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PORTFOLIO

Yong Ju Lee http://www.eboarch.com


Yong Ju Lee yongjulee99@gmail.com www.eboarch.com 330 E 83rd ST #LD, NY 10028 2


CONTENTS Dynamic Performance of Nature SoftShelf Wallpaper: Network Parallelism Ornamental Connectivity Thickening Tree Space Icon: Cathedral Speciation Park 51 50 Lispenard Holcom Building Vertical Fluidity Perception and Contemplation Phytobench Archiving River Parana Excavating the Future Horizontal City Metalytical Apparatuses Pattern : Redux CV

5 - 19 21 - 33 35 - 43 45 - 49 51 - 63 65 - 69 71 - 83 85 - 89 91 - 95 97-101 103-107 108-113 114-117 118-119 120-121 122-123 124-127 128-131 132-133 3


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DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF NATURE Winner of a Commission for a Permanent Installation at The Leonardo, an Art, Science, and Technology Museum with Brian Brush (as EB Office) Program: Media wall Location: Salt Lake City, Utah Completion: October, 2011 5


Dynamic Performance of Nature is a permanent architectural media installation in the Leonardo Museum of Art, Science and Technology, located in Salt Lake City, Utah. It’s composed of 176 unique recycled HDPE fins (diverting 3 tons of waste from landfills) embedded with 1,888 full-color RGB LED’s. DPoN engenders environmental perception in the museum’s visitors by communicating global environmental information through a dynamic and interactive interface embedded in the material of the wall. It’s conceived upon the notion that sustainability for the 21st century should be crafted to evolve beyond conventional application of green techniques into something alive and integrated with the environment, conditioning the most sophisticated forms of creativity for the preservation of life. DPoN will invite curious inquisition as well as detached contemplation of the synthesis between light, material, space, and global environmental information. 6


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With DPoN we’ve injected static materials with live information to create a flowing picture of the world. Environmental sensors capture data from sources throughout the planet. As the sensors register changes in temperature, wind, seismicity, and other factors, the LEDs reflect these fluctuations with continuous spectral waves that represent minute shifts in the data feed from moment to moment. At 92 feet long and over 14 feet high, DPoN traverses the museum’s ground floor lobby, acting as a programmatic threshold between exhibit spaces. Not only limited to environmental data, we imagine DPoN evolving over time, acting as site for continued creative experimentation by designers in the visualization of information through material and architecture.

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The color spectrum seen flowing through the wall reflects temperatures in the weather feed; the speed of color flow across the piece shows actual wind speed; the direction of color flow indicates the direction of the wind with cardinal directions oriented to the sides of the wall. When an earthquake registers with the USGS, a distorted world map on the wall displays the earthquake’s location — the brighter the color and more frequent the lights flash, the stronger the quake. Visitors can interact with DPoN using Twitter to send messages to @LeoArtwall that either change the global weather feed or simply paint a wash of colors that dance and chase across the wall. 10


LOCAL SENSING LED CABLES PERSONAL INPUT

gle GooSGS U

GLOBAL SENSING

SOLAR PANEL /POWER GENERATOR

ENVIRONMENTAL PHENOMENON

LED CONTROLER

COMPUTER PROCESSING

SECTIONAL SURFACE

LED PATTERN

TRANSLATION

VISITOR

PERCEPTION/INTERACTION 11


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Concept rendering with fiber optics 13


Cut file

LED location model CONNECTING BOLT AND ROD. CONNECT TO UNISTRUT ABOVE. EMBEDDED IN PLATE SCORE LINE FOR CONNECTING BOLT AND ROD LED STRING. CONNECT TO LEADER CABLE ABOVE CEILING DRILL POINT FOR BOLT FASTENING CNC MILLED PLATE. ATTACH TO MIRRORED PLATE. FASTEN BY BOLT LED. EMBEDDED IN PLATE LED STRING. EMBEDDED IN PLATE

SCORE LINE FOR LED AND STRING INNER FACE OF PLATE OUTER FACE OF PLATE CNC MILLED PLATE. ATTACH TO MIRRORED PLATE. FASTEN BY BOLT

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Elevation

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Data visualization designer : Noa Younse Consulting engineer : Kyle Twitchell, Telyk Works Lighting consultant : Ben Watson, Solus Inc. Installation team : Haley Blanco, Thomas Candee, Shaun Salisbury, Florence Schmitt, Hayes Shair, Danny Thai Photography courtesy of EB Office, The Leonardo, Peter Katz, and Noa Younse 19


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SOFTSHELF

Phillip Anzalone & Caterina Tiazzoldi Studio, Fall 2008 Special Mention, Young and Design Competition for Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Milan 2009 with Brian Brush Program: Parametric furniture

