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Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

College of Applied Arts Newsletter A Member  of  The  Texas  State  University  System    

FROM THE  DEAN’S  DESK  

Dates to Remember

College & Graduate Students, The College of Applied Arts continues to experience enrollment growth both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The undergraduate enrollment headcount increased (3.8%) from 3,254 in fall of 2011 to 3,377 in fall of 2012. The Graduate enrollment headcount increased (7.2%) from 512 in fall of 2011 to 549 in fall of 2012. We have experienced significant growth in 5 graduate programs; the Criminal Justice Doctorate program grew 14%, from 35 to 41 students, the Master's Criminal Justice program grew 11%, from 100 to 112 students, the Human Nutrition program grew 23%, from 24 to 31students, the Department of Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies (OWLS) grew 9.4%, from 63 to 68 students. Fall 2012  Graduate  Enrollment    

0 14  

Ag Ed

100 222  

December 6

8-14 Final Exams 13

Hooding Ceremony, Alkek Teaching Theater, 6 pm

15

Commencement Ceremony, 6 pm

19

Grades available

January 2-10 Late Registration and Schedule Changes

CJ

8-9 Transfer Orientation/Registration

Ph D

10

Freshman Orientation/Registration

17

Diplomas pick- up, ends February 8

14

First Day of Classes

21

MLK Holiday, classes do not meet

30

12th Class Day

FCS

35 53  

HN OWLS SW

63 24  

Last day of classes

Sustainability

We have added new graduate programs in the School of Family and Consumer Sciences to meet the market needs. An MSIS in Sustainability Studies added 24 new graduate students to the fall semester enrollment and the MS in Merchandising and Consumer Studies will enroll its first cohort in spring of 2013.

Drop with Refund


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

Occupational   F   rom the Dean’s Desk (cont.) Education   Program            

Social Work sustained their enrollment at 217 and will add a spring cohort of approximately 50 new students. The challenge is to recruit, retain and graduate students and keep an incremental growth balance of our graduate enrollment.

External funding continues to provide opportunities to faculty, recently Donna M. Vandiver was awarded a ($490,000) grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in conjunction with Professors Elizabeth J. Letourneau from Johns Hopkins University and Mark J. Chaffin from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The grant will examine the effects of juvenile sex offender registration across three separate states.

On September 25, 2012, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notified the School of Social Work at Texas State University-San Marcos that the HHS Health Resources and Services Administration has awarded the School of Social Work $479,035 (over three years) to fund the School’s Project Stand Up for Veterans. This exciting project will fund student stipends to educate graduate social workers in mental and behavioral health and prepare them to work with military personnel, veterans, and their families. Just as the military stands up a trained force, Texas State School of Social Work will stand up a cadre of well-prepared clinical social workers prepared to work with this important population. Dr. Mary Jo Garcia Biggs, Dr. Katherine Selber, and Dr. Amy Russell will oversee Project Stand Up for Veterans. Dr. Gwendolyn Hustvedt, associate professor in the School of Family and Consumer Sciences, received $120,135 from a USDA Challenge NIFA Higher Education grant to revolutionize apparel industry education through STEM in partnership with Kansas State University and Oklahoma State University. The college will continue to strategically assign graduate assistants to the faculty that are writing new grant requests. Texas State and the College of Applied Arts will continue to leverage the emerging research classification and the HSI designation to continue soliciting external funding opportunities. Dr. Hardin Rahe, Professor in the Department of Agriculture, along with colleagues Michael Forstner and Dittmar Hahn from the Department of Biology, were recently awarded a USDA grant in the amount of $138,000. The intent of the project is to increase, through STEM-based learning, the number of underrepresented students who complete graduate degrees in agriculture. T. Jaime Chahin, Dean of the College of Applied Arts


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter  Occupational   G raduate Student Spotlight Education   Program      

Meet Jaclyn (Jackie) Schildkraut, Criminal Justice Doctoral Student  

Jaclyn (Jackie) Schildkraut is a second year doctoral student in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University. Jackie joins her cohort from the University of Central Florida in Orlando, FL, where she earned her Bachelors degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (2009) and her Masters degree in Applied Sociology (2011). Looking for a change, Jackie decided to join the program at Texas State because of the outstanding faculty and the opportunity to get in on the ground floor of a newer program.

Jaclyn Schildkraut,  second  year  doctoral  student   in  the  School  of  Criminal  Justice  at  Texas  State.  

Jackie’s research interests took shape following the 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech. Determined to give back, Jackie and a high school friend organized a charity event designed to raise money for the Hokie Memorial Scholarship Fund. When the event did not raise as much as desired, Jackie decided to contribute further by focusing her research on these tragic events. Currently, Jackie has an article examining the media portrayal of the Virginia Tech event forthcoming in the journal Fast Capitalism (www.fastcapitalism.com). An additional piece about the mediatization of school shootings focusing on both Virginia Tech and Columbine is due out later this year as a chapter in the book School Shootings: Mediatized Violence in a Global Age. Jackie, along with her cohort member H. Jaymi Elsass, are also currently researching how school shootings can affect students’ fear of crime and perceptions of safety on campus. Beyond school shootings, Jackie also focuses on media effects as they relate to other criminal justice issues in much of her research. Her first publication, “Murder in Black: A Media Distortion Analysis of 2010 Homicides in Baltimore,” was published earlier this year in Homicide Studies. This study, which has also spurned several other articles currently under review with other journals, examines how stories about homicide in racially homogeneous areas are assigned newsworthiness and seeks to find predictors that may lead to stories being covered or being excluded from news coverage. This research began as a class project during her Masters program and eventually became her thesis. In addition to the article being published, the research also earned Jackie the 2011 Richard Block Award for Outstanding Thesis, sponsored by the Homicide Research Working Group. (Spotlight continues on next page.)


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter  Occupational   G raduate Student Spotlight (cont.) Education   Program      

   

Additional research interests for Jackie also include elected executions and issues of death row volunteering. She has one article, entitled “An Inmate’s Right to Die: Legal and Ethical Considerations in Death Row Volunteering,” which was recently published in Criminal Justice Studies, and several other works that she is currently co-authoring with her mentor, Glenn Muschert, from Miami University (Ohio). Jackie also has several book reviews and encyclopedia entries also published, and she continues to work with both her peers and faculty members to publish new research.

Jackie analyzes  research  data  in  the  Hill  House   conference  room,     where  the  doctoral  program  is  housed.  

In addition to writing and publishing, Jackie also has had the opportunity to present her research at conferences nationwide. She recently returned from the American Society of Criminology meetings in Chicago, IL, where she presented her latest research on media distortion and Baltimore homicides to a packed audience, including one of the researchers she usually cites. She has also had the opportunity while at Texas State to present at conferences in New York City, Washington DC, and Las Vegas. Next year, her research will take her to Dallas and both Brunswick and Atlanta for various meetings. Beyond just research, Jackie also enjoys her teaching responsibilities. As a doctoral instructional assistant, she has had the opportunity to teach courses in Crime Theories and Research Methods. Her unique approach to class organization, which includes the integration of web-based components to help facilitate learning, earned her the recognition of Sakai, the company that developed the TRACS platform. In early 2012, Jackie had the honor of winning the Teaching with Sakai Innovation Award for face-to-face learning, an award that Texas State faculty has won three consecutive times, and another criminal justice faculty member, Dr. Scott Bowman, also won. She had the opportunity to attend the Sakai international conference in Atlanta in June and present her use of the technology to other professionals as well as technology developers. She looks forward to the challenge that teaching an introductory level course next spring will bring her. Jackie is an avid sports fan and enjoys cheering on her favorite teams, including the New York Yankees, Dallas Cowboys, and Florida Panthers. She also enjoys traveling and hopes to one day extend her research to Europe so she can visit various countries. (Spotlight continues on next page.)


