Page 1

Sponsorship Package 2010-2011


Who We Are

Engineers Without Borders (EWB) offers University of Alberta students a chance to apply their skills to contribute to global development issues. We are committed, energetic and passionate about creating positive global change. Initiating new ideas and putting them into action, we lead bold, innovative and meaningful events to increase awareness and engage a wide range of people while keeping in mind the developing communities with whom we work. We understand the importance of feedback to fuel our learning as individuals and as a team - we are always open to improve in our pursuit of excellence. As a team, we

are accountable to ourselves and other members to create a unique, inclusive and supportive chapter. Contrary to what some might initially think when they hear the name “Engineers Without Borders”, our focus is not on going overseas and building wells and bridges - we use the problem-solving skills that university students typically develop to drive positive social change. We strongly encourage students from all faculties to join and share their own knowledge and experience.

Table of Contents

Pumpkin Drop Public outreach as a part of the 2009 Stand Against Poverty event.

» Visit us online at http://ualberta.ewb.ca to learn more

Who We Are What We Do

1 2

Overseas Work Junior Fellowship Program Tom East - Ghana Lucas Maidens - Malawi

3 3 3

Canadian Programs Member Learning Public Outreach School Outreach Global Engineering

4 5 5 5

Chapter Budget Executive Donating to EWB

6 6 7

Human Development is not about the rise and fall of national incomes. Rather, it is about people, their desire and struggle to expand their freedoms and lead lives they value.

1


what we do Extreme poverty is not inevitable. And 32 million Canadians who believe it unjust can choose to make a difference in the lives of the three billion people who live in poverty. That is why Engineers Without Borders is working in Canada—striving to make Canada a model global citizen. EWB also works in partnership with developing communities around the world, helping them to gain access to the appropriate technologies to improve their lives. We focus on developing the capacity of the local technical sector to ensure that innovative, appropriate and sustainable solutions to issues that impede development are locally generated and available. We work with communities and ensure that our projects address root cause problems. In Canada Here at home, EWB is taking action to promote political and personal choices that contribute to a more prosperous future for millions of rural Africans. We connect Canadians to our innovative, entrepreneurial and resilient African partners. We are making change start right here at home, by calling on the Canadian government to reestablish itself as a global leader by restructuring our aid to have an impact in communities where it is needed most. To these ends, our Canadian projects are divided into 3 areas: Public Outreach: We educate Edmontonians on- and off-campus about development through activities such as Fair Trade Fridays, awareness events and advocacy. Member Learning: As an organization, EWB emphasizes the importance of building members’ leadership, facilitation and problem-solving skills in addition to developing an understanding of global issues. School Outreach: Every year, the University of Alberta Chapter of Engineers Without Borders reaches over 2000 students through our school outreach program. Global Engineering: EWB teaches a multidisciplinary and long term approach to problem solving; one in which the sociological, economic and cultural aspects of a solution are as important as its technical efficiency and effectiveness.

2

Overseas In Africa, Engineers Without Borders is pioneering sophisticated responses to complex development challenges. EWB volunteers work with our overseas institutional partners – governments, development organizations and private enterprises – to identify practical and long-term solutions to poverty. By focusing on the needs of rural communities, we are improving access to clean water and critical infrastructure, increasing farmers’ yields, and supporting business opportunities for aspiring entrepreneurs. More specifically, our overseas volunteers currently work in one of three program areas (Governance & Rural Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, or Agricultural Value Chains) in the following countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi and Zambia.

Malawi, photo by 2009 JF Ian Wright.

Engineers Without Borders University of Alberta — Sponsorship Package 2010/11


OVERSEAS WORK New ideas in development, like a rope, must be extensions of current customs and ideas and must fit into the local culture. Simple solutions to poverty which can be understood and implemented locally have the best chance to create long term positive change for communities in development. EWB works in partnership with developing communities around the world, helping them to gain access to the appropriate technologies to improve their lives. We focus on developing the capacity of the local technical sector to ensure that innovative, appropriate and sustainable solutions to issues that impede development are locally generated and available. We work with communities and ensure that our projects address root “A new rope is plaited at cause problems. As a prerequisite for a sustainable solution our the end of the old.” – West African Proverb projects ensure that communities have ownership over and help drive the solution.