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Softshelf is a bookshelf designed and fabricated by Yong Ju Lee and Brian Brush for the Columbia University pavilion at the 2009 Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy. As part of a series of pieces done for the Parametric Furniture Studio at the GSAPP led by professors Caterina Tiazzoldi and Philip Anzalone, Softshelf explores unique relationships between material, customization, fabrication, and parametric design. Softshelf is inspired by the idea of creating a bookshelf that deforms the rational cellular grid in order to create a custom occupiable, differentiated, and soft space for the storage of books and other objects. It is fully customizable by manipulating five customer controls embedded in a parametric design system: overall size of the shelf, overall geometric effect of the shrinking and expanding of boxes, the strength of this geometric effect on the entire shelf system, the curvature shape of the shelf, and the stretched shape of the boxes. Softshelf takes advantage of the rigidity and fluidity of wood combined with the precision of CNC milling technology to create a monolithic and continuous form, sturdy yet geometrically complex, and ultimately innovative.

Configuration 1 23


1.Dimension & Extent of the Array Size of Shelf Assembly by Height and Width of Space and Number of Shelves Desired

Internal Logic and geometric relationships

array_S n_D p_T s_A fallo

array_Y

bubble

c_R

array_X

2.Pinch Number and Location Which Cells to Pinch and Scale to Produce Effect

4.Profile Curve Give the Shelf a Sine Curve Profile for Stability More or Less Curved? What Portion of the Curve to Use?

3.Pinch Influence How More or Less Influence the Pinched Cell has on Surrounding Cells 5.Individual Shelf Profiles The Shape of the Shelf Node Extrusions in Different Combinations

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What can the client control? 1. Overall Size of the Bookshelf Height and Width of the Bookshelf can be Chosen to Fit a Particular Sized Space. 2. Overall Effect Client can Control the Shrinking and Expanding of Boxes that Produces the Overall Effect. 3. Strength of Effect Client can Control the Influence of the Effect on the Boxes of the Bookshelf. 4. Overall Shape of the Bookshelf Client can Choose a Shape that is More or Less Curved. 5.Individual Box Shape Client can Choose a Box that is More or Less Stretched. Configuration 2 25


top

a1

c1

d1

b1 a2

e1

c2 b2

d2 c3

a3 b3

a4

left

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e2 d3

c4

e3

front


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Study models

FabricaĆ&#x;ng technique study for filleted corner Detail drawing for bending metal

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Laminated secĆ&#x;on

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Tooling paths for 17 components

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WALLPAPER :NETWORK PARALLELISM

Michael Bell Studio, Spring 2007 Finalist, Tectonics 2007 : International Student Design Competition Program: Bus terminal Location: Queensboro Plaza, New York City

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wave form of music for airports 2/1

phase1

VOCAL PIANO1 PIANO2 PIANO3

phase2

ELEMENT1 ELEMENT2 ELEMENT3 ELEMENT4

phase3

SKIN/STRUCTURE ROUTE FOR VISITORS ROUTE FOR BUSES SERVICE ROOM GREEN/OPEN SPACE

program sequence

public entry zone

public service zone

check-in zone

secure zone

bus terminal service zone

Negative program in space

Ambient music -Brian Eno

After 9/11, the situation in the airport became similar to that in the jail. The surveillance and scanning process developed a more strict program sequence in space and time. It became unavoidable that visitors experience a negative feeling in this space.

Brian Eno called his music Ambient Music. He explained his music as wallpaper. People know the existence of wallpaper but it is homogeneous in space and they don’t usually notice it is there. Eno wanted his music to be sonic wallpaper. One of his pieces, Music for Airport 2/1, ist still played at LaGuardia Ariport, showing the strength of his his music’s ambient effect. This music keeps changing gradually but visitors in the airport cannot perceive its change. To them this music is homogeneous in time like wallpaper.

Shape of perception The negative aspect in a certain space is dependent on the perception of the visitors. To measure the degree of perception, the pentagon shape is drawn from five lines corresponding to five variable factors in the program sequence. The pentagon trasforms relative to each moment in the program sequence and these pentagons, as sections, can be lofted in time. The space of perception that results changes according to the program sequence. The noticeable change of perception strengthens the negative aspects of the building. Making the shape of perception [purple shape in the loft diagram] consistent throughout the program sequence can reduce the negative aspects of the space.

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Homogeneous in time To make his music homogeneous, he employs some musical elements, each of which has a different period. There is a main element [vocal in phase1] and other supporting elements [piano 1,2,3 in phase1]. Simplifying these [phase2], a pattern results with a new period of its own. By putting these elements together, he made it difficult for the listener to perceive the change in time. In the same way, any kind of architectural elements can be distributed with their own period [phase3]. By mixing them together [phase 4], space gains homogeneity within the program sequence and in time.