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter  Occupational   G raduate Student Spotlight (cont.) Education   Program      

   

Jaclyn’s Current Accomplishments Publications Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (2012). “An Inmate’s Right To Die: Legal and Ethical Considerations in Death Row Volunteering.” Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society. (Online First – doi: 10.1080/1478601X.2012.720575) Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (2012, Forthcoming). “Media and Massacre: A Comparative Analysis of the Reporting of the 2007 Virginia Tech Shootings.” Fast Capitalism, 9(1). Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (2012). “The Remote Is Controlled By The Monster: Issues of Mediatized Violence and School Shootings” in Glenn W. Muschert and Johanna Sumiala (eds.) School Shootings: Mediatized Violence in a Global Age (pp. 235258). Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing Group Limited. Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (2012, September). “Serial killers: Psychiatry, criminology, responsibility.” Book review for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books, Rutgers University. Available at http://clcjbooks.rutgers.edu/books/serial_killers.html. Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (Forthcoming). “Embezzlement.” Article for Encyclopedia of Social Deviance, edited by Heith Copes & Craig J. Forsyth.

Conferences Schildkraut, Jaclyn, Amy Donley, and Marie Gualtieri. “Atypical and A Typical Homicide: Testing A Reporter’s Decision To Publish.” Paper accepted for presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, IL. November.

Third Texas State Instructor Wins Teaching With Sakai Innovation Award A first time teacher and criminal justice doctoral student is Texas State University’s latest winner of the Teaching With Sakai Innovation Award (TWSIA). Jaclyn Schildkraut, from the School of Criminal Justice, submitted her spring 2012 course, Crime Theory and Victimization for the international award. She says she didn’t expect much to come of it, and was very surprised when she was notified she had won the Higher Education Face-to-Face category of the award for 2012. (Click here to see gain access to the video interview done with Jaclyn. Scroll down to see her video it is at the end of the page.)


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

 Occupational   G raduate Studies NewsP& Events Education   rogram      

The Office of the Dean of the College of Applied Arts cordially invites you to attend the

 

Master’s Hooding Ceremony Class of December 2012 "The noblest search is the search for excellence." Lyndon B. Johnson Thirty-Sixth President of the United States, 1963-1969 Texas State University Class of 1930 The Master’s Hooding Ceremony honors Scholarly Achievement & Graduate Research Alkek Teaching Theater Thursday, December 13th, 2012, 6 pm

RSVP by December 1st to 512-245-3538 For special accommodations, please contact the Office of Disability Services at 512-245-3451, At least 72 hours prior to the event.

Texas State University is a member of The Texas State University System.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

Graduate Studies News & Events (cont.) Master’s Graduation Candidates for December 2012 Department of Agriculture

School of Family and Consumer Sciences

Lee J. Kitchens, MSAG Jennifer M. Perez, MSAG Ghazal Tarar, MSAG

Family & Child Studies Casey E. Bellows, MS Kathalene D. Brooks, MS Riley A. Hammond, MS Megan E. Kraft, MS Kasserin L. Longoria, MS Samantha L. Mundine, MS April M. Postell, MS Eleia D. Roddy, MS

School of Criminal Justice Megan W. Black, MSCJ Dannette De Leon, MSCJ Coleman P. Elliott, MSCJ Melanie R. Escamilla, MSCJ Nancy J. Ford, MSCJ Warren V. Held, MSCJ Lucy Hernandez, MSCJ Matthew J. Herrera, MSCJ Robert Z. Hughes, MSCJ Thomas J. Hughes, MSCJ Robert W. Jennings, MSCJ Erin McGann, MSCJ Carlos D. Montemayor, MSCJ Rebecca L. Montgomery, MSCJ Rory H. Oldham, MSCJ Steve C. Ou, MSCJ Charles T. Root, MSCJ John E. Russell, MSCJ Michael E. Seibert, MSCJ Gregory G. Slade, MSCJ Jason D. Thompson, MSCJ Jackie A. Villarreal, MSCJ Kristina Y. Villarreal, MSCJ

Human Nutrition Program Yuki Gomada, MS Priscilla Pham, MS Sustainability Program Alison M. Owen, MS

Department of Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies Jason M. Castillo, MSIS Deidra Flynn, MSIS Victoria M. Ackerman M Ed Peggy A. Ridley, M Ed Roberto Rodriguez, M Ed Douglass V. Weikel, M Ed

School of Social Work Julian J. Apolinar, MSW Shemeca R. Barnes, MSW Corina M. Benavides, MSW Laura A. Esparza, MSW Judy M. Morrison, MSW David Soriano, MSW Christina D. Thompson-Garcia, MSW

* Graduate Advisors and Graduation Candidates please be aware that participation in the CAA Master’s Hooding Ceremony constitutes that all graduation requirements have been successfully met (thesis defense, comprehensive oral and written exams, completion of field hours, etc.) at the program, departmental and University levels.


CAA Newsletter

Department of Agriculture

Fall 2012

State Farm YAB Grant Awarded for Composting Program

State Farm Community Relations congratulated the Horticulture Program for a successful grant to the State Farm Youth Advisory Board Grant. The check/grant was for a little over $85,000 and is intended to set up a composting and mentoring program at the high school.

       

The composting project will be implemented throughout the   high school to collect all of their cafeteria food waste, and will, therefore, benefit the whole high school. The agriculture classes will monitor the food waste bins and the  in-vessel composter and will be mentored by the college students. The attached grant was originally written for the grade school, but the school di   The purpose of this project is to develop a composting education program in which students from   Texas State University teach elementary school students in the San Marcos Consolidated Independent School District about organic waste and composting while empowering them in   diverting trash from the waste stream, raising their awareness as to what they throw away and encouraging them to recycle while teaching them the value of compost.  

The project addresses Environmental Responsibility by engaging students in an activity that raises their awareness of the waste they generate while also teaching them methods to reduce waste on a practical, individual level. Reduction of waste through composting generates a product   that is not only good for the environment, but is also a valuable horticultural product, especially in this region of Central Texas.  

Each year, Americans generate 30 million tons of food waste, but spend thousands in trash receptacle rental and hauling fees to process these types of materials that are currently in the waste stream. There is potential to not only save money in trash processing funds, but to create a   valuable product from the waste. This project will help teach youth about creating an organic soil amendment that can increase soil productivity and help preserve our soils. The United States is fortunate to have some of the finest and most productive soils in the world. However, areas of productive land are being lost due to development, compaction, erosion and high salinity. At the same time, there are food shortages in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The human population of the world is rising and farmers are being expected to produce more food in poorer soils and on less land. Some estimates are that 6 billion people are eating food produced on 11 percent of the earth's surface and just 3 percent of that land is considered fertile soil. Soil scientists have predicted for a long time that soil is a precious resource and one that calls for attention and creating compost helps rebuild soils.


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

Department of Agriculture (cont.)  

Faculty and Graduate Student Accomplishments (* Indicates graduate or undergraduate student)  

Articles published:

*Pilat, M., A. McFarland, A., Snelgrove, K. Collins, T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Zajicek. 2012. The effect of tree cover and vegetation on incidence of childhood asthma in metropolitan statistical areas of Texas. HortTechnology, 22(5).   *Nolan, G. A. McFarland, J.M. Zajicek and T.M. Waliczek. 2012. The effects of   nutrition education and gardening on attitudes, preferences and knowledge of 2nd   HortTechnology, 22(3). 5th graders toward fruit and vegetables. Presentations:

*Montoya, J., T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Gandonou. An economic analysis of a university educational vermicomposting system – Bobcat Blend. HortScience,   July, Miami, FL.  

