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Yolo County Agriculture Department

PARAQUAT

ANY ONE WHO HANDLES PARAGUAT

(applies, mixes, loads, rinses containers or equipment, or any other handling activites) MUST complete: 1. EPA Stewardship Training (https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-worker-safety/ paraquat-dichloride-training-certified-applicators). Bring the completed certificate to the AG Department AND 2. Become a certified applicator. Either by taking the Private Applicator exam, or the DPR QAC/QAL exam. Call the Ag Department for more information.

Honor Our Veterans November 11, 2019 In This Issue

YOLO COUNTY FARM BUREAU

November Ag Roundtable Meeting NOVEMBER 19, 2019

Featured Speaker:

Agriculture Liaison Bill Lyons, Office of Governor Newsom

Purchase tickets online at www.yolofarmbureau.org, email amy@yolofarmbureau.org or call (530) 662-6316 YOU MUST RSVP BY NOVEMBER 12, 2019 TO BE INCLUDED FOR DINNER WALK-INS ARE NOT GUARANTEED DINNER

Location: Yolo Fliers Club Time: 6 PM Social Hour 7 PM Buffet Tickets: $45 in advance $55 at the door Proceeds benefit Ag Ed Program

Short Reports:

UC Cooperative Extension Yolo County Ag Commissioner Yolo County Farm Bureau Young Farmers & Ranchers WCC Ag Department

Paraquat Training Regulations YCFB Ag Roundtable November 19th, Fliers Club YCFB Board Member Attendance YCFB Welcomes New Members President’s Message Yolo County Wants to be Premier Ag Employer YCFB Sponsors Survey for Yolo County Animal Shelter Issues YC Board of Director Meeting Minutes Aug 13, 2019 Fresh Produce Training (FSMA) November 19th YCFB Writes Letter - Oppose Woodland Floodwall YCFB Business Members VCA Big to purchase PG&E lines, poles & other Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles New Smog Regulation Road Construction, Workshops & Seminars YF&R at Woodland Dinner on Main event CalOSHA Wild Fire Smoke Regulations Understanding Your Outbuilding Insurance Options SWEEP Applications Accepted Now Sheeperhearder’s Pay USDA Assistance Payroll Information YC Ag Department Worker Safety Info Seminars

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At-Large Freeman Barsotti E P P P E E P E Dominic Bruno E P P E E E P E Garrett Driver P P E P P P P E Chuck Dudley P P P E E E P P Robert Falconer P P P P P E E P Mike Hall P P E P E P P P Mike Howard P P P P P P P P Stan Lester E P P P P P P E Bret Leishman P P P P E P P E Joe F. Martinez P P P P P P P P Jeff Merwin P P P P E P P P Eric Paulsen E P P P P E P P Robert Ramming E P P P P P P P Justin Rominger E P P P P P P P Casey Stone P P P P P P P P Don Tompkins P P P P P P P P Paul Underhill E P A P P P E P YF&R Board Member Miranda Driver P P P -----------------------------------------------Eric Willson P P P P Advisory Committee Dr. Jim Barrett P P P P P P = Present E = Excused A = Absent October/November 2019

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President Joe F. Martinez 1st Vice President Garrett Driver 2nd Vice President Mike Hall Past President Nancy Lea

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Farm Bureau Information Executive Officers

New Members

Joe F. Martinez, President

Agricultural Associate

You may contact Joe directly at: president@yolofarmbureau.org

Garrett Driver, 1st Vice President Mike Hall, 2nd Vice President

Leslie Blickle Sierra Gold Nurseries

Collegiate Business

Denise Sagara, Secretary-Treasurer

Staff

Meetings Board of Directors Meeting

Denise Sagara

The Board of Directors meets the second Tuesday of each month, except September and December Members are invited to attend

Executive Director

Amy Merwin

Ag Education Coordinator

November 12, 2019 6:00 pm No Meeting in December =========================================

Carly Sims

Assistant to Ag Education Coordinator & Membership

Young Farmers & Ranchers Meeting

Katerina Kronauge

November 2019 Please call for information

Irrigated Lands Program Coordinator

Elizabeth Carvalho

Assistant to Irrigated Lands Program Coordinator & Accounts Payable

Jasmine Hernandez

YF&R meetings are held the first Tuesday of the month. Anyone between the ages of 18 and 35 with an interest in serving the community, addressing current agricultural issues and socializing is welcome to attend. Dinner is always served.

Office Manager

Thank You

Purpose

AgriNews, Yolo County Farm Bureau Office: 530-662-6316 Fax: 530-662-8611 Newsletter is published monthly for YCFB members by Yolo County Farm Bureau 69 West Kentucky Avenue Woodland, CA 95695 Third class postage POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Yolo County Farm Bureau News P. O. Box 1556, Woodland CA 95776

Yolo County Farm Bureau is a non-governmental, non-profit, voluntary membership, advocacy group whose purpose is to protect and promote agricultural interests throughout Yolo County and to find solutions to the problems facing agricultural businesses and the rural community. Farm Bureau strives to protect and improve the ability of farmers and ranchers engaged in production agriculture to provide a safe, reliable supply of food and fiber through responsible stewardship of the county’s resources.

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President Martinez’s Message| CA’s Premier Ag Employer It’s October and I’m still harvesting. I hope that most of you have finished for the year and are getting ready for next year. Farm Bureau is gearing up for the winter meetings with the Woodland Chamber of Commerce Farm City Banquet this month October 17th (see page 7 for more information about the event and to purchase tickets), our Ag Roundtable meeting November 19th at the Flier’s Club, California Farm Bureau Federation Annual Meeting in December and then our Board Retreat and our Annual Meeting in January. This is also the time of year we send out flyers about the seminars and workshops planned for the coming year. You should be receiving your packets soon. If you don’t receive one please call our office. As you’ll see when you read the rest of the newsletter, we have taken a position to oppose the City of Woodland’s Flood Control project. See pages 10-11. This project, in our opinion, violates the spirit and letter of “Measure S”, passed by Woodland City voters in March 2004. Woodland voted for a Regional Flood Control Project; this proposed project, as did the former, separates the greater Woodland community into Flood Protection “haves” and “have nots”. We also note the similarity of alignment and structural components. We are receiving numerous calls from growers interested in growing hemp in 2020. Hemp can have the same odor problems as cannabis so it’s likely no one will want it planted next to their residence. County Supervisors toured hemp planted in Sutter County. The motorium placed on planting hemp expires December 31st. We’ve been working with Yolo County Ag Commissioner, John Young, as he updates the Right-To-Farm Ordinance. The Ordinance was adopted many years ago to deal with problems between growers and urban residents. It was not intended to take care of problems between growers. Unfortunately, cannabis growers have complained about conventional growing practices and have threatened to sue. We hope the updated Right-To-Farm Ordinance can solve these differences. A final draft is expected to be submitted to Yolo County Supervisors for their approval before the end of the year. October is the end of the fiscal year for Farm Bureau memberships. If you have not renewed your membership please send in your dues before October 31st. Please call our office at 530.662.6316 if you have any questions. See the article in the next column. Yolo County has funds to provide better housing and improved services to ag farmworkers. The first step is to get a count of how many farmworkers are actually needed. We will work with the County to develop a questionnaire or survey for you to complete and return to our office. Finally, please see page 19 - the Yolo County Young Farmers and Ranchers are going to sell pumpkins this year on the weekends of October 12th and 19th. Check their Facebook and Instagram for times and locations. Plan to purchase your pumpkins from them! Have a nice Halloween and I’ll be back in November!