Junior Fellowship Program

a prerequisite for a sustainable solution our projects ensure that communities have ownership over, and drive, the solution.

Tom East

New ideas in development, like a rope, must be extensions of current customs and ideas and must fit into the local culture. Simple solutions to poverty which can be understood and implemented locally have the best chance to create long term positive change for communities in development.

This past summer, EWB UofA sent two Junior Fellows overseas. Following are excerpts from their blogs:

“So after dealing with e-mails I start real work. The most valuable work I’ve done over the past month and a half is building relationships with people, laying some of the foundations for future work, and coming to understand things here in Ghana. If that sounds lame then you’re probably right. I don’t have any way of explaining why it took my so long to do so little, or why I don’t feel bad about it. The truest explanation I have for you is that this work is hard. In terms of more concrete outputs of may stay so far—I’ve worked extensively on computer skills with the MIS officer (who is now beginning to learn coding), I’ve introduced the project monitoring database to the DWE and begun capacity building, I’ve entered 214 projects into the database, I’ve removed approximately 300 viruses from computers, I’ve deleted 17,000 redundant word, excel, pdf, and powerpoint files...”

EWB works in partnership with developing communities around the world, helping them to gain access to the appropriate technologies to improve their lives. We focus on developing the capacity of the local technical sector to ensure that innovative, appropriate and sustainable solutions to issues that impede development are locally generated and available. We work with communities and ensure that our projects address root cause problems. As

Lucas Maidens Malawi [Agricultural Value Chains] “20 days left in Malawi, and only 12 in the office. The work doesn’t all end there, but some things are hard to do from the other side of the world. So here’s the basic rundown of what I’m going to be doing for the rest of them. I’m all moved into and settled down in my new home, coming to work at the office 8 o’clock each morning. Payt and I have taken over the conference room. We have electricity and fairly good wireless internet, and only get kicked out for the occasional meeting. From here we’re writing a number of reports, profiles and business models...”

» EWB UofA presents to over 2000 Edmonton students a year

Ghana [Governance and Rural Infrastructure]

3


Canadian Programs In 2009-2010, over 2,000 active EWB volunteers and leaders at 35 chapters country-wide worked to promote the idea that lasting change in Africa will stem not from charity, but from helping foster opportunity. Here at the University of Alberta, our portfolio of programs is centered around four outcome areas are contributing simultaneously to a wide-spread attitude change and to deeper system change both on campus and within the broader Edmonton community. Not only do we help drive change through education, attitude changes and advocacy, we also equip our members with the leadership and passion to suceed in their professional lives; our Global Engineering program is also helping Engineering students to think beyond the box - to fully comprehend the repercussions of their work and realize that they are the next generation of globally-minded problem solvers.

4

2010/11 president Fraser Mah leads a workshop in ETLC.

Member Learning As an organization, EWB emphasizes the importance of building members’ understanding of international development and the contributions that Canadians can make towards human development. By participating in each chapter’s member learning program, members have the chance to increase their skills and knowledge, becoming effective spokespeople in Canada for international development and overseas volunteers. Workshops Our chapter holds bi-weekly member learning workshops, from 5:15-6:30pm in the Colt Design Lab in ETLC. These workshops are participationbased and focus on peer-to-peer learning, where members come together and learn from each other. Several past workshops include: Guest Speaker Guy

Thompson from History/ Sociology discussing “How the world got this way” – the evolution of poverty and inequality; an interactive ‘press conference’ panel discussing trade policy; Facilitation 101; presentations by returned overseas volunteers on their experiences. Social Change Cafés Every Tuesday at 5pm there is chai, curry, great company, and casual discussions about a particular development, social change, or other related topic at Remedy Cafe. Retreats The chapter hosts several daylong or weekend-long retreats for its members each year, focused on sharing learnings and knowledge, skill-building, fun teambuilding activities, and getting to know each other better! There is usually at least one retreat each semester, sometimes in partnership with other nearby chapters.