*Tarar, G., T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Zajicek. 2012. The effect of urban tree cover and vegetation on incidence of stress related illnesses in humans in metropolitan statistical areas of Texas. HortScience, July, Miami, FL.

 

*Sembera, J. and T.M. Waliczek. 2012. Bobcat Blend -- Campus Food Collections. Food Policy Conference. May, San Antonio, TX.

 

*Sembera, J. and T.M. Waliczek. 2012. Composting at Texas State: On Campus and in Research. State of Texas Alliance for Recycling (STAR) 15th Annual Texas Recycling & Sustainability Summit. Corpus Christi, TX.

   

Grants: *Trant, R. and T.M. Waliczek. 2012. Bobcat Blend -- Creating and implementing a student run campus composting and mentoring program. State Farm Youth Advisory Board, $85,000.

 

Student’s Sustainable Farm Students’ Sustainable Farm (SSF) organic produce operates under three pillars: 1) Ecologically friendly to the natural occurring environment 2) Social cooperation 3) Economically sound OUR MISSION The ultimate goal is to create an eco-system, which can educate, nourish, and provide research opportunities to all students, faculty, staff and the community. Students are encouraged to participate in growing and harvesting while at Texas State!


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

Department of Agriculture (cont.)  

Department of Agriculture Graduate Students Represent in Washington D.C. Texas State University - San Marcos graduate students, Juan Garcia and Diana Morales, traveled to Washington D.C. on October 18-22, 2012. At the United State Department of Agriculture building they presented the results of the progress of the USDA FATE grant Food Safety and Agroterrorism Training: Education Our Future Workforce.

               

Juan and Diana also attended the 2012 Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) conference while in D.C, along with other undergraduates from Texas State University-San Marcos and other prominent transfer students from community colleges funded through HACU. The HACU conference was held at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. The theme of the meeting was “Championing Hispanic Higher Education Success: Advancing Access and Opportunity in a Changing Environment”. Here the students attended different workshops to help them gain more knowledge on how to become more marketable in the workforce. Attending the conference allowed our students to participate in this important Hispanic conference and to network with other students from California, Florida, Puerto Rico, and professionals from General Electric (GE), different USDA agencies and many other companies.

                   

The students were able to enjoy the historical city by visiting some of our nation’s most famous memorials, many world class museums, the National Zoo and to dine in some of Washington DC’s best café and restaurants.


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

Department of Agriculture (cont.)  

Research Awards 3rd Place, Distinguished Research Manuscript, 31st National Agricultural Mechanics Committee Blue Ribbon Paper Research Seminar, October 2012, Indianapolis, IN, Selected factors influencing Missouri school-based agricultural educators to instruct agricultural mechanics curriculum Saucier, P. R, & Krysher, S. (2012, October). Selected factors influencing Missouri school-based agricultural educators to instruct agricultural mechanics curriculum. Paper presented at the 31st National Agricultural Mechanics Committee Blue Ribbon Poster Session, Indianapolis, IN. 1st Place, Outstanding Conference Research Paper, 30th Annual Conference for the Association for Career and Technical Education Research, November 2012, Atlanta, GA, Assessing performance and consequence competence in a technology-based professional development for agricultural science teachers: An evaluation of the Lincoln Electric Welding Technology Workshop Saucier, P. R., McKim, B. R., Muller, J. E., & Kingman, D. M. (2012, November). Assessing performance and consequence competence in a technology-based professional development for agricultural science teachers: An evaluation of the Lincoln Electric Welding Technology Workshop. Paper presented at the 30th Annual Conference for the Association Career and Technical Education Research, Atlanta, GA.

14th Annual Kill It N Grill It On October 12, 2012, the Agricultural Ambassadors hosted the 14th Annual Kill It N Grill It Cook-off. At this cook-off, approximately 12 teams competed in various food categories ranging from exotic meats to baked dishes. This event coincides with other Homecoming events. Brittany Rivera served as the Kill It N Grill It Chair for 2012 and was assisted by Juan Garcia.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice

 

Faculty and Graduate Student Collaboration Will Examine Probation Records

             

Dr. Beth Sanders and Dr. Scott Bowman from the School of Criminal Justice received a contract from Bexar County Community Supervision and Corrections Department (CSCD) to conduct a mixed-methods evaluation of adult probation. The project will examine probation records in order to evaluate how well the department’s current risk assessment instrument predicts revocation. Additionally, graduate students Hunter Martaindale, Jaclyn Schildkraut, Victoria Terranova, Anne Kringen, and Tyler Vaughan will be assisting on the project.

   

Faculty and Doctoral Student Publications

Jonathan Allen

Allen, J. & Cancino, J. (2012). Social disorganization, Latinos, and juvenile crime in the Texas borderlands. Journal of Criminal Justice 40(2), 152-163.

 

Floyd Berry

Berry, F. & Piechocki, G. (2011) Maricopa revisited: Findings from a probation offender survey. Southwest Journal of Criminal Justice.

Lynn Greenwood Book Review of Prevention and Youth Crime: Is Early Intervention Working? International Criminal Justice Review. 2011 Kevin Jennings Mijares, T., Ling, H. & Jennings, K. (2012) A New development in sensory enhancing technology. Journal of the Global Homeland Security Education Network, 1(1), 89-104. Kristina Lopez Lopez, K., & Miller, H.V. (2011). Ethnicity, acculturation, and offending: Findings from a sample of Hispanic adolescents. The Open Family Studies Journal, 4, 27-37. Miller, H.V., Miller, J.M., Tillyer, R., & Lopez, K. (2010). Recovery and punishment in correctional settings: Reconciling conflicting objectives. In Stacy Burns & Mark Peyrot (Eds.), Research in Social Problems and Public Policy. Amsterdam: JAI Press. Miller, J.M., Higgins, G., & Lopez, K. (2010). Cybercrime awareness and prevention: A critical review of online resources. In Christopher Reddick (Ed.), Citizens and EGovernment: Evaluating Policy and Management. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference Publishers.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)   Faculty and Doctoral   Student Publications        

Sarah Scott

Scott, S. E. (----). Race/ethnicity, historiographic private prisons, and labor punishment. In S. Bowman (Ed.), Racism in the U.S. prison system (--- - ---). Santa Barbara: ABCCLIO/Greenwood.

Pollock, J. M., & Scott, S. E. (2008). Study guide: Crime & justice in America: An introduction to criminal justice. Cincinnati: LexisNexis/Anderson Publishing.

Jaclyn Shildkraut

Schildkraut, J. (2012, In Press). The Remote Is Controlled By The Monster: Issues of Mediatized Violence and School Shootings. In Glenn W. Muschert & Johanna Sumiala (Eds.) School Shootings: Mediatized Violence in a Global Age (pp. 235-258). Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing Group Limited.

           

Schildkraut, J. (2012). Serial killers: Psychiatry, criminology, responsibility. Book review for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books, Rutgers University. Available at http://clcjbooks.rutgers.edu/books/serial_killers.html. Schildkraut, J. (2012). An Inmate’s Right To Die: Legal and Ethical Considerations in Death Row Volunteering. Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society.   (Online First – doi: 10.1080/1478601X.2012.720575) Schildkraut, J. (2012, Forthcoming). Media and Massacre: A Comparative Analysis of the Reporting of the 2007 Virginia Tech Shootings. Fast Capitalism, 9(1). Schildkraut, J., & Donley, A.M. (2012). Murder in Black: A Media Distortion Analysis of 2010 Homicides in Baltimore. Homicide Studies, 16(2), 175-196. Howard E. Williams was invited to attend the Third Annual Australasian ECD Best Practices Conference in Wellington, New Zealand, 29 October – 1 November, 2012, to present and discuss his recently published paper "The Braidwood Commission reports on TASER use in Canada: An evidence-based policy review." ************************************************************************** Texas State University & the Department of Criminal Justice Hosts the

23rd Annual Competition & Seminar for Crisis Negotiations January 8 - 11, 2013 For details contact: Dr. Wayman Mullins at wm04@txstate.edu.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)      

Officers Undergo Active Shooter Training at Texas State University Source: www.myfoxaustin.com Posted: Nov 13, 2012 8:53 PM CST Updated: Nov 13, 2012 9:50 PM CST

From   fire range shooting, to busting down barricades and doors, to taking on a vehicle ambush,

law enforcement officers have to stay ahead of the modern criminal. "All the stuff that we're

showing patrol officers today are things that swat teams have been training for years," said John

Curnutt, Director of Training for the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training in

San Marcos.