Yolo County Health & Human Services Making Yolo County California’s Premier Ag Employer Yolo County wants to do it’s part to support local Ag workers and Ag employers. The county has a history of wanting to provide housing and education for farmworkers. They are aware there is currently a shortage of farmworkers needed to work in the field. They believe that one way they can help is making Yolo County the most supportive work environment possible which would help attract more labor to our region. Funds have been received and Yolo County’s first Agricultural Labor Coordinator (Esmeralda Garza) has been hired. Her job will be to provide every available county or non-profit resource we can to area agriculture workers to help them find more affordable housing, childcare, education, food supports or medical care. Her first order of business is to get a full count of farmworkers in Yolo County and identify their needs. After discussion on how to accomplish this Farm Bureau agreed to write a letter to growers (and put it in our newsletter) with information about the program. The first step is to get a count of how many farm laborers are in (or needed) in Yolo County. We suggested we ask by season to get a more accurate count of how many and when farmworkers are needed.

Road Closed Signs at County Road 22 Construction will be from the Woodland city limits (about one mile east of County Road 102) to the western gate at the levee, and is planned to begin by October 27th. Non-farm equipment will have to use the I-5 detour. Farm equipment will be allowed through the construction area (no road vehicles). As it has been our practice in the past, farmers will have access to adjacent properties at all times (all vehicles). Road closures will have only barricades, gates will remain OPEN. If they are locked call Mark Christison cell 530.383.5236, Todd Riddiough at 530.666.8039 or Ed Medina at 530-666-8030.

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2019 Farm Bureau Sponsors - Thank You! RUBY SPONSORS

EMERALD SPONSORS

PEARL SPONSORS

SAPPHIRE SPONSORS

Yolo County Animal Shelter

UTP (Unleash the Possibilities), a non-profit raising funds for a new animal shelter, needs your help by completing the survey at the link below. The information will be used to complete a study of the public’s view of the current facilities and its expectations for a new one. It needs a broad range of responses to validate the results of the survey. Please share this with friends and neighbors, post it on Facebook and other social media. The survey takes about 5 to 7 minutes to complete, and the responses are anonymous. Here is the link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/5ZXF8C7 UTP thanks you for your help!

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Primary Sponsor of Yolo County Farm Bureau

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Issues CURRENT ISSUES City of Woodland New Flood Control Proposal The City of Woodland is proposing a levee and canal system running east/west along the north edge of the City to stop and redirect flood waters that may potentially come from Cache Creek. The CEQA scoping time period for this project closed on September 25th. The Yolo County Farm Bureau filed scoping comments (Please read pages 10-11 of this newsletter. The next Woodland City Council meeting at which flood issues will be discussed is the City Council workshop on Tuesday, October 15th. City of Davis Mace Blvd. between I-80 and El Macero - Reduced from 4 traffic lanes to 2 lanes October 2, 2019 update from the City of Davis: City staff met to discuss the technical memo from Cal Trans that showed the evaluation of multiple scenarios for reconfiguring the on-ramps onto eastbound I-80. CITY Staff asked ITS consultants, Fehr and Peers, for additional modeling for signalization of the intersection of Mace/Montgomery since the Cal Trans modeling does not show there will be a significant improvement with their recommend limited changes to the I-80 on-ramps. City staff is scheduled to meet with ITS consultants, Fehr and Peers, next week to go over the additional modeling. An open community meeting to go over design options is scheduled for Thursday, October 24th, at Pioneer Elementary School (5215 Hamel St, Davis, CA 95618) starting at 6:30 p.m. The Cal Trans technical memo is attached and can also be found online with the Mace project information. Project information is available on the project website: https://cityofdavis.org/maceblvd The City will continue to communicate progress and construction dates via email and social media.

Industrial Hemp Yolo County currently has a moratorium on planting hemp through 12/31/2019. The County is considering only allowing permitted cannabis growers to grow hemp. UC Davis is researching the possibility of growing cannabis for seed and plan to tour a cannabis operation in Sutter County. Many Yolo County growers are interested in planting hemp in 2020. We have asked the Yolo County Agricultural commissioner to report on this at the next Board meeting. Right to Farm Ordinance Agricultural Commissioner, John Young, is working on an update to Yolo County’s Right To Farm Ordinance. We will send a letter of support when the final draft is completed. Farm Bureau has drafted a letter of support which will be sent at the appropriate time. Yolo County Salmonid Project The Bureau announcement that it has issued its final Record of Decision on the Fish Passage Project,without responding to any comments we submitted. Central Valley Flood Protection Plan - Proposed Expansion of the Yolo Bypass No update. Delta Protection Plan Proposed Changes GOAL: Respond to proposed changes to the Delta Protection Land Use and Resource Management Plan. No update. http://delta.ca.gov/land_use/land_use_plan/. Interested persons may submit comments to the DPC at submit@delta.ca.gov. http://delta.ca.gov/

Yolo Subbasin Groundwater Agency Sustainable Groundwater Act Plan The next meeting is scheduled for November. www.yologroundwater.org Union Pacific (UP) Railroad Request For Yolo County To Close Road 32A At Co. Rd 103 GOAL: Keep Crossing Available For Ag Traffic A meeting was held with representatives from Yolo County, Union Pacific, Bike Davis, City of Davis, and YCFB with the prospective contractor to be hired by Yolo County to answer questions about the project. This contract is to study options to move the crossing. YOLO COUNTY ISSUES Cannabis in Yolo County GOAL: To Share Cannabis Information with Members AND MAKE SURE THAT THE INTERESTS OF YOLO COUNTY FARMERS AND RANCHERS ARE RECOGNIZED IN THE FORTHCOMING CANNABIS ORDINANCE http://www.yolocounty.org/community-services/cannabis-3398 Yolo County residents, including growers, are urged to report complaints to the County.