Engineers Without Borders University of Alberta — Sponsorship Package 2010/11


Public Outreach To help make Canada the most pro-development country in the world, EWB members engage Canadians, raising their awareness about the urgent need for human development. Our members regularly run events aimed at engaging Canadians in the fight against poverty.

visit us online at:

http://ualberta.ewb.ca

School Outreach Canada will only become a model global citizen if our future leaders understand the complexities of the international community. The students of today, if passionate, knowledgeable and committed, will help to ensure a sustainable tomorrow. That is why EWB chapter volunteers engage 12-18 year olds, raising their awareness and understanding of development issues. Since the initiation of our high school outreach program, we have reached over 75,000 students. Participants of our 'Water For The World', 'Food For Thought', and ‘Energy Matters’ interactive workshops are encouraged to become passionate about the need for change and well-equipped to turn their good intentions into impact.

From asking people to "smash poverty" to dressing up as coffee cups and giving out samples and information about fair trade, to hosting candidate debates, EWB members are getting the word out. Events we've ran or participated in the past include: * STAND Against Poverty * EWB Day * Wabonwa! night

* boothing at Engineering Open House, Orientation, Week of Welcome * lecture series and events during University of Alberta International Week and Sustainability Awareness Weeks * reverse trick-or-treating with Fair Trade Halloween chocolate * FairTrade Fridays * Election candidate forums

Global Engineering The world needs you. A Global Engineer.

EWB: Developing engineerinG Poster developed for Global Engineering campaign.

Engineers Without Borders represents the human side of engineering and attracts a new type of engineering student – one focused beyond the equations. EWB teaches a multidisciplinary and long term approach to technology and problem solving; one in which the sociological, economic and cultural aspects of a solution are as important as its technical efficiency and effectiveness. EWB is working to bring together the students and faculty at the U of A to explore these issues and ideas. In the furtherance of the above goals, the University of Alberta Chapter of EWB has been working with the engineering faculty to enhance the undergraduate curriculum. Students in Introduction to Engineering 101 are now introduced to sustainable and appropriate development concepts in some of their assignments. Furthermore, EWB has become involved in the Community Service Learning Component of some Engineering English 199 class sections. Our emphasis on the human side of engineering is attracting more women to the profession. Around 50% of EWB’s members are women, in contrast with a approximately 20% female engineering student body.

» EWB is the biggest supporter of Fair Trade in Canada

5


Chapter budget 2010/2011 The University of Alberta Chapter of Engineers Without Borders relies completely on donated funds or funds raised by our volunteers. We receive generously donated funds from the University of Alberta, as well as corporations, individuals and other organizations. EWB UofA volunteers also plan fundraising events like selling EWB calendars and fair trade mugs, an annual wine and cheese and numerous barbeques in order to raise funds for our programs. The majority of this money goes to our overseas programs. It also goes towards our in-Canada programs, which strive to engage Canadians on issues relating to poverty and development. Only a small amount of funds are spent on administration, and we adhere to strict, audited accountability measures when dealing with funds.

EXPENSES 1000 Overseas 24000 Overhead Office, supplies, phone Junior Fellows Misc. GaRI Support Working Partnerships TOTAL 35300 Outreach 3800 expense breakdown School Outreach Outreach Events Promotional Materials Fair Trade Member Development 1000 Chapter Retreats Western Canada Retreat National Conference 6000 Flights Delegate registration fees Fundraising

500

Chapter Executive If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with any of the chapter exec — we're more than happy to discuss EWB, our program areas or answer any questions/comment/concerns you may have!

