DIMENSIONS: 3.5625 " w x 4.833" h Percutaneous vascular Percutaneous vascular services. services. Coronary PDF EXPORT SETTINGS Coronary •• PCI Intervention -- the of aa stent during COMPATABILITY: 5 (PDFplacing 1.4) | STANDARDS | GENERAL: Optimize PDF: Off; Create Acrobat Layers: N/A; Export Layers: Intervention PCI Acrobat the placing of COMPLIANCE: stentNone during Visible anda Layers; Include Bookmarks: Off; Include Hyperlinks: Off; Export Nonprinting Objects: Off; Export Visible Guides and Baseline Grids: Off; heart attack aPrintable heart attack Create Tagged PDF: Off; Interactive Elements: Do Not Include | COMPRESSION: COLOR IMAGES: Bicubic Downsample at: 300 ppi for images above: 450 ABDOMEN ppi; Compression: ZIP; Tile Size: N/A; Quality: 8 Bit GRAYSCALE IMAGES: Bicubic Downsample at: 300ABDOMEN ppi for images above: 450 ppi; Compression: ZIP; Tile •• EVAR -- aneurysm repair Size: N/A; Quality: 8 Bit MONOCHROME IMAGES: No Sampling Change that for images above: 1250 ppi; Compression: CCITT Group 4; Compress Text and Line Art: EVAR aneurysm repair that EVAR EVAR On; Crop Image Data to Frames: On | OUTPUT: Colorof Conversion: Convert to Destination; Destination:Endovascular Document CMYK - U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2; Profile prevents ruptures the aorta Endovascular prevents ruptures of aorta Inclusion Policy: Don’t Include Profiles; Simulate Overprint: N/A;the Output Intent Profile Name: N/A; Output Condition: N/A; Output Condition Identifier: N/A; Registry Aneurysm Aneurysm Name:•N/A | ADVANCED: Subset Fonts Below: 0%; Omit PDF: Off; Omit EPS: Off; Omit Bitmap Images: Off; Transparency Flattener Preset: N/A Repair • PVD Repair PVD -- evaluation evaluation and and treatment treatment with with angioplasty angioplasty and and stents stents LEGS LEGS No No more more traveling... traveling... top-notch top-notch PVD PVD heart Peripheral heart and and vascular vascular care care is is available available Peripheral Vascular Vascular right right here, here, close close to to home. home. Disease Disease

“We are picking up a few rigs every now and then but we won’t see it really take off until we (get) that price in the $60 to $65 range,” Burns said. So, while the price of a barrel of crude will eventually rise, it does make it profitable for United States oil companies to compete on the global market, leading to more jobs for American workers and a boom to the economies of oil producing states. n

At At the the

of of good good health. health.

HanoverHospital.org

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017 ISSUE: 1701

HANOVER

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ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance


ADVOCACY

April 20, 2017 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. York Expo Center

Memorial Hall East • 334 Carlisle Ave., York

Sponsor and exhibitor applications now being accepted — reserve today! They served us — now let us serve them! At the Expo

Veterans Benefits Community Services Products and Services Available Support/Assistance Programs Education/Training Services

At the Job Fair

Employers Job Counseling Workshop/Seminars Resume Writing Assistance

This event is in support of veterans of all ages, active military, and their families.

To become a sponsor or exhibitor, please contact your account representative, call (717) 285-1350, or email info@onlinepub.com

Brought to you by:

717.285.1350

www.VeteransExpo.com

Y

YCEAtoHOUSE AD — ork County is home more than VETERANS 34,000 veterans — many of whom need help accessing the benefits they have earned and reaching the job opportunities they deserve. PDF EXPORT SETTINGS