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August 13, 2019 Board of Directors Minutes President Joe Martinez called the meeting to order at 7:05 PM. It was held at the Farm Bureau Board Room, 69 West Kentucky Avenue, Woodland. Guests in attendance were YF&R Scholarship recipient Kassidy Talbot and her father Terry Talbot; YF&R Scholarship recipient Isabelle Tafoya and her parents Dan and Thora Tafoya; Congressional Candidate Tamika Hamilton and her children and Merrie Tompkins. Staff Denise Sagara, Amy Merwin and Jasmine Hernandez were present.

RESOLVED: Yolo County Farm Bureau donate $750 to purchase supplies for the 2019 Buyer’s Auction at the Yolo County Fair.

Adoption of Consent Agenda President Martinez presented to the Board the Consent Agenda. It was duly moved, seconded and carried: RESOLVED: to approve the consent agenda of the August 13, 2019 Board of Directors meeting.

Request for Donation to the California Farm Water Coalition Powerhouse Science Project Each year YCFB makes a $100 donation to the California Farm Water Coalition. This year we received a request to contribute to the construction of the California Farm Water Coalition Powerhouse Science Project. After discussion it was duly moved, seconded and carried: RESOLVED: Yolo County Farm Bureau will donate $100 to the California Farm Water Coalition Powerhouse Science Project.

Presentations • YF&R Vice Chair Eric Willson presented 2019 YF&R Scholarship Certificate to Isabelle Tafoya and Kassidy Talbot in recognition of being awarded the 2019 YF&R scholarships. • Congressional Candidate Tamika Hamilton introduced herself to the board and spoke about her reasons to run for Congress against Congressman Garamendi.

Request from CFBF for Distinguished Service Award Nomination Each year California Farm Bureau Federation asks County Farm Bureaus for nominations for the Distinguished Serviced Service Award to be presented at the December annual meeting. President Martinez asked board members to submit potential candidate information to Mrs. Sagara.

Reports • Mike Howard reported the date for the January Ag Roundtable meeting has been moved to January 28, 2020. The committee is currently working on topics and speakers for the meetings. • Eric Willson reported YF&R Committee members held their August meeting at Rominger Brothers farm; he attended the YF&R State Leadership meeting where he found YCFB YF&R has both an excellent membership and a good relationship with the Farm Bureau board; YF&R will have a display at the Yolo County Fair; and reported the YF&R committee members would like to purchase a hog at the YC Fair.

EIS/EIR Approved for Yolo Bypass Salmon Habitat Restoration and Fish Passage Project The State Water Board recently approved the EIS/EIR for the Yolo Bypass Salmon Habitat Restoration and Fish Passage Project. This is a project that has been worked on for many years, and the approval of the EIS/EIR came with little note, and a very short comment period. YCFB sent a comment letter with concerns and unanswered questions about the project. Due to the short comment period comments had to be submitted by August 8, 2019. After discussion it was duly moved, seconded and carried: RESOLVED: YCFB Board members approved the comment letter submitted in response to the recently approved EIS/EIR for the Yolo Bypass Salmon Habitat Restoration and Fish Passage Project to the State Water Board members.

Upon hearing the report it was duly moved, seconded and carried: RESOLVED: to approve the YF&R Committee spend up to $2,000 to purchase a hog at the Yolo County Fair. • Gary Sack was attending another Farm Bureau meeting and submitted a written report. • John Young reported that the 2018 Crop Report is finished and brought copies for board members to review; he reported there have been a lot of complaints regarding the use of zon guns; Yolo County has paid for the services of a trapper so anyone having problems with wildlife should contact him; he is working on updating the Right-To-Farm Ordinance and asked that his red-lined version be sent to directors to review and reported there is a problem with a large rat-like animal called nutria – it hasn’t been found in Yolo County yet, but it will likely show up soon. Request for Donation for the 2019 FFA Buyer’s Luncheon at the Yolo County Fair Every year Farm Bureau is asked to make a donation to purchase supplies for the FFA Buyer’s Auction at the Yolo County Fair. A request was received this year. After discussion it was duly moved, seconded and carried:

Discussion: • Past President Nancy Lea has been working on a letter to the Yolo County Board of Supervisors with suggestions and comments about updating the Right-To-Farm Ordinance. • President Martinez asked the board to indicate if they have any preference to hold the Annual Board Retreat locally, or at an “away” location. • Mrs. Sagara reported the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board is considering creating an Irrigated Lands Pasture program for lands that are not fertilized and pesticides are not applied. As there was no other business it was duly moved, seconded and carried: RESOLVED: to adjourn the meeting at 7:52 PM. Respectfully submitted, Denise Sagara Secretary

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Fresh Produce Workshop November 18, 2019

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YCFB Writes Letter to City of Woodland September 25, 2019 City of Woodland ATTN: Tim Busch 300 First Street Woodland, CA 95695 RE:

Scoping Comments on the Woodland Flood Risk Management Project

Dear Tim; PREFACE: Initially, we point out that the City in its advocacy for this Project has abandoned the premise of Regional Flood Protection for the greater City of Woodland area, incorporated and unincorporated. And, we also comment that, as we have been informed by comments and dialogue through the Citizens Flood Advisory Committee process, and meetings our staff and YCFB members have had with the City, it has continually taken the position that being placed on the north, or “wet” side of a levee, the agricultural land north of town will not be negatively devalued for agricultural purposes unless it is directly flooded within the newly created conveyance bypasses and/or subject to areas of ponding especially near the Cache Creek Settling Basin. Thus, the City apparently has taken the position that owners of lands without those direct impacts will not be compensated. Water will be allowed – even directed -to flood through this area, creating negative impacts for the existing and planned agricultural operations in addition to negatively impacting the individuals who live and work there. We also note that much of this land has never flooded in its recorded history. The decisions made by the City will, for use and valuation purposes, turn this entire acreage from the right bank of Cache Creek south to the levee itself into bypasses, water holding areas or what we describe as an “institutionalized flood plain”. We conclude that it diminishes the magnitude of the issues to even argue that this land is not devalued for agricultural purposes as we discuss below. We direct our comments to aspects of the proposed project which clearly impact the agricultural operations north of the “approximately 7 miles of secondary earthen levee and a diversion channel along the northern boundary of the City to redirect overland flood flows from the right bank of Cache Creek into a diversion channel to be conveyed to the CCSB and the COW North Drainage Channel.” We also note that since a substantial amount of very prime farm acreage, which is located close to freeway, air and rail transport, is impacted there is a much broader effect on the Yolo County agricultural economy than the mere acreage numbers represent, and the agricultural infrastructure needed to support Yolo County’s agricultural economy will also be impacted. Each of these impacts we single out will impact the agriculture on the wet side of the levee and thus must be addressed in environmental documents. Agriculture The scoping document appears to limit the impacts to conversion of agricultural acreage to “weir/bypass improvements, use of borrow material, or creation of habitat.” This summary ignores: the permanent conversion of land to levees and bypass; the loss of agricultural land to higher and deeper water at the east end of the proposed project and the impact for agricultural purposes on the approximately 6,000 acres north and west of this proposed flood levee system. Obviously, once the levees and canals are installed the land consumed by them is permanently lost to agriculture. Ornamental plantings or habitat installation along these levees and bypasses for which expressions of support were made at public meetings often bring additional hardship to adjacent and neighboring ag: habitat