President Fraser Mah fraser@ualberta.ewb.ca

Finance Gurpaul Atwal gurpaul@ualberta.ewb.ca

School outreach Hai Doan hai@ualberta.ewb.ca

Junior Fellow Lucas Maidens lucas@ualberta.ewb.ca

Fundraising Matthew Li matt@ualberta.ewb.ca

member learning Sierra Jensen sierra@ualberta.ewb.ca

Junior fellow Tom East tom@ualberta.ewb.ca

Public Outreach Travis Hnidan travis@ualberta.ewb.ca

communications Tyler Heal tyler@ualberta.ewb.ca

6

Engineers Without Borders University of Alberta — Sponsorship Package 2010/11


WHY SUPPORT EWB? "I strongly support EWB because of their sustainable development projects. Furthermore, by sharing the living conditions of the people whom they help, EWB members will always think of them as human beings rather than abstract entities that appear periodically on TV. "This is precisely the kind of knowledge that the world needs to become a better place.” – Dr. Walter Allegretto Dr. Allegretto kindly collects donations while conducting review sessions for his Math lectures and donates the proceeds to Engineers Without Borders.

Goals for 2010/2011 • Raise $35 000 • Send two members overseas on four month internships • Support one Working Partners overseas on long term placements • Help support EWB's Governance and Rural Infrastucture program in Ghana • Send 10 members to the EWB national conference in Toronto • Promote globally conscious personal choices • Present our School Outreach program to 2000 students

donating to engineers without borders By donating to Engineers Without Borders you are helping to reduce extreme poverty and lessen people’s vulnerability. Nationally in 2008 EWB spent 56% of every dollar on overseas projects and 30% on projects in Canada. Only $8 out of every $100 went to overhead costs. The 2010/2011 budget for the UofA EWB chapter can be seen on the previous page. Engineers Without Borders is a Canadian charity and as such, we are able to issue tax receipts for donations. Our Charitable Registration number is: 89980-1815-RR0001

Benefits of Becoming a Sponsor

As a corporation or individual sponsoring EWB UofA, there are benefits available to you depending on your level of support. We will also present to your workplace on development issues/global engineering; you will also recieve complimentary tickets to our events. Nshima ($10 000+) The sustaining food of our African partners, Nshima-level sponsors get permanent recognition in our office Gold ($5000+) Logo in annual report, placement on promotional material Silver ($1000-4999) Name in annual report Recognition in EWB office Bronze ($250-999) Sponsors section on website

(you will receive all the benefits from previous levels in addition to those from your level)

If you are interested in sponsoring the Chapter's activities, please contact Matt Li at matt@ualberta.ewb.ca, or by phone at (780) 887-8408.

» EWB partners with grassroots African organization for the greatest impact

7


2009-2010 Sponsors Platinum ($10 000+) University of Alberta Faculty of Engineering Gold ($5000+) University of Alberta Silver ($1000-4999) Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Univeristy of Alberta Students' Union Student Group Services Dr. Walter Allegretto Grace United Church Bronze ($250-999) EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd. Bill East M.D. Inc. Arrow Engineering Inc. Civil Engineering Club

Engineers Without Borders — University of Alberta Chapter w. http://www.ualberta.ewb.ca e. ualberta@ewb.ca m. E2-040K ETLC, University of Alberta  Edmonton AB T6G 2H6 ian wright plays Bao, a traditional game, with a child in Malawi

8

Engineers Without Borders University of Alberta — Sponsorship Package 2010/11


Engineers Without Borders — University of Alberta Chapter w. http://www.ualberta.ewb.ca e. ualberta@ewb.ca Engineers Without Borders University of Alberta — Sponsorship Package 2010/11 m. E2-040K ETLC, University of Alberta  Edmonton AB T6G 2H6

10

EWB UofA Sponsorship Package 2010-2011  

Report on the University of Alberta chapter of Engineers Without Borders' activities, and the benefits of becoming a sponsor.