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patternization Patternization

Except for the programs dedicated to surveillance and scanning, within the sequence all elements can be patterns with their own periods.

monocoque

monocoqueMonocoque Monocoque is the name of the car frame that encompasses body, skin, structure and space at the same time. Igloo is an example of the monocoque frame in architecture. Like the monocoque, all patterns are put

Monocoque is the name of body. the car frame that encompasses body, skin, structure and space at the s together in one Monocoque is the name of the car frame that encompasses body, skin, structure and space at the Igloo is an example ofIgloo theismonocoque frame in architecture. Like the same time. an example of the monocoque frame in architecture. Like monocoque, the monocoque, all all pattern patterns together in one body.are put together in one body.

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Part model, 3D Printing

Section 40


Digital model 41


Transformation

Elegance is the characteristic of being effective, yet unusually simple. The proof of a mathematical theorem is considered to have mathematical elegance if it is surprisingly simple yet effective and constructive; similarly, a computer program or algorithm is elegant if it uses a small amount of intuitive code to great effect. A truss is a physical manifestation of elements in a pattern. As the truss is the basic point of departure for this system, new surface is developed through re-arranging this pattern. By shifting some joints in only one direction, changing the period, the entire structure can be changed to a different phase. To keep the joints in pin connection as in a truss, the joint part is designed to rotate easily but be fixable. After adjusting and securing the joint position, the surface is fabricated by determining the length of the beams and the shape of the enclosing panels from the overall model. With simple and effective operability housed in each structural component, a material and spatial system with constructive variability is produced. 42


1:1 model

Detail for 1:1 model 43


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ORNAMENTAL CONNECTIVITY :FORM, FABRICATION, AND DATA ENVIRONMENTS Independent Study, Spring 2009 Advised by Phillip Anzalon and Sarah Williams with Brian Brush and Leah Meisterlin Program: Work station for GIS

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Digital Model

The amorphous body of contemporary digital fabrication-related work, although experimental and progressive on many levels of architectonic and systematic production, is not often ventured from beginnings in an extant environmental condition. At the same time, much of the work in spatial analysis and visualization of data quantifying such environments does not extend into determinate three-dimensional space and form. Spatial data can be used for more than just description, argument, or visual narrative. It has the potential to generate form as a response to the questions raised by its analysis. Similarly, projects in digital fabrication can encompass but also surpass physical descriptions of technique and geometry. This project was conceived as an opportunity for two related but narrowly engaged techniques, geographic information systems analysis and digital fabrication, to be integrated in the production of architectural form and ornament through digital fabrication techniques and input from data environments. The assumption of such integration is that the result, rather than being a conceptual or otherwise generative idea that is realized through an accommodation of tool and technique to a projective end, would emerge from the combination of techniques, as a synthetic 46

2D Density Contour Map

investigation of the ability of disparate tools to inform design. As such, the project was consciously situated within the bourgeoning climate of real-time, information-driven, communicative and digitally founded architecture. This project investigated wireless internet connectivity and router usage across Columbia University’s Morningside campus, using a sampled dataset of 270 router access points taken during the course of finals week (6-13 December 2008). The project had two primary goals. One was to design and fabricate a prototype architectural object that uses the environmental datascape produced by this space of wireless connectivity as a geometrical infrastructure for design, but also to contribute to this space in a reciprocal, public, physical alteration. Another is the further contribution to this space through an innovative approach to interactive representation of the dataset, using GIS to both produce the datascape informing fabrication and represent this datascape four-dimensionally. Techniques of investigation included GIS analysis and data representation, Flash animation with interactive components, parametric modeling, print-to-part modeling, and digital fabrication.


Final Model 47


Backside of Final Model


Study Model

Rhino. Grasshopper Model

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THICKENING

Scott Marble & Keith Kaseman Studio, Fall 2007 with Brian Brush Program: Public housing Location: W 225th Street near Marble Hill, New York City

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Buildings are always prototypes. Unlike other comparative objects (cars, airplanes, industrial products, furniture, ipods, etc), buildings are always unique. This is both an exhilarating and challenging reality; exhilarating in that as architects, we are always innovating, always designing something new / challenging in that the development associated with rening an object through multiple prototypes that allow the actual object to be perfect is simply not how buildings are built but they are always experiments. Components of buildings, on the other hand can, and often are, developed through prototyping that assures a high degree of resolution and renement. The network of coordination associated with the assembly of components that comprise a building is where prototyping becomes logistically impractical. It is exactly this limit of (physical) prototyping that is addressed, and partially overcome, with recent design management software that creates virtual prototypes capable of coordinating entire buildings before they become actual. The design of Boeings’ 777 passenger jet was a benchmark for this type of virtual prototyping as it marked the rst time that a jet of this complexity was fully designed without a physical prototype. Over 10,000 engineers in 26 countries collectively worked on a single computer model that became the instructions for production. This also serves as a benchmark for architecture as this type of integrated design process is just beginning to emerge as the model for building production / prototyping. It also questions whether digital prototyping eectively eliminates the need for physical prototyping and if not (which seems to be the case with the recent resurgent interest in fabrication among architects) then what is the relationship between the two? There are important issues surrounding this development that will be central to our research into redening prototype for architecture.