next door is not a positive for agriculture since it brings with it the increased possibility of “threatened” or “endangered” species and related “takings”, and, agriculture is not benefitted by anything that will introduce individuals unrelated to agriculture into a farming area. The increasing number of homeless in the Woodland area is a matter of record (number of Homeless increased 63% since 2017: 8/30/19/Daily Democrat): the residents, farmers and property owners north of the levee will have their persons and property increasingly at risk if opportunities are created for these individuals to relocate into this essentially under policed agricultural area. The flows on the land north of the levee (the “wet” side) are going to be deeper and last longer than even possible before its construction. Before construction, any Cache Creek overflows would not be confined but typically would be an overland, shallow short term sheet flow. But henceforth, these flows if they occur will now be directed and held onto these lands: Higher velocities may result that can cause scour and deposit of debris and importation of pathogens. The damage caused to the land north on the wet side by this scouring and import of debris/pathogens are part of the cost of the project. These factors devalue the land. Project proponents must recognize that Project funding must pay for that diminution of value. The importation of weed seeds and spores, since it comes with additional costs for cleanup and weed control, will present an undue burden to agricultural operators on the wet side. There are organic farmers north of the levee who have organic certifications and may not use typical pesticides. The burden of manually or mechanically removing imported noxious weeds could as a practical matter limit this entire area for new or all organic farming and/or challenge the viability of organic operations currently in place. The study needs to include analysis as to increased costs of production including additional pesticides, debris removal, releveling, etc. These factors are relevant to any discussion of the Project’s impact on specific farmland, its relative value pre-and post- project, or impact on the agricultural sector of Yolo County’s economy. These factors devalue the land. Project proponents must recognize that project funding must pay for that diminution of value. We comment that the City has introduced another element of risk: assuming there is a flood event that puts water on the wet side of the levee late in the season farmers may be limited in their ability to get on the ground in a timely fashion. In our area the land has been typically “bedded” before winter sets in: thus, the farmer has already expended costs getting ready for spring planting. Crop loans, etc. are predicated on an assumption that the farmer will have the ability to actually farm the ground. This late season rain risk factor devalues the property, and can increase costs or cause crop loss. Project proponents must recognize that project funding must pay for that diminution of value. Additionally, we note that this area does not have the benefit of surface water for irrigation or domestic purposes. Residents, landowners and farmers depend upon ground water. Since the proposed project abandons the concept of regional protection, some added attention has to be directed to well head protection for both agricultural and domestic wells which serve those who live, own or farm north of the levee. Project proponents must recognize that Project funding must pay for that cost and/or diminution of value. We also point out that agriculture and the individuals who live on the land occasionally require additions to the constructed infrastructure relevant to their lives and businesses: farmers are entitled as a matter of right to build a second house on agricultural parcels. This recognized right to improve to accommodate changing needs applies also to land on the wet side of the Project levee. What will be the added costs or even possibilities of doing so with the institutionalization of this area into a flood plain? Will the City step up to defray the added costs of site preparation and construction? Will it assume the costs of flood insurance? And, a casual

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YCFB Writes Letter to City of Woodland drive through this area shows extensive plantings to permanent crops. These crops benefit by immediately available processing: will this new classification limit the ability to fund or build these installations? The placement on the wet side of a flood control levee has devalued this area for agricultural purposes. The Project proponents must recognize that Project funding must pay for that cost and/or diminution of value. Farmers and ranchers know that an additional opportunity that may provide them and their family with operating flexibility is the ability to sell a conservation easement or a mitigation easement for urban development. Much of this land is within one mile of the city limits (or the urban limit line of the COW) so in the absence of any consideration of this flood barrier, the opportunities to sell such an easement would logically be available at some point in time. The obvious question is whether any agency will purchase an easement if it can assume, since the land is on the wet side of a flood levee, that it will never develop beyond isolated farm structures in any event. Yolo County Farm Bureau is exploring the continued availability of this option for land which is located on the wet side of a levee. If our assumption that selling a conservation easement is no longer a viable option for these farmers is correct, the placement of the flood barrier has stripped those landowners of value. The Project proponents must recognize that Project funding must pay for that cost and/or diminution of value. Despite the fact that the COW has produced an appraiser’s valuation that claims there is no difference for agricultural purposes for identical land located north or south of the levee, as our comments illustrate, the ag land on the wet side will be devalued by the installation of the proposed project. That appraiser valuation is perhaps theoretically arguable. However, the real world gets in the way. When a farmer or rancher is asked if s/he would choose to purchase one of two identical parcels of land for the same price, one parcel on the wet side of a levee and its identical partner on the dry side, s/he, without exception, will choose to purchase the land on the dry side. A factor in the purchase of farmland is the risk involved in the operation of the property. Risk impacts land price. No grower or landowner would pay the same for acreage that is subject to the risk of flooding as s/he would for identical land that does not have a flood risk. Additionally, the value of farmland is based on potential limitations. We have enumerated potential limits on allowed uses above. Thus, the costs for the impacts to landowners and farmers north of the levee must be calculated. The loss of value of this entire acreage must be part of the Project cost analysis. Project proponents must recognize that project funding must pay for that diminution of value. We have concerns about impacts on road transportation. Useable roads are obviously critical for agricultural and rural residents/ families. The scoping list of topics refers to “Potential temporary and short-term disruption of traffic circulation or emergency access during construction”. However, interruptions in road use are a characteristic of this Project. Project proponents basically concede that County Road 102, the major transportation corridor between the Sutter Basin, the Town of Knights Landing and the City of Woodland and all of the farmland encompassed in that area, will be shut down for extended periods of time when the area at the east end of the bypass will be flooded at substantial depths. Periods of high rainfall can occur at any time between November and April. Farmers need to be able to transport farm equipment, supplies and their employees throughout the year, especially in the late winter and early spring planting seasons. Families who live in Knights Landing, and/or are employed on area farms or otherwise outside their town need to ensure that their domestic transportation needs are met for employment, medical, emergency, basic provisioning and school attendance. The Project proponents seem to assume that other north south corridors (Interstate 5, State Hwy 16/CR 98, and State