In today's world, it has been determined that patrol officers should get some of the hands on

training techniques that SWAT officers already know.

"For decades it was a specialized unit with specialized training and they didn't show it to other  

people because hey that unit will handle it, that unit will do it," said Curnutt. But that unit cannot always be there.

At the   ALERRT training center at Texas State University in San Marcos, officers from across the

country are getting what is called active shooter response training.

"How to go in and save people who are involved in a mass casualty event like in Aurora,  

Colorado, or Virginia Tech or Fort Hood. How to go in there and effectively stop a threat from further injuring or killing people," said Curnutt.

While the training at ALERRT may seem like make-believe scenarios, there are real people who  

wish it had come to their communities sooner.

"I lost my daughter in 2006 at a school shooting in Colorado," said John-Michael Keyes, founder of the iloveuguys Foundation.  

Keyes' daughter, Emily, was shot and killed at Platte Canyon High School in Bailey, Colorado, on September 27, 2006. Keyes is helping law enforcement handle active shooter situations better by showing officers and schools how to better communicate, by using the situation at his daughter's school as an example. "At that school they actually called it a ‘code white'. What's that mean? And so being very specific with the language is real critical in an emergency because you never know who is in the building and being natural, clear and distinct with your language. ‘Lockdown' is certainly more distinct than ‘code white'." Keyes is hoping to prevent a similar situation from happening at other schools and college campuses. Also during the training, officers are also learning from the first responders of the deadly Arizona shooting rampage that also wounded Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. The idea is to teach others what they did right and what they would change from the response to the Arizona shooting. "We don't like to see officers training, you know shooting and having to move and be aggressive, but it's all designed to save lives," Curnutt said.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)                                

School of Criminal Justice Represents at National Conference The American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meetings were held on November 14-17, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. This year, a record number of graduate students participated at ASC. Our students assisted with recruiting efforts by working at a table in the book exhibit area that advertised our programs at the School of Criminal Justice, Texas State University. The students also attended a reception at Gino's pizza hosted by our School. This was our first   reception hosted by our school. The students invited other students and faculty from other departments. The students were able to meet many of the criminologists and criminal justice researchers they have read and learned about in the classroom. Many students indicated they made many professional contacts. With eight students in the   dissertation phase, the conference served as an opportunity for students to gauge the job market and meet potential future employers.  

The following doctoral students did an excellent job of presenting original research. “Violent Victimization Risk in Five Daily Activity Domains” Ward Adams “Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Serial Crime” “Homicide: Relying on Legal Outcomes as Behavioral Measures” Jonathan Allen “On Expanding Deterrence Theory” Jaime Elsass “Cultural Invariance in an Emerging Minority: Self Control and Delinquency in the Hispanic Population” Erin Grant “Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Serial Crime” “Homicide: Relying on Legal Outcomes as Behavioral Measures” Ann Kringen “Prevalence of Violent Victimization within a Sample of Hispanic Adolescents” Kristina Lopez


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)            

School of Criminal Justice Represents at National Conference (cont.)

         

“Sexting Attitudes and Behaviors: A Retrospective Examination of Sexting Among Teenagers” Kathy Martinez-Lopez  

“Atypical and A Typical Homicide: Testing a Reporter’s Decision to Publish” Jaclyn Schildkraut

   

“Black, White, and Grey: How Context Influences the perception of Racial Profile” Michele Quinones

“Examinations of Community Perceptions of Sex Offenders” Barbara Smith

The following masters students presented original research as well. “School Disorder and the Current Strategies Utilized: An Analysis of Texas Schools” Joseph McKenna “Educating Victimization Risk: Alternate Crime Prevention Strategies for College Campuses” Tyler Vaughan Kyle Mueller Jessica Marinez “Gender Differences in Hazing Rituals” Melissa Vasquez Kelly Richburg “Who Your Mother Warned You About: How Peer Relationships Influence Precursor Attitudes of Teen Dating Violence” Rebecca Roberie


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)    

Doctoral Student Presents to Legislative Budget Board

                         

In summer 2011, doctoral student, Ward A. Adams, attended the Quantitative Analysis of Crime and Criminal Justice seminar at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Michigan, sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). A requirement of that course was to develop a research project from one of the criminal justice-related databases available through the   Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), a data   warehouse located at the University of Michigan.

Doctoral student, Ward Adams in Chicago at the American Society of Criminology in November of 2012.

Ward spent quite a lot of time building his project, and didn’t want it to go to waste. He started thinking about refining it into something that might be publishable. Earlier in 2012, Criminal justice students were informed by Dr. Mark Stafford, the interim director for the School of Criminal Justice, that there were opportunities for students to present original research at the Legislative Budget Board’s (LBB’s) fall 2012 Criminal Justice Forum. The LBB develops budget and policy recommendations for legislative appropriations, fiscal analyses, and conducts evaluations and reviews for the State of Texas Legislature. Ward contacted the LBB, and was selected to present during that forum. That forum provided the impetus to return to his summer project, entitled “Do Time and Location Matter in Identifying Patterns of Victimization?” The focus of that work was to determine how the location and time of crime might shed light on criminal victimization. This particular kind of research is important, because it is easily understood and can be readily implemented by law enforcement agencies. The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) data was used to conduct the analyses. Three types of crime were used in the study: Crimes against persons, crimes against property, and crimes against society. Crimes against society include drug use, gambling, and similar offenses. The specific crimes analyzed were aggravated assault of youth, ages 17 and below, youth vandalism, ages 14 and below, and prostitution. The percent of each crime were measured at three-hour intervals, day of the week, city size, and several different locations. (Continues on next page.)


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)                                

Graduate Student Presents to Legislative Budget Board (cont.)

In short, all three crimes demonstrated distinct spatial and temporal patterns. For example, nearly 50 percent of incidences of aggravated assault of youth ages 17 and below occur primarily at home or on roads. Assaults increase in frequency as youth move through the day. Youth, ages 14 and below, engage in vandalism primarily between the hours of 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm during the school week.   The vast majority (80 percent) of prostitution occurs on streets or roads between 8:00 pm and 10:00 pm.  

Ward presents his research findings and recommendations at an International Conference in Norway in 2012.