park highway

subway station

Site -negative space

Cluster prototype -Each cluster is composed of five units. 52


Prototype can be transformed by the site. 53


Concept model _thickening of space through component manipulation _rotate and shift about an axis

Tooling path for study model 1.axis as organizing scaffold 2.surface spatializing 3.folding material 4.inside/outside triangle wedge axis thread triangle fold

axis thread

90 degree fold 60 degree fold 45 degree fold

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Study model


Unit cluster

three units

unit cluster

interconnected space (living/kitchen/bathroom) room type1

two type1 one type2 two type3 type2

level 6ft terrace level 12ft

level 0ft level 6ft

type3

level 0ft

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Section

Cross section 56


Plan by the unit types

bath

room

living

TYPE 2 UP UP

TYPE 1_1 bath

living

room living

kitchen

bath

TYPE 3_1

TYPE 1_2 living

bath

room

UP

TYPE 3_2 living

kitchen

bath

Plan +6ft

TYPE 2 living

room

DN room

living

room

TYPE 1_1

DN

DN

terrace room

terrace

room

DN

TYPE 1_2

room

living

room

Plan +18ft 57


Plan with the structure

living

bath

room

TYPE 2 UP UP

TYPE 1_1 living

bath

room living

kitchen

bath

TYPE 3_1

TYPE 1_2 living

bath

room

UP

TYPE 3_2 living

kitchen

bath

Plan +6ft

TYPE 2 living

room

DN room

living

room

TYPE 1_1

DN

DN

terrace room

terrace

room

DN

TYPE 1_2

room

living

room

Plan +18ft 58


Structure model

Interior view 59


Thickening, as a concept, deals with the relationship between surface and volume, the densication of space and a subsequent interconnection of program. With respect to housing, our design responds to a seeming lack of spatial and social connection in the tower in the park typology. Design intent focuses on creating moments of shared experience and blending of programmatic environments across all scales.

Assembling process 60


Surface version of structure 61


Accumulation

Top

Tooling path 62

Elevation


Part model 63


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TREE SPACE

Project selection for New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Art in the Parks Temporary Outdoor Art Program with Brian Brush (as EB Office) Program: Public pavillion Location: Prospect Park, Brooklyn

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Tree Space is an investigation of the ambiguous dialect between virtual and natural in art. It’s a sculptural installation that figuratively looks like a tree by virtue of the compositional logic of the elements that construct it. Tree Space describes the character of a specific recursive method, the Lindenmayer System, which models growth and is characterized by tree-like or plant-like morphologies. Tree Space has branches that simulate growth and give it form, creating their own spatial field; a digital canopy under which one can stand, sit, or move freely. This form will be translated into a geometric and monolithic construction of solid material and light with embedded steel connections. Tree Space will literally be an open, occupiable tree with a dense canopy of computer-generated and digitally fabricated branches.

Day time view(material option1 : wood bar option) 66

Created as a 3-dimensional object using virtual techniques, Tree Space is based on natural phenomena and natural processes; a translation into the virtual of natural information to create art. It’s an information age materialization of nature to create a different notion of designed urban natural space. Through the culturally embedded form-type of a tree, we hope to communicate the innovation of digital techniques in art and design using the symbolic perception of the public eye. Our goal is to invigorate interest in such work through a highly compelling, accessible, and exciting public art object that redefines the notion of designed urban natural space.


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Night time view(material option2 : plastic tube with LED) 68


Model by rapid prototyping 69


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ICON :CATHEDRAL SPECIATION Hernan Diaz Alonso Studio, Spring 2008

Program: Cathedral Location: Central Park, Across American Museum of Natural History, New York City

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Saturn Devouring his Son, Fransisco Goya, 1820 – 1823

Cathedral has been an ICON. Before Renaissance, it had only reliegious meaning. Gothic Cathedral was a representation of some sacred personage as christ or a saint or angel. After Renaissance, this meaning changed to cultural way. It bacame the object of great attention and devotion; an idol -like a pop icon. The meaning of Cathedral in these days is still close to the latter. However, this iconic aspect is sometimes understood as ignorance of he context. New Cathedral could show how these two dierent qualities (icon-context) meet and react each others. 73


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AccumulaƟon, AnimaƟon sequence

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Cluster_horizontal type

Cluster_verĆ&#x;cal type 76


East elevaĆ&#x;on 77


78


Interior view 79


Horizontal cluster -Physical model, 3D prinĆ&#x;ng 80


Maya model 81


SecƟon 82


Interior view to bell tower 83


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PARK 51

Professional Work at Soma Architects, New York Program: Islamic Culture Center Location: New York City, New Yrok

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View from street 86


Facade geometry studies 87


Interior view 88


Exoskeleton/Endoskeleton 89


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50 LISPENARD

Professional Work at Soma Architects, New York Program: Residential building Location: New York City, NY