Hwy 113) will not be flooded on the wet side. We note that no one can accurately predict the movement of flood waters: all it takes is a wayward nutria to create a levee break where it is not anticipated. The significant fact is that the recommended project assigns the land north of the levee to basically “carry the water” to benefit the lands and the economy to the south of it. We also note the apparent extent of flood protection to be accorded to residents and landowner/farmers on the “wet” side (other than an existing 22 residences who may be provided flood insurance): the County will provide them notice to evacuate. We call attention to the fact that looking at the result of several years of planning and expenditures, the agenda of the Project proponents appears to be obtaining community support for a second edition of the Lower Cache Creek Flood Barrier that was rejected by the voters in 2004. The fact that the Woodland City Council is considering a ballot measure to repeal “Measure S” is confirmation of both that fact and that City of Woodland officials know the proposed project is in violation of the specific language of Measure S since City of Woodland money has been spent on this substantially similar project. We believe that there are regional options that would better serve a larger number of Yolo County residents and a larger amount of acreage in the Cache Creek watershed. Flood protection for the Woodland areas should be part of the broader discussion advocating a measure of protection for other areas, including Esparto, Madison, Yolo, Knights Landing, Plainfield and possibly Davis. The County should be involved in Woodland area flood management planning as should Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, with input from the Sustainable Groundwater Management Agency. Project proponents are basically leaving most of the County “out in the rain” from the standpoint of accessing the flood control federal and state tax dollars which will be spent just to protect portions of incorporated Woodland. We also believe that construction of this Project without addressing flood issues in the above listed areas could limit or even preclude their solution. In conclusion, we note that the City of Woodland sent out its Notice of Scoping Meeting in “August 2019”. (No date is stamped on the letter.) This “notice” advises that Scoping Comments on the Project “must be provided to the City of Woodland no later than Wednesday, September 25, 2019. Yolo County Farm Bureau had its August meeting on August 13, 2019. The information did not come to the Executive Board’s attention until later that month. Yolo County Farm Bureau does not have a board meeting in September: August through October are the busiest times for Yolo County farmers and ranchers. Thus, it has been difficult for Yolo County Farm Bureau to provide the opportunities for discussion that is our standard. The City imposed time constraints made it impossible for us to reach out to all of our members who live, own and/or farm acreage impacted by the City proposed Project. However, review of our archives and our input on the (2003-2004) Flood Wall and the fact that two of our Executive Board members have served as members of the City of Woodland Flood Control Advisory Committee (constituted 2015) since its inception has afforded us a reasonable predicate for this introductory discussion. The issues we raise need to be fleshed out in the environmental documents, and the City needs be aware that its costs of proceeding include compensation for all negative impacts on wet side farmland. Sincerely, Joseph F. Martinez, President Cc: California Farm Bureau Federation, Chris Scheuring

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

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Yolo County Farm Bureau Business Members Please support these companies and tell them you are a Farm Bureau member Accounting Tax Services

A I M Company 530.666.2446 Carbahal & Company, AAC Agrichem Services Inc 530.758.8111 530.753.4178 Crippen & Associates, CPAs Alsco Geyer Irrigation Inc. 530.458.2148 530.476.2253 Johnston, Martin & David Geer Transportation Montgomery CPA’s 530.682.3210 530.662.3911 Dunnigan Water District Perry, Bunch and 530.724.3271 Johnston, Inc. Durham Pump Irrigation 530.662.3251 530.662.8654 Ullrich Delevati, CPAs Erdman Warehouse 530.666.6671 530.437.2243 Garton Tractor Agricultural Consulting 209.948.5401 FJS Consulting Koebel, Doug Trucking 530.304.1158 530.662.5408 Marrone Bio Innovations Agricultural Seed 530.750.2800 Adams Grain Company Martinez Ag Services 530.668.2000 530.681.8322 Ag Seeds Unlimited Nutrien Ag Solutions 530.666.3361 707.320.8828 California Oils Pacific Coast Producers Corporation 209.367.8800 530.476.2928 Pacific Gas & Electric Corteva 800.743.5000 530.666.1182 Petrik Labs, Inc. Farmers Grain Elevator 530.666.1157 530.662.9626 Radial Tire Center HM Clause 916.371.5066 530.747.3200 Reliable Tire Service Limagrain Sunflowers, Inc. 916.372.6675 530.661.6995 Sustainable Technologies Nunhems USA, Inc. 510.523.1122 530.787.1948 Turner Ag Research Seedtec 530.601.0879 530.666.7871 Valley Clean Energy Syngenta Seeds, Inc. 855.699.8232 530.666.0986 TS&L Seed Agricultural Supplies 530.666.1239 B.E. Giovannetti & Sons 530.662.1727 Agricultural Services Canevari Brothers 40th District Agricultural 530.662.0228 Association Colusa County Farm Supply 530.402.2222 530.682.5809

Grow West 530.662.5442 Growers Air Service 530.753.2819 Holt Ag Solutions 530.666.1944 Irrigation Supply Co. 530.666.5925 Pacific Ace Hardware 530.787.3800 Pacific Laser, Inc. 530.661.3223 Sterling May Equipment Co., Inc. 530.662.6637 Valley Tire Center 530.666.9601 Valley Truck and Tractor 530.662.4637 Wilbur Ellis Company 530.662.4182 Wilkinson International Inc. 530.662.7373 Woodland Draper Mfg 530.662.8437 Woodland Irrigation 530.406.8830

Bees

Bullfrog Bees & Pure All Natural 530.681.2971 BZBee Pollination 530.787.3044 Tauzer Apiaries Sola Bee Farm 530.758.0363

Business Retail

Davis Chamber of Commerce 530.756.5160

Business Services

Air Evac EMS, Inc. 916.342.3221 Allied Computer Solutions 530.681.5141 BJ Heating & AC 530.662.8601 Kergel Auto Body 530.668-6686

Dental Services

Henry E. Bennett, DDS. Dental Consultant Second Opinions 530.758.2350

Engineering Services

Blankinship & Associates 530.757.0941 Davids Engineering Inc. 530.757.6107 x 102

Building, Construction & Hardware Cranston Steel Structures, Inc. 530.662.0966 Diamond D General Engineer, Inc. 530.662.2042

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

Duncan Built (construction) 530.666.6835

Page 12


Yolo County Farm Bureau Business Members Please support these companies and tell them you are a Farm Bureau member Financial Services

Farm Credit West 530.666.3333 First Northern Bank 530.661.6000 Main Street Wealth Group 530.666.2128 River City Bank 530.666.6681 Tri-Counties Bank 530.668.5800 Valley Ag Loans Peter M. Holmes Agricultural Loans 530.661.6479