ISSUE: 1701 ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance

The Veterans’ Expo connects active and retired military members of CAMERA READY: 1701 all ages and their families with the andFP resources available to ADbenefits SIZE CONTRACTED: No Bleed DIMENSIONS: 7.375" w x 9.875" h them through local communityservice providers, healthcare In this spirit, area businesses and professionals, VA benefits counselors, organizations are urged to participate VFWs, and American Legions, plus in the third annual Veterans’ Expo & businesses covering everything Job Fair — York, which will return to from home improvement, legal the York Expo Center from 9 a.m. to services, and finance to retirement 2 p.m. Thursday, April 20, 2017. living and insurance. COMPATABILITY: Acrobat 5 (PDF 1.4) | STANDARDS COMPLIANCE: None | GENERAL: Optimize PDF: Off; Create Acrobat Layers: N/A; Export Layers: Visible and Printable Layers; Include Bookmarks: Off; Include Hyperlinks: Off; Export Nonprinting Objects: Off; Export Visible Guides and Baseline Grids: Off; Create Tagged PDF: Off; Interactive Elements: Do Not Include | COMPRESSION: COLOR IMAGES: Bicubic Downsample at: 300 ppi for images above: 450 ppi; Compression: ZIP; Tile Size: N/A; Quality: 8 Bit GRAYSCALE IMAGES: Bicubic Downsample at: 300 ppi for images above: 450 ppi; Compression: ZIP; Tile Size: N/A; Quality: 8 Bit MONOCHROME IMAGES: No Sampling Change for images above: 1250 ppi; Compression: CCITT Group 4; Compress Text and Line Art: On; Crop Image Data to Frames: On | OUTPUT: Color Conversion: Convert to Destination; Destination: Document CMYK - U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2; Profile Inclusion Policy: Don’t Include Profiles; Simulate Overprint: N/A; Output Intent Profile Name: N/A; Output Condition: N/A; Output Condition Identifier: N/A; Registry Name: N/A | ADVANCED: Subset Fonts Below: 0%; Omit PDF: Off; Omit EPS: Off; Omit Bitmap Images: Off; Transparency Flattener Preset: N/A

Presented by OLP Events, the two-inone event comprises both an expo and a job fair; admission is free to the public.

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In addition, the Job Fair provides an opportunity for veterans and employers to meet face-to-face

YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org

to discuss available positions. A Resource Center will be staffed by representatives providing assistance with relevant topics, such as resume writing, information on VA benefits and Medicare, mock interviews, and guidance on small-business ownership for veterans, women, and the disabled.

Exhibitor and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, call (717) 285-1350, email info@onlinepub.com, or visit www.veteransexpo.com.


GUIDE

It’s time to think about who you’ll nominate for the

YCEA 2017

SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD NOMINEE REQUIREMENTS:

1. A member of the York County Economic Alliance for at least one year. 2. Locally owned and privately held business. 3. No more than 100 full-time employees. 4. In business, under current management, for a minimum of three successive years.

The nominee should demonstrate its aid to the community through use of personnel or financial resources, including examples of leadership and achievements in community affairs and staff community involvement.

FINANCES:

GROWTH IN:

1. Employees: Demonstrates impact on local employment market. 2. Sales Volume: Indication of continued growth – total sales must not exceed $10 million.

INVOLVEMENT:

CONTRIBUTIONS:

The nominee should demonstrate involvement through membership in professional, business and/or trade associations.

Nominees must submit financial information for each of the previous three years. This includes a Profit & Loss Statement for 2014, 2015, 2016, and any description needed to explain unique aspects of the financials. This information will remain confidential and will be reviewed ONLY by an independent financial auditor.

RECOGNITION

The Small Business of the Year winner will be given the Tower of Strength Award and honored during the Economic Alliance’s Annual Dinner on Friday, April 28, 2017. The award winner will receive publicity in the program, through various local media outlets, York Chamber Connect Magazine, www.ycea-pa.org and more.

Please contact Mary Walker at 717.771.4574 or MWalker@YCEA-PA.org for nomination forms and more information YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

21


GUIDE

PREVIOUS SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNERS 2016:  CBY Systems, Inc. 2015:  Gavin Advertising 2014:  DOCEO Office Solutions 2013:  Site Design Concepts, Inc.

2012:  Paragon Engineering Services, Inc. 2011:  Gamlet, Inc. 2010:  First Capital Engineering 2009:  Bailey Coach

The Graham Innovation Scholars are joining the merchants of York’s Central Market with the first student-run retail business in York!