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Aerial view 92


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Ground floor 94

3rd floor


Penthouse lower level

Penthouse upper level 95


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HOLCOM BUILDING

Professional Work at Soma Architects, New York Program: Facade for office building Location: Beirut, Lebanon

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Perspective View : North East Side 99


Aluminum Panel : East Facade

Aluminum Panel : North Facade

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PERCEPTION

CEILING

FUNCTION

SPACE

VERTICAL FLUIDITY

With Jaryeon Seo (as EB Office)

FLOOR

Program: Bathroom interior 103

Like City, relaƟ plan outnew cont ceili atyp com thei verƟ and tang


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Like many other apartments in Manhattan, the height of this bathroom is relatively tall compared to the small footprint. To manipulate this disproportionate space and to achieve a new spatial atmosphere, geometric contrast across the vertical axis (floor to ceiling) is explored. By adding atypical geometry which contrasts the more rational common fixtures, and then matching their materials, the occupant can experience vertical fluidity between function and material perception; visuality and tangibility. 105


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PERCEPTION AND CONTEMPLATION Entry for Competition “In Cyprus -Relax as Architects -Reinterpret” with Brian Brush

Program: Contemplation of the historic objects Location: Salamis, a Greek ruin city on the eastern coast of Cyprus

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Salamis is a Greek ruin city on the eastern coast of Cyprus. People come from all over the world to see the stone columns and brick walls of antiquity, preserved, petrified, and frozen in time. They come to witness that which was and will never be again; a prototype of the passage of time. For some, the contemplation of this passage is a marvelous mental recreation of the past; conjured images of Greek philosophs and Mediterranean Sea traders walking stone streets, the sound of bronze and ceramic clamoring in carts. For this visitor, the site of a historic ruin is like a virtual cultural tour, where the old is not simply old; it’s meaningful, evocative, and reminiscent. Reinterpreting contemplation is less about changing exactly what or how someone contemplates a historic object. It’s more about creating something that gives reason to pause, to question, to tilt one’s head to the side out of curiosity and ask why; it’s not to shock. This project wraps the gymnasium at Salamis within a dense canopy of flowing, metal wires welded together to create a three-dimensional manmade

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web. It takes inspiration from cob webs found in nature, a back yard, maybe even an attic, not only for a web’s geometric interest, but also for the symbolic value cob webs possess culturally. In one moment the web intends to penetrate the petrified scene, dragging the frozen time of the past up to the dynamic time of the present in a material contrast of stone primitives and metallic meshes. In another, however, it pushes perception of history; how can such a historic object be encrusted by something so new, something that, although new, is evocative of something that usually forms in places time (but not nature) has forgot? Reinterpreting contemplation of the historic object is about creating cause for a change of perception that questions that assumption of history. Contemplation is no longer of what the object represents or what information history has passed on to it, but rather it’s of what the object is, in and of itself in front of your eyes and within your hands.


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Cluster cube segment

Strand construction

a

j b

b

c

c

d

d e

i

e f

f

h g

i

h

g

strand ID b-02

a-02

b-01

c-02

c-01

e-02

d-02

d-01

e-01

f-02

f-01

i-01

h-01

g-01

g-02

h-02

j-01

i-02

The Salamis Web is realizable by a combination of handicraft and computational construction administration. The entire web contains 24 web clusters. Each cluster is composed of welded metallic strands and is divided into cubic segments, anywhere from 10 to 30 in number, 45cm x 75cm x 45cm. Each cube is a three dimensional slice of the web cluster such that it contains a cross-sectional portion of all the metallic strands that pass through the particular cluster and that particular cube.

Longitudinal section

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faceA xy-position

faceB xy-position

strand length (cm)

12-e-317

(17,19)

(24,14)

52

12-e-318

(19,24)

(16,27)

49

12-e-319

(23,21)

(12,06)

61

12-e-320

(36,09)

(41,17)

50

12-e-321

(38,13)

(31,21)

56

e-02

The strands pass through the cube and intersect with two opposing cube faces. The two faces are subdivided by a Cartesian matrix that gives xy location data of where each strand intersects with the face. Therefore each strand of each cluster is associated with precise sectional information to be used in fabrication: strand ID, cluster #, cube segment #, faceA xy-position, faceB xy-position, strand length. All of this information is extracted via script in the virtual model and is exported to an xml database to be used as a “cut sheet” or “strand schedule.” The strands are then assembled in a jig or box similar to the cube diagram and welded into position. Multiple cubes are then assembled and welded again to form the entire cluster.