The most interesting differences, however, were those between the largest cities and the smallest locations. Generally, crimes in large cities tended to be more evenly distributed in space and time. In contrast, crimes in small areas, which in this study are county locations, were much more likely to occur at home or in some cases, hotels. For example, prostitution was much more likely to occur in homes or hotels in small locations, while street prostitution was far more prevalent in large cities. To summarize, this study demonstrated that time and location can contribute to the understanding of victimization. Crimes against property, persons, and society display a great deal of variation in time and location, and incidents within each crime type are distinctly patterned. Additionally, these findings point to opportunities for law enforcement agencies to increase efficiency and therefore save money by tailoring their strategies by location and time, which is always an important consideration, especially in these days of ongoing budget cuts. The School of Criminal Justice continues to mentor and facilitate innovative opportunities for its doctoral, masters and undergraduate student body. For details about this outstanding program and the career possibilities, go to http://www.cj.txstate.edu/.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

Occupational   School of Family and Consumer Education   Program      Sciences

   

Research Presentation Wins First Place Priscilla Pham (graduate student of Dr. Vatsala Maitin) won first place for her research presentation entitled ‘Preliminary characterization of secreted bioactive compounds from Bifidobacterium longum with modulatory activity towards enterocytic Fasting Induced Adipocyte Factor (FIAF)’ at the Texas State University’s 3rd Annual Women in Science and Engineering Conference in April 2012. The Conference convened on April 12 & 13, 2012. This event provides opportunities for young women studying for careers in the science and engineering fields to gain insights into successful engineering, science, and career practices from experienced professionals and educators. A key goal of the conference is to provide a place for women to explore options and challenges, talk with likeminded professionals, learn what others are doing, and become inspired and empowered to make a difference. Program highlights include panel discussions and career development sessions and opportunities to explore through laboratory tours, research poster sessions, and student scholarship awards. In the same month, she presented her thesis research as a selected oral presentation at the Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego. At the Experimental Biology conference, her abstract was also selected for the graduate student poster competition under the Dietary Bioactive Compounds Research Interest Section of the American Society for Nutrition. She defended her graduate thesis in Human Nutrition on August 3rd, 2012. Results from her thesis research suggest that a beneficial bacterium called Bifidobacterium longum that is a normal inhabitant of the human gut is able to secrete some proteins during its active growth that may help protect against excessive fat storage from the diet. Growth of this bacteria in the gut can be promoted through breastfeeding in infants and through prebiotic foods such as many fruits and vegetables, whole grains and legumes in adults. Priscilla is currently continuing her research in this area with Dr. Maitin, in the capacity of a Ph.D. student in Biology.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

Occupational   School of Family and Consumer Education   Program      Sciences (cont.)

   

Faculty & Graduate Student Accomplishments Presentations: Dr. Mira Ahn, Assistant Professor, attended the Housing Education and Research Association (HERA) conference in Roanoke, VA, October 28th through October 31st. She presented two research articles, “Examining government assistance for rural elderly housing with 2009 American Housing Survey data” and “Housing affordability issues of Baby boomers”. Dr. BJ Friedman, Dr. Sylvia Crixell and Seanna Marceaux, MS graduate, gave an invited research presentation, "Practice in a Large Meals on Wheels Program" at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food and Nutrition Conference and Exhibition in Philadelphia in October. Their presentation attracted attention from potential funders to expand the research. Re-Accreditation: The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) after writing self-studies and hosting site visitors evaluated both the Didactic Program (DP) and the Dietetic Internship (DI). Dr. Sylvia Crixell is the Director of the DP and Dr. BJ Friedman directs the DI. Both programs were commended for their high quality. The final reaccreditation decisions will be announced Spring 2013. Contracts: Drs. Sylvia Crixell and BJ Friedman successfully negotiated and fulfilled a contract with NUTURME, an organic baby food company, to review the literature within the context of their product manufacturing practices and provide recommendations regarding accuracy of labeling and claims, as well as suggestions for improving current products or developing future products. The majority of this work was conducted through supervision of Sarajane Morris, a recent graduate of the undergraduate dietetics program and a current Dietetic Intern. Peer reviewed publications: (* indicates Human Nutrition Program Alum) Escamilla J*, Lane MA, Maitin V (2012) Cell-free supernatants from probiotic Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG decrease colon cancer cell invasion in vitro. Nutrition and Cancer, DOI:10.1080/01635581.2012.700758. Vattem DA, Lester CE*, DeLeon RC*, Jamison BY, Maitin V (2012) Dietary supplementation with two Zingiberaceae spices ginger and turmeric modulates innate immunity parameters in Lumbricus terrestris. Journal of Natural Pharmaceuticals, 3(1): 3745. Vattem DA, Vaden M, Jamison BY, Maitin V (2012) Antioxidant and anti-adhesive activity of some common lichens. Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 7(2): 96-103.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

Occupational   School of Family and Consumer Education   Program      Sciences (cont.)

   

Faculty & Graduate Student Accomplishments Peer reviewed abstracts: Pham P, Cotten RC, Kolinek T, Parker S, Vattem DA, Maitin V (2012) Preliminary characterization of secreted bioactive compounds from Bifidobacterium longum with modulatory activity towards enterocytic Fasting Induced Adipocyte Factor (FIAF). FASEB J. 26:373.6. 1. Jamison BY, Gomada Y, Maitin V, Vattem DA (2012) Sage (Salvia Officinalis) ameliorates experimentally induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans. FASEB J. 26:1025.10. 2. Gomada Y, Jamison BY, Maitin V, Vattem DA (2012) Cinnamon decreases excitation toxicity in primary neuronal cultures from chick embryos. FASEB J. 26: 1025.11.

Congratulations To The Fashion Merchandising (FM) Team Through the efforts of Ms. Bobbie Moore, Dr. Ann DuPont and their FM colleagues, Texas State has been identified by JC Penney as one of three Universities nationally, to help completely revamp its internship program. Ms. Moore will travel to Plano to work with the JCP Corporate talent acquisition group, along with the Universities of Arizona and Missouri.

Cotton Student Sponsorship Program Grant Helps Fashion Merchandising Students Learn and Market Cotton Products Dr. Jay Sang Ryu, an assistant Professor in Fashion Merchandising in the School of Family and Consumer Sciences, was selected as a recipient of 2013 Cotton Student Sponsorship Program Grant provided by the Importer Support Program of the Cotton Board and Cotton Incorporated. The grant will help support the project entitled “From Cotton Learning to Cotton Marketing.” In this project, fashion merchandising students at Texas State University – San Marcos will have opportunities to learn about a cotton fabric and a wide array of cotton-containing finished goods and to incorporate what they learned into the creation and execution of a cotton awareness marketing campaign to Gen Y. For more information on the project, please contact Jay Sang Ryu at (512) 245-4620 or by email at jryu@txstate.edu.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Family and Consumer   Sciences (cont.)   Faculty Accomplishments (cont.)          

Dr. Vatsala Maitin was an invited speaker at the International Conference and Exhibition on Probiotics, held from November 19-21, 2012 in San Antonio, TX. Dr. Maitin presented her research as part of the Molecular Nutrition track. The title of her talk was 'Probiotic-derived bioactive components as modulators of host health: one size does not fit all'. Dr. Maitin was also a guest speaker at the Professional development meeting of the honor society Kappa Delta Pi at Texas State University for the month of November, where she spoke about her experiences in international education and how they relate to her teaching and mentoring.  

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FCS Graduate Programs Offered

The School of Family & Consumer Sciences (FCS) currently offers 4 post-graduate programs.

M.S. in Human Nutrition The M.S. in Human Nutrition provides graduate education from whole foods and nutrient perspectives in nutrition, metabolism, food science and biotechnology incorporating practical training and research. Graduates will be equipped with the technical skills and scientific knowledge to integrate nutrition, food and nutraceuticals with human health issues and wellness promotion. The program offers 2 tracks - Functional Foods and Nutritional Sciences. Both tracks offer either a thesis or non-thesis option. Refer to   http://www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/Prospect_Students/Pgms_Apps/Masters/APP_ARTS/Hum an_Nutr.html for application requirements.