Food Products

Capay Ranch 1680 Inc 415.509.6199 Capay Valley Vineyards 530.796.4110 Casey Flat Ranch 415.435.2225 Everglade Farms 530.662.6571 Farm Fresh To You 530.219.0433 Holland Ranch 916.995.6496 Lea Ranch Manas Custom Meats, Inc. 530.787.1740 Muller Ranch LLC 530.666.1806 McAravy Brothers 530.724.3434 Panorama Meats 530.668.8920 Rominger Brothers Farms Inc 530.668.1558 Sage Ag LLC 530.383.5922 Schreiner Farms 530.662.3728

Tandy Farm 530.662.8302 Windmill Vineyards LLC 530.662.6892 Woodland Farmer’s Market 530.666.2626 Woodland Roots 530.666.8214 Yolo Almond Ranch 916.761.7064 Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation 530.796.3400

Insurance

Agro Crop Insurance Agency 916.372.2566 Armstrong & Associates Insurance Agency 530.668.2777 InterWest Insurance Services, Inc. 530.661.1300 Jack Cramer Insurance Agency 530.662.1076 Eric Roberson & Sons Insurance Services Inc. 530.365.1009 Wraith, Scarlett & Randolph Insurance Services, Inc. 530.662.9181

Labor Contractor

D. Campos Inc 530.662.4143 Emiliano Lara Labor Contractor 530.756.1357 J & R Farm Labor, Inc. 916.826.2834 Michel Labor Services 530.669.6906 Sunrise Ag Labor, FLC 530.822.7777

Legal Services

Gardner, Janes, Nakken, Hugo & Nolan, Lawyers 530.662.2859 Mark Pruner Attorney 916.744.1500

Leveling

John Reyes Land Leveling 530-724-3510 Los Rios Custom Services 530-308-4399 Sagara Farms, Inc. GPS Leveling 530.787.2000

Neal D Peart, NDP Commercial & Ag Realty 530.383.5351

Startup Incubator AgStart 530.574.6810

Nurseries

Alexander Grapevine Nursery 530.669.1345

Petroleum & Fuels

Allied Propane Service 707.678.8500 InterState Oil Company 530.662.5481 Sheldon Gas Company 707.425.2951

Real Estate

Cache Creek Realty 530.662.1722 Farm & Ranch Realty 530.666.4638 Linda Pillard, Accredited Land Consultant, United Country Real EstateCalifornia Properties 530.713.6121 Morgan, William T Real Estate 530.662.8696 Natural Resources Group, Inc. 916.372.5595

Yolo County Farm Bureau does not assume responsibility for statements by advertisers or for advertised products in the Yolo County Farm Bureau Newsletter

Yolo County Farm Bureau does not assume responsibility for statements by advertisers or for advertised products

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Valley Clean Energy Offer to PGE VALLEY CLEAN ENERGY BOARD ANSWERS GOVERNOR’S CALL, AUTHORIZES OFFER TO PURCHASE PG&E ASSETS Yolo County, CA – The board of Yolo County’s clean power agency has submitted a $300 million bid to purchase Pacific Gas & Electric’s lines, poles and other electricity distribution assets within Yolo County. The purchase would enable the creation of a locally owned and operated public utility that the board has concluded would result in a more successful, efficient and safe electricity system. Following the announcement this summer of its intent to examine the purchase of local PG&E assets, and after months of study and review with expert consultants, the Valley Clean Energy board of directors submitted a non-binding offer Friday, Oct. 18, to purchase PG&E’s assets. Valley Clean Energy’s offer would ultimately be subject to approval by the federal court handling the PG&E bankruptcy case. Valley Clean Energy is a public agency that currently purchases electricity under a joint powers agreement for the cities of Woodland and Davis and unincorporated Yolo County, but relies on PG&E’s distribution system to bring that power to its customers. Purchase of the local PG&E power poles and lines would allow for the creation of a Yolo County-based public utility similar in nature to those found in Lodi, Roseville, Sacramento (SMUD) and other communities across the state. Circumstances surrounding PG&E’s January bankruptcy filing have created this unique opportunity to reimagine a more successful, efficient and safe electricity system in Yolo County and other areas of PG&E’s service territory. “We have taken an important step toward local energy independence by submitting an official non-binding offer letter to PG&E of $300 million for the acquisition of PG&E's power delivery infrastructure in Yolo County,” said Valley Clean Energy Board Chair Tom Stallard, a member of the Woodland City Council. “Our analysis was conducted by seasoned professionals and we believe the offer is competitive, fair and equitable.” Valley Clean Energy’s efforts are supported by recent statements by Gov. Gavin Newsom, who is encouraging local jurisdictions to pursue acquisition of PG&E’s local electrical lines. In reference to San Francisco’s recent offer to buy PG&E assets, the governor was quoted as saying, “I back more competition. I am very specifically encouraging others to come into this space and to make some bids. We want to create a competitive space — and all of it with an eye on different approaches.” PG&E’s bankruptcy protection filing in January 2019 created an opportunity for community choice energy agencies such as Valley Clean Energy, along with other public agencies, to determine whether a “public power” electric service approach might provide greater control, benefits and safeguards to California communities. “The transfer of PG&E’s electricity assets will aid PG&E’s financial stability and contribute to fire victim recovery settlements while helping Valley Clean Energy expand upon its efforts to provide reliable, safe, clean and affordable electricity to the residents and businesses of Yolo County,” added VCE Board Vice Chair Gary Sandy, a member of the Yolo County Board of Supervisors. “Bottom line, our offer makes financial and environmental sense.”

Added VCE Board Member Lucas Frerichs, a member of the Davis City Council, “Control of the power poles and lines in Yolo County would allow us to make local investment decisions that could mean a safer electricity system and provide benefits for both customers and the environment. “We want this process to be as smooth as possible and will work with all concerned parties to ensure that transitioning from an investor-owned model to a municipally owned utility is beneficial to consumers, businesses and employees who would be served by our new utility.” The decision to pursue acquisition of PG&E’s electric distribution assets is not unique to Valley Clean Energy; the city and county of San Francisco announced a $2.5 billion offer on Sept. 9 for PG&E’s infrastructure within its geographic boundaries. Additionally, on Sept. 3, the South San Joaquin Irrigation District — a water agency in the heart of the state’s agricultural region that tried to buy PG&E distribution facilities in 2006 and 2016 — formally renewed its offer to purchase PG&E distribution system assets as part of the current bankruptcy proceeding. And on Thursday, Oct. 17, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo announced his proposal to investigate the formation of a public utility for his city in the wake of the recent PG&E power shutoffs. While the cost and responsibility of operating and upgrading an electrical distribution system is significant, many proven examples indicate that public ownership of power facilities is practical. A total of 54 public power utilities currently serve almost one-third of Californians. Valley Clean Energy procures power for more than 150,000 residential and commercial electricity customers in Woodland, Davis and unincorporated Yolo County. However, customers currently pay PG&E for the distribution of that power to their homes and businesses using the infrastructure Valley Clean Energy has now offered to acquire. Having full control over both electricity distribution and generation can help achieve Valley Clean Energy’s stated goals of providing cost-competitive clean energy, product choice, increased energy efficiency and price stability. The PG&E bankruptcy process does not have a specific timeline but is expected to conclude in 2020. In the meantime, using other existing publicly owned utilities as models, the Valley Clean Energy board will consider possible agency structure, operational and financing options. For more information about Valley Clean Energy, visit www. valleycleanenergy.org or call Jim Parks, VCE’s customer outreach and programs director, at 530-446-2750. ### About Valley Clean Energy: Valley Clean Energy is a notfor-profit public agency formed to provide electrical generation service to customers in Woodland, Davis and the unincorporated areas of Yolo County. Our mission is to source cost-competitive clean electricity while providing product choice, price stability, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emission reductions and reinvestment in the communities we serve.

