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Scientific Method Labs

Hypothesis

Test

Conclusion

The red liquid is lighter than the green liquid.

Pour in the green, then the red liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids did not mix, so our hypothesis was correct. Red is lighter than blue.

Pour in the yellow, then the red liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids did not mix, so our hypothesis was correct. Red is lighter than yellow.

The yellow liquid is lighter than the blue liquid.

Pour in the blue, then the yellow liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids mixed, so our hypothesis was incorrect. Blue is lighter than yellow.

The blue liquid is lighter than the green liquid.

Pour in the green, then the blue liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids did not mix, so our hypothesis was correct. Red is lighter than blue.

The yellow liquid is lighter than the green liquid.

Pour in the green, then the yellow liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids did not mix, so our hypothesis was correct. Yellow is lighter than green

The blue liquid is lighter than the red liquid.

Pour in the red, then the blue liquid. Watch for mixing for five seconds.

The liquids mixed, so our hypothesis was incorrect. Blue is heavier than red.

The red liquid is lighter than the yellow liquid.

QUESTION: HOW CAN WE STACK THESE LIQUIDS SO THEY DON’T MIX? Observations: The liquids are different weights, different densities. Hypothesis: If we can find which liquids are densest, we can stack by weight, because the lighter liquids will remain suspended.

Conclusion By this we conclude that red is lighter than blue, yellow, and green, the lightest of all our samples, so it must go on top to avoid mixing. Blue is lighter than yellow and green, so it must be second closest to the top after red. The yellow is lighter than the green, so the order has to be (from top to bottom) red, blue, yellow, green.

LOREM + ELEMENTUM

Science Brochure The Scientific Method THE FIVE STEPS OF THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD 1) Make Observations: If you don’t know how your experiment started, how will you measure change? 2) Ask a Question: What is the purpose of the experiment? 3) Develop a Hypothesis: What can be done to achieve the goal of the experiment? If we try x then y will happen because of z cause. 4) Test Hypothesis: Try x to find out if y will happen. 5) Conclusion: Write down everything you learned from your experiment.

Written by Kate Butchart

Variables -IndependentAn independent variable is that which is specifically intended in the nature of the experiment to set the control group apart from the study group. -DependentA dependent variable is the reaction that is being studied in relation to the independent variable.


APPLYING THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD TO REAL LIFE

Molly has a new pet cat, Moxie. However, Molly and Moxie arenʼt getting along well, because Molly isnʼt getting enough sleep. You see, if Molly tries to sleep, Moxie will sneak into her room and poke Mollyʼs head for two minutes at half-hour intervals, waking Molly. So, Moxie annoys at 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, etc. Step 1) Make Observations - Moxie bugs Molly every halfhour when Molly tries to sleep. - Molly wakes up every half-hour when Moxie yowls. - Molly dislikes it that her cat wakes her up every 1/2 hour. Step 2) Ask a Question What can we do to help Molly sleep better? Step 3) Develop Hypothesis If we lock Moxie in the basement at 10:00, then Molly will sleep better because Moxie will not be able to wake her up. Step 4) Test Hypothesis Lock Moxie in the basement for three nights in a row to make sure there is enough data. Then survey Molly on whether she feels less tired than she did a week ago. Step 5) Conclusion If Molly is better-rested, our hypothesis was true. If Molly is not better rested, try the theory again for a longer amount of time to double-check results.

Differences Between Theory, Hypothesis, and (Scientific) Law A theory is an umproven scientifically plausible explanation for a phenomenon. A hypothesis is an idea made to test how to change something. A scientific law is a fact that has been proven true in all or almost all cases.

Applying the Scientific Method to the Cold Equation Step 1) Make Observations: -There are a lot of stowaways. -The extra weight of stowaways causes EDS* to crash. - Crashed EDS can’t help people in emergencies. - EDS can only carry so much rocket fuel efficiently. Step 2) Ask a Question: What law can be instated to ensure the safety of the EDS, the EDS’ staff, the EDS’ supplies, those receiving aid from EDS, and the maximum number of bystanders? Step 3) Develop a Hypothesis If clear doors and pre-EDS-flight safety checks are made mandatory, then the pilots will be able to easily locate and remove any individuals who chose to attempt to hitchhike before takeoff to the main ship, because transparent materials will allow the pilots to check the closets without having to unpack and repack the supplies. Step 4) Test Hypothesis: Manufacture several EDS with the transparent closet doors. Have the transparent closet door sample keep a log of stowaway jettisonings**, also have an equal number of nontransparent door model EDS keep a jettison log. After a statistically significant amount of time, compare log information. Step 5) Conclusion: If there are significantly fewer stowaway jettisoning in the transparent door EDS models, then our hypothesis is correct. If there are fewer jettisonings in the opaque, white door model EDS, or if the numbers of jettisonings are approximately equal, or if there is not a statistically significant difference in the numbers, then our hypothesis is not nessacsarily correct. * EDS can stand for Emergency Dispatch Ship, or Emergency Dispatch Ships. Adding an s to the end would not be linguistically correct. **According to spellcheck, jettisonings is not a real word. However, it seems like the appropriate way to refer to the individual times a person is jettisoned, as “jettison” already refers to a verb.


Lab Tools Triple Beam Balance A triple beam balance is used to weigh objects in grams. Three different weights and three different numbered beams opposite a sprung platform can be used, along with simple addition, to find the weight.

Ruler A ruler is a tool used for measuring length. Rulers are around a foot long (margins may vary), and usually have inches and centimeters written on opposite sides. Rulers are also commonly used to aide in drawing fairly reliably straight lines.

Beaker A beaker is a container that can be used to measure amounts of liquid. It is often made of glass for durability and ease of reading the milliliter scale on the side.

Erlenmeyer Flask An Erlenmeyer flask or conical flask is a sort of beaker-like container useful for swirling liquid mixtures in. It can also be used to measure milliliters of a substance.

Thermometer A thermometer is a tool used to measure temperature. Liquid (often mercury or alcohol) contained in a metal shaft expands when heated and becomes smaller when cooled. Scales of temperature run up the sides, one in Fahrenheit, with the freezing point of water at 32 degrees and the boiling point at, another is Celsius, sometimes called centigrade, which declares the freezing point of water to be 0 degrees and the boiling point of water to be 100 degrees.

Independent and Dependent Variables at YNT at least five of them Independent Variables The classrooms are larger. The courses are combined. The classes are ninety minutes long each instead of sixty. There are two teachers per classroom. Each student is assigned a laptop. dependent variable- students learn better


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