       

Texas State Dietetic Internship trains entry-level dietitians who provide high quality and current nutrition services to the public in the ever-evolving health care and nutrition and foods professional environments. The M.S. Family & Child Studies provides students with knowledge and expertise to attain professional positions and advancement opportunities in family and child programs. Graduate Child Life Specialist Track. A Child Life Specialist is a professional who is specially trained to help children and their families understand and manage challenging healthcare experiences, usually within a hospital setting. Child Life Specialists are skilled in providing developmental, educational, and therapeutic interventions for stressed children and their families. For more information about the certification process, visit the Child Life Council website at www.childlife.org. For information on the new Child Life Track at Texas State University, contact Dr. Beth Russell at er15@txstate.edu. The M.S. in Merchandising and Consumer Studies provides graduate education based upon a consumer-centric perspective applied to fashion products and merchandising, practical training and research. Graduates gain additional knowledge and critical thinking and decision-making skills that provide the expertise to attain professional positions and career advancement in Merchandising and Consumer Studies, both in the public and private sectors. Non-thesis track graduate students will complete a research project and practicum. Thesis track graduate students will be mentored by graduate faculty who are experts in their area and conduct a research project with data collection that results in a thesis.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Family and Consumer   Sciences (cont.)                              

Mexican Nationals Outspend Americans at Outlets

Texas State study focused on San Marcos shoppers

Published: Tuesday, 18 Sep 2012, 9:51 PM CDT By Erin Cargile

SAN MARCOS, Texas (KXAN) - The deals attract many shoppers from across the state and the nation. But those spending the most at the two outlet malls in San Marcos are coming from across the border in Mexico. A recent study published by Texas State University that focused on Mexican citizens shows they are spending twice as much at the outlets as Americans who live outside Austin and San Antonio. "It's the merchandise, prices and selection that is really the appeal," said Dr. Ann Dupont, a professor with the School of Family and Consumer Studies at Texas State. "They're not just coming to visit family and friends and happen to go by the mall, they're coming to do that. It's a destination."  

Click here to read the rest of this article.

Sustainability Studies Graduate Student Presents Analysis of 2011 Drought

Posted by Jayme Blaschke University News Service October 1, 2012

Erin Dorothea Dasher, a sustainability studies graduate student at Texas State University-San Marcos, will present an analysis of consumer responses to the 2011 Texas drought at the 2012 International EcoSummit in Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 2. The presentation is based on data from her 2012 thesis survey of Texas consumers that was distributed in January, immediately after the worst single-year drought in Texas. Part of the survey focused on Texas consumers' beliefs regarding the drought’s cause, their awareness and knowledge of the drought and their environmental attitudes. The data collected by the survey was analyzed to demonstrate Texas consumer’s awareness and knowledge of the 2011 Texas drought. The study demonstrates that Texas consumers are fairly evenly divided about the cause of the drought, but none of the respondents have enough information on the drought. The presentation focuses on the need for consumer education about drought, especially severe drought events. Consumers who believe human behaviors contributed to the drought feel personally prepared to do something about consumption behaviors. However, the lack of awareness among many consumers about the severity or extent of the drought highlight the clear need for awareness campaigns that would educate Texas consumers about drought and identify what they can do to personally help mitigate its effects. For more information, contact Gwendolyn Hustvedt at gh21@txstate.edu.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Family and Consumer   Sciences (cont.)      

American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Texas Student Symposium

By Kelly Hunt

This October Texas State University’s Student ASID Chapter took 35 students to Dallas for the ASID Texas Student Symposium. ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) is a national organization for students and professionals of the design community. The Student Symposium allows interior design students across the state to network between schools with professionals, get an inside look on the Dallas Design Center and to gain knowledge and skills to succeed in the interior design field.

                 

Texas State ASID Students (Angie This year our students participated in showroom Mecklin, Sara Whitehead, Kelly tours, lecturers from sales representatives as well Hunt) at the construction site tour as designers on topics such as hiring a contractor, of the Pearl Hotel. keeping up with clients and the importance of   finding a good rep. Guest speaker, Matthew DeGeeter of the design firm Perkins and Will, lectured on the importance of design programs in school and the connections that ASID fosters for students to help achieve their dream job. Our students also toured the re-design project of the Pearl Hotel in downtown Dallas, in a short time the students were able to see a project full circle, from visiting the design firm working on the project and looking at plans, drawings and meeting with the architect, to touring the construction site and then visiting the model room and model suite to see examples of how the hotel will look when it is finished. The Symposium also hosted a speed charette, where the students from all of the schools were placed into groups and they had two hours to work together to create a complete design for a designated space. The speed charette is good practice for a real world setting students must work with people they do not know and be able to competently collaborate in order to present the best possible solution. The student symposium allowed students to gain experience and skills not gained in the classroom. It allows students to gain name recognition in the design world with student scholarships and design competitions. Texas State undergraduate students Corey Davey, Kelly Hunt and Claire Lucke were among the winners. Corey Davey (Texas State Student ASID President) received the 2012 Kathy Parr Hammond Memorial Scholarships for his student work as well as his efforts in using design to make the community a better place. (Article continues on next page.)


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

School of Family and Consumer   Sciences (cont.)      

ASID Texas Student Symposium (cont.)

                     

Kelly Hunt (Texas State Student ASID Treasurer) received second place in the ASID Student Scholarships for her design portfolio and involvement in the design community. The student design competitions evaluate student work from portfolios in various design categories. Kelly Hunt received first place in both the Residential and Commercial design categories as well as second in the Collaborative Work Category with her design partner Claire Lucke, Texas State Student ASID Programs Officer.  

The student symposium allowed students to gain Scholarship Winners: experience and skills not gained in the classroom. It Corey Davey allows students to gain name recognition in the design and world with student scholarships and design Kelly Hunt. competitions. Texas State undergraduate students Corey Davey, Kelly Hunt and Claire Lucke were among the winners. Corey Davey (Texas State Student ASID President) received the 2012 Kathy Parr Hammond Memorial Scholarships for his student work as well as his efforts in using design to make the community a better place. Kelly Hunt (Texas State Student ASID Treasurer) received second place in the ASID Student Scholarships for her design portfolio and involvement in the design community. The student design competitions evaluate student work from portfolios in various design categories. Kelly Hunt received first place in both the Residential and Commercial design categories as well as second in the Collaborative Work Category with her design partner Claire Lucke, Texas State Student ASID Programs Officer. Overall Texas State had the largest student representation at the symposium and set high standards for student design work. The symposium is a great event to motivate students, and gain knowledge not gained in the classroom and prepare them to succeed in a highly competitive field after graduation.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter

S   chool of Family and Consumer Sciences (cont.) Challenge Grant Supports Science Research For Apparel Industry By Kristina Kenney, University News Service, October 16, 2012

Texas State University-San Marcos School of Family and Consumer Sciences, in partnership with Kansas State University and Oklahoma State University, was awarded a USDA NIFA Higher Education Challenge Grant to help support science education research for students entering the global apparel industry. The grant, an award of $713,847, will help support and encourage the Gwendolyn Hustvedt transformation of fiber, textiles and clothing (FTC) education by increasing faculty competencies regarding science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), with a particular focus on sustainability, in order to help maintain the competitiveness of the U.S. apparel industry. Gwendolyn Hustvedt is an associate professor in the department and serves as co-director of the project. “Texas is a leader in the apparel industry, and Texas State, along with our partners on the grant, serve as an important source of new employees and innovation for this industry,” Hustvedt said. “We are excited to work with the USDA to increase environmental science competencies of our students and FTC curriculum quality, serving students in the entire region.” The project adds environmental science competencies to the FTC curriculum and encourages transformation of FTC education by accelerating STEM competencies into FTC programs, enhancing the quality of postsecondary instruction so that FTC graduates have workplace skills and knowledge required for success in an industry undergoing transformation toward sustainability and increasing the number and diversity of students who pursue a postsecondary program in FTC.