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Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles Smog| SB 210 (Leyva), creates an inspection and maintenance program for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and was signed into law by the Governor. This bill would essentially create a smog-check program for heavy-duty vehicles. The Air Resources Board (ARB) is in the process of developing a similar program as part of the State Implementation Plan for San Joaquin Valley PM 2.5, so that effort will now be incorporated into implementation of SB 210. Farm Bureau opposed SB 210 because not all of the amendments we requested to reduce the impacts of the proposed program on trucks agricultural operations depend upon were adopted. However, Farm Bureau will work with ARB as it implements the new program to limit impacts on heavy duty agricultural trucks. Farm Bureau was successful at getting the following provisions to protect agricultural vehicles incorporated into SB 210: • Trucks used exclusively in agriculture have 75 days, rather than 45, to correct violations or emissions system failures and are not prohibited from using them during that time; and • Out-of-state trucks must have a way of establishing and verifying compliance prior to entering California (to ensure outof-state trucks carrying agricultural commodities aren’t turned away at the border). Other provisions that will benefit all heavy-duty truck owners include: • Capping the compliance fees at $30; • Allowing ARB to exempt vehicles from testing requirements if the cost of compliance outweighs the benefits of compliance; and • Requiring ARB to adopt a pilot project and report the results to the legislature prior to full implementation of the law. *******************************

Bicycle Events and Construction Road Construction/Closures Sept. 30 to November 15 In support of the 2019 Pavement Preservation Project, the following county roads (CR) in the Knights Landing and Woodland areas will be closed to through traffic from September 30 to November 15 in these locations: • CR 102 from County Road 17 to State Route 113 • CR 22 from the eastern City of Woodland limit to northbound Interstate 5 ramp Detour signage will guide traffic to alternate routes and resident and property access, in the closed areas, will be provided during the construction.

Workshops & Seminars Nov 19 Nov 19

FSMA Produce Safety Rule Training , English Ag Roundtable - Bill Lyons Guest Speaker

Jan 7 Jan 7 Jan 17

Heat Illness Training, English Heat Illness Training, Spanish YCFB Annual Meeting Irrigated Lands Annual Meeting Irrigated Lands Annual Meeting Irrigated Lands Annual Meeting

Feb 5 Spray Safe, English Feb 11 Implements of Husbandry, English Feb 13 Hazardous Materials/Heat Illness Combination Training, English Feb 13 Hazardous Materials/Heat Illness Combination Training, Spanish Feb 18 Implements of Husbandry, Spanish Feb 20 First Aid Training, English Feb 20 First Aid Training, Spanish Feb 21 Harassment Prevention Training (Employees only), English Feb 21 Harassment Prevention Training (Employees only), Spanish Feb 25 Train-the-Trainer, English Feb 26 English Safety Day Mar 4 Spanish Safety Day Mar 12 CPR/First Aid Training, English Mar 17 Hazardous Materials/Heat Illness Combination Training, English Mar 17 Hazardous Materials/Heat Illness Combination Training, Spanish Mar 19 CPR/First Aid Training, Spanish Mar 24 Harassment Prevention Training (Supervisors only), English Mar 24 Harassment Prevention Training (Supervisors only), Spanish Mar 26 Train-the-Trainer, Spanish Mar 31 First Aid Training, English Mar 31 First Aid Training, Spanish Apr 2 Harassment Prevention Training (Employees only), English Apr 2 Harassment Prevention Training (Employees only), Spanish Apr 7 Heat Illness Training, English Apr 7 Heat Illness Training, Spanish Apr 9 CPR/First Aid Training, English Apr 16 CPR/First Aid Training, Spanish May 7 Heat Illness Training, English May 7 Heat Illness Training, Spanish May 21 Nut Harvest Safety Training, English May 21 Nut Harvest Safety Training, Spanish

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

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YF&R Members

CalOSHA Wildfire Smoke Reg

Yolo County YF&R Members were asked to volunteer at Woodland's Dinner on Main which was held Sunday, September 15th. The dinner is put on by community members to promote local agriculture and showcased local products throughout the event. We were able to help set the tables with locally produced wine and beer for attendees to enjoy with dinner.

A new Cal/OSHA emergency regulation, (https://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/5141_1.html) effective July 29, 2019, requires that when the Air Quality Index* is 151 or higher due to wildfire smoke, employers must: • Allow workers to work indoors in effectively filtered buildings when feasible, or • Relocate workers to areas with better air quality, or • Provide outdoor workers with approved respirators, such as N95 respirators. Employers must also check air quality at outdoor work sites at the start of each shift when they anticipate workers may be exposed to smoke. The resources listed below offer details on the new regulation as well as information that can be used for worker trainings on the harmful effects of wildfire smoke and safe and effective use of respirators. *This refers to the Air Quality Index (AQI) for particulate matter 2.5 micrometers and smaller (PM2.5). Email Occupational Health Watch with feedback about this update or change of address. Wildfire smoke can harm the health of exposed outdoor workers. Resources Fires and Health California Department of Public Health website Protection from Wildfire Smoke Cal/OSHA Emergency Regulation 8 CCR 5141.1 Wildfire Smoke A Guide for Public Health Officials – AirNow website Worker Safety and Health in Wildfire Regions Cal/OSHA website

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Farm Credit West

Experience from the ground up

Our business is agriculture. In fact, many of our staff have direct experience in farming or ranching: living – and working – testaments to our timeless commitment to the future of agriculture.