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PHYTOBENCH

Honorable Mention, Seoul Design Olympiad 2009 Competition 2010 Metropolis Magazine Next Generation Competition NextGen Notable with Brian Brush (as EB Office) Program: Public furniture

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Test: Bush Terminal Piers, New York The City of New York is home to 259 sites which have been remediated or are being managed for future remediation under one of the State of New York Department of Environmental Conservation’s remedial programs such as State Superfund, Brownfield Cleanp, etc. One of these sites is Bush Terminal Piers, located along the Upper New York Bay in Brooklyn near Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood. Historic landfilling operations at the site resulted in the presence of hazardous substances in the soil, groundwater and sediments and in the presence of landfill-related gasses beneath the landfill's surface.

Stage 1 Volunteer Seedling Establishment

Phytobench, with its seed-embedded composite lumber construction, can be deployed in multiple locations along a system of pedestrian pathways to germinate the spread of volunteer plants throughout the polluted site. Avoiding expensive and potentially harmful use of machinery excavation and chemical seeding mixtures Phytobench accomplishes consilience by passively generating ecosystem, while actively merging the built and non-built, designed and non-designed.

Bush Terminal Piers

Stage 2 Volunteer Plant Growth

Stage 3 Expansion and Phyto-remediation

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A bench that gives you a rest and helps the earth. We think outdoor seating should do more than look good and provide a place to sit. We think it can actually improve the environment it’s in too. That’s the idea behind Phytobench, a seating element that grows phyto-remediative plants capable of cleaning soil while simultaneously creating infrastructure for beautiful public space. Phytobench works by using a composite of various recycled materials embedded with plant seeds to grow plants that spread across a soil landscape. The plants Phytobench grows aren’t like most plants, they’re “hyper-accumulators.” They possess resistivity to toxicity in the soil caused by the presence of heavy metals, chemicals or pollutants from things like pesticides, and other industrial processes. Growing in the soil, they “bio-accumulate” pollutants or render them inert within the soil through chemical transformations. The plants can even be mined to repurpose the chemicals they absorbed! 116

To initiate the process, we place Phyotbench on a site anywhere from a public park to an open brownfield, to a golf course, and even your own backyard or rooftop garden. A series of porous components allow rainfall and plantlife to penetrate the interstitial air space within the bench. On an array of “teeth” forming the bottom surfaces of the components, the replaceable seed-embedded composite is attached. During heavy rains, central channels at the heart of each component collect water The water is funneled down to the seed-embedded composite. Fed by water and the nutrients within the composite, seedlings germinate, the composite substrate eventually dissolves, the bench anchors in the soil, and the seedlings grow into volunteers that spread out and repair the surrounding soil. The beauty of Phytobench is that it can also be used to beautify any outdoor space through growing plants and flowers. So even if you don’t have soil to repair, you can use Phytobench as a greener, more colorful alternative to typical outdoor seating.


Test: Bush Terminal Piers, New York The City of New York is home to 259 sites which have been remediated or are being managed for future remediation under one of the State of New York Department of Environmental Conservation’s remedial programs such as State Superfund, Brownfield Cleanp, etc. One of these sites is Bush Terminal Piers, located along the Upper New York Bay in Brooklyn near Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood. Historic landfilling operations at the site resulted in the presence of hazardous substances in the soil, groundwater and sediments and in the presence of landfill-related gasses beneath the landfill's surface.

Stage 1 Volunteer Seedling Establishment

Phytobench, with its seed-embedded composite lumber construction, can be deployed in multiple locations along a system of pedestrian pathways to germinate the spread of volunteer plants throughout the polluted site. Avoiding expensive and potentially harmful use of machinery excavation and chemical seeding mixtures Phytobench accomplishes consilience by passively generating ecosystem, while actively merging the built and non-built, designed and non-designed.

Bush Terminal Piers

Stage 2 Volunteer Plant Growth

Stage 3 Expansion and Phyto-remediation

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ARCHIVING RIVER PARANA with Kyung Jae Kim

Program: Vertical zoo 118


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EXCAVATING THE FUTURE Jury Selection, ENYA Competition 2010 with Kyung Jae Kim

Program: Cultural facilities between Manhattan and Bronx Location: High Bridge, New York City

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HORIZONTAL CITY

Honorable Mention, Evolo Housing Competition with Kyung Jae Kim and Kyu Seon Hong Program: Public housing Location: on the edge of Hudson River, New York City

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METALYTICAL APPARATUSES Co-instructor with Brian Brush

A551 Graduate Design Studio, Montana State University Summer, 2011

“Architecture’s imperative is to grasp something absent, to trace or demarcate a condition that is there only latently.” K. Michael Hays from Architecture’s Desire The spectrum of isolation between form, space, information and material in architecture is collapsing. As the generation and consumption of information ascends in public consciousness and the ability to compute, store, and communicate information expands, architectural and material assemblies will no longer exist as inert boundaries separating discrete conditions of human occupation. Rather, the architectural object, element, and assembly will operate as Metalytical Apparatuses, intelligent manifolds generated by and facilitating the exchange of human-socialenvironmental informatics, the currencies of cultural production which flow uninterrupted through our personal and urban spaces. The purpose of this studio is therefore to engage architecture as a discourse of the meta, or “the other;” a process of interpreting and then signifying through material praxis the meta-data of the physical, social, cultural and environmental context that architecture responds to and subsequently creates. The challenge will not only be to distill the invisible, the ephemeral, and the a-temporal into a distinct and substantive architectural event, but to instrumentalize them through rigorous digital, material, and tectonic versioning tested through articulated prototypes and demonstrated through meticulous graphic documentation.