H-E-B Read3 Program Partners with Human Nutrition Program Elizabeth Stamper from the H-E-B Read3 program contacted Drs. BJ Friedman, Sylvia Crixell and Sue Williams to assist H-E-B in San Marcos. H-E-B Read 3 is a literacy program inaugurated last year in Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston and San Antonio and will soon expand to San Marcos. In collaboration with the San Marcos school superintendent, 6 San Marcos schools were chosen in which to implement this program. The program consists of 6 weeks of training with parents of children, ages 3-4, who are not involved in a pre-school program that will prepare them to read. Our students, 6 FCD students and 6 NF students will work with the parents and their children to provide literacy training and nutrition education for 6 weeks, meeting with them 2 hours each week, beginning Oct 12. We are initiating a contract with H-E-B to pay our students $10/hr to conduct this work. The total contract will be for about $3300. H-E-B provides the curriculum and H-E-B partner volunteers, the schools provide some teachers, and we will provide student trainers as described. We are excited about this collaboration with H-E-B in our community and look forward to additional opportunities.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter  Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies  

Texas State Program Chair Co-Edits New Scholarly Volume Posted by Mark Hendricks University News Service August 2, 2012 Carrie J. Boden-McGill, chair of the Occupational Education Program at Texas State University-San Marcos, has co-edited a new book on transformational Education.                    

Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is published by Information Age Publishing Inc. and is co-edited by Boden-McGill and Sola M. Kippers of Capella University. Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is an edited collection that synthesizes current research on transformative learning and expands the current knowledge base. The book provides a synthesis of some of the most exciting research in two fields: adult education and human services. The objectives of this themed collection are threefold. First, it serves as a space to synthesize current research on transformative learning. Through an extensive literature review, the editors discern several important strands of research in the area of transformative learning. The second objective of the collection is to expand the current knowledge base in the area of transformative learning by creating a space for dialog on the subject and bringing together diverse voices. The third objective is to transcend the field of adult education, with a specific   goal to reach an audience in human services (psychology, counseling, social work, marriage and family therapy). Boden-McGill was named associate professor and chair of the Occupational Education   Program at Texas State on June 1. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in English from Bethel College, a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from Wichita State University in, and a doctor of philosophy degree in education from Kansas State University. Before joining Texas State, Boden-McGill served for five years as associate professor and program coordinator for the Master of Adult Education Program at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Prior to her appointment in Arkansas, Boden-McGill worked at Friends University in Wichita, Kansas, for nine years, where she was associate professor and director of the Program for Adult College Education.

Graduate Information Sessions

If you’re interested in pursuing a Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (MSIS) or a Master of Education in the management of technical education (MEd), we invite you call the office at 512-245-2115 for an appointment. Advisors are available in all three locations. • Texas State campus, San Marcos • Round Rock campus, Round Rock • Alamo University Center, San Antonio Please contact owls@txstate.edu for details.


Fall 2012

CAA Newsletter  Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies (cont.)  

Faculty Accomplishments Dr. Steve Springer is now a member of Alamo Region Career Pathway Education Council as one of the representatives for higher education. The council is a reconstitution of Tech Prep Executive Committee for the Alamo Area that Dr. Springer served on for a number of years. This council works with industry, schools and higher education to create career paths for students. "Lunch and Learn" for Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies - This Fall Dr. Steve Springer is presenting a series of lunch and learn lectures at the Round Rock campus. In addition, he has presented one at the St. Phillips Southwest Campus and the Alamo University   Center. These lectures are free and designed to promote discussion among students, faculty and community. Topics are focused on contemporary issues such as PTSD and areas related to goal   setting and change. For additional information contact Dr. Springer at ss01@txstate.edu.   Dr. Steven Dietz has been elected president of the Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology and

the Life Sciences and has already begun his work as President-elect of the Society. In addition to

presenting   at several conferences, he had three papers published this Fall including a paper titled,

"Making Sense of Social Value Creation: Three Organizational Case Studies" (with Connie Porter). He has been invited to provide a keynote address at an international conference on methods innovations being held in the Philippines. His topic will be, "Developing research   Graduate Student Researchers: A Heuristic."  

Publications: C.J., & King, K.P. (Eds.). (2012). Conversations about Adult Learning in Our Boden-McGill,   Complex World. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. Web Link:   http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Conversations-about-Adult-Learning-in-Our-ComplexWorld  

Presentations: Lipson Lawrence, R., Boden-McGill, C.J., Caffarella, R., Mott, V.W., Tisdell, E.J., & Wolf, M.A. (2012). Setting the state for transformative learning: The women professors of adult education retreat experience. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Transformative Learning. San Francisco, CA. Sedivy-Benton, A.L., & Boden-McGill, C.J. (2012). Personal or school?: Factors that influence a teacher’s intentions of remaining or leaving the profession. In Proceedings of the Administrative Issues Journal inaugural conference. Norman, OK. Boden-McGill, C.J., Springer, S.S., & Homoud, M.M.F. (2012). Seizing opportunities moment by moment: The effects of an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction course on personal epistemological beliefs and implications for academic program administration. In Proceedings of the Administrative Issues Journal inaugural conference. Norman, OK. Boden-McGill, C.J., Henschke, J.A., Lockhart, M., Isenberg, S., Taylor, J., Johnson, C., Lovell, E., Peno, K., DiSilvestro, F., & Merrill, H. (2012). Conversations about adult learning in our complex world. Invited panel convened at the 2012 Adult Higher Education Alliance preconference. Las Vegas, NV.


CAA Newsletter

Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies (cont.)    

Faculty Accomplishments continued Boden-McGill, C.J., Erichsen, E.A., Francois, E., Kaiser, L., Marmon, E., & Strohschen, G. (2012). “It is the relationship that teaches”: Conversations on transformative learning. Round table convened at the 2012 American Association of Adult and Continuing Education/Adult Higher Education Alliance conference. Las Vegas, NV.                  

Boden-McGill, C.J. (2012). A model of sustainable adult education practices: 12 cornerstones, “Education,” and “education” at Heifer International. Paper presented at the 2012 American Association of Adult and Continuing Education/Adult Higher Education Alliance conference. Las Vegas, NV. Boden-McGill, C.J., Bowles, F., Gallavan, N., & Krejci, K. (2012). Transformative learning for all ages: Conversations from the field. Invited panel convened at the Southeastern Regional Association of Teacher Educators Fall Conference. Little Rock, AR. Boden-McGill, C.J., Strohschen, G., Thombre, A. (2012). Perspectives on transformative learning in a changing world. Invited panel convened at the 2012 Arkansas Association for   Continuing and Adult Education and Arkansas literacy Councils, Inc. Conference. Little Rock, AR.  

Graduate Student Accomplishment

Aracely Martinez, Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies major was named 2012 Outstanding Student in the Respiratory Care Program.

Congratulations, Aracely.


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

School of Social Work

 

Association of Social Work Board Elected President-Elect

   

On November 3, 2012, Dorinda N. Noble was elected President-Elect of the Board of Directors of the Association of Social Work Boards. This is a North American group, encompassing social work regulatory boards throughout the US, Canada, and American territories. The Association, a non-profit group which is housed in Virginia, also has working agreements with Ireland, Wales, Korea, and several other foreign countries. ASWB owns, monitors, and administers social work licensing tests across the US and Canada, as well as providing advice and counsel to regulatory boards in North America and abroad. Her position is a 4-year commitment. She will serve as the Board’s President-Elect for a year, as President for two years, and as Past President for one year. Not only will she oversee the work of the Board of Directors, but also she will represent the Association across North America and in several foreign countries.

Being elected by the member boards is an honor. She has been involved for 15 years with social work regulation by serving at the pleasure of the governors of Louisiana and Texas on their respective social work licensing and regulatory boards, and she has been involved with the Association since 1997. Her position as President will bring attention to Texas State as she deals with regulators (most of them appointed by their jurisdiction's governor) across North America and abroad. Congratulations, Dr. Noble.  