WOODLAND 530.666.3333

FarmCreditWest.com

Committed. Experienced. Trusted. AgAgri-News October/November 2019 Volume 39 Issue 10

Yolo Page 17


Understanding Your Outbuilding Insurance Options An important part of your farm or ranch policy is the protection it offers for damage to farm or ranch buildings and structures. These buildings must be listed on your policy to be covered. In addition to barns, stables, pens, confinement buildings and sheds, other outbuildings include cold storage structures, rice dryers, nut hullers, packing houses, prune dehydrators and potato storage sheds, for example. Coverage for farm buildings includes: • Water pumps, motors and other outdoor equipment used for the operation of the building • Furniture, fixtures, machinery and equipment – pertaining to the use of the building – located in, on or within 100 feet of the building Also talk to your agent about: • Insuring your farm buildings for replacement cost or actual cash value • The Causes of Loss (Broad, Basic or Special) for which you want to insure

• How much deductible to carry. A higher deductible may lower your premium, but you would have to pay more in the event of a loss. • The current values of your farm buildings Under certain conditions, AgriChoice® may also provide coverage for collapse of farm buildings. Extended coverage for new farm buildings If you add a new barn, shelter or other confinement building, AgriChoice extends your coverage of up to $100,000 for 60 days (beginning when the building materials are delivered) or until your next renewal date. When your policy is about to renew, discuss the values of any new structures with your agent to be sure you’re properly insured. Don’t forget the fixtures The AgriChoice policy provides coverage for equipment breakdown and mechanical failure of fixtures or systems built into farm buildings. Be sure your agent is aware of the values of all fixtures, systems and equipment associated with your barns or other structures.

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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SWEEP Applications ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR AGRICULTURAL WATER AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY GRANTS UP TO $100,000 PER FARMER

Sheephearder’s Pay The Office of the Labor Commissioner recently released guidance for employers of sheepherders as to how they are expected to calculate sheepherders’ regular rate of pay. The RRP calculation is important to sheepherder employers who need to calculate correct overtime premium pay rates.

Applications will be accepted from October 21st - December 16th 2019 https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/oefi/ sweep/

This information is located on the Farm Employers Labor Service (FELS) website. www.fels.net If you prefer our office can print and send this information to you. Please call us at 530.662.6316.

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

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USDA Disaster Assistance USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for California Farmers Hurt by 2018, 2019 Disasters 09/16/2019 01:29 PM EDT California Farmers and Ranchers affected by Wildfires in 2018 and 2019 can apply through the Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+). Sign-up for this U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) program began September 11. Brooke Raffaele Public Affairs & Outreach Coordinator California Farm Service Agency U.S. Department of Agriculture (530) 219-7747

Payroll Information Q. I have an employee whose timecard hours are 11 hours and 35 minutes, or 10 hours and 22 minutes. How do I correctly pay this? Can I round up or down the hours to the nearest 15 minutes? A. As long as the use of a rounding policy will not result, over time, in undercompensating the employees for all the time they have worked, an employer in California may round hours worked to the nearest: • Five minutes • One-tenth of an hour (i.e., six minutes) or • (At most) one-quarter of an hour (i.e., 15 minutes) Rounding to the nearest half hour (i.e., 30 minutes) is not allowed. Ensure that over time no employee is undercompensated for hours actually worked.

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Support Our Local Businesses

Petersen & ComPany Agricultural Real Estate

6± Acres – Large grain storage and drying facility on the Sac. River 24± Acres – Syrah vineyard located just east of Highway 99. 70± Acres – Bing cherry orchard with home & large shop. 79± Acres – Amazing home site with incredible views in Clements. 93± Acres – Three year old Cabernet vineyard with great contracts. Nine parcels. Incredible home sites. 102± Acres – 620± cow dairy, potential for perm crops. Located near Galt. Joe Petersen ● (209) 368-8010 ● DRE #01489372

John Deere Rewards Discount Program New Farm Bureau members will need to have an active membership for 30 days from the date they join to utilize the John Deere Rewards discount program.

As many of you know, this is a program that came to us last year through AFBF, and CFBF signed on to the agreement to offer the discount program as a benefit to our members. Unfortunately, John Deere has experienced excessive utilization of this program at the dealer-level, where it is being used too often as a tool to drive sales by signing up customers with a Farm Bureau membership to earn increased discounts. To ensure longevity of this partnership, Farm Bureau and John Deere will be implementing a 30-day new member wait period. For existing and recently renewed Farm Bureau members, nothing will change. Their experience will continue exactly as it is now when they go to www.JohnDeere.com/ FarmBureau to register for their discount.

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Support Our Local Businesses

RENTAL SERVICES BIG GUN

SPRINKLER PIPE

CERTA SET

HDPE PIPELINE

PUMP RIG

PORTABLE PUMP RIG

ALUMINUM PIPELINE

FILTER (PORTABLE)

CERTA SET PIPELINE

pacsouthwestirr.com (707) 678-4277 • 555 W. Chestnut St, Dixon, CA 95620 Contact Hunter Kett : (707) 953-4447 • hkett@pacsouthwestirr.com BALLICO 209-634-5072

STOCKTON 209-460-0450

CROWSLANDING 209-837-4669

General Eng. Contractor #835461

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Valley Truck & Tractor From big to small. From farm to front yard. As a Farm Bureau® member, you’re eligible to save.*

1025R COMPACT UTILITY TRACTOR

23.9-hp (17.8-kW) Tier 4 diesel engine Quik-Park™ Loader and AutoConnect™ Drive-over Deck compatible Easy operation four-wheel drive (4WD) power steering Fast and easy implement changeover

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Offer valid on qualifying purchases through 31 May 2019. Subject to approved installment credit with John Deere Financial, for Ag, consumer, or commercial use only. Up to a 20% down payment may be required. Implements, attachments, taxes, freight, setup and delivery charges could increase the monthly payment. Available at participating U.S. dealers. Price and model availability may vary by dealer. Limited to stock on hand. 2Valley Truck & Tractor Co.’s New Residential Tractor Program is offered on John Deere 1, 2 & 3 Series Compact Utility Tractors for 10 years or 2,000 hours, whichever comes first. See Valley Truck & Tractor Co. warranty contract for complete terms and conditions. Some Restrictions Apply. See Dealer For Details. *Must be a valid member of Farm Bureau for 30 days and have a valid email address to be eligible for John Deere Rewards benefits. John Deere’s green and yellow color scheme, the leaping deer symbol, and JOHN DEERE are trademarks of Deere & Company. 1

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Yolo County Farm Bureau P. O. Box 1556 Woodland, CA 95776

Non-Profit Org US Postage PAID Sacramento, CA Permit #1309

YC Ag Department Worker Safety Information Seminars

2 hours Private Applicator Certification (PAC) Exam LOCATION: REGISTRATION: NEED C.E. HOURS ??

Norton Hall, 70 Cottonood Street Woodland Call 530-666-8140 The seminars offer 2 hours of continuing education in Laws and Regulations for licenses and private applicators.

AgAgri-News Volume 39 Issue 10

October/November 2019

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Profile for yolocountyfarmbureau

October-November 2019  

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