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Public activity supports and envelops the institutional framework, encouraging the emergence and propogation of institutional entities

City Functions

Human Activity Networks

Established Institutional Entities fixed and permanent steady state of operation parallels with presence

Patterns of public activity temporary and dynamic constant state of fluctuation parallels with intensity

Intersections behave as zones of hyperactivity

MICRO condition Penetrations in to building provide moments of transformation with a transition into program. An interaction between public and institution (realm of science and technology) is formed at the scale of the individual

MACRO Condition Relationship between a solid, defined geometry and an overlapping network of varying transparency epresent motion and fluctuating densities (Presence vs. Intensity)

Glass panel Steel mesh

6(&7,21%%



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Steel frame

Composite panels

6(&7,21$$



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Steel Frame

Formed composite panels

:$//6(&7,21

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B

B

open to below

down

Exhibit

Exhibit

Exhibit

Exterior Courtyard

open to above/below A

A

open to below up

Utility

A

Auditorium

A Down

Storage

Office

Storage

Utility Utility Media

Lounge

Studio

up up

Office

Conference Room

Office

Office

Office

B B

6(&21')/2253/$1 

Darian Rauschendorfer

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Mark Matheny 125


Brent Huntley 126

Chris Hodgson


Danielle Farebrother

Ben Eagan 127


PATTERN : REDUX Instructor

A525 Tech Elecative Class Montana State University Summer, 2011

Pattern is back in architecture. Decorative patterning of surfaces such as geometric tiled floors, screen walls or carved reliefs had flourished through ancient, medieval, renaissance, and neoclassical periods such that by the ascendance of modernism they were wholly taken for granted. Much of modernism, and in particular the International Style, opted for the clean planes of color, monolithic material, and white walls that eventually caused the sophistication and ubiquitous presence of patterning to disappear. However, over the last couple decades, through the ambitious attempts by Postmodernism, Deconstructivism and now Parametrics to develop a new vocabulary for architecture, the call for the pattern has emerged again. This emergence is almost single-handedly coupled with the integration of advanced design and production technology in architecture. Patterning is once again a fundamental creative act in architecture and through the use of digital technology the pattern has entirely shifted from its previous role as secondary or tertiary ornament to the primary creative gesture of building. This class will expose students to this new paradigm of the pattern through a Pattern Redux. Individual students will develop their own projects through the session beginning with precedent pattern studies, followed by pattern evolutions and concluding with pattern creations. They begin by choosing a historical or existing project to study and present as a basis for their logical investigation. Students will translate information from their studies into digital material and specify, discover, add and articulate new digital patterns based on the extracted logics of their precedents. Digital pattern translation will be taught using Rhino Grasshopper, Generative Components or 3D Studio Max and tutorials will be specifically crafted to engaging pattern discourse. The projects students will study and ultimately create can have any size and function from a small art piece to a building or a map. The projects will be approached and evaluated within the conceptual context described above, looking at how students can articulate a redux of pattern through intense analysis, digital translation, and intuitive transformation through the spectrums outlined. Fundamentally, pattern will be adopted by students to denote a new interpretation of architecture. The goal of the class is to give students the technical skills and knowledge to engage the contemporary discourse of patterns in architecture by seeking new interpretations of existing work and by evolving them towards a hybridized conceptual state that traverses historical institutions and contemporary digital design methodologies. 128


AJ Hoffman

Zack Schaff

Brent Huntley 129


Joe Treecrab 130

Matt Muir

Max Anthon


Alesha Quam

Mark Matheny

Ryan Walters 131


YONG JU LEE   Yongjulee99@gmail.com  www.eboarch.com      

EDUCATION  

Master of Architecture                                                                                                                                               2006. 9. ‐ 2009. 5.        ‐Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University    Bachelor of Science in Architecture                                                                                                                         1999. 3. – 2006. 2.                 ‐Honors degree With Highest distinction        ‐Yonsei University, Seoul     