HRSA Grant Awarded

   

Texas   State University-San Marcos School of Social Work was awarded a Health Resources and

Services Administration Grant to mount Project Stand Up for Veterans. The $479,035 grant (over three years) will provide competitive stipends to prepare Masters of Social Work students to meet the behavioral and mental health needs of military personnel, veterans, and their   families, particularly in Medically Underserved Communities and rural areas. Texas State University currently serves over 2400 student veterans and their family members. With leadership and support from the School of Social Work and the Texas State Veterans Advisory Council members, the University has crafted a broad campus Veterans Initiative to develop better ways to serve the unique needs of student veterans, and to train faculty and staff in those service strategies. This project will be an important component of this initiative. Members of the military, veterans, and their family members often struggle with the stress of uncertainty stemming from war, multiple deployments, and the risk of injury or death. Transitioning back to community and family life after deployment can be challenging especially in medically underserved areas. Project Stand Up for Veterans will produce welltrained MSW social workers who understand the challenges which military populations face, and are prepared, clinically, culturally and linguistically, to work effectively with those populations, particularly in areas in which services are few and far between. Just as the military stands up a trained force, Texas State School of Social Work will stand up a cadre of well-prepared social workers to work with this important population. Dr. Mary Jo Garcia Biggs, Dr. Katherine Selber, and Dr. Amy Russell will oversee Project Stand Up for Veterans.


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

School of Social Work (cont.)

 

MSW Graduate Student Selected to Receive Scholarship

         

MSW student Matthew Krugh has been selected to receive the Mark Ames Memorial Scholarship to attend the Association for Experiential Education's Therapeutic Adventure Professional Group's Pre-Conference in Madison, Wisconsin to be held October 30-31. This means he is being comped the registration fee; however, he will still need support with his airfare. Matthew is doing a directed study with Dr. Norton in Adventure Therapy this semester, and I believe that the pre-conference theme "Adventure Therapy: Transforming Theory and Practice in Mental Health" will fit well with the course that Matt and I developed. Matt was selected among 12 other national finalists for this award.

             

FACES Program Helps Students Succeed University Star, Monica Solis, September 4, 2012

A Texas State program aimed toward helping students who have been through the foster system recently began its second year on campus. care Foster Care Alumni Creating Educational Success (FACES) held its first professional development training for faculty and staff Aug. 31. FACES will host the training at least once   a semester to provide a greater awareness of issues facing foster care students. The Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation recently awarded FACES a $90,000 grant to expand the program. FACES assists foster care alumni by hosting social events and creating an on-campus support network. The program also provides mentoring and advising when sought by students. The program has a foster care advisory council students can approach for help with a variety of issues including adjusting to college life, success tips or graduation plans. The vice president for student affairs office has held mentoring services for foster care alumni for the past three to four years, said Christine Norton, associate professor for the school of social work. “Part of what we’re trying to do is de-stigmatize having been in foster care — that it shouldn’t be a source of shame for anyone,” Norton said. “Personally, I feel very inspired by our students who were in foster care. They’re really strong and resilient, and that’s how we approach them.” Toni Watt, associate professor of sociology, said approximately 80 Texas State students have been identified as foster care alumni. Watt became involved with FACES after doing years of research on the transitions experienced by foster children. She studied graduation rates and realized it was not enough to simply do research alone. (Click here to read the rest of this article.)


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

School of Social Work (cont.)

 

                     

Faculty and Graduate Student Collaborations Dr. Christine Lynn Norton has actively mentored several MSW students by teaching Directed Study electives in Adventure Therapy Practice and Research. Her graduate students in these courses have participated in research projects with Dr. Norton and co-authored peer reviewed papers that have been submitted for publication. Aleah Penn, MSW student, was also awarded a $1000 Research Stipend from the Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Research Cooperative for her work with Dr. Norton and was invited to attend and present with Dr. Norton at the REAP (Research and Evaluation of Adventure Programming) Symposium in Santa Fe, New Mexico in August. MSW student Matthew Krugh, who also studied adventure therapy with Dr. Norton was awarded the first annual Mark Ames Memorial Scholarship by the Association for Experiential Education's Therapeutic Adventure Professional Group, and attended the TAPG Pre-Conference in Madison, Wisconsin this November where he received this award.   Dr. Christine Lynn Norton was elected to serve a second term as one of two United States Delegates to the Adventure Therapy International Congress (ATIC). In this role, Dr. Norton will   help to convene the next International Adventure Therapy Conference (IATC) in 2015, and will be the Editor-in-Chief of the next Conference Proceedings. Dr. Norton served as a co-editor for the 5IATC Proceedings, which have recently been published. Dr. Norton also had   a recent article on adventure therapy published in the Clinical Social Work Journal.

Faculty Publications

Pryor, A., Carpenter, C., Norton, C.L. & Kirchner, J. (Eds.) (2012). Emerging insights: International perspectives on adventure therapy, Proceedings of the 5th International Adventure Therapy Conference, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Prague, Czech Republic: European Science and Art Publishing. Tucker, A., & Norton, C.L. (2012). The use of adventure therapy techniques by clinical social workers: Implications for practice and training. Clinical Social Work Journal. DOI: 10.1007/s10615-012-0411-4Online First™ Chonody, J., Smith, S., & Litle, M. (2012). Legislating unequal treatment: An exploration of public policy on same-sex marriage. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 8(3), 270-286. Chonody, J., Smith, S., & Rutledge, S. (2012). “That’s so gay”: Language use and antigay bias amongst heterosexual college students. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 24 (3), 241-259. Chonody, J., Woodford, M., & Smith, S. (in press). Christian students' attitudes toward sexual minorities: Religious teachings, religiosity, and contact. Submitted to Journal of Social Work Education.


CAA Newsletter

Fall 2012

Graduate Studies News & Events   (cont.)    

Paperless Application for the CAA Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF)

In an   effort to support University goals and

sustainability efforts we are implementing a paperless application process for the CAA Graduate Research Fellowship.              

The purpose of the Graduate Research Fellowship program is to allow students the opportunity to learn more about conducting research by assisting faculty with various research projects (i.e., book, research article, grant proposal). The student will work with a professor for approximately 20 hours a week for $6,250 a semester. The positions are for a 9-month duration (September 1 awarded through May 31). APPLICATION PROCESS:

Students will apply by filling out the online

     

application. All attachments will now be submitted PDF format in a compressed zip file.

COMPRESSED ZIP FILE MUST INCLUDE:

1. A one-page (single-spaced) personal statement of career goals and future plans, including why the student should be awarded a Graduate Research Fellowship. 2. Two (2) letters of recommendation. At least one letter must be from a professor in an academic institution. Recommendation letters should be addressed to the GRF Selection Committee. 3. A current, professional one-page resume.

PLEASE NOTE: Submission of transcripts are no longer necessary. They can be viewed in the Banner Document Management System (BDMS).

Board of Regents A nine member Board of Regents appointed by the Governor governs the Texas State University System. In addition, a nonvoting student regent is appointed annually to the Board. Charlie Amato Chairman San Antonio Donna N. Williams Vice Chair Arlington Dr. Jaime R. Garza Regent San Antonio Kevin J. Lilly Regent Houston Ron Mitchell Regent Horseshoe Bay David Montagne Regent Beaumont Trisha Pollard Regent Bellaire Rossanna Salazar Regent Austin William F. Scott Regent Nederland Andrew Greenberg Student Regent Beaumont Brian McCall Chancellor

Newsletter Editor

A member of The Texas State University System

 

Yolanda Quintanilla Graduate Recruiter College of Applied Arts Agriculture Building, #306 yq10@txstate.edu

College of Applied Arts Fall 2012 Newsletter  

The College of Applied Arts celebrates and recognizes scholarly achievement from its faculty and graduate student body.

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