Spartan Central

Delivering the spirit of York College to York’s Central Market.

WWW.YCP.EDU/GRAHAM-SCHOLARS

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YORK COUNTY ISSUE: ECONOMIC ALLIANCE www.ycea-pa.org 1701

YORK COLLEGE

ORG/PUB: York County Economic Alliance

2008:  White Rose Bar & Grill 2007:  Real Services, Inc. 2006:  Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects 2005:  Do It Outdoors / dio 2004:  Golenco Contractors, Inc. 2003:  Keener Kitchen Mfg. Co. 2002:  C.S. Davidson, Inc. 2001:  Keystruct Construction, Inc. 2000:  Laugerman’s Harley-Davidson 1999:  Quigley Motor Company, Inc. 1998:  Brown’s Orchards & Farm Market 1997:  Datum Filing System, Inc. 1996:  Christmas Tree Hill, Inc. 1995:  NuTec Design Associates, Inc. 1994:  Central Penn Sales 1993:  Classic Caramel Co. 1992:  Bradley Lifting Co. 1991:  Tren Tech, Inc. 1990:  American Hydro 1989:  Y.E.S.C.O. 1988:  Formprest Cleaners 1987:  Penn Bus 1986:  Martin’s Potato Chips 1985:  Brewery Products Co. 1984:  Works Electrical Co., Inc. 1983:  George Brown & Son Glass 1982:  Carl’s News Stand


GUIDE

MEMBER NEWS

Welcome! NEW MEMBERS Bleacher Bums

Retail — Shopping 2899 Whiteford Rd York, PA 17402 717.755.5500 www.bleacherbumsonline.com

Harry L Bubb Associates, Inc. Insurance 70 E Forrest Ave Shrewsbury, PA 17361 717.235.5681 www.bubbinsurance.com

Central Pennsylvania Wireless Harry L Bubb Associates, Inc. Cellular/Mobile Equipment & Service 701 Loucks Rd York, PA 17401 717.430.4170 www.cpawireless.com

Insurance 3195 A Cape Horn Rd Red Lion, PA 17356 717.246.8488 www.bubbinsurance.com

Central Pennsylvania Wireless Cellular/Mobile Equipment & Service 150 Memory Ln, Ste C York, PA 17402 www.cpawireless.com

Design Quake

Business Services 15 E Philadelphia St York, PA 17401 717.559.0555

MOD PIZZA

Virtual October

Outback Steakhouse

York County Alliance for Learning

Restaurants 380 Town Center Dr York, PA 17408 717.757.4363 www.outback.com

Nonprofit Organization 4945 Horn Rd York, PA 17406 717.757.6441 http://hornfarmcenter.org

Impact Disaster Services Restorations — Floor & Property 1900 W Mason Ave York, PA 17404 717.885.2290 www.impactdisasterservices.com

U-GRO Learning Centers, Inc.

Restaurant 360 Town Center Dr York, PA 17408 717.690.1455 http://metrodiner.com Restaurant 370 Town Center Dr York, PA 17408 717.855.2568 www.modpizza.com

Central Pennsylvania Wireless Horn Farm Center for Cellular/Mobile Equipment & Service Agricultural Education 2058 S Queen St, Ste C York, PA 17403 717.900.4463 www.cpawireless.com

Metro Diner

Primerica – Samuel McGurk Financial Services 3098 E Prospect Rd York, PA 17402 717.891.0645 www.primerica.com/mcgurkjr

Quantum Dynamix

Childcare 1321 N Sherman St York, PA 17402 717.757.5900 www.u-gro.com

Computer — Sales & Service 2331 E Market St, Ste H2 York, PA 17402 717.755.0442 www.VirtualOctober.com

Nonprofit Organization 1601 Kenneth Rd York, PA 17404 717.505.0044 www.ycal.us

Youth Advocates Program, Inc. Nonprofit Organization 907 Roosevelt Ave York, PA 17404 717.843.9555 www.yapinc.org