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE   

Partner, EB Office, New York (www.eboarch.com , formerly softrigid)                                                             2008. 9. –Present        ‐Partner in emerging architectural design collaboration        ‐Winner, Commission for permanent installation,           The Dynamic Performance of Nature in The Leonardo Museum, Salt Lake City, built in 2011    Visiting Faculty, Montana State University                                                                                                             2011. 5. – 2011. 8.        ‐Graduate design studio with Brian Brush, Metalytical Apparatuses        ‐Tech elective class, Pattern :Redux    Project Architect, Soma Architects, New York City                                                                                                2010. 2. – 2011. 4.              ‐Lead designer for parametric techniques        ‐Park 51 – Islamic Cultural Center, New York City        ‐50 Lispernard – Residential Building, New York City        ‐Rmeil 444 – Residential Tower, Beirut        ‐Unilux – Lighting Showroom interior, Beirut    Teaching Assistant/Digital Assistant, Columbia University                                                                                   2008. 9. – 2009. 8.        ‐Studio assistant for Eric Schuldenfrei/Marisa Yiu Studio        ‐Digital tool assistant for Digital Craft        ‐Teaching Assistant for Visual Studies courses              Technique of Ultra real (Autodesk 3ds Max)              Meshing (Autodesk 3ds Max, Rhinoceros Grasshopper)              Rethinking BIM (Autodesk Revit, Rhinoceros Grasshopper)            Design Staff , Global Design Strategies, New York                                                                                                                  2009. 10.        ‐Schematic Design for Bacos Tower, South Africa    3D Modeler, Alice Aycock Studio, New York                                                                                                         2008. 9. – 2008. 12.       ‐Modeling for fabrication of sculpture in Autodesk 3ds Max                                                            3D Modeler, Obra Architects, New York                                                                                                                                  2007. 11.       ‐Gdansk ESC Competition    Intern Architect, Asymptote Architecture, New York                                                                                            2007. 6. – 2007. 9.  ‐3D modeling (Autodesk Maya and Rhinoceros) and physical modeling    Junior Architect, TED Architects Studio, Seoul                                                                                                       2005. 9. – 2006. 6.  132


ACHIEVEMENTS/AWARDS  

Winner, Major Art Installation of the Leonardo Center, Salt Lake City (Built in 2011)                                                      2010. 4.  Jury Selection, Emerging New York Architects Competition                                                                                                   2010. 2.  Honorable Mention, Seoul Design Olympiad 2009 Competition, Seoul                                                                               2009. 9.  Finalist, The 4th Bin International Competition, New York                                                                                                     2009. 9.  Special Mention, Rima Editrice Young & Design Competition, Salone Internazionale del Mobile                                   2009. 4.  Prototyping the City Workshop, Turin                                                                                                                                        2008. 7.  Finalist, Tectonic 2007 International Student Design Competition, Eindhoven                                                                2007. 11.  Honorable Mention, Evolo Housing Competition, New York                                                                                                  2007. 8.  1st place in Yonsei Graduate Exhibition of Studio Works, Seoul                                                                                         2005. 12.  Scholarships in Yonsei University, Seoul                                                                                                                   99, 00, 03, 04, 05     

PUBLICATION/LECTURE/EXHIBITION  

Dynamic Performance of Nature published in Space Magazine                                                                                          2011. 12.  Dynamic Performance of Nature published in Metropolis Magazine, Interior Design, IIDA Perspective                     2011. 11.  Lecture, “True to Model,” Montana State University School of Architecture Summer Lecture Series                           2011. 7.  Process+Prototype Exhibition, Portland                                                                                                                                     2011. 6.  Presenter at PetchaKutcha Night, Portland                                                                                                                               2011. 4.  Ornamental Connectivity and SoftShelf                                                        in Contemporary Digital Architecture: Design and Techniques by Links                                                                              2010. 9.  PhytoBench in Metropolis Magazine, July/August 2010 issue                                                                                               2010. 7.  Real in Transforum Exhibition at Gallery Korea, New York City                                                                                             2010. 5.  Exhibition at Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Artist Showcase at 25CPW Gallery, New York City                                        2010. 1.  FuseBench exhibited at Jamsil Center, Seoul. Published in Seoul Design Olympiad Catalogue                                     2009. 10.  SoftShelf in IDEAT magazine, France, July 2009 issue                                                                                                              2009. 7.  SoftShelf in GdA ‐ IL GIORNALE DELL’ARREDAMENTO, Rima Editrice, Italy                                                                         2009. 6.  SoftShelf in Digital Primitives, a+d+m Magazine                                                                                                                       2009. 4.  Horizontal City, Evolo Magazine                                                                                                                                                  2009. 1.  Co‐editor, Transforum, Columbia University Press                                                                                                                2008. 12.  Tectonic 2007 International Student Design Competition Exhibition, Eindhoven                                                            2007. 12.  Studio works chosen for Abstract, GSAPP                                                                                                                       06, 07, 08, 09     

SOFTWARE CAPABILITIES   

Autodesk Revit Architecture 2010 Certified Associate  Autodesk Maya, 3ds Max, AutoCAD, EcoTech  Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effect, InDesign  Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, Maxwell Studio, Flow Path, Mastercam, SolidWorks 

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Portfolio  

Portfolio by Yong Ju Lee

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