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YELLOWSTONE PARK FOUNDATION GUIDE BOOK TO PRESERVING AND PROTECTING YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK


NATIONAL PARKS ARE THE BEST IDEA WE EVER HAD. ABSOLUTELY AMERICAN, ABSOLUTELY DEMOCRATIC, THEY REFLECT US AT OUR BEST ... Wallace Stegner, American Novelist and Conservationist PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


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THE YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN AND YELLOWSTONE ONGOING STRATEGIC INITIATIVE PROJECTS

PHOTO: TOM MURPHY

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FUTURE GENERATIONS DESERVE THE MEMORY OF THEIR FIRST UNFORGETTABLE VISIT TO YELLOWSTONE. Karen Bates Kress, President Yellowstone Park Foundation

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


PRESERVING AND PROTECTING THE WORLD’S FIRST NATIONAL PARK

Anyone who has been to Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has an indelible memory of their first visit: Watching Old Faithful geyser put on a show, guaranteed to thrill every time ... Chancing to see a wolf pack, running free, due to one of the most successful wildlife reintroduction programs in the U.S. that occurred in 1995-1996 ... Experiencing the majesty of Artist Point, exactly as Thomas Moran and other artists captured it so many years ago ... Spotting a grizzly bear and her cubs, and marveling at their dominating presence ... This wild and untamed place might be much different if it were not for the work of the Yellowstone Park Foundation (YPF) and its loyal donors. While the federal government provides funding for day-to-day operational support, such as National Park Service salaries and maintenance, Yellowstone has many more needs to keep it a world-class Park. Since its inception in 1996, YPF has been the official fundraising partner of Yellowstone, and has raised over $80 million and supported over 250 important projects. This work has helped the Park realize a standard of excellence that this global treasure deserves.

Without the vision of the Yellowstone Park Foundation, and the generosity and commitment of its supporters, these 250 projects, and those listed on the following pages, would not happen. This brochure is your guide to Yellowstone’s priority projects. Section 1 contains information about YPF’s new YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN, launched in mid-2013. It is a five-year, $40 million effort designed to make sure we safeguard Yellowstone for the next generation. In Section 2, YPF’s YELLOWSTONE ONGOING STRATEGIC INITIATIVE PROJECTS are outlined. They would not be possible without your help. In either section, you are welcome to make a donation to a specific project, or to the overall initiative where a project is housed. Future generations deserve the memory of their first unforgettable visit to Yellowstone. Please support our movement so that there is a Yellowstone ... forever. Many thanks, Kay Yeager, Chairman

Karen Bates Kress, President

Yellowstone Park Foundation

Yellowstone Park Foundation

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1 / THE YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN

The Wilderness Forever Fund............................................................................ 12 The Science Fund for Tomorrow’s Yellowstone............................................... 18 Yellowstone Youth.............................................................................................. 24 Visitor Experience – Accessing America’s Treasures....................................... 28

SECTION 2 / YELLOWSTONE ONGOING STRATEGIC INITIATIVE PROJECTS

Wildlife, Wonders and Wilderness.................................................................... 38 Visitor Experience............................................................................................... 48 Cultural Treasures............................................................................................... 52 Ranger Heritage.................................................................................................. 56 Greenest Park...................................................................................................... 60 Tomorrow’s Stewards......................................................................................... 64

How to Become a Friend of Yellowstone.......................................................... 68

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FOR THE BENEFIT AND ENJOYMENT OF THE PEOPLE. North Entrance to Yellowstone National Park

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SECTION 1 / THE YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN

PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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WE ALL HAVE OUR OWN YELLOWSTONE.

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PHOTO: JIM PEACO


THE YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN •

It is a sacred refuge, spanning 2.2 million acres of wilderness, wildlife, and natural wonders.

It is a shared experience that unites generations and nations.

It is the world’s greatest natural laboratory; what we learn in Yellowstone influences the world.

But Yellowstone is in transition. That is why the Yellowstone Park Foundation is mounting a five-year $40 million effort — the YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN — to safeguard a Yellowstone that lasts forever. Funds raised will address important projects in four different areas outlined in the following sections: •

The Wilderness Forever Fund

The Science Fund for Tomorrow’s Yellowstone

Yellowstone Youth

Visitor Experience — Accessing America’s Treasures

The YELLOWSTONE FOREVER CAMPAIGN is our chance to carry this treasured place forward for the next generation, and to create future stewards to support it.

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IN WILDERNESS IS THE PRESERVATION OF THE WORLD. Henry David Thoreau

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PHOTOS: MATT LUDIN


PRESERVING AND

PROTECTING AN

UNSPOILED YELLOWSTONE

The wilderness experience is what makes

THE WILDERNESS FOREVER FUND will restore

Yellowstone one of the most exceptional

hundreds of miles of backcountry trails, and

stretches of land in the world. Currently, more

make sure that Rangers have the tools, stock, and

than 95 percent of the Park remains relatively

backcountry cabins needed so that an unspoiled

undeveloped, but this vast, untouched place

Yellowstone can remain true to its rare wilderness

will disappear as we know it, if we do not act.

characteristics. The following pages outline some of the projects included in this fund.

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YELLOWSTONE TRAILS RESTORATION PROJECTS Yellowstone National Park is a hiker’s paradise, containing over 1,000 miles of beautiful trails to explore. Yet with increasing visitation to the Park’s scenic and historic areas, in both the front and backcountry, Yellowstone’s trails are in serious need of restoration. In 2006, YPF established a $2,000,000 Trails Fund Initiative to target high destination areas in the Old Faithful, Canyon, Mammoth Hot Springs, and Yellowstone Lake areas. This work needs continued support. Some projects include: The Mallard Lake Trail Restoration Project The Mallard Lake/Mallard Creek Trail loop is a high-use recreational trail in the Old Faithful area. In 2013, a 40-foot bridge crossing the Firehole River, adjacent to the Old Faithful Lodge, was removed and rebuilt. Three more aging log bridges on the road to Mallard Lake need to be replaced. The Buffalo Forks Trail Restoration Project To date, crews have addressed hazardous erosion and drainage problems. Next up: crews will address the final four-mile section of the Buffalo Forks Trail, and complete treatments for the Buffalo Plateau/Forks loop.

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

YELLOWSTONE RANGER READINESS PROJECTS There is a saying that rangers are born not made. The commitment, toughness, and numerous skills they bring to their jobs each day is legendary. They need and deserve the right equipment to be successful. Some projects include: Stock Project Over 100 horses and mules support critical operations in Yellowstone’s wilderness. Costs continue to soar for hay and winter pastures. Stock and tack also have to be replaced. This project will support these essential needs. Backcountry Patrol Because Yellowstone is a vast 2.2 million acres of land, wildlife poaching, illegal trail construction, snowmobile incursions, and other unlawful activities continue to compromise resources, values, and the wilderness character of the Park. This initiative will provide support

for critical monitoring equipment such as remote cameras and ground sensors so that Yellowstone Rangers can successfully curb these activities. Ranger Readiness Yellowstone Rangers need the right tools to successfully conduct their year-round patrols, such as: binoculars, spotting scopes, tents, tools, avalanche beacons, water filters, and winter and foul weather clothing. This initiative provides them with the tools they need to do their difficult jobs.  

YELLOWSTONE RANGER RESEARCH PROJECTS Data collection is critical to understanding the impacts stemming from visitors who come into Yellowstone’s wilderness for a day or overnight. Ranger Research Research is necessary for activities that will help the Park plan and manage the limits and restrictions needed to keep Yellowstone wild.  16


NOTHING GOES UNRECORDED. EVERY WORD OF LEAF AND SNOWFLAKE AND PARTICLE OF DEW. . . AS WELL AS EARTHQUAKE AND AVALANCHE, IS WRITTEN DOWN IN NATURE’S BOOK. John Muir

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


MANAGING YELLOWSTONE’S VAST RESOURCES THROUGH CUTTING-EDGE SCIENCE PROJECTS Yellowstone is a special refuge from a busy

and precipitation patterns are impacting the

world, an unspoiled ecosystem like no other.

ecosystem; and the world’s greatest laboratory

But Yellowstone’s dynamic landscape is now in

is being affected by increased visitation.

a time of rapid transition. To understand these changes, we need to Invasive species are threatening native habitats;

evaluate new management approaches, and

health challenges are emerging for one of

support practical programs that are a part

the world’s greatest assemblages of wildlife

of THE SCIENCE FUND FOR TOMORROW’S

in their natural setting; shifting temperature

YELLOWSTONE. 18


PHOTO: TOM MURPHY

WILDLIFE HEALTH BREAK-THROUGH PROJECTS Vital to solving wildlife health issues, these projects can provide a giant step forward in fostering understanding, and stemming the tide of these threats both to wildlife and human health. The Brucellosis Project Funding will provide research into monitoring brucellosis, a study that could help Park managers develop tools that may reduce this infection in bison and elk. This infection causes these species to abort, and can be transmitted to humans. Brown Bat Health Project Bats are essential to the health of Yellowstone’s forests, because they are predators of several insect pests. Recently, bats have suffered a dramatic decline in many areas of the country. Funding will allow Yellowstone wildlife scientists to study the entire issue, and create solutions to protect this important environmental equalizer. 19

The Hantavirus Project Hantavirus is a deadly disease that can be transmitted from rodents to humans. Understanding the dynamics of the disease will help Park managers identify and minimize areas of risk for Park visitors and residents. Funding will help implement monitoring and risk assessment models that can be used to improve management.

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION IMPACT PROJECTS We need to understand how changing temperatures, precipitation patterns, and snowpack levels influence Yellowstone’s complex, multi-dimensional ecosystem. Alpine Vegetation High elevation, alpine vegetation includes rare species of plants and lichens that are sensitive to a changing climate. These species may disappear in the future. It is important for scientists to inventory them, and understand the environmental conditions that affect their survival. Funding will be used to monitor high priority areas, install climate-monitoring equipment, and evaluate grazing. Wildlife Elk numbers have declined due to climate, hunting outside the Park, and a fully restored complement of predators, including grizzly bears and gray wolves. Bison have become a dominant grazer across Yellowstone, and scientists need to understand how changing temperatures and precipitation will affect the complex interplay between these grazers, the plants they eat, and their predators. Funding will be used to study these interactions, and evaluate management options. Park Management Planning As precipitation and temperature patterns change, managers must consider how these changes affect everything they do, from managing wildlife and fisheries, to the restoration of roads and historic structures. Funding will be used to implement strategic climate monitoring instruments, and implement scenario-planning exercises that will be used to make better informed decisions in the future. PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

STOP THE INVASION PROJECTS It is a scientific fact that in order to maintain Yellowstone’s ecosystem, we must discover ways to stop and control the aggressive intrusion of nonnative species. By providing funding for consistent monitoring and the use of technology, we can create viable strategies that will help us win the fight against these invaders. Help Native Plants Thrive Over 200 species of nonnative plants are established in Yellowstone, and dozens of these plants seriously threaten native plants and habitats. Funding will be used to test new, innovative tools to control these pests, monitor the efficacy of treatments, and evaluate the benefits for native plants.

Stop Aquatic Invaders Invasive aquatic species are a threat to the Park’s spectacular fisheries and aquatic ecosystems. Funding for this program will help managers implement early detection monitoring and a rapid response program to catch aquatic invaders before they become established. Projects will include inspections of boats and trailers, education programs for anglers, and monitoring of high-risk water bodies for new invaders.

PRESERVING THE WORLD’S GREATEST LABORATORY PROJECTS As more people visit Yellowstone from around the world, we need to understand the impact on Yellowstone’s natural and cultural resources. Visitor Impact Yellowstone’s visitation has increased dramatically over the last two decades. As more people enter the backcountry, and visit these spectacular areas, impacts can add up. Funding will be used to monitor conditions and levels of activity at frontcountry and backcountry locations. Strategies will be developed to avoid and minimize impacts so that these resources are protected for all to see and enjoy.

Understanding the Visitor People come to Yellowstone from all over the world to enjoy and understand its unique beauty. This program will enhance Yellowstone’s understanding of its visitors and their experiences, and show the Park how to more effectively connect with them in order to provide a transformative experience.

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I FEEL I GAINED CONFIDENCE. I GREW CLOSER TO COMPLETE STRANGERS, AND MADE THEM MY FAMILY. Participant in the Yellowstone Conservation Corps Youth Program

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


I N S P I R I N G A N E W G E N E R AT I O N O F ST E WA R D S

Yellowstone has a mesmeric effect on visitors of

Providing these experiences is how we can

all ages, backgrounds and nationalities. But it

inspire a new generation of stewards for

has an especially profound effect on our youth.

tomorrow.

When a plugged-in, big-city 12-year-old sees a

One of the top priorities of the YELLOWSTONE

geyser, passes a bison, or walks through miles

FOREVER CAMPAIGN is to engage and involve

and miles of wilderness with no civilization

more young people in the magic of Yellowstone.

in sight, the connection can last a lifetime. PHOTO: DAVID THOMPSON

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PHOTO: AUDREY HALL


YOUTH CAMPUS PROJECT A Place to Call Their Own Who didn’t want a room or a special sanctuary that was theirs alone when growing up? A place where big dreams, new discoveries and exciting adventures could be realized. That’s why we want to expand and upgrade Yellowstone’s Youth Campus. Currently, more than 7,500 young people come to Yellowstone every year and have these kinds of big dream experiences. But we want to double the number of young people who can have their unique relationship with Yellowstone, in their very own place. Plans for this initiative include adding more dorm rooms, creating new flexible, common spaces and learning areas to accommodate multiple programs, groups and activities at the same time. The expanded capacity of the campus will also allow us to welcome more young people into the Park for day and overnight trips. It also means creating a digitally equipped distance learning space, with an area that allows Park Rangers to bring Yellowstone directly into classrooms across the country. This technology will allow them to follow-up with classes after an in-person visit.

YOUTH PROGRAMS If places like Yellowstone are to last beyond our generation, we simply must encourage connections between young people and nature. YPF is funding many youth programs to do just that. Please see Section 2, page 65 to find out how you can help. PHOTO: AUDREY HALL

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THIS IS SUCH AN AMAZING NATIONAL PARK — ONE OF THE BEST IN THE SYSTEM. Visitor

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


P R O V I D I N G A F I R S T- C L A S S E X P E R I E N C E I N T H E WO R L D ’ S F I R S T N AT I O N A L PA R K Everyone deserves a chance to experience

As annual visitation numbers continue to

Yellowstone – to escape daily life and share

rise, and after decades of wear and tear,

in something truly special. Walking along

Yellowstone needs help to provide visitors

boardwalks overlooking a geyser basin, hiking

with the first-class Park experience they

through miles of wilderness, and gazing at the

deserve. VISITOR EXPERIENCE – ACCESSING

Upper Falls of the Yellowstone are just a few

AMERICA’S TREASURES will help restore

of the wonders that continue to captivate and

many of Yellowstone’s most iconic spots.

amaze generations of visitors. 28


HISTORIC LANDMARK PROJECTS The Roosevelt Arch and Gardiner Gateway Project Funding Needed: $2.7 million In 1903, when President Theodore Roosevelt laid the cornerstone for the Roosevelt Arch, now a National Historic Landmark, he declared that Yellowstone “was created, and is now administered, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” A testament to the enduring, democratic national park vision that is “America’s best idea,” this grand entryway once welcomed visitors with a flourish. In the second half of the 20th century, the road leading to the Arch was re-routed to accommodate the

transition from horses to cars, a move that ultimately caused numerous traffic jams, and provided no place to safely stop to admire the Arch’s grandeur. The Roosevelt Arch and Gardiner Gateway Project will correct this 100-year-old problem, and link this essential piece of Yellowstone’s past to its future. The new Arch Park will include viewing areas with exhibits that share the area’s Arch history, and provide walkways and green spaces that extend the length of the entrance, set off by a stage to be used for Park and community events.

PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone Overlooks and Trails – North and South Rims Funding Needed: North Rim - $7.4 million; South Rim – $1.7 million For nearly 75 years, the infrastructure in this area has remained strong, in spite of continual hammering from nature and humans. Funds will be dedicated to construct five historic overlooks and trails in the extraordinary Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. North Rim Projects: Brink of the Upper Falls Overlook Funding Needed: $2.3 million Restore the soundness of the historic overlook, repair the historic steps, and restore the bridge. Brink of the Lower Falls (Long Trail and Overlook) Funding Needed: $2.8 million Stabilize the entire area to return it to its historic integrity. Red Rock Overlook Funding Needed: $688,000 Engineer steps and walls to stabilize the knife-edge route to the overlook. Inspiration Point (Closed 2013) Funding Needed: $1.6 million Stabilize and restore this historic area. South Rim Projects: Uncle Tom’s Overlook Funding Needed: $1.7 million New pedestrian walkways leading from the overlook of the Upper Falls will be paved and edged with boulders for easier access. PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PHOTO: PARK MATT SERVICE LUDIN


MUSEUM PROJECTS All four facilities listed below and their visitor entrance areas need to be preserved, upgraded, and rehabilitated to their original historic splendor. In conjunction with the Park’s imminent northern roads federal highway project, we have an excellent opportunity to do just that. Many area improvements are also planned, including: separating vehicle and pedestrian traffic; emphasizing exhibits with new directional signage; replacing worn out paths with paved walkways; and improving the Madison campground amphitheater with more ADA-accessible paths, better seating, new technology, and updated outdoor exhibits. Norris Geyser Basin Museum Funding Needed: $1 million This museum was built in 1929, and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Over 2 million visitors come to the Norris area each year, resulting in deterioration of the facility and the sensitive geothermal resources in and around the basin. Funding would improve hiking trails and visitor safety, and protect resources. Madison Junction Museum Funding Needed: $2.3 million The Madison Junction Museum is one of a series of “trailside museums”

designed by architect Herbert Maier in a style that has become known as National Park Service Rustic. Built in 1929, it is located on a small rise that overlooks the meadows and canyon of the Madison River. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Funding would provide a greatly enhanced visitor experience by adding a new interpretive panel and information kiosk that tells the Madison Junction Museum’s story, and a trailside museum wayside, that identifies plant species and architectural details.

HISTORIC KIOSK PROJECTS Funding Needed: $550,000 Historic interpretive kiosks and exhibits along the Golden Gate Road will be upgraded, including: the Moose Exhibit at Willow Park, Roaring Mountain, and Obsidian Cliff, where a new platform

with exhibits will be added so visitors can enjoy a better view of this extraordinary feature. At Isa Lake, an area atop the Continental Divide, the exhibits will be restored.

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WE PASS WITH RAPID TRANSITION FROM ONE REMARKABLE VISION TO ANOTHER, EACH UNIQUE OF ITS KIND AND SURPASSING ALL OTHERS IN THE KNOWN WORLD. THE INTELLIGENT AMERICAN WILL ONE DAY POINT ON THE MAP TO THIS REMARKABLE DISTRICT WITH THE CONSCIOUS PRIDE THAT IT HAS NOT ITS PARALLEL ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden, 1872 Yellowstone Trip

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


SECTION 2 / YELLOWSTONE ONGOING STRATEGIC INITIATIVE PROJECTS

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TO MAKE YELLOWSTONE LAST FOREVER, WE MUST THINK BIG TODAY. 35

PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


YELLOWSTONE ONGOING STRATEGIC INITIATIVE PROJECTS The Yellowstone Park Foundation (YPF) is dedicated to ensuring that Yellowstone National Park – the world’s first national park – endures forever. YPF’s primary goal is to raise funds and resources to provide the margin of excellence for Yellowstone and enhance the experiences of its visitors. YPF has a defined mission in order to accomplish this goal: The Yellowstone Park Foundation works in cooperation with the National Park Service to fund projects and programs that protect, preserve, and enhance the natural and cultural resources and the visitor experience of Yellowstone National Park. YPF funds projects under six strategic initiatives: •

Wildlife, Wonders & Wilderness

Visitor Experience

Cultural Treasures

Ranger Heritage

Greenest Park

Tomorrow’s Stewards

The following section outlines the projects that are included under each of these initiatives. If we take the same visionary action that created the Yellowstone we love today, your support can preserve an extraordinary Yellowstone that lasts forever.

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ALL OF THE ANIMALS ARE SO AMAZING. WE JUST NEVER HAVE A CHANCE TO SEE THEM LIKE THIS WHERE WE LIVE. Visitor

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


S U P P O R T I N G P R O J E C T S R E L A T I N G T O W I L D L I F E , G E O L O G Y, S C I E N C E , T H E E C O SY ST E M , A N D E D U C AT I O N TO P R E S E RV E N AT U R A L R E S O U R C E S .

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NATIVE FISH CONSERVATION Funding Needed: $1,000,000 annually – matched by federal funds

actions taken to disrupt spawning grounds around Carrington Island and other areas.

Project 1: Cutthroat Trout Restoration in Yellowstone Lake: The Yellowstone cutthroat trout population, Yellowstone Lake’s only native trout, has been severely reduced by lake trout predation and other factors, including whirling disease and drought.

New resources include the addition of enhanced radio monitoring and data analysis to help pinpoint seasonal movements of lake trout. This radio monitoring will aid in targeted netting, as well as identifying spawning areas, where ova suppression will be initiated in the coming years.

Ongoing efforts to eradicate lake trout include the addition of more gill netting boats and crews, finalization of research agreements to provide estimates of lake trout population size, and

Although progress has been made, the job is not done. Please help stop the invasion with your support.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Cutthroat Restoration Project in Yellowstone Lake $100

Eliminates 20 nonnative lake trout.

$500

Eliminates 100 nonnative lake trout.

$1,000

Eliminates 200 nonnative lake trout.

$5,000

Eliminates 1,000 nonnative lake trout, or purchases 1,250 gallons of marine gasoline to run netting boats.

$10,000

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Eliminates 2,000 predatory lake trout or purchases 1,000 feet of new gill nets.


I CAN’T THINK OF ANYTHING THAT’S BETTER FOR THE ECOSYSTEM RIGHT NOW THAN WORKING ON NATIVE FISH RESTORATION. Dan Wenk, Yellowstone National Park Superintendent PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


Project 2: Restoration of the Arctic Grayling, Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Slough Creek Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Yellowstone is still home to the last remaining stream dwelling Arctic Grayling and pure genetic strains of Yellowstone cutthroat trout. But current populations of these unique species are at an all-time low.

Grayling, after their efforts to remove nonnative trout have proven to be successful.

Park biologists have identified priority areas that will help restore and maintain native fish populations in several key tributaries: Grayling Creek, Goose Lake, and Slough Creek.

Currently on Slough Creek, anglers with Yellowstone’s Fly Fish Volunteer Program identify, record and measure trout that have been caught to better understand Yellowstone’s cutthroat trout populations. To prevent nonnative fish from traveling upstream, a fish barrier will be constructed on Slough Creek.

Over the next five years at Grayling Creek, biologists plan to begin reintroducing Arctic

Three of the four pure wild populations of Westslope cutthroat trout are in Yellowstone. In 2014 at Goose Lake, efforts will begin to increase the population of Westslope cutthroat brood stock. These fish will then be used to populate future stream projects.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Native Fish in Yellowstone National Park $50

Supports DNA analysis for one fish.

$100

Supports 50 Arctic Grayling minnows to be reintroduced in Grayling Creek.

$500

Purchases fish shocking equipment to remove nonnative fish and release native fish.

$5,000

Purchases resources for a day to reintroduce 500 native fish.

$25,000

Purchases materials to complete a nonnative fish barrier on Slough Creek.

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WILDLIFE HEALTH Wildlife Health Project Funding Needed: $100,000 Annually Because infectious diseases are more frequently being shared between humans and wildlife, YPF started funding the Yellowstone Wildlife Health Program in 2007. This program has produced high-quality research, partly due to the development of a state-of-the-art diagnostic lab. Groundbreaking work in the lab has included identification of the brucellosis bacteria in bison and elk, and provided insight into whether a vaccination program would significantly reduce this infection.

Raptor Initiative Funding Needed: $85,000 annually This five-year program will focus on gauging the environmental effects on golden eagles, red-tailed hawks, Swainson’s hawks, kestrels, and prairie falcons, a group of species that have not been monitored previously.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Raptor Initiative $50

work $100

Further work is needed to develop a more comprehensive wildlife health program that would promote wildlife conservation and reduce disease risks to Park staff, visitors and local communities.

Provides fuel for a day of field Provides an Interpretative Ranger program

$500

Provides support for a month of field work for student researchers

Bear Boxes for Campgrounds Funding Needed: $1,500 Per Box/$82,500 Annually The installation of bear-proof food storage boxes in roadside campgrounds improves visitor safety, promotes the conservation of threatened grizzly bears, and enhances the visitor experience in Yellowstone. Over 1,200 sites still need bear boxes to meet the Park’s goal to provide a bear-proof food storage box in every campground site in the Park.  

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Wolf Programs Funding Needed: $250,000 Annually This project has received national acclaim, and pays for monitoring, equipment, short-term studies, and other wolf program needs. It also covers the costs that researchers incur when they capture and collar wolves, including vehicles and aerial monitoring.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Wolf Programs $2,500

Supports winter/summer field studies on predation, pup survival, and monitoring aerial flights.

$5,000

Supports Yellowstone’s wolf biologists’ efforts to collar wolves to gather genetic samples for testing and lab work.

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Managing Bison Project Funding Needed: $50,000 Managing wild bison migration outside Yellowstone is a pressing conservation challenge. This project will review land use and demographic trends in Yellowstone gateway communities to understand residents’ perspectives on bison in order to diffuse conflict.  

PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

American Pika Funded 2014 Funding Needed 2015: $8,000 This new project will study the small member of the rabbit order, and its struggle to adapt to Yellowstone’s changing climate and habitat. Because of its vulnerability, it is being considered for listing on the Endangered Species Act. The study will develop a habitat model to uncover how weather changes may threaten this charismatic species.

PHOTO: CINDY GOEDDEL

Yellowstone Cougars Funding Needed: $50,000 Monitoring the dynamics of Yellowstone’s cougar population is a new project that can determine how predator diversity affects the ecosystem. This research will also help the Park collaborate with other wildlife managers in parks where many carnivores reside.

PHOTO: BRAD ORSTED

PHOTO: TOM MURPHY

Wolf Field Education Project Funding Needed: $50,000 Annually Protecting wolves, and safely managing over 25,000 visitors who attend formal field education programs is the goal of this project. Your support also helps prevent the wolves from becoming habituated to humans.

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OVER 25,000 PEOPLE A DAY COME TO SEE OLD FAITHFUL IN JULY AND AUGUST, AND CLOSE TO THAT IN JUNE AND SEPTEMBER. THEY COME TO SEE DYNAMIC GEOLOGY, AND INCREDIBLE BEAUTY. Katy Duffy, Interpretive Planner – Yellowstone National Park

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


S U P P O RT S P R O J E C T S T H AT E N H A N C E T H E V I S I TO R E X P E R I E N C E , I N C L U D I N G E D U C AT I O N , R E C R E AT I O N , S A F E T Y, A N D A C C E S S I B I L I T Y.

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

PHOTO: DAVID THOMPSON

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Trails Fund Initiative Funding Needed: $200,000 Annually The goal of this initiative is to restore and repair Yellowstone’s heavily used network of trails, so they are protected and safe for visitors. Partnerships with three volunteer and youth work groups will provide additional muscle power, and offer teens the opportunity to gain valuable work skills as a result of their experience. Wildlife and Visitor Safety Project Funding Needed: $100,000 annually Teams of seasonal interpretive law enforcement and bear management rangers are needed to manage over 1,000 bear jams that can happen during a season, in addition to other wildlife jams. Rangers not only need to manage roadside viewing opportunities that keep visitors safe and educate them, but they also help keep the wildlife safe. Funding for this program will make sure there is a sufficient contingent of Rangers to manage traffic jams, reduce accidents and road rage, provide educational materials to visitors, and make sure the public does not feed wildlife or approach them too closely. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone Overlooks Funding Needed: $75,000 per year for two years This funding request is for design and planning work for the Yellowstone Forever Campaign project listed on page 30 – Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone Overlooks and Trails – North and South Rims. It includes preliminary site work, topographical surveying, and conceptual designs, and is vital to ensure that compliance approvals are met, and construction begins in a reasonable timeframe.


PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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YELLOWSTONE IS AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARK. IT IS NOT ONLY THE WORLD’S FIRST NATIONAL PARK, IT IS ALSO A BEACON TO THE WORLD FOR WHAT CONSERVATION, WHAT PRESERVATION, CAN BE. Dan Wenk, Yellowstone National Park Superintendent

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S U P P O R T S P R O J E C T S T H A T P R O T E C T, P R E S E R V E , R E S E A R C H , O R S H A R E I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T Y E L LOW STO N E ’ S H U M A N H I S TO RY A N D C U LT U R A L R E S O U R C E S .

PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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Yellowstone Archives Blitz Funding Needed: $106,000 A “processing blitz” will utilize small groups to arrange, describe, and organize large collections at Yellowstone’s archives. This project would be a model for repositories facing challenges in making their collections available to researchers. The new processing blitz technique will be shared with fellow archivists, and a blog will be the clearing house for project documentation. The project staff will submit proposals for presentations at professional meetings, and submit articles to journals for publication.

D E D FUN

Snake River Archaeology Funding Needed: $70,000 Learning from the past to preserve our future is the focus of this project. Questions that can be answered are: What are the long-term human responses to weather changes? And how and why do cultures change? Investigation will help tell the stories of how Native Americans utilized the area and its resources for many thousands of years before Yellowstone was a Park.  

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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I WOULD STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT ALL PORTIONS OF THE PARK BE WELL PROTECTED ... Harry Yount, America’s First Park Ranger

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


S U P P O RT S P R O J E C T S T H AT P R O M OT E T H E E F F E C T I V E N E S S , S A F E T Y, A N D E F F I C I E N C Y O F R A N G E R S , A N D P R E S E R V E S T H E RICH TRADITION OF RANGERS IN YELLOWSTONE.

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


Search, Observe and Report Funding Needed: $5,000 Annually Aircraft surveillance is an important tool for monitoring Yellowstone’s backcountry areas and its remote perimeter. Flights have found unknown camps close to the Park’s boundaries, helping field rangers on the ground focus their patrol efforts in order to identify unknown hunting camps, and stop illegal snowmobile activity in sensitive thermal areas. Adopt-a-Horse Funding Needed: $20,000 Annual Funding Needed: $2,000 Covers the Cost of Veterinary Needs, Feed or Shoeing One Horse for One Year Support can ensure that Yellowstone Rangers and horses are better equipped for the important work they perform, such as Ranger patrols, carrying firefighting equipment, search-and-rescue supplies, and trail building materials.

Campground Host Golf Carts Funding Needed: $20,000 Campground hosts use golf carts to complete their daily work, and are used in highly trafficked public areas. The new carts will contribute to the Park’s green transportation vehicle fleet. Bertram Boat Restoration Funding Needed: $150,000 The Bertram Boat is used for rough water emergency operations on Yellowstone Lake. Not only is it an outstanding emergency response boat, but it is a piece of Yellowstone history, with significant operational value. It has shuttled countless rescuers, firefighters, VIPs and Rangers over the last 47 years. Restoration of this boat is critical, since no boat manufacturers today are building boats with the same capabilities.  

Bechler Trail Removal Funding Needed: $38,100 This illegal trail will be removed, and the damaged area restored. Travel across these backcountry areas will then only be open to visitors who practice leave-no-trace principles.

D E D FUN

Security Systems for Entrances Funding Needed: $170,000 The goal of this program is to continue to enhance the Park’s capability to protect resources and visitors from criminal activity by adding high-tech equipment that will help identify and capture criminals. This project will also aid in the distribution of “Be on the Lookouts” for stolen vehicles and other felony and misdemeanor activities, and assist in search and rescue incidents.

PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

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WE WERE ABLE TO REDUCE THE POTABLE WATER USED TO IRRIGATE HISTORIC LAWNS IN MAMMOTH BY 30% THANKS TO A DONATION THROUGH YPF. Lynn Chan, Landscape Architect – Yellowstone Green Team

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


S U P P O RT S P R O J E C T S T H AT R E D U C E Y E L LOW S TO N E ’ S E C O L O G I C A L F O O T P R I N T, I N C R E A S E O P E R A T I O N A L E F F I C I E N C Y, A N D B E T T E R P R E S E RV E E N V I R O N M E N TA L R E S O U R C E S .

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PHOTO: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Mammoth Lighting LED Funding Needed: $18,000 This project would replace the existing acorn lights located along the esplanade and parade ground in Mammoth Hot Springs that were installed in the 1930s! The old light fixture will be replaced with new LED technology. Solar System at Lamar Buffalo Ranch Funding Needed: $112,000 The ranch does not have commercial power, and has partially relied on the sun for its electrical energy since 1996, when the first PV panels were installed. This project will update the old components of the solar renewable energy system, insuring that the renewable energy generated is stored at maximum capacity, while reducing maintenance needs. 61

Stephens Creek Nursery Greenhouse Funding Needed: $79,000 This project will provide improvements to the nursery, in operation since 1933. A tractor and greenhouse would be purchased that would provide a longer growing season for seedlings, and a place to dry native seed.

D E D FUN

Aerosol Can Crusher Funding Needed: $2,500 An aerosol can crusher is needed to more safely recycle aerosol cans in the craft shops, and vehicle repair garage.

D E D FUN


Backcountry Cabin Lighting Funding Needed: $19,320 This project will reduce white gas for lighting in Yellowstone’s 42 backcountry cabins, improve safety for Yellowstone Rangers, and, most importantly, reduce the amount of white gas packed into the wilderness on pack horses or backpacks. Energy Monitoring Improvements Funding Needed: $70,000 This project will provide energy monitors to nine administrative buildings in the Mammoth Hot Springs area. The monitors will provide data that will help focus energy conservation efforts. Water Management and Fleet Analysis Funding Needed: $115,000 This project is a collaboration among the Park, The Coca-Cola Company and Georgia Tech Research Institute to assess Mammoth water management, conduct a best practices fleet assessment, and implement sustainable practices and communications.

D E D FUN Lamar Micro-Hydro Funding Needed: $126,000 This project will install a turbine generator that will charge the battery bank, and increase hot water for the bath house at Lamar Buffalo Ranch.

D E D FUN PHOTO: MATT LUDIN

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THE EXPERIENCE IS UNPARALLELED IN ANYTHING OFFERED IN THE STANDARD PUBLIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM. Woodland Park Elementary School, Sheridan, WY on the Expedition: Yellowstone! Youth Program

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PHOTO: AUDREY HALL


S U P P O RT S P R O J E C T S T H AT P R O M OT E T H E U N D E R STA N D I N G , A P P R E C I AT I O N , A N D ST E WA R D S H I P O F Y E L LOW STO N E A M O N G T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N .

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YELLOWSTONE YOUTH PROGRAMS Funding Needed: $190,000 for all of the following programs Yellowstone to You Yellowstone education staff brings Park information and displays to community events, fairs, and conferences in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, including tribal areas. Wildlife Olympics Can you run faster than a grizzly bear? This is one question children ages five to 12 get to answer when they participate in this free summer learning activity. An extension of the Junior Ranger program, children test their senses and compare their abilities with those of animals in Yellowstone. The Olympics is a fun way to learn about wildlife and get some exercise too! Expedition: Yellowstone! A multi-day, curriculum-based residential program that brings youth in grades 4 through 8 to the Park, students gain first-hand knowledge of Yellowstone’s natural and cultural resources, and learn about issues affecting its ecosystem. The Park would like to double the 1,500 participants that currently participate each year.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Expedition: Yellowstone! $200

Funds a scholarship for one student for a week

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Distance Learning Yellowstone offers video conferencing with a National Park Resource Education Ranger for schools and groups from around the world. More than 6,700 participate annually.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Distance Learning $200

Funds one video conference that includes staff and materials

Yellowstone Young Scientist Children ages 5 and up are introduced to super volcanoes, microbes, and other geologic wonders in Yellowstone’s “living laboratory.” The program encourages the 2,300 children who participate each year to consider careers in the sciences. Junior Ranger Program Interested student visitors to the Park complete a series of activities, and share their answers and knowledge with a Park Ranger. They receive an official Junior Ranger patch or badge and certificate. In 2013, the program broke records for participation. There were 51,002 youth who participated, up 17% over 2012.


Youth Conservation Corp (YCC): Funded 2014 Funding Needed 2015: $328,000 Annually Engaging youth ages 15 to 18, YCC is an education, leadership, work, and outdoor recreation program giving teens from diverse backgrounds a one-month summer work experience in Yellowstone National Park. Work projects include building buck-rail fence near thermal features, removing trails that develop near wildlife viewing areas, and collecting native seed to be used later in restoration projects. Approximately 24 students participate in one of two sessions each summer.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Youth Conservation Corps $5,000

Funds one teen to attend this one month program

Park Journeys: Funding Needed: $90,000 Annually Underserved urban and rural youth embark on a five-day adventure in one of the world’s finest outdoor classrooms. It inspires stewardship and nurtures leadership and academic potential among youth whose opportunities in nature have been limited. Funding will offer five one-week programs.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Park Journeys $1,800

Sponsors a teen’s first trip to Yellowstone

PHOTO: AUDREY HALL

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PHOTO: MATT LUDIN


HOW TO BECOME A FRIEND OF YELLOWSTONE The 1872 Society – Visionary leaders recognized Yellowstone’s extraordinary features and championed its designation as the world’s first national park in 1872. Today, the Yellowstone Park Foundation honors this distinguished group of donors who, year after year, help protect, preserve, and enhance this national treasure by supporting the Annual Fund at a giving level of $1,000 or more. Learn more at www.ypf.org/1872. The Old Faithful Society – Friends of Yellowstone are honored who have made a legacy commitment to the Park through a planned gift to the Yellowstone Park Foundation. Each individual gift contributes to YPF’s financial strength and stability, and our capacity to help protect the wonders, wildlife, and heritage of Yellowstone National Park. Learn more at www.ypf.plannedgiving.org.

Matching Gifts – See if your employer will match your gift. Find out how at www.ypf.org/matching. Corporate Partnerships – If you would like to learn about becoming a corporate partner of the Yellowstone Park Foundation, please contact us: 406.586.6303. Gateway Businesses for the Park – If you own a business located in a Yellowstone gateway community, be a steward of Yellowstone through the Gateway Businesses for the Park Program. Visit www.forthepark.org to learn more. Destination Yellowstone Kiosk – If you travel to the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, make a donation at the Destination Yellowstone kiosk.

Donate Online – at www.ypf.org by clicking on the “How to Help” button for: • Monthly giving • Become a member of the 1872 Society ($1,000+) • Credit card donations

Old Faithful Haynes Photo Shop – When you visit Yellowstone, please stop by and learn more about YPF at innovative kiosks, and have your photo taken in front of a giant Haynes postcard for a small donation.

Gifts of Securities – Gifts of stock and other securities are an easy way to help Yellowstone while receiving a number of tax benefits. Call YPF at 406.586.6303 to find out more.

Check – Send your check to: Yellowstone Park Foundation 222 E. Main Street, Suite 301 Bozeman, MT 59715

Text – the word “Yellowstone” to 85944. Automatically $10 will be added to your cell phone bill, and a gift made to YPF.

Questions – Please call us: 406.586.6303

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PHOTO: TOM MURPHY


JUDGE, THEN, WHAT MUST HAVE BEEN OUR ASTONISHMENT, AS WE ENTERED THE BASIN AT MID-AFTERNOON OF OUR SECOND DAY’S TRAVEL, TO SEE IN THE CLEAR SUNLIGHT, AT NO GREAT DISTANCE, AN IMMENSE VOLUME OF CLEAR, SPARKLING WATER PROJECTED INTO THE AIR TO THE HEIGHT OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE FEET. “GEYSERS! GEYSERS!” EXCLAIMED ONE OF OUR COMPANY, AND, SPURRING OUR JADED HORSES, WE SOON GATHERED AROUND THIS WONDERFUL PHENOMENON. WE GAVE IT THE NAME OF “OLD FAITHFUL.” Nathaniel P. Langford, Explorer, Sept. 18, 1870


YELLOWSTONE PARK FOUNDATION 222 EAST MAIN STREET, SUITE 301 BOZEMAN, MONTANA 59715 WWW.YPF.ORG 406.586.6303


Yellowstone Forever Projects Guide Book