Advertising 480 New Holland Ave, Ste 8201 Lancaster, PA 17602 717.431.6681 www.quantumdynamix.net

e c r u o s e Government Office Phone Numbers R y t i n Commu & Websites You Should Know COUNTY Assessment and Tax Claim Clerk of Courts Elections Emergency Management Human Services Planning Commission Recorder of Deeds Tax Collectors

717.771.9232 717.771.9612 717.771.9604 717.840.2990 717.771.9347 717.771.9870 717.771.9608 See Website

www.yorkcountypa.gov/property-taxes www.yorkcountypa.gov/courts-criminal-justice www.yorkcountypa.gov/voting-elections www.yorkcountypa.gov/emergency-services www.yorkcountypa.gov/health-human-services www.ycpc.org www.yorkcountypa.gov/property-taxes www.yorkcountypa.gov/county-administration

1.866.466.3972 717.783.3750 717.787.5996 See Website See Website 717.787.7190 717.346.9903 See Website

http://dced.pa.gov/programs-funding www.education.pa.gov www.dgs.pa.gov www.revenue.pa.gov/GetAssistance www.dot.state.pa.us/Internet http://dced.pa.gov/business-assistance www.openrecords.pa.gov www.psp.pa.gov

STATE Dept. of Community and Economic Development Dept. of Education Dept. of General Services Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Transportation Office of International Business Development Office of Open Records State Police

YORK CHAMBER YORK CHAMBER CONNECT CONNECT January/February November 2016 2017

23


Marion Meadows

Will Downing

Snarky Puppy

Fred Hammond

March 31-April 9, 2017 Reading, PA

Shemekia Copeland

Rick Braun

Najee

Spend 10 jazz- and blues-filled days and nights in the Greater Reading area! Over 120 scheduled events, plus great shopping and dining in one area, make the 27th annual Boscov’s Berks Jazz Fest your perfect spring getaway. For tickets, call Ticketmaster toll free at 1-800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com to order online.

PATTI AUSTIN • GERALD ALBRIGHT • JONATHAN BUTLER • SNARKY PUPPY • WILL DOWNING • NAJEE • KEIKO MATSUI • RICK BRAUN • JIM BRICKMAN MARCUS MILLER • FOURPLAY FEATUIRNG BOB JAMES, NATHAN EAST, HARVEY MASON, CHUCK LOEB • PAT MARTINO ORGAN TRIO WITH HORNS BRIAN CULBERTSON • NEW URBAN JAZZ PARTY: BOB BALDWIN, WALTER BEASLEY, MARION MEADOWS, TOM BROWNE • NICK COLIONNE • ERIC DARIUS ADAM HAWLEY • LARRY GRAHAM & GRAHAM CENTRAL STATION • DR. LONNIE SMITH • TROKER • JEFF HAMILTON TRIO • JAREKUS SINGLETON TOMMY KATONA & TEXAS FLOOD • JON CLEARY • EVERETTE HARP & FRIENDS: CHANTE MOORE, PHIL PERRY, BRIAN BROMBERG JASON MILES PRESENTS CELEBRATING THE MUSIC OF WEATHER REPORT• BERKS GROOVE PROJECT • GERALD VEASLEY’S MIDNIGHT JAMS ERIC MARIENTHAL • FRANK DIBUSSOLO’S PHILLY REUNION BAND • GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JAZZ CELEBRATION: KIRK WHALUM, FRED HAMMOND, KEVIN WHALUM, JOHN STODDART AND THE DOXA GOSPEL ENSEMBLE • ANAT COHEN QUARTET • WEST COAST JAM WITH RICK BRAUN, NORMAN BROWN, RICHARD ELLIOT • THE ARTIMUS PYLE BAND: TRIBUTE TO RONNIE VAN ZANDT’S LYNYRD SKYNYRD • SHEMEKIA COPELAND AND MUCH MORE!*

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! berksjazzfest.com * LINEUP AS OF 12/23/16. SUBJECT TO CHANGE

PROUD SPONSOR OF THE BOSCOV’S BERKS JAZZ FEST

Follow us on Twitter @berksjazzfest

York Chamber Connect - Jan/Feb 2017  
York Chamber Connect - Jan/Feb 2017  
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