__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


La Asociación de Empleados – 50 años caminando junto a los empleados del Banco ¡Si no eres socio todavía… te invitamos a afiliarte! ¡Como socio puedes ayudar a tus colegas y aprovechar los servicios!

La Asociación de Empleados custodia sus intereses en el área laboral, trabaja para promover el bienestar de sus afiliados y participa en la construcción de una institución de calidad. Está atenta al cumplimiento de las políticas y normas del Banco referidas al personal y promueve la mejora de éstas, así como representa los intereses generales de los empleados y consultores en la Sede y las Representaciones.

Ofrecemos a nuestros afiliados los siguientes servicios: • • • •

Asistencia laboral Asesoramiento jurídico Ayuda financiera para estudios Ayuda solidaria en caso de emergencias

• Descuento en la afiliación del gimnasio • Descuentos en varios servicios: At&t, Capital Bikeshare, Zip Car • La Tiendita ofrece descuentos para eventos culturales, conciertos y parques de diversiones, entre otros

Ven a la Asociación y aprovecha a reunirte con otros colegas para disfrutar de actividades recreativas y culturales que contribuyen con el bienestar individual y la mejora del ambiente laboral. • Puedes concurrir a eventos culturales y solidarios diversos promovidos por la Asociación. • Tienes acceso a la galería de arte de la Asociación. • Puedes participar en los clubes de tu preferencia: Arte Oratoria Corredores Salsa Fútbol Tennis Teatro Yoga

Patricia Giovannoni (email: patriciag: Ext: 1212) Ichiro Toda (email: ichirot; Ext: 2842) José Salazar (email: josesal; Ext: 2922) Mildred Rivera (email: idbsalsa; Ext: 2319) Juan Carlos Perez-Segnini (email: juanps; Ext: 2797) Michael Lavezzo (email: michaell; Ext: 2316) Luis Alejandro Simón (email: luissi; Ext: 1532) Heidi Fishpaw (email: heidif; Ext: 1921)

Te invitamos a inscribirte como afiliado a la Asociación (estamos ubicados en NE-469). ¡Trae tus ideas y entusiasmo! Podrás ser protagonista de la mejora del ambiente laboral y aprovechar nuestros servicios.


Young Connection (YC) is the community of young

professionals at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). YC emerged out of the need for a venue where

IDB professionals could share ideas, experiences and knowledge, as well as transform their enthusiasm and leadership capabilities into actions.

Young Connection provides a platform for young

professionals to positively impact the development of

Latin America and the Caribbean while contributing to their professional growth.

Similar communities also exist within other

international organizations, such as the World

Bank, the Organization of American States (OAS),

and the United Nations (UN). Our partnership with these communities offers opportunities to create

an integrated and collaborative network of young professionals and further common goals.

How to become a YC member? Send an email to yconnection@iadb.org if you would like to create an initiative, participate in an existing

one, or receive our newsletter with news and events. You can also like our Facebook page or follow us on

Twitter @YoungConnection, to stay updated with our latest activities.Â


Editorial

O ur Aut h o rs : We live in a world in which technological Ana Pantelić Felix Quintero-Vollmer Enner Martínez Erica Renee Harding Maria Losacco Mábel Giraldo Aristizábal Juan Pablo Severi Valentín Sierra

Antonio Garcia Zaballos Félix González Herranz Nathalia Foditsch Enrique Iglesias Viviana Urueña Moyano Pedro Oswaldo Hernández Santamaría Juliana Chen Peraza Nima Veiseh

innovations penetrate virtually every aspect of our lives—communication, business, even personal relationships. Mobile subscriptions nearly equal the number of people in the globe. One third of the world’s population now has access to the Internet. Social media adoption does not lag behind: If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest, having over one billion active users. This pace of technological innovation is unheralded in human history. The inevitable change in today’s global landscape is also permeating the field of international development, wherein Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are now catalysts of economic, social, and institutional development. Within this context, Connexio dedicates its 9th Edition to Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), with the objective of shedding light on the transformative nature of ICTs on development. From social media to e-governance to mobile banking to the digital divide, this edition brings you 13 articles on experiences, analyses, and chronicles about how ICTs are shaping our time. A focus on the technological breakthroughs that promote development would be incomplete without raising analytical questions about the potential negative impacts of ICTs. These questions point to the need for additional research in such diverse issues as how the digital divide generates uneven benefits of ICTs, possibly further skewing already worrisome income distributions, and how electronic waste can harm the environment. We welcome you to a journey of ICT4D and hope this edition will provoke you to ask yourselves more questions and explore how you can contribute to finding answers.

References

UN’s ITU (International Telecommunications Union). http://www.itu.int. Peralta, Eyder (October, 2012). Facebook Hits Major Milestone: 1 Billion Active Users. NPR. http://www.npr.org/ blogs/thetwo-way/2012/10/04/162283078/facebook-hits-majormilestone-1-billion-active-users

Articles included in this publication and opinions expressed therein do not reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, Young Connection or Connexio but remain solely those of the author(s).


2 0 11

EXP

AND

E TU POT

R E V I S TA

D E

ENC

IAL

| CR EA

I N T E G R A C I Ó N

Y

TUS

POS

IBIL

I DA D

D E S A R R O L L O

ES

EDIC

Sector

Eme rgen

IÓN V III

2.5

ce of a New Soc ial

Muham

Sec tor

mad Yunus

y el emp resamod elo de s soci ales Entrevis

ta con

UribeÁlvaro Vélez iva sobr e la regió

su pers pect

n

Entrevis

Marceta con lo Claur e

un emp rend ejem plo de imie nto Amé rica para Latin a

Edició em pr n Es en di pecial sobre m ie nt o

Editors in Chief: Rebecca Van Roy and Stephanie Suber Editing Committee: Rebecca Van Roy, Stephanie Suber, Sandra Murcia and Alexandra Vega

Rebecca Van Roy

CONTENTS

Cover design and layout: IDB/GST Design Office

Rebecca Van Roy holds a Master’s Degree in Communication from The Johns Hopkins University and a Bachelor’s in International Economics and Political Science from University of Richmond. A Venezuelan-American, born and raised in Caracas, she currently works as a Consultant for MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund) at the InterAmerican Development Bank. She previously worked as an Analyst for Compass Solutions, a US Environmental Protection Agency contractor, and interned for the US eRulemaking Program and The Washington Post. You can contact Rebecca via rebeccav@iadb.org or LinkedIn.

Photographers: Alejandro Donis and Yvette Chique Labarca

@ConnexioWriters Connexio Facebook

Technological Breakthrough: Social Media for the Greater GoodFelix A. Quintero-Vollmer

8

Programa de Mentores para El Salvador- Enner Emilio Martínez

12 From Paper to Film: Unveiling the Past and Capturing the Present through Technology- Erica Renee Harding

16 Making the Revolution with a Phone:

How Mobile Banking can Support Development Strategies- Maria Losacco

20 Antioquia le apuesta a las TIC como

motor de desarrollo: Entrevista con el Gobernador Sergio FajardoMábel Giraldo Aristizábal

26 Del Quipu a la tablet- Juan Pablo Severi 30 Information and Communication Technologies for Micro, Small and Medium-Sized in Latin AmericaValentín Sierra

38 Acceder para Crecer: Políticas TIC en

Stephanie Suber

Contact Connexio Magazine:

4

Banco Interamericano de DesarrolloAntonio García Zaballos, Félix González Herranz, Nathalia Foditsch, Enrique Iglesias

DIGITAL Communication: Rebecca Van Roy

This edition was the result of the combined effort of 16 selected writers who participated in Connexio’s call for papers launched in January, 2013; IDB’s Design Unit, which brought these ideas to life; and the IDB Staff Association, which sponsored the publication.

Scaling Up Poverty Alleviation Efforts To Reach Millions with the Innovative Use of Tablet Computers: The LISTA Initiative- Ana Pantelić

34 El Innovador Índice de Banda Ancha del

Partnerships and Outreach: Stephanie Suber and Sandra Murcia

Web Developer: Jeronimo Castro

1

América Latina- Viviana Urueña Moyano, Pedro Oswaldo Hernández Santamaría

42 Data Collection OpportunitiesJuliana Chen Peraza

Stephanie Suber holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, with a concentration in International Business from American University, in Washington, DC. An Ecuadorian-American, born in South Carolina and raised in Ecuador, she currently works as a Consultant for the Capital Markets and Financial Institutions Division at the Inter-American Development Bank. She previously worked for World Supply Group, a defense contractor, and interned at Capitol Hill for Senator Jim Demint.

46 Entrevista con Aminta Perez-Gold

pymesprácTICas: Una comunidad de aprendizaje en LAC.

50 The Next Industrial Revolution of Latin America: Technology, Institutions and Networks- Nima Veiseh


Scaling Up Poverty Alleviation Efforts To Reach Millions with the Innovative Use of Tablet Computers:

The LISTA Initiative A n a Pa n t e l i C

by Ana Pantelić

Ana Pantelić, winner of the 2013 World Summit Youth Award, is the Project Coordinator for Fundación Capital’s The LISTA Initiative, working out of Bogotá, Colombia. She is also an affiliated researcher with the Center for Environmental Policy and Sustainable Development at the University of Belgrade’s Faculty of Political Sciences in, her hometown, Serbia. She holds a Master’s degree in International Relations and a Bachelor’s degree in Communication, both from Boston University, and has experience working in international development, research and education. She can be reached by email at anapantelic@gmail.com.

iv

2013

Despite years of governmental and nonprofit efforts, and millions of dollars invested in international aid, poverty and inequality remain persistent challenges for policymakers and development practitioners throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. In 2011, 174 million people in the region were defined as living in poverty (34% of the population), and nearly half of them were considered to be extremely poor (ECLAC 2011). With a Gini coefficient of 0.52, the region is also among the most unequal in the world. Efforts to reverse these trends are typically implemented at the local or community level, and carry high operational costs per person reached. Given the magnitude of these challenges, it is nearly impossible to expand typical development initiatives to the scale needed to create a significant and sustainable impact on poverty in the region. Could Information and

Communication Technologies (ICTs), and more specifically tablet computers, provide the key to reaching not thousands, but hundreds of thousands of poor people with tools that help them improve their economic situation? If so, what kind of technologies are best suited to meet the needs of low-income, rural communities? And how will these technologies be adopted by the poor and implemented by practitioners in the field? Fundación Capital, a regional development organization focused on finding ways to bring anti-poverty initiatives to scale, has been working to answer these questions, testing the limits of technology for development through its LISTA1 Initiative. The LISTA initiative is an ongoing effort by Fundación Capital to harness advances in mobile technology to expand the reach of poverty alleviation projects.


This article summarizes the methodology and results of the initiative’s pilot phase, Colombia LISTA, which used tablet computers and cell phone nudge messages to provide training and information to people in rural communities. The article also provides a critical examination of whether tablets and other mobile technologies can be effective in providing financial education to low-income communities, offering recommendations for further testing and implementation of this and other training materials across regional, geographical and cultural contexts. Fundación Capital places special emphasis on financial inclusion as a strategic engine of poverty reduction and bottom-up

From a theoretical perspective, the first step in this process is an increase in financial literacy, which is associated with higher levels of income and educational attainment (Xu & Zia, 2008). Financial inclusion and access to financial products and services that actually meet the needs of the poor have been shown to have a positive impact on individuals and their families in areas such as asset accumulation, stress reduction, and resource management (Morduch & Haley 2012, Pantelic 2011, Jalilian & Kirkpatrick 2012, Evans & English 2002). Despite these benefits, three-quarters of the world's poor remain without access to a bank account (World Bank, 2012), a paradox given that the poorer a household is, the more it needs

It is for these reasons that alternative channels need to be considered, and technology-based instruments can be effective for scaling up financial education and other training initiatives. During the Colombia LISTA pilot, Fundación Capital tested a tablet-based application with offline functionality that could be used without the presence of a trained facilitator. Complementary mobile-based incentives and nudge messages were also tested during the pilot. To date, there have been a few attempts at using mobilebased instruments to scale up financial inclusion initiatives (Jack & Suri 2011, Karlan et. al 2012, Forero 2012), but none of them incorporated tablets. LISTA experimented in the use of new

three-quarters of the world's poor remain without access to a bank account. economic development. Given the fluctuating incomes of the poor, budgeting scarce resources is a vital part of their daily activities. Whether it’s saving up to pay for the education of their children, accessing microinsurance to weather emergencies, or taking out a loan to grow their businesses, the financial transactions of the poor are complex and crucial in ensuring their livelihoods (Collins et. al, 2012). Gaining access to the financial products and services that meet the needs of the poor is what is known as financial inclusion, and it has shown to have an important impact on poverty alleviation. One of the ways in which this inclusion can be achieved is by stimulating demand via financial education and promoting a more efficient use of scarce resources, encouraging saving, and contributing to the accumulation of assets (Deb & Kubzansky, 2012).

access to financial services such as savings accounts, microinsurance, emergency loans, and electronic payments for remittances (Pantelic, 2013). Access to financial education can often improve this situation, but in many cases it is accompanied by an elevated implementation cost both for the provider (governments, development organizations, or financial institutions) and for the recipient of the training (low-income persons with actual and opportunity costs), making it difficult to scale up and meet demand (MasterCard et al, 2011). In addition, the resulting training may not be sufficiently personalized or adapted to the needs of those at the base of the pyramid. Finally, studies have shown that for financial inclusion to occur, such education initiatives need to also be linked to actual financial products or services (Forero, 2012).

channels for scaling up the delivery of financial education and mobilizing savings, which is crucial for effectively accessing isolated rural areas (GSMA, 2010). LISTA is a unique proposal for providing mobile learning at the base of the pyramid through a tablet-based financial education application designed for training low-income people in rural areas to make more informed decisions about their personal and business finances. Building off recommendations from the “lean” methodology (Ries, 2011), the Colombia LISTA prototype tested a small sample of financial education contents (2.5 hours of use on average) in order to focus on experimenting with delivery methodologies, understanding the BoP user experience, and incorporating complementary ICT processes. The application included three modules, with 1


theoretical topics being covered in the ABCs of Savings. That knowledge was taken from theory to practice in the Savings Calculator module, and users were familiarized with the use of automatic teller machines via the ATM Simulator. All three modules include common elements like empowerment, motivation and rules of thumb, along with reminders and nudge messages. In terms of delivery and distribution systems, the best results were noted with the freeing financial education2 methodology. This refers to the use of community-identified leaders (also low-income) as tablet facilitators, who would familiarize themselves with the application’s functionality and contents, and then simply facilitate the tablet’s distribution among their community. No prior knowledge of ICT or financial education topics was required of the facilitators, nor was any particular level of literacy (a handful of the women facilitators were also illiterate). Over the course of ten weeks, these tablets were rotated between the facilitators, and a total of 1270 low-income users (primarily women) accessed the application. The results show that one of the biggest advantages of this rotation methodology is that it reaches even the most rural areas (given offline functionality and portability), which is precisely the population that is most affected by extreme poverty in the region (Urquizo, 2012). Tablets are initially perceived as challenging to use and expensive, with the assumption that they are not accessible or designed for the poor (Rincón Gómez, 2012). As recognized leaders of their communities, the leaders who distributed the tablets were able to inspire trust and confidence, thus

2

2013

breaking the technology-poverty barrier very quickly. This distribution system was found to be more effective in engaging users and ensuring completion of all modules than some of the other strategies tested (like leaving the tablet in a fixed location with open access or using government-hired field workers to distribute the tablet). During the design phase, special attention was also given to integrating audio and video into the application, which helped provide an entertaining educational experience that motivated, trained, and empowered users despite challenges like low literacy levels (Rincón Gómez, 2012). In terms of the user experience, interactive and engaging contents were found to be the best way to deliver educational contents. Recent studies in complementary fields like behavioral economics and psychology (Thaler & Sunstein 2008, Drexler et al. 2011) inspired the design of a series of automatic text and voice messages, as well as mobilebased incentives, which were also tested during the pilot. With regard to these complementary ICT processes, voice messages had an 84% effectiveness rate, though text messages were actually preferred to voice messages, given that recipients can re-read the messages at their own convenience (Rincón Gómez 2012). Mobile incentives (prepaid cell phone top-ups) were looked upon favorably, but were not shown to be a prerequisite for engaging recipients in using the tablet or achieving a higher completion rate. Working directly with the Government of Colombia and its Department for Social Prosperity (along with many other governmental, financial, and private institutions), LISTA streamlined targeting mechanisms by engaging

conditional cash transfer recipients as facilitators and participants in the pilot project. In this sense, the LISTA Initiative complemented pre-existing government social policies, taking advantage of the government’s commitment (Maldonado & Tejerina 2010) to financial inclusion as a poverty alleviation strategy (Grifoni & Messy 2012). This partnership with the government had the additional benefit of lending institutional legitimacy to the implementation process, and facilitated access to comprehensive data about participants, which complemented both the design and evaluation efforts. Results of the pilot implementation of Colombia LISTA show that a high-tech solution for mobile education, using a tablet-based application in rural areas, is received very well. Just in terms of numbers, 74% of users completed all three educational modules (including entrance and exit surveys), and LISTA reached more than twice the amount of people that were initially targeted. In terms of qualitative results, an external evaluation also found that the tablets were an effective way to motivate and empower low-income people as they begin to accumulate assets and invest in creating a better future for themselves and their children (Rincón Gómez 2012). The approachable and easy-to-use design negated the need for trained facilitators (greatly decreasing implementation costs), while the hands-on experience provided by the tactile screen increased user engagement. In addition, usage analytics facilitated the monitoring process, resulting in faster response times for technological or content troubleshooting, and decreasing quantitative evaluation costs by collecting entrance and exit survey information directly from the users.


Freeing Financial Education Given the positive results of the Colombia LISTA pilot and expressions of interest by government representatives and financial institutions, Fundación Capital is seeking to expand the LISTA initiative within Latin America and to other regions, to apply lessons learned, scale up activities, and design additional ICT-based tools. The application must, however, first undergo a series of modifications to increase interactivity, further personalize contents, and facilitate use for people with low literacy levels. Experience from the 2012 pilot indicates that there is both a market and a demand for ICT-based instruments, particularly tabletbased applications, in poverty alleviation and reduction efforts. When designed and implemented correctly, technology has the potential to revolutionize the efforts of public entities, private companies and civil society organizations, dramatically scaling up their poverty alleviation projects and increasing the sustainability of those initiatives. References

Collins, D., J. Morduch, S. Rutherford, S. and O. Ruthven (2009) “Portfolios of the Poor: How the World’s Poor Live on $2 a Day” (Princeton,

NJ, USA: Princeton University Press). Rincón Gómez N. E., L.A. Valderrama Castellanos and J.D. Salas Betín (2012) “Evaluación de resultados del piloto del proyecto Colombia LISTA” (Bogotá: Conttactica S.A.S.). Deb A. and M. Kubzansky (2012) “Bridging the Gap: The Business Case for Financial Capability” (Monitor Group).

Transfers in Latin America” in Development in Practice (vol. 21, no. 6). GSMA Development Fund (2010) “mLearning: A Platform for Educational Opportunities at the Base of the Pyramid”. Jack, W. and T. Suri (2011) “Mobile Money: The Economics of M-Pesa” (NBER Working Paper 16721).

Drexler, A., G. Fischer and A. Schoar (2011) “Keeping it Simple: Financial Literacy and Rules of Thumb” (London: Centre for Economic Policy Research).

Jalilian, H. and C. Kirkpatrick (2002) “Financial development and poverty reduction in developing countries” in International Journal of Finance & Economics (Wiley & Sons Ltd.).

Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean - ECLAC (2011) "Social Panorama of Latin America" (United Nations).

Karlan, D., M. Morten and J. Zinman (2012) “A Personal Touch: Text Messaging for Loan Repayment” (NBER Working Paper 17952).

Evans, G. W. and K. English (2002) “The environment of poverty: Multiple stressor exposure, psychophysiological stress, and socioemotional adjustment “(Child Development, 73, 1238-1248).

Maldonado J. and L. Tejerina (2010) “Investing in large-scale financial inclusion: The Case of Colombia” (Inter-American Development Bank Technical Note No. IDBTN-197).

Forero J. (2012) “Educación financiera y las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) para poblaciones adultas de países en desarrollo – Estudio bibliográfico y estado del arte” (Colombia: Fundación Capital, Creative Commons Attribution).

Morduch J. and B. Haley (2002) “Analysis of the Effects of Microfinance on Poverty Reduction” (NYU Wagner Working Paper).

Grifoni A. and F. Messy (2012) “Current Status of National Strategies for Financial Education: A Comparative Analysis and Relevant Practices” (OECD Publishing: OECD Working Papers on Finance, Insurance and Private Pensions, No. 16). Pantelic, A. (2013) “The Implications of a Growing Microfinance Market in Latin America and the Caribbean” Chapter 2 in Gueyie, J.P., R. Manos and J. Yaron, eds., “Promoting Microfinance: Challenges and Innovations in Developing Countries and Countries in Transition” (Palgrave Macmillan). Pantelic, A. (2011) “A Comparative Analysis of Microfinance and Conditional Cash

The MasterCard Foundation, Microfinance Opportunities and Genesis Analytics (2011) “Global Study on Financial Education: Report” (Ontario: The MasterCard Foundation). Ries E. (2011) “The Lean Startup” (New York: Crown Publishing House). Thaler R. and C.R. Sunstein (2008) “Nudge” (New York: Penguin Group). Urquizo J. (2012) “The Financial Behavior of Rural Residents: Findings from Five Latin American Countries” (ACCION International). World Bank (2012) "Measuring Financial Inclusion: The Global Findex Database". Xu L. and B. Zia (2012) “Financial Literacy around the World: An Overview of the Evidence with Practical Suggestions for the Way Forward” (World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 6107).

3


l a c i g o l o : n h h g Tec akthrou Bre ood G r e t rea G e h t for a i d e M , Social ou blog

Felix A. Quintero-Vollmer

et, y e w t u nt? yo , e e m b p u o t l You eve d llmer o r V e t o s r ou fo Quinte y x i n l e a F c By but

In an interview published on March 11th, 2013 by The Interdependent, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice pointed out: “Social media has tremendous potential for raising awareness of critical issues and Felix, born in Caracas, Venezuela, holds a Master of Law in International Legal Studies from Georgetown University and a J.D. degree and Bachelors of Liberal Arts from Universidad Metropolitana. He currently works as a consultant at the Inter-American Development Bank's Corporate Legal Affairs Division in Washington, D.C. Prior to moving to the U.S., Felix interned for the Baker & McKenzie office in Caracas and worked as in-house counsel for the Shell Group in Venezuela. You can reach him at felixq@iadb.org.

4

2013

reaching new audiences around the world.”3 I couldn’t agree more. Social media provides an exciting opportunity for information to reach millions of people within a few seconds and without intermediaries. It is precisely on these three features (scope, information flow and speed) that I will focus on, as I convey social media’s impact in the life of the average citizen, particularly, in Latin America.


Perhaps the most dramatic example of the social media expansion through Latin America has been the recent emergence of bloggers in Cuba, such as that There are no particular conditions of Yoani Sánchez. Making use or restrictions to participate in the of different social media tools, information exchange: social media there seems to be a dialogue is inherently democratic. This is, enhancement amongst Cubans, perhaps, the greatest contribution both within the island and of these communication channels elsewhere, and with other players to people all over the world. They in Latin America. The recent strengthen freedom of speech by designation of Sánchez as Cuba’s incorporating ideas, perspectives Regional Vice-President before the and initiatives without distinction Inter-American Press Association’s of sex, race, political inclination, Committee on Freedom of the religious belief, income, or any Press and Information4 has no other characteristic of the millions precedent and clearly illustrates the of people that choose to participate point. in this digital dialogue. The virtually Social media’s vast reach endless reach of these tools provides an incredible opportunity facilitates the flow of information for entrepreneurs and businesses beyond most frontiers, allowing to target markets and potential for a true exchange of information clients. Creative marketing between government and citizens, schemes that have been adapted leaders and followers, organizations to different formats and products and militants, institutions and and services are now offered activists, businesses and clients, to more people through these entrepreneurs and potential clients, networks. Moreover, new business and any other person with enough ideas have emerged as a result of curiosity to “log in” through the people’s increasing fascination with network of their choice. the digital dialogue.   

Scope:

Information flow: Both public and private sectors, even at an international level, are making use of social technologies to communicate with civil society. For example, Ambassador Rice also noted that more than half of the Security Council members at the United Nations have Twitter accounts5. This, in and of itself, is quite revealing, as it demonstrates an interest from leaders to keep the public updated by drawing its attention to their debates. An opposite communication flow (from the general public to leaders and/or institutions) will surely turn out to be invaluable, as social media can also contribute to the fight against corruption. This is of particular interest to the Latin American region, which, according to Transparency International, has performed poorly in this regard vis-a-vis the rest of the world6. The NGO’s article on the Latin American region concludes by stating “decision makers and citizens should not forget that present and future economic prosperity needs to be accompanied by democratic governance and corruption

5


eradication. If not, growth will not be sustained and serious problems like inequality and citizen insecurity will continue being characteristics that hinder progress in the region”7. Given that the link between socio-economic progress and transparent governance is undeniable8, it would only make sense to invest heavily in the fight against corruption. Fortunately, we live in an era where ethics officers, compliance investigations and institutional integrity departments are being incorporated into public bureaucracies, corporations and other organizations’ structures all over the world. But does social media fit in this complex jigsaw puzzle?

Speed: In a world where constant change is the rule, adaptability is key for mankind; even for survival. Allow me to elaborate. According to the Pan-American Health Organization, between 1999 and 2009, a total of 5.5 million people died in the Americas because of avoidable causes, such as homicides, suicides and accidents9. It is clear that we still have a long way to go, as the region craves infrastructure and trained personnel for security and health related services. So how can social media contribute10 to overcome the daily obstacles that arise from these deficiencies? Let’s

before it is too late. Inevitably, there is an urgent need for people to know where to go, as health complications and even death might be minutes away. So how can Venezuelans avoid institutions that are not adequately prepared to treat their medical needs? Let’s dig a little deeper. According to the statistics published by the Observatorio Estadístico de la Comisión Nacional de Telecomunicaciones (CONATEL), the Venezuelan State’s telecommunications regulation entity, there has been a significant increase in Internet and mobile phone services throughout the last decade in the country12. Consider

These networks can be fundamental when it comes to promoting and demanding transparency, as well as when turning the spotlight towards injustices, abuses and scandals. A lot of these technological tools can play a fundamental role in the fight against corruption by strengthening accountability. Just as YouTube videos, tweets and Facebook photographs can have negative consequences on a person’s reputation after a wild night in town, they can also be an “enforceable” control mechanism of sorts against leaders, organizations and institutions, when used to call into question their credibility. These networks can be fundamental when it comes to promoting and demanding transparency, as well as when turning the spotlight towards injustices, abuses and scandals.

6

2013

look at a specific situation in one of the region’s countries. Venezuela’s health system is undergoing a crisis, as hospitals are facing scarcity of basic resources and services, such as water and electricity, as well as lacking infrastructure maintenance. There is also a significant shortage of qualified medical personnel and the existing medical equipment is outdated and could benefit from being replaced with modern technologies. The situation has escalated to the point where patients, including women in labor11, have been denied access to hospitals because of the deficiencies in these health institutions, forcing them to seek medical assistance elsewhere,

the following numbers: In 1998 CONATEL registered a total of 322,224 users of Internet service13. By 2012, CONATEL estimated that there was a population of 12,555,010 logging on to the World Wide Web from Venezuela14. This represents an increase of 40.79% of the “online” population. The surge in mobile phone usage is even more astonishing. In 1997 CONATEL estimated approximately 1,102,948 subscribers. This number rose to a total of 31,732,781 by 201215, which adds up to a 101.75% increase! It is important, however, to clarify that CONATEL did not (i) consider the percentage of people that were using Internet via mobile phones16; and (ii) provide percentages of users by income.


Technological Breakthrough

Although these variables would surely need to be considered in order to determine whether we are targeting the correct audience, I believe that the unprecedented immediacy of social media could contribute to direct Venezuelans in need of urgent medical attention to safe harbor. Just as some Twitter accounts are used to inform people about traffic jams, others could be used to alert the public of temporary hospital conditions that could impede the provision of adequate health services. In fact, this could even be an e-Government initiative! One saved life would not be the solution to what seems to be several problems, but it could definitely be a good start.

As in any other region in the world, inter-connectivity in Latin America is a must when addressing social and economic development. Social media gives a voice to the average citizen; allows people to remain updated with global, regional and local events; and, facilitates information flows between government and citizens. Furthermore, social media can also foster business and trade through the promotion of the different products and services available to the public. As a result, it strengthens democracy, promotes competition and contributes to the growth of emerging markets. Definitely a win-win scenario to all parties involved.

7


Programa de Mentores para El Salvador

Enner Emilio Martínez

Rompiendo paradigmas: Mentoría sin fronteras. Por Enner Emilio Martínez

Enner Martínez tiene diecinueve años de edad y es originario de la ciudad de San Miguel, El Salvador. En 2013 obtuvo una beca del Gobierno de El Salvador para estudiar Licenciatura en Economía y Negocios en la Escuela Superior de Economía y Negocios (ESEN). En 2012 estudió en la Universidad de Oriente. Ese mismo año, se graduó del Programa Empresarial ¡Supérate! y obtuvo el Supérate Student Award. En 2011 participó en el Programa Mentores para El Salvador, el cual le brindó la oportunidad de tener a un mentor alemán, Marc Alexander Backhaus. Actualmente, realiza un intercambio académico y cultural, gracias a la Embajada Americana El Salvador, en Illinois State University, Estados Unidos. Además de su área de estudios, le interesan las comunicaciones y las relaciones internacionales. Enner cree firmemente que la educación es la clave para el desarrollo de la sociedad.

8

2013

En el 2010, un equipo de profesionales exitosos originarios de El Salvador sintió la necesidad de contribuir al desarrollo socioeconómico de su país. Al mismo tiempo, contaban con el progreso de las Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación (TIC). Quizás se considere que combinar las nuevas tecnologías y construir una mejor sociedad es imposible. No obstante, estos salvadoreños y su fuerte deseo de ayudar hicieron realidad lo que un día fue solo un sueño. El objetivo del Programa de Mentores para El Salvador es “lograr que estudiantes de bachillerato de El Salvador, accedan a la oportunidad de compartir sus expectativas y fortalecer su formación y educación, a través de la relación virtual directa con jóvenes profesionales viviendo en el exterior, al convertirse éstos en sus mentores académicos y/o profesionales”17. María Luisa Hayem, salvadoreña viviendo en los Estados Unidos, es la creadora y directora del programa. Así, con la idea de María Luisa, las habilidades en el manejo software de Oscar Salguero, también salvadoreño, y un equipo de profesionales alrededor del mundo, se dio inicio a este concepto emprendedor que creyó, desde el principio, en “utilizar la tecnología para contribuir al desarrollo de El Salvador” (Programa de Mentores para El Salvador, 2010). Sus socios son el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) y Juventud y


utilicé las nuevas tecnologías con el objetivo de aumentar mi aprendizaje y tener una experiencia única en mi vida.

Learn It Live. El primero busca que los jóvenes, que forman el 40% de la población en América Latina y el Caribe, desarrollen iniciativas para aumentar su calidad de vida y oportunidades. El segundo busca “conectar personas con los mejores expertos en salud, negocios, tecnología y más”, como indica su sitio web. En el 2011 tuve la oportunidad de ser parte del programa, en su primera generación. Saber que podría conocer a personas de otros países y que se convertirían en mis mentores, me llenó de mucha ilusión y me hizo sentir privilegiado. Nunca en mi vida había tenido contacto con profesionales salvadoreños y extranjeros radicados fuera de mi país, El Salvador. Además, era mi oportunidad de practicar inglés, ya que las conversaciones se realizarían en dicho idioma.

Gracias a la plataforma virtual, mis compañeros y yo, todos del Centro ¡Supérate! CASSA San Miguel, creamos una cuenta para el envío y recepción de mensajes con nuestros mentores, quienes se encontraban en distintos países del mundo. Mi mentor Marc Alexander Backhaus, de nacionalidad alemana, viajaba a México, Colombia y Alemania debido a su trabajo como SAP Solution IT Consultant. Si no hubiésemos contado con la tecnología, hubiese sido imposible tener la comunicación que él y yo establecimos. En promedio enviamos más de treinta mensajes en ocho meses, gracias a la plataforma virtual del programa y su actualización. Entre los mensajes, Marc me envió una presentación de Microsoft PowerPoint, la cual incluía fotografías de su familia, costumbres, lugares representativos de Alemania y algunas frases básicas en alemán, las cuales aprendí. Por mi parte, le envié una presentación con imágenes de mi familia, mis proyectos como voluntario y elementos típicos de mi país. Mientras era parte del programa, realicé una campaña de reciclaje llamada ¡Haz tu parte!, junto a mis compañeros de bachillerato. Mi mentor me dio consejos para mejorar nuestra idea original, pues en su país se fomentan mucho estas prácticas medio ambientalistas. De más está decir que sus consejos fueron muy importantes para nuestra proyecto.

También escribí dos ensayos en inglés: If I had only twenty four hours to live (Si solo tuviera veinticuatro horas de vida) y My life within seven years (Mi vida dentro de siete años). Marc los leyó y me hizo sugerencias para enriquecer mi escritura. Que se tomara el tiempo de ayudarme en mis ensayos significó mucho para mí, al igual que todo el que me dedicó como mentor. El contacto con Marc abrió mis expectativas de superación. Aprendí que los sueños sí se pueden realizar cuando se trabaja con coraje y pasión por alcanzarlos. Sus palabras me inspiraban a perseverar y no decaer en el camino hacia mis metas. Cada vez que revisaba mi cuenta, en la página web del programa, me llenaba de emoción saber que me compartiría más de sus experiencias personales, profesionales y de cómo llegó a donde está hoy en día. Estas son gratas enseñanzas que siempre le agradeceré. Múltiples son los beneficios que obtuve de la comunicación con mi mentor. Mejoré considerablemente mi nivel de inglés; comprendí la importancia de ayudar a las demás personas y de realizar actividades de voluntariado; a través de esta experiencia tuve una mejor idea para elegir la carrera que quería estudiar en la universidad; y más aún, utilicé las nuevas tecnologías con el objetivo de aumentar mi aprendizaje y tener una experiencia única en mi vida.

9


Mentores para El Salvador 10

Por otro lado, los mentores se contactaban con nosotros desde Estados Unidos, México, Sudamérica y Europa. Por esta razón, resultaba difícil reunirlos a todos en un solo lugar. Sin embargo, las videoconferencias facilitaron que nos pudiésemos comunicar en tiempo real con ellos. De esta manera, ellos podían continuar con sus labores y dedicar tiempo para charlar con mis compañeros y conmigo. Fue así como la primera presentación oficial se llevó a cabo por medio de una videoconferencia y pudimos conocer a quienes serían nuestros mentores, un momento que estábamos esperando con ansias. La clausura también se realizó

2013

mediante una videoconferencia. En esta tuve el espacio para hablar en alemán y darle las gracias a los mentores por todo lo que nos habían ayudado. En la actualidad, los treinta y cuatro estudiantes de la primera generación estamos en una institución de educación superior. En mi caso, estudio Economía y Negocios en la Escuela Superior de Economía y Negocios (ESEN) y a finales de este año espero viajar de intercambio a Estados Unidos, gracias a una beca de la Embajada Americana en El Salvador. Siempre recuerdo, con mucha nostalgia, lo importante que fue para mí la experiencia de tener un mentor alemán. La experiencia en el Programa de Mentores para El Salvador nos compromete a retribuir todo lo que recibimos y a construir una mejor sociedad. Es así como realizamos servicio comunitario en beneficio de nuestras comunidades y una vez

que seamos profesionales haremos muchísimo más por el desarrollo socioeconómico del país. Como ex alumno, me llena de alegría saber que el programa continúa expandiéndose y que en 2013 está beneficiando a estudiantes de los Centros ¡Supérate! CASSA San Miguel e Hilasal, en La Libertad. Asimismo, que va mejorando día con día, paralelo al avance de las TIC. De esta manera, acortar distancias, llevar testimonios de superación y éxito a jóvenes próximos a iniciar la universidad, practicar inglés, utilizar el chat con fines educativos y hacer uso adecuado de las TIC son elementos que hacen al Programa de Mentores para El Salvador un concepto único. Esto muestra que sí se puede lograr desarrollo social a través de la evolución tecnológica y, por qué no decirlo, crecimiento económico. Finalmente, todo depende de los objetivos que motiven a utilizar la tecnología.18


www.mentoringinternational.org Mentoring International–El Salvador:

Howinfo@mentoringelsalvador.org to Find Us. www.mentoringinternational.org

facebook.com/MentoringInternational

Mentoring International–El Salvador: info@mentoringelsalvador.org

M

M

We are currently on our third year of mentoring underprivileged youth in El Salvador with the support of the following partners:

facebook.com/MentoringInternational

We are currently on our third year of mentoring underprivileged youth in El Salvador with the support of the following partners:

How to Find Us. www.mentoringinternational.org Mentoring International–El Salvador: info@mentoringelsalvador.org facebook.com/MentoringInternational

M

We are currently on our third year of mentoring underprivileged youth in El Salvador with the support of the following partners:

El Salvador

About

El Salvado

botones A La izquierda (bALi) or “buttons On The left” seeks to promote women's career potential by providing a live and virtual platform for young professional Latin American women. These platforms offer the necessary resources for young women to achieve their professional and personal goals.

Activities The website offers useful content in Spanish focused on the following areas: • • • •

Professional Development Personal development Education Entrepreneurship.

Additionally, bALi contributes to the professional growth of Latin American women through workshops, speaker series, and networking opportunities for professional growth.

El Salvador


From Paper

to Film Erica Renee Harding

st and a P he t esent ling i r P e v n he U t ring u t p ology a n h C c gh Te throu

Hardin ee n ca Re By Eri

Erica Renee Harding is a native of Jacksonville, Florida. She completed her Masters of Arts in Latin American Studies at Ohio University and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Media Arts from Clark Atlanta Univesity. Prior to completing her Master’s she interned with Millennium Challenge Corporation in the Public Affairs Department and helped facilitate new social media activities for global development events. Her skills in journalism and documentary film were honed while interning a year with CNN Español. She produced and co-directed a documentary “On Our Land: Being Garifuna in Honduras” that won Honorable Mention at the Bronze Lens Film Festival in Atlanta, Ga.

12

2013

g


My eyes darted under my eyelids as streams of light seeped in. I tilted my head back and took in the Caribbean breeze that glided through the balcony doors of my mountain view, Honduran hotel. I could smell the ocean as the right side of body warmed to the sun and I realized my excitement beat my alarm clock to wake me up. I had made it to Trujillo, Honduras and was so excited to finally film! Nine months of reading, writing, researching and planning had brought me to this point. I was on location and ready to roll. I gathered my three-man film crew in Honduras and shared with them my vision of the documentary. I wanted to be a vehicle in which to shed light on a culture unknown. I figured I could take my writing one step closer to tangibility by visually uncovering this unknown culture to many. With utmost integrity, I wanted to reveal exactly what my lens would capture. As a result, I battled the approach I should take, which people to interview or even what story I wanted to tell. More importantly, I was unsure if I would be accepted by locals or shunned

as a “gringo” doing another “project”. To my surprise, I was welcomed with open arms, similar to that of a loving grandmother. (I realized later, it was mainly because I am Black and they assumed I was of the Garifuna indigenous group just visiting family for a while.) It was then that I realized I should not force a theme or angle but I should let the people explain what’s important to them and allow them to create and share their thoughts. In the end, I was the medium in which people shared their thoughts, I was simply an outlet, albeit, organized and purpose driven but never forcing my view. I asked what do you want to share to the world? They replied: “We were an un-enslaved people19. We need better education. We are losing our culture because of American influence. We are suffering because of land struggles, and we are a strong culture that will survive.” Investigative journalism is the most rewarding when you don’t know all about the region and topic, so I made sure to select a

I gathered my three-man film crew in Honduras and shared with them my vision of the documentary. I wanted to be a vehicle in which to shed light on a culture unknown. topic foreign to my knowledge. Chronicles of Indigenous groups are not taught in history class in Western culture. If so, a watered down version of Pocahontas and John Smith is as good as it’s going to be. As a matter of fact, if it wasn’t for my mother’s dinner time stories of the migration of her grandparents, from Cuba to Florida, I would have never known Blacks existed in Central America. So wrapping my mind around an Afro-Indigenous culture

13


in Honduras was enlightening and the lessons learned over two years of research, travel and filming would prove to be one of the most monumental experiences and accomplishments in my 25 years of life.

studied the region immensely) or classmates had heard of or knew much about the Garifuna. Why was this group less studied than the Miskito, Pech or Tolupanes? Here we are, all studying Latin American history and we don’t have a clue

trailer effectively using hashtags. A Twitter user searching the hashtag connected me with a Garifuna blogger in New York City who then tweeted about my film. This is the number one reason why media and technology are so important; in its

With technology there are no boundaries, we don’t have to wait to know what is happening, we can see it all for ourselves and determine our own thoughts about an image and what it means. Obtaining a M.A in International Studies with a concentration on Latin American Studies meant that I had to focus on a country and topic in Latin America. During one of my many assigned readings on the history of Latin America I came across the impact of indigenous groups in the Caribbean region. After reading a miniscule three lined excerpt on the un-enslaved Afro-Indigenous, Garifuna, I was immediately drawn to the history of the culture. What’s intriguing is that none of my professors (all of whom were either from Latin America or

14

2013

about this group of people who’ve contributed such rich history and influence in parts of Latin America and Black history. Little did I know, people who were born and raised in some parts of Honduras would not even know of the Garifuna. Technology helped me learn about the Garifuna. My earliest search led me to one film produced in 1995 about Garifuna cultural foods. In addition, I scoured YouTube for clues on contacts and cultural references and came across a movie in its post –production phase about the Garifuna. I was able to reach out to a member of the film crew through LinkedIn.com. Once my film was complete, I constantly tweeted the

simplest form, it’s an educational tool as well as a resource for connecting to the masses. Writing is still widely expected and accepted in the intellectual world. Many people enjoy reading and allowing their imaginations to take them away to feel, smell and taste worlds through words. Like all things, time and technology disseminates new thoughts and, as a result, transitions take place in every field of work. In the aspect of education, I don’t think history has ever been affected as much as it has with the revolution of media. Let’s not forget the fact that any two-year old can handle a smart phone or tablet better than you, so realize that anything you want to see or learn can be typed into the search box of Google, BING or YouTube and if not available, you can make it available.


and even hear because we have a plethora of resources to investigate for ourselves, and also channels through which we can express our perspectives. Media and technology are the most influential tools in international development. They share experiences and expose controversies. We need every single angle of visual aid and perspective to be effective in development and with media and technology we can access what we once thought was unknown. In order to capture and understand the present, we must have some form of knowledge of the past. With technology there are no boundaries, we don’t have to wait to know what is happening, we can see it all for ourselves and determine our own thoughts about an image and what it means. With this medium we can discuss, relate, educate and witness. I encourage everyone to take advantage of the access to technology by using it on your travels (respectfully). Teach others how to use it and support the endeavors of artist who disseminate progressive messages. These small steps will help the developing world share their thoughts, struggles and build an audience of people who would otherwise not know. Media and technology can make international development a local variable in a global equation. References

Johnson, P. C. (2007). Diaspora Conversions: Black Carib Religion and the Recovery of Africa. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California: University of California Press.

From Paper to Film

I traveled hundreds of miles from my Ohio apartment to Honduras and because of technology and media I was able to share it with faculty and students. Film festivals provided a platform in which to share my artistic work and love for history to an audience of random people from all over the world. Who knows how many I’ve reached, and it’s all because I have my experience in Trujillo, Honduras documented on film. My 12 year old niece, who knew absolutely nothing about international development, now has empathy for land rights issues in indigenous communities and the effects of transnational ties. In other words, media and technology casts a wider net for educating those unattached from a particular topic or theme. Some argue that documenting historical accounts through media still carries a paternalistic approach, but the truth is anyone can do this. Not to take away from the artistic approach and passion of journalist, but visual aids can be done at any time and many places. Although Honduras is one of the poorest countries in the world, I witnessed people with cell phones and cameras and also access to internet at cafes. As a result, messages on cultures can be packaged and easily distributed, but often times misconstrued and not thoroughly examined. In this case, media and technology serve as an alternative and allows diverse perspectives on issues. Remember that history was often written by those in power. Unfortunately, they controlled resources and education thus controlling the stories that were untold. Now, people can tell their own stories; their voices can be heard. Now we can have the power to disregard what we read

15


Making the Revolution with a Phone: How Mobile Banking can Support Development Strategies

Maria Losacco

By Maria Losacco

Maria has several years of work experience with international organizations including the Qatar National Food Security Program and the International Fund for Agricultural Development). She is specialized in research papers analysis and evaluation, international relations, agricultural projects monitoring and evaluation, knowledge management, web applications development and maintenance conference planning and organization. Maria holds a Master of Arts in International Relations and Bachelor’s Degree in Foreign Languages. She is fluent in English and has a good knowledge of Arabic, German and French.

16

2013

Mobile technology has experienced a tremendous growth in the last years, surpassing any other technology available on the market. According to the World Bank, around threequarters of the global population have access to a mobile phone, with an impressive increase from little less than 1 billion in 2000 to over 6 billion as of July 2012. If in the developed countries mobile phones have become absolutely essential for everyday life, in developing countries, where 5 of the 6 billion mobile phones are found, their role could be even more crucial. Indeed, applications and services designed ad hoc to facilitate economic transactions can dramatically impact rural communities and their way of doing business. In some countries this is already an extraordinary reality. Getting informed on market prices or buying and selling products is at hand if adequate infrastructures and services are provided. But for those living in a remote rural area of a developing country without banking accounts, access to internet and lack of education on financial instruments, any single business operation is complicated and often just unrealizable. In fact, three-fourths of the world’s poor do not have a


bank account not only because of poverty (no money to deposit), but also due to the costs, traveling distance and documentation required to reach a bank and open a banking account. Without valid alternatives, the poor remain trapped in a vicious cycle, in which it is not only the lack of money, but also the lack of access to banking and commercial services and the difficulties to access formal lines of credit that prevent them from developing their own business and making profits. Access to mobile technology can dramatically change their life, as shown by an exemplary case of mobile technology successfully applied to development strategies in Kenya. Developed by Vodafone and managed by Safaricom, its Kenyan affiliated, M-PESA (M for mobile and pesa for money in Swahili) was launched in Kenya in 2007 and since then has substantially changed the lives of millions of people, including the rural poor. M-PESA is a small-value electronic payment (transactions cannot exceed US$500) available from mobile phones and largely based on text/SMS messaging. The system is easy to access and very user-friendly: customers open a M-PESA account and are assigned an individual electronic money account associated to their phone number and accessible through a SIM card. Once they have money on their account, the system allows them to use their mobile phones to transfer credit to both M-PESA users and non-users, pay electricity bills, supermarket expenses, school fees and remittances using their virtual credit. They can refer to M-PESA agents, or retail stores, capillary distributed all over the country to exchange e-money into cash and vice-versa and perform other

financial operations as depositing or withdrawing bank notes. Opening the account has no costs associated, while each transaction is charged a reasonable fee ranging from 5% – 30% of the transaction amount (the higher applies when the transaction size as small as US$0.10). With its simple design and easy access, M-PESA has shaken up the way of doing business and everyday life of millions of Kenyans. Numbers well describe the paradigm of what can be considered both a technological and financial success. From less than 53,000 users in April 2007, one month after its launch, M-PESA passed to more than 15.2 million users and transferred more than US$1.4 trillion in electronic files, surpassing any other traditional institutions and financial instruments such as PostBank, post offices, banks and ATMs, that cannot count on a similar presence in the country. The change is even more dramatic for nomad and seminomad communities, such as pastoralists and livestock traders in rural areas who are greatly benefiting from M-PESA. Living miles away from commercial banks and moving their cattle in desert areas, pastoralists are basically cut out from any conventional financial systems and are practically unable to perform any simple operations, such as transferring money back home. Moreover, carrying large amounts of cash over long distances implies for them a serious risk of being robbed. With M–PESA, the possibility of easily transferring money back home or to conclude selling and buying of livestock has dramatically boosted their business and impacted their lives. Pastoralists are now able to easily connect to their families,

M-PESA passed to more than 15.2 million users. gather information on more suitable areas where to move their cattle for grazing, get in contact with livestock markets and conclude business without problems and delays in payments. M-PESA is an example of how mobile technology can be successfully used to extend financial services to branches of the society that are usually excluded from traditional channels. It also shows how crucial it is to develop systems to facilitate everyday payments– without exclusively focusing on deposit/investment functions. Relying on a technology available to all layers of the society, with the rural poor included, M-PESA has marked a crucial turn in the application of ICT to development strategies. Most important, M-PESA proved that less expensive alternatives to traditional financial systems do exist and every cent saved is a cent that poor can invest in. Kenya is probably the most discussed of the successful cases 17


Making the Revolution with a Phone

Making the Revolution with a Phone one can find in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region that is leading mobile banking sector with very high percentages of adult users, such as 68 percent in Kenya, 52 percent in Sudan, 50 percent in Gabon, 44 percent in Algeria (see the Global Findex, a recently released

generally associated to bank accounts and the lack of adequate documentation. As a result, around 60 percent of Latin American adults in the region, or 250 million people, are still unbanked today. And in spite of the favorable conditions for the spreading of mobile banking,

DaviPlata is growing, evolving and offering more and more services. Today the customers can use their phones to make micro payments, make money transfer, pay for purchases, top up their mobile phone account, pay bills and withdraw cash from ATMs.

60 percent of Latin American adults in the region, or 250 million people, are still unbanked today. index of Global Financial Inclusion Indicators presented by the World Bank). Mutatis mutandis, a similar strategy could be adopted in Latin America, a region that seems to have a favorable environment: 98 percent of the population have mobile cell signal, the percentage of mobile phones penetration is among the highest in the world and the percentage of banked people remains low. In the region, the barriers to access formal credit lines are very strong mainly due to the lack of money to invest, the high costs

18

2013

only 3 percent of the adults in the region use mobile phones for financial transactions. The scenario is now rapidly changing, as the case of DaviPlata, a mobile platform launched in Colombia in April 2011 is proving. With about 38 percent of the population unbanked, 105 percent of cell phone penetration and 100 percent geographical coverage on network infrastructure, Colombia has favorable conditions to lead a mobile revolution in the region. Initially born to create savings accounts for the unbanked people,

Moreover, the alliance with the Colombian government proved to be successful and convenient for both parties, especially for what concerns the payment of subsidies. In this regard, DaviPlata is helping the government to reach the poorest offering an efficient, user friendly, transparent, and cost-effective system. As of June 2012, DaviPlata was counting over 568,000 users and over 4 million transactions. It is building its success on low enrollment and transaction costs, simplicity of the interface and a less technical


ne

and more colloquial language , as opposed to the traditional financial institutions whose offer is still based on high cost operations, branch based transactions and complicated operational processes. In the developing countries, where access to internet is still limited and meager infrastructure heavily limit movements and access to traditional credit institutions, mobile phones are becoming ubiquitous in all layers of the society and can make the difference in everyday life. They can facilitate savings and investments, boost business, create new job opportunities, facilitate the circulation of market information and potentialities seem to be just

limitless. For the poorest living in remote areas this is quite a revolution, coming as easy as a text message on their mobile phone.

Reinke, Elaine and Silvia Sperandini. 2012. “M-PESA: The Power of Mobile Technology in Livestock Marketing. Kenya Learning Route, case 3”. IFAD Blogs. Last accessed April 10, 2013. http://ifad-un.blogspot.fr/2012/03/m-pesapower-of-mobile-technology-in.html.

References

Rojas Serrano, Juan Carlos. 2012. “DaviPlata: "Self-Service” Financial Inclusion”. Harvard University. Last accessed April 12, 2013. http://www.managementexchange.com/ story/ daviplata-financial-inclusion-all-using-self-servicetransactional-product-going-kyc-kyc-know-.

“Davivienda - 2012 Earnings Presentation”. Davivienda. Last accessed April 12, 2013. https://www.davivienda.com/wps/wcm/ connect/277d74ab​2854-45c2-8505-a11a29814e45. Deloitte Center for Financial Services. 2011. “The Future of Mobile Banking in Latin America. Insights from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico”. Last accessed April 10, 2013. http:// www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedStates/ Local%20Assets/Documents/ FSI/US_FSI_ Mobilebanking_Latin_America_121511.pdf. Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli and Leora Klapperthe. 2012. “Latin America: Most still Keep their Money under the Mattress”. The World Bank Blogs. Last accessed April 12, 2013. http:// blogs.worldbank.org/latinamerica/latin-americamost-still-keep-their-money-under-the-mattress.

Safaricom Official Website. http://www. safaricom.co.ke. The World Bank. 2012. “Global Financial Inclusion (Global Findex) Database”. Last accessed April 10, 2013. http://microdata. worldbank.org/index.php/catalog/globalfindex. The World Bank. 2012. “Maximizing Mobile”. Last accessed April 12, 2013. http://siteresources.worldbank.org/

19


Antioquia le apuesta a las TIC como motor de desarrollo: Entrevista con el Gobernador Sergio Fajardo

Mábel Giraldo Aristizábal

Por Mábel Giraldo Aristizábal

Mábel Cristina Giraldo Aristizábal, es Comunicadora Social y Periodista de la Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana de Medellín, Colombia. Inició sus estudios en la Universidad de la Sabana en Bogotá y culminó en la Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca, España realizando sus prácticas profesionales en el Canal 4 de Castilla y León. Posteriormente viajó a París a realizar estudios en Civilización Francesa en la Universidad de la Sorbonne. Desde hace un año ingresó al equipo de docentes de 'Enseña por Colombia', organización sin ánimo de lucro que trabaja en pro de la Educación de la población más vulnerable y aislada del país y que pertenece a la red mundia 'Teach for All'. Actualmente se desempeña como maestra en el municipio de Chigorodó en el Urabá Antioqueño (Costa Caribe), en donde combina su profesión de periodista con el interés por investigar sobre el campo de la educación en Latinoamérica y el caribe.

20

2013

En el año 2003 cuando el Ministerio de Educación Nacional de Colombia decidió crear un nuevo proyecto con el fin de modernizar y adaptar las nuevas tecnologías dentro del ámbito de la educación, los gobiernos de sus diferentes regiones y departamentos iniciaron procesos con el fin de vincular nuevas plataformas tecnológicas a lo que sería su plan de desarrollo. Seis años más tarde, en el 2009 el Ministerio de Comunicaciones de Colombia pasaría a ser parte de esta modernización y cambiaría su nombre y objetivos para convertirse en el actual Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones, teniendo como funciones el incremento y facilitación de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, con el objetivo de contribuir al desarrollo socioeconómico del país, generando una plataforma mediática para garantizar el acceso digital a la salud, la educación, el empleo, la justicia, entre otras esferas políticas para

todos los habitantes del territorio Colombiano. Paralelo a este proceso, en el 2004, cuando el matemático Sergio Fajardo ganó las elecciones que lo llevaron a ser Alcalde de Medellín, la segunda ciudad con mayor población de Colombia con 2.5 millones de habitantes, la visión de la ciudad cambió con el eslogan de su gobierno “Medellín la más Educada”. Fue efectivamente desde ese momento, cuando se vivió una transformación cultural y empezaron a aparecer iniciativas que de la mano de las TIC darían paso al primer sistema de parques bibliotecas del país, teniendo una gran acogida dentro de la población urbana e invitando a que otras ciudades en Colombia se uniera a estos esfuerzos por crear espacios en donde la educación y la tecnología estuvieran de la mano. Fue a inicios del 2012, cuando el ex alcalde de Medellín Sergio Fajardo, inició su labor


como gobernador de Antioquia, departamento con la segunda economía regional más grande de Colombia, quién siguió con su modelo de educación para reproducirlo esta vez a nivel regional. El Gobierno de Fajardo que en la actualidad destina el 53% de su presupuesto en educación, decidió hacer un cambio radical y apostar todo el potencial en las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. La apuesta que se hace en Antioquia es decisiva y pretende generar avances en el desarrollo socioeconómico desde la implementación de las TIC. Se apunta a la educación como motor de transformación de Antioquia.

educativos, colegios digitales, escuelas rurales digitales abiertas a toda la comunidad, olimpiadas online, clubes juveniles de ciencia, arte y tecnología, entre otras propuestas que facilitan la educación a través de las TIC. En este caso el objetivo es claro y como en otros países se centra en mejorar la calidad educativa mediante la inserción de las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación y la formación de docentes altamente calificados, para que exista mayor permanencia escolar y generar un fin último que apunta a reducir las brechas entre sectores sociales. La tarea no ha sido para nada fácil, ya que el 93% de los establecimientos

La participación de estos estudiantes los convierte en mediadores educativos con sus pares, quienes serán los encargados de llevar las ideas, el conocimiento y el aprendizaje a sus municipios y hacer de su entorno un lugar con más oportunidades gracias a la inclusión de la educación digital. Dentro del plan de desarrollo de la Secretaría de Educación de Antioquia se encuentra el programa de Antioquia Digital que pretende brindar a los ciudadanos todos los conocimientos para hacer de las TIC herramientas de alto alcance educativo, con el fin de transformar los ambientes de aprendizaje, mejorando la infraestructura y el uso de las TIC en Antioquia. Adicional a esto se pretende generar apropiación en todos los ciudadanos, en especial los estudiantes, mediante la construcción de parques

educativos oficiales se encuentran en zonas rurales. La idea inicial surge de la inquietud por desarrollar las capacidades y habilidades de todos los habitantes de la región en un siglo en donde las nuevas tecnologías juegan un papel preponderante. Según la Superintendencia de Industria y Comercio de Colombia, en el 2012 la telefonía móvil registró un índice de penetración superior a 100%, mientras que en términos de internet registró 18,9 millones en una población de alrededor

21


47,1 millones de habitantes. Teniendo estas cifras en cuenta, es preciso crear un panorama en donde las TIC son presentadas como el medio de transformación educativa, cultural y económica que busca impulsar el modelo. Dentro de estas líneas, se plantea la idea de Educación como motor de la transformación de Antioquia, incluyendo la ciencia, la tecnología, la innovación y el emprendimiento, para lograr los objetivos que se pretenden llevar a cabo en su totalidad en el 2015. De esta forma el gobierno propone construir centros de gestión y producción de contenidos educativos digitales, apropiación social de las TIC y equipamiento tecnológico, para que esta apuesta sea exitosa y cumpla su prometido. Lograr el objetivo supone grandes esfuerzos, y pese a que cada día se entregan nuevos computadores, tabletas y diferentes equipos electrónicos, los centros educativos no han conseguido superar el uso de los aparatos electrónicos. Esto debido a que aún falta trabajo en la medida de una transformación de las prácticas y modelos pedagógicos y en la penetración de nuevos manejos y usos por parte de los usuarios.

22

2013

Del dicho al hecho, los DiverTIC: una experiencia transformadora Finalmente es en los colegios y en las aulas de clase en donde este proyecto educativo llamado “Antioquia Digital” es posible y llega a los estudiantes gracias al equipamiento tecnológico, los contenidos educativos digitales y la apropiación social de las TIC. El reto es mejorar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes en los diferentes saberes y disciplinas, y al mismo tiempo desarrollar habilidades y capacidades. Para lograr estos objetivos, la gobernación de Antioquia invento los DiverTIC, que son clubes juveniles de ciencia y arte digital, en donde los estudiantes se asocian con sus pares y con la ayuda de un maestro con la finalidad de aprender haciendo y obtener un adelanto significativo; en este caso el maestro es mediador y motivador, pero no interviene directamente en las decisiones de sus estudiantes. Los dota de herramientas y recursos, pero son ellos quienes resuelven los problemas. Los elementos principales, con los que cuenta cada club, se basan en el aprendizaje mediante retos, un sistema de ranking y membresía que se controla en la página web de Antioquia Digital, y la conformación de grupos y comunidades virtuales, que también opera en la misma plataforma. Además de las anteriores ventajas, en junio del presente año, la gobernación convocó a un campamento digital con el objetivo de que los clubes digitales de toda Antioquia tuvieran la oportunidad

de compartir sus adelantos en el campo. La experiencia fue sumamente motivadora y citó a 800 jóvenes que se reunieron en el evento, abriendo las puertas para la creación de una segunda etapa del campamento digital. Las cifras son alentadoras, pues en la primera etapa se crearon 200 clubes conformados por tres mil estudiantes de 14 a 18 años de edad pertenecientes a 117 instituciones educativas de los 75 municipios participantes. Para la segunda etapa que está proyectada para el periodo 20142015, se pretende la participación de diez mil integrantes de 600 clubes y la vinculación de 350 instituciones educativas.

Inclusión digital A la fecha los resultados han sido satisfactorios ya que el objetivo principal que es expandir las TIC como medio de aprendizaje ha sido posible ya que se han hecho grande esfuerzos para incluir a los estudiantes de municipios pequeños y alejados del casco urbano. Finalmente la participación de los jóvenes en los DiverTIC hace que el contacto con expertos temáticos garantice el desarrollo de sus habilidades y puedan realizar sus propias construcciones y producciones sin importar el lugar de donde provienen. Por otro lado la participación de estos estudiantes los convierte en mediadores educativos con sus pares, quienes serán los encargados de llevar las ideas, el conocimiento y el aprendizaje a sus municipios y hacer de su entorno un lugar con más oportunidades gracias a la inclusión de la educación digital.


En el pupitre con el Gobernador Los esfuerzos por mejorar la calidad educativa e implementar las nuevas tecnologías no se detienen, y en esta edición escogimos entrevistar a Sergio Fajardo, no por su condición como Gobernador, sino como modelo de autoridad académica en Colombia y en el resto de América y el Caribe. El Gobernador se destaca por las universidades en las que ha sido profesor, entre ellas la Universidad de Los Andes en Bogotá en donde fue director del Departamento de Matemáticas y del Departamento de investigaciones, además de ser profesor de la Universidad de Colorado en Boulder, del Instituto de Investigación en Matemáticas del Berkley College, de la Universidad de Wisconsin en Estados Unidos, y ha sido profesor invitado a la Universidad Católica de Chile, a la Universidad Nacional del Sur en Argentina y a la Universidad Central en Venezuela, entre muchas otras. Sus títulos y cargos como profesor y docente llegan a los más altos escalafones, sin embargo y desde su posición como político independiente, Fajardo lleva alrededor de quince años en la esfera política, apostando todo su conocimiento al desarrollo de la Educación, para Antioquia, Colombia y América Latina. Por Mábel Giraldo Aristizábal

¿De dónde surge la propuesta de Antioquia Digital? Los políticos toman las decisiones más importantes en la sociedad, por eso decidimos llegar a la política con una gran apuesta: la educación como motor de la transformación.

Enfrentamos las desigualdades sociales, la violencia y la ilegalidad a partir del reconocimiento de la dignidad del espíritu humano y de las inmensas capacidades de nuestra gente. Sabemos que el primer escalón en la construcción del camino de las oportunidades y la libertad es la educación. Educación que

en el siglo XXI va de la mano de la ciencia, la tecnología, la innovación, el emprendimiento y la cultura porque son las herramientas para “sacar” lo mejor de las personas y apostarle al talento. En Antioquia contamos con cerca de 39.000 computadores en los salones de clase pero

23


hacía falta una estrategia, un plan para aprovechar los equipos, mejorar los procesos y poner a volar el talento de nuestros niños, niñas y jóvenes. Esa estrategia es Antioquia Digital, que abre la puerta de las oportunidades. Por supuesto, como siempre, nuestras maestras y maestros tienen una tarea fundamental en todo este proceso porque también deben apropiarse de las tecnologías y usarlas como herramientas para mejorar la enseñanza. La apropiación y uso de esas tecnologías, la planeación y desarrollo de actividades de clase con el uso de contenidos educativos de calidad y la creación de redes virtuales de maestras y maestros van de la mano con el mejoramiento y expansión de la infraestructura tecnológica y de telecomunicaciones a lo largo de la geografía del departamento.

¿Por qué incentivar las TIC? Más que incentivarse lo valioso es promover los usos de las tecnologías partiendo de la utilidad que representan. Las posibilidades de comunicarnos y de conectarnos con el mundo son muy valiosas porque cuando logramos conectar a los ciudadanos estamos disminuyendo las brechas de la desigualdad y brindando

las posibilidades de acceso a las oportunidades Promover el uso, posibilitar el acceso y desarrollar las capacidades en estudiantes, maestras y maestros es nuestro gran reto para que puedan adquirir conocimientos y enfrentar los desafíos académicos, profesionales y laborales que nos plantea el siglo XXI.

¿Por qué vincular las nuevas tecnologías a la política de educación de Antioquia? Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación se vinculan de manera natural a la apuesta política de Antioquia la más educada porque son un medio y una plataforma de acceso a las oportunidades. Además facilitan la labor de maestras y maestros.

En Antioquia la más educada entendemos la tecnología como una herramienta efectiva y poderosa para mejorar la calidad de la educación y de esta manera las condiciones de vida de las antioqueñas y antioqueños.

¿Qué resultados significativos ha tenido el programa en la región? Lo más significativo de Antioquia Digital en sus primeros 18 meses de actividad ha sido la movilización de la comunidad educativa para acercarse y hacer uso de las herramientas, la participación en los procesos de formación y el aprovechamiento de los contenidos digitales interactivos dispuestos a través de la red social educativa de Antioquia www. antioquiadigital.edu.co.

En Antioquia contamos con cerca de 39.000 computadores en los salones de clase pero hacía falta una estrategia, un plan para aprovechar los equipos, mejorar los procesos y poner a volar el talento de nuestros niños, niñas y jóvenes. Esa estrategia es Antioquia Digital, que abre la puerta de las oportunidades. 24

2013


Las posibilidades de comunicarnos y de conectarnos con el mundo son muy valiosas porque cuando logramos conectar a los ciudadanos estamos disminuyendo las brechas de la desigualdad y brindando las posibilidades de acceso a las oportunidades. Además:

• En el primer Campamento Antioquia Digital participaron • 117 establecimientos 800 jóvenes pertenecientes a educativos se benefician los clubes digitales. actualmente de la estrategia de 4.000 maestras y • Más Colegios Digitales, con una maestros conforman las redes avanzada dotación tecnológica, virtuales de matemática, programas de formación lenguaje, TIC y etnoeducación docente en uso pedagógico y hacen uso de contenidos de TIC y el acompañamiento educativos digitales para académico en el aula por parte apoyar la planeación y de expertos. desarrollo de sus clases. • Más de 3.000 estudiantes • Más de 3.000 docentes se han hacen parte de los Clubes certificado en uso pedagógico Juveniles Antioquia Digital, de TIC a través de la ruta de en los que se promueve la formación. incorporación de la ciencia • Antioquia Digital entregó al y la tecnología en sus departamento el Metaportal proyectos de vida a través www.antioquiadigital.edu. de la participación en talleres co. Es la red social educativa técnicos orientados por de Antioquia compuesta expertos, desarrollo de retos a su vez por 12 redes de y proyectos de investigación aprendizaje virtual, 3 portales escolar.

y 3 herramientas virtuales para apoyar los procesos de enseñanza y aprendizaje en los establecimientos educativos. • El municipio de Hispania se beneficia desde el 2012 de la estrategia Municipio Digital. Cada uno de los 1.100 estudiantes hace uso de una tableta digital y accede a cursos escolares en línea gracias al desarrollo de una infraestructura de telecomunicaciones de alta capacidad para todo el municipio.

25


Del Quipu

J u a n Pa b l o S e v e r i

“la red está en todas partes; por lo tanto, el futuro de Internet es, en realidad, el futuro de todo”.

lo Severi por Juan Pab Nací en Montevideo, Uruguay hace 54 años. Egresé tardíamente de la Universidad de la República con el título de Economista, luego de cursar algunos estudios de filosofía y electrónica. Años más tarde, cursé un Master en International Management en la Universidad de Saint Thomas, Minnesota. Antes de dejar el Uruguay, alterné trabajos de consultoría en proyectos de inversión con la docencia universitaria y la investigación. Desde temprano mi trabajo se vincula al Banco, al extremo que mi primer visita a Washington fue en el año 1992 como conferencista invitado en un seminario sobre los usos de las estadísticas censales para el direccionamiento de inversiones sociales. De a poco las consultorías me fueron sacando de mi país, hasta que en el año 98 ingreso al Banco como staff y me traslado, con mi señora y cuatro hijos. Luego de un periplo de 12 años que me llevaron por las Representaciones del Banco en Honduras, Perú y Argentina, desembarco en la sede en el año 2011. Desde hace algunos meses, me desempeño como Presidente de la Asociación de Empleados. Las variadas experiencias que me tocó vivir me enseñaron muchas cosas, pero la más deslumbrante, la cada vez más evidente inmensidad de lo que resta por conocer… de la naturaleza y de los hombres.

26

2013


a la tablet Especial fascinación nos causa la herencia cultural, organizacional y científica del Imperio de los Incas. A la vida nómade de funcionario internacional, debo algunos años en la Lima Virreinal, donde me tocó trabajar para un proyecto multisectorial inspirado en el Qhapaq Ñan. Fue en aquellos años que, en visitas a museos, revisión de documentos y asistencia a conferencias, tuve frente a los ojos ejemplos de quipus y tocapus y escuché del sistema de correo de los chasquis. Un cosa es evidente: la complejidad del imperio solamente pudo construirse y administrarse sobre la base de un sólido sistema de registros, almacenamiento de datos y comunicación. Así el entramado de hilos de colores y anudamientos llamado quipus, eran funcionales al cobro de tributos y codificación de mensajes para su envío a larga distancia. Los tocapus, son tejidos de colores en tela que se especula combinaban simbología gráfica con codificaciones todavía indescifradas. Los chasquis eran un

cuerpo de corredores entrenados que llevaban mensajes registrados en quipus y tocapus. Su tránsito era facilitado por el complejo vial del Qhapaq Ñan, monumental obra con aspiraciones a ser incorporada por UNESCO al patrimonio cultural de la humanidad y que alcanzó a los 6000 km de vías empedradas, con puentes y terraplenes que vencían la quebrada geografía andina. Diversas tecnologías fueron sucesivamente desarrolladas, revisadas, adaptadas y sustituidas para facilitar el registro, acumulación y divulgación de Información. Su complejidad, potencialidad e intensidad de uso progresan al mismo ritmo que la organización social a la que sirven. Ambas dimensiones resultan interdependientes. Así, no es imaginable el funcionamiento de un aeropuerto relativamente modesto, sin radio y radar. La formación progresivamente masiva de profesionales requeridos para sostener la revolución industrial a partir del siglo 19 no hubiera sido posible sin la imprenta. Fue la imprenta y la Ilustración las que inspiraron la frustrada ilusión de los enciclopedistas, liderados por Diderot, que soñaron con reunir en una publicación todo el conocimiento y ponerlo a disposición de muchos.

El telégrafo, el pony express, los mensajes de tambores, las señales de humo, las palomas mensajeras y porqué no, un papel dentro de una botella, nos avisan desde todos los rincones del recuerdo, que siempre habrán nuevas técnicas para alcanzar nuevas dimensiones. Seguramente los Incas desconocían la sigla TIC o su equivalente en quechua, pero contaban con el desarrollo tecnológico suficiente para administrar la información requerida para hacer viable el Imperio. Lo que seguro escapó a los esfuerzos predictivos de sus oráculos, al igual que superó a la fecunda imaginación de Julio Verne e incluso fue mucho más allá de las delirantes profecías de Nostradamus, era hasta dónde llegaría la acumulación y transmisión de datos. Toda la sabiduría custodiada en las bibliotecas monacales del medioevo y que jugaron un papel decisivo para el Renacimiento, puede estar disponible en un ordenador “en cada escritorio y en cada hogar” al vaticinio del señor Gates y bajo el impulso de los vientos de Silicon Valley…y aquellos vientos trajeron estas tempestades… Según Alfons Cornella promotor de innovaciones y conferencista español,

Toda la sabiduría custodiada en las bibliotecas monacales del medioevo y que jugaron un papel decisivo para el Renacimiento, puede estar disponible en un ordenador. 27


De l Qu i p u a l a ta b l e t 28

mientras en los 60s un ciudadano norteamericano promedio recibía 18 estaciones de radio, 4 canales de televisión y algunos centenares de títulos de revistas, para 2004 estimaba tenía a disposición 18.000 títulos de revistas y 20 millones de sitios de internet. Internet, en unas pocas décadas lo ha invadido todo y su capacidad de penetración parece estar lejos de amainar. En un congreso promovido por MIT en España, a propósito de ”El Futuro de Internet”, retumbó la afirmación: “la red está en todas partes; por lo tanto, el futuro de Internet es, en realidad, el futuro de todo”. Es que, imágenes, música, textos, libros, mensajes de voz, fotografías, planos, mapas, todo, casi que absolutamente todo, se digitaliza, se almacena y se transmite por la red. También la red sabe donde estamos y nos lleva adonde queramos ir, y ya basta apenas con conversar con el celular para conseguirlo. Es un hecho que será cada vez más difícil estar desconectados, o estaremos enchufados, o seremos habitantes de un mundo paralelo. Y este fenómeno es de doble vía, somos consumidores y productores de información y conocimiento en una espiral esencialmente inacabada. Con la progresiva maduración de la democracia, se hace extensivo el derecho casi irrestricto a la información. Finlandia ha hecho del acceso a internet de banda ancha un derecho constitucional. Cada vez surgen más Programas Nacionales que, siguiendo la experiencia pionera del Uruguay, distribuyen ordenadores portátiles entre escolares y liceales, asegurando conectividad e intentando evitar la fragmentación social…pero tal vez hasta estos programas deberían migrar –si es que no lo están haciendo-- hacia

2013

otros dispositivos móviles. Los expertos en futurología se esfuerzan en predecir cómo serán nuestras vidas en unos años. Si bien y como es obvio no todas son coincidencias, nadie puede desconocer la extraordinaria relevancia de Internet en cualquier escenario. Sin embargo, aún con divergencias respecto a ponderadores, es seguro que habrá un efecto neto de impactos positivos y negativos, que ojalá resulte en un neto positivo. Las recientes revelaciones de Snowden, han llamado la atención y puesto en alerta al mundo. La penetración y rebotes de su mensaje incluso, no son sino consecuencia de la casi instantaneidad con la que luego de producido un hecho, este se transforma en noticia y viaja a las fronteras más remotas. Sin haber salido todavía del impacto inicial que causó el dato sobre ciudadanos y organizaciones defensoras de los derechos civiles, se sucedieron las sospechas que las prácticas de dudosa legalidad denunciadas, eran de uso corriente en muchos países de democracias consolidadas. El fenómeno reanima un debate en nada novedoso por el tema pero si original por sus dimensiones, alcances y características. Detractores y defensores de la acción impulsada desde los servicios de inteligencia acuden a refugiarse alternativamente en argumentos de libertad y seguridad… un difícil balance que acompaña desde siempre a la construcción democrática. Pero el nuevo debate de la privacidad no se agota en problemas de terrorismo, inteligencia y seguridad nacional. Los sistemas y medios sobre los que se asientan progresivamente las relaciones sociales en general

y, particularmente en el mundo del trabajo, han abierto una nueva dimensión. La creciente exposición personal en las llamadas redes sociales entraña riesgos que alerta a padres y tutores. Fenómenos como el ciberbullying, acoso sexual, pérdida de identidad y de control sobre la privacidad, alteración de información e incluso, la extensión de comportamientos típicamente adictivos que lejos de socializar, aíslan al individuo, representan verdaderos riesgos. Según señala el experto en comunicación Alfredo Castaños, entre los adolescentes y menores que utilizan sistemas de entretenimiento virtual, como Internet, vídeo-juegos o teléfonos móviles, aproximadamente un diez por ciento realiza un uso indebido que tiene consecuencias problemáticas. No escapa a nadie tampoco, la vigorosa irrupción de la tecnología en el medio laboral y, las nuevas dimensiones para el control del comportamiento de los empleados que esto ha posibilitado. Parece también irreversible el proceso de creciente vinculación al mundo virtual, tanto en el tiempo de trabajo como en el tiempo de ocio. Incluso, se hacen cada vez más frecuentes los arreglos laborales desde emplazamientos remotos de los empleados. Esto supone simultáneamente aumentar alternativas y opciones personales, pero también, amenaza crecientemente con hacer borrosas las fronteras entre el tiempo laboral y el tiempo personal, alentando de alguna manera la opresiva invasión de supervisores en la vida personal y familiar e inversamente, avasallando presumiblemente también el control del medio laboral. Simultáneamente, diversas formas de mensajes, correos y otros medios son utilizados


Finlandia ha hecho del acceso a internet de banda ancha un derecho constitucional. para transmitir exigencias laborales desbordando los límites del espacio y tiempo personal y familiar. Todas estas irrupciones en el medio laboral y personal, ocurren al amparo del desarrollo tecnológico y, como no podía ser de otra manera, antecedieron a la legislación en materia de protección de derechos y a la reglamentación de procedimientos. Lo cierto es que muchos casos de violación del derecho a la intimidad acuden a tribunales para dirimir el problema. El debate en esta materia alcanza hoy ámbitos académicos, judiciales y legislativos.

…después del fantasioso episodio de la costilla, y el mandato del Libro del Génesis para que creciéramos y domináramos la tierra, los animales y los peces, cabe dudar y mucho respecto a si el escritor de turno imaginó lo complejo de la instrucción divina y, también, hasta qué punto avanzaríamos. Hacia el final de la década del 60s, la pantalla de los televisores mostraron a Neil Amstrong dando los primeros pasos en la Luna, haciendo competir en dimensiones de logro al viaje con la transmisión simultánea de las imágenes. Hace un año, la nave Voyager I --luego de treinta y seis años

en viaje-- abandonó el sistema solar. Una vez más, me permito sorprender por las señales que se reciben desde tanta distancia, posibilitadas por tecnología hoy largamente obsoleta y, también, por la energía que hace esto posible. Las tecnologías de la información, que inspiraron este artículo (y a la sazón, que fue posible gracias a Internet), resultan en una abrumadora acumulación de ingenio e intrepidez humana, que al tiempo que hacen al bienestar de los hombres, dibujan escenarios de desarrollo incierto y traen consigo advertencias y riesgos innegables.

29


Information and Communication Technologies for Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Latin America V a l e n t í n S i e rr a

By Valentín Sierra

Valentín Sierra is a researcher and analyst of policy, technology and industry trends at Washington CORE, a Washington, DC-based consulting firm providing research and advisory services to clients in Asia and the Americas. He also volunteers as a public affairs advisor for Altrubanc, a new online service connecting promising students with educational sponsors. Valentín previously served as assistant editor of Vox.LACEA. org, the research-based forum and resource center of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association. Originally from Manizales, Colombia, Valentín graduated Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Saint John’s University in Minnesota, USA, with a Bachelor’s Degree in political science and economics.

30

2013

The promise of ICT4D-B: information and communication technology for the development of businesses The increasing accessibility and sophistication of information and communication technology (ICT)20 is allowing communities around the globe to overcome the geographical barriers, financial limitations, and educational constraints that prevent their socioeconomic advancement. In the private sector, the technological paradigm is now that the increased and effective use of ICT holds the key to staying competitive in domestic or international markets by

improving i) production and supply chain operations; ii) access to industry and market information; iii) communication with clients and suppliers; as well as iv) advertising and marketing efforts. Through these advances, ICT has significantly expanded the growth potential of businesses of all sizes all around the world. At the macroeconomic level, each 10% increase in the use of ICT in a country contributes between 1.6% and 3.6% to GDP growth, with higher gains for countries in which the use of ICT represents more than 10% of the economy (Ca’Zorzi 2011). Moreover, the adoption of ICT leads to significant productivity gains: labor productivity in countries with high levels of ICT use is seven times greater on average than in countries with low levels of ICT use (Dixon et al. 2007).


Improving overall economic development in Latin America by leveraging the power of ICT is thus a real promise. Its fulfillment, however, is contingent upon the active engagement of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSME)21, which employ 67% of the workforce and account for 99% of businesses in the region (Avendaño et al. 2013). Against this backdrop, this article first explores the benefits of integrating ICT solutions into business operations in Latin America, and argues that government-sponsored initiatives should seek to continuously move MSME to a higher, more sophisticated level of ICT utilization in pursuit of the full socio-economic potential of these modern tools. While many governments in the region are currently implementing a

variety of policies and programs to promote and facilitate the adoption of ICT by MSME, future assessments of these initiatives should take into consideration not only the number of businesses impacted, but how government action has improved business mobility across different levels of the ICT use continuum discussed in section 3.

Key benefits of ICT4D-B: A firsthand look My personal and professional experiences have allowed me to see firsthand the empowering effect of ICT4D-B. In 2011, I had the opportunity to serve as a consultant on a multi-country study for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) assessing

the main government initiatives, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption of ICT by MSME across the Asia-Pacific region (APEC 2011). After reaching out to over 190 Chilean, Mexican and Peruvian MSME, the main benefits consistently reported by respondents were the following: • Improving customer relations, • Increasing visibility and reputation, • Growing existing business relations, • Improving access to market information and business trends, • Improving management of supply chain and product/service delivery • Improving quality control   One business owner reported that his MSME, a chemical product company employing 15 workers, grew six-fold in 8 years after implementing e-commerce. The internet also enabled this MSME

31


to find new suppliers and clients worldwide and access technical information useful for R&D purposes. ICT also allows MSME to build social capital at a low cost through social media and other businessminded online interactions. These venues may result in new business leads or good ideas for expanding or becoming more productive. I have experienced this particular benefit firsthand as the son of a microenterprise owner in Manizales, Colombia. For nearly 10 years, my father has owned and operated a small fast food restaurant in the neighborhood where our family resides. The business employs three people in total: my father, my stepmother and a part-time kitchen helper. By leveraging social media platforms - a skill he taught himself after getting Internet for our house in 2009 - my father proactively engages young customers in Manizales through regular promotions. My father’s client base has increased significantly in the past three years mainly as a result of this free marketing strategy. The additional income has enabled him to purchase a motorcycle for making deliveries, which people can now place via text message. Such is the transformative power of basic ICT4D-B.

The current state of ICT4D-B through the lenses of the ICT use continuum The more an MSME integrates ICT across its business processes, the higher the benefits for the company’s effectiveness and efficiency. Thus, determining which countries’ MSME are becoming increasingly competitive through the use of ICT requires an analysis

32

2013

across different levels of ICT sophistication. Rovira and Stumpo (2013) identified four progressive stages in the use of ICT by businesses as follows:

Stage 1: consisting primarily of informal micro and small businesses, particularly in rural areas, which lack access to basic ICT.

Stage 2: consisting primarily of small and medium-sized businesses which make an investment in basic ICT equipment and applications (e.g. PC, Internet, e-mail, websites) to streamline administrative procedures. At this stage, businesses may also engage in relatively more sophisticated operations such as electronic transactions with government agencies and the banking sector (e-government and e-banking, respectively).

Stage 3: consisting primarily of medium and large businesses in which ICT-based solutions support decision-making, coordination among employees (i.e. Intranet) and coordination with suppliers and clients (i.e. Extranet). At this stage, companies also engage in e-commerce.

Stage 4: consisting mainly of transnational and large domestically-owned corporations whose intensive ICT use requires highly qualified staff and Intranet capabilities. In addition, this stage involves the use of highly specialized software such as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), an integrated and comprehensive business management tool, and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to manage business contacts, clients, and sales leads, among other things. On the basis of this ICT use continuum and the most recently

reported data on ICT penetration across industry, trade and services in Latin America, we can determine which country’s MSMEs are using ICT more intensively. According to the data collected by Rovira and Stumpo (2013) and reported by ECLAC (2013), most MSME in Latin America are in the first two stages of the ICT use continuum. The average number of MSMEs that utilize basic ICT tools ranges between 80% and 90% for small businesses and approaches 100% for medium businesses. While Brazil and Colombia are leading the way in Stage 2 in terms of the percentage of MSMEs with computers (99.5% and 99%, respectively) and connectivity to the Internet (both at 98.5%), the percentage of MSME with their own website is highest in Argentina (62.5%). The percentage of MSME using e-government and e-banking services is also highest in Brazil (71% and 86%, respectively), followed by Colombia (59.5% and 85%). In terms of Stage 3, the percentage of MSMEs with an Intranet is highest in Costa Rica (46.5%), followed by Brazil (41.5%), where the percentage of MSMEs with an Extranet is also among the largest (34%). Brazilian MSMEs are also among the most active in e-commerce, as the percentage of these companies placing online orders is the highest in the region (61%). The percentage of SME receiving online orders is highest in Colombia (48%), followed by Uruguay (42%). As for Stage 4, in which MSME participation is not as significant, the percentage of MSME using Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solutions is highest in Chile (45.5%) and the percentage of those using Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems is highest in Brazil (27%).


Innovative governmentsponsored approaches to ICT4D-B are on the rise The aforementioned evidence shows that Brazilian MSME currently lead in the region when it comes to incorporating both basic and advanced ICT tools into their productive and administrative processes. Government initiatives seem to be partly responsible for this success. For example, the Brazilian government offers technology consulting services for MSME, matching MSME demands with ICT solutions providers (ECLAC 2013). Similarly, Mexico has established a network of entrepreneur support centers which provide consulting, training and financing services related to the integration of ICT into business processes (APEC 2011). Colombia, Argentina and Costa Rica, other high-performing countries, are offering loans and grants to MSMEs for incorporating ICT into production processes (Rovira and Stumpo 2013). Meanwhile, Chile promotes e-commerce among MSME through free training courses for micro and small entrepreneurs, and provides incentives for MSME which provide ICT training to workers and leverage ICT tools in the curriculum (APEC 2011). Costa Rica also subsidizes cloud solutions and training on cloud technologies for MSMEs (Rovira and Stumpo 2013). As it turns out, the cloud could liberate MSMEs in Latin America from at least 50% of the burden of high upfront ICT costs - identified by most as their main obstacle - while increasing MSME mobility and flexibility.

Hopefully, more governments in the region will regard cloud-based solutions as enablers for moving MSME closer to stages 3 and 4 of the ICT use continuum. Meanwhile, it is pertinent to build an enabling environment characterized by affordable broadband accessibility, flexible financing mechanisms, and adequate ICT skill sets in the workforce.

The road ahead of ICT4D-B The socio-economic promise of ICT4D-B is slowly being fulfilled in Latin America, but many obstacles lay ahead. While more than 80% of MSME in Latin America are using basic ICT, less than 25% of them are using advanced ICT applications (ECLAC 2013). Unfortunately, many Latin American MSME still consider ICT a risky and costly investment, particularly in the context of limited ICT literacy and training, limited access to credit for the MSME sector, lack of qualified human resources, and the high cost of broadband in the region (APEC 2011; OECD & ECLAC 2012). The digital inclusion of rural MSMEs is also a major challenge. Despite these difficulties, MSME have begun a journey towards digital inclusion that is irreversible, and governments have an opportunity to capitalize on the momentum mustered by ICT4D-B. Helping MSME move toward more sophisticated ICT solutions will gradually empower them to drive growth and productivity while boosting innovation, thus improving the communities around them. Government efforts to design a progressive set of ICT-oriented programs - from early-childhood digital education to customized consulting services for startups

- are therefore critical to make Latin America’s MSME sector more competitive and to promote economic development in the region. References

Avendaño, R., Boehm, N. & Calza, E. (2013, January). Why scarce small and medium enterprise financing hinders growth in Latin America: A role for public policies. Retrieved from http://www. voxeu.org/ Ca’Zorzi, Antonio. (2011, March). Las TIC en el desarrollo de las PyME. Centro Internacional de Investigaciones para el Desarrollo. Retrieved from http://pymespracticas.typepad.com/. Dixon, A. N., Sallstrom, L., Wasmer, A. L., & Damuth, R. J. (2007, April). The Economic and Societal Benefits of ICT Use: An Assessment and Policy Road Map for Latin America and the Caribbean. CompTIA. Retrieved from www. pannastrategies.com. Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). (2011, November). Research Study of the Main Benefits of Investing in the Use of ICT by SMEs: Experiences in APEC Economies. Singapore: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Retrieved from http://publications. apec.org/.     Rovira, S., Santoleri, P. & Stumpo, G. (2013, March). Incorporación de TIC en el sector productivo: uso y desuso de las políticas públicas para favorecer su difusión. Entre mitos y realidades. TIC, políticas públicas y desarrollo productivo en América Latina. Santiago de Chile: Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL). Retrieved from http://www.eclac.org Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). (2013, March). Economía Digital para el cambio estructural y la igualdad. Retrieved from http://www.eclac.org/ publicaciones. OECD & ECLAC. (2012). Latin American Economic Outlook 2013: SME Policies for Structural Change, SMEs, Innovation and Technological Development. Retrieved from http://www.eclac. org/publicaciones/.

33


El Innovador Índice de Banda Ancha del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo

34

2013

Consultora de la Plataforma de Banda Ancha del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo. Foditsch es abogada especializada en políticas públicas y regulación y previamente trabajó para el Gobierno Federal de Brasil, Brookings Institution, Banco Mundial y firmas jurídicas.

Enrique Iglesias

Consultor y Líder Técnico-Estratégico de la Plataforma de Banda Ancha del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo. González Herranz es ingeniero y tiene más de cuatro años de experiencia en el sector de las telecomunicaciones, habiendo trabajado para el Banco Mundial, France Telecom, Telefónica y Capgemini.

Natha lia Fod it sch

Especialista Líder en materia de Telecomunicaciones y Coordinador de la Plataforma de Banda Ancha del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo. Garcia Zaballos es doctor en Economía de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid y tiene más de 14 años en experiencia en el sector de las telecomunicaciones donde ha desarrollado su actividad profesional en distintos puestos de responsabilidad.

Félix González Herranz

Antonio GarcÍa Zaballos

Por Antonio García Zaballos, Félix González Herranz, Nathalia Foditsch y Enrique Iglesias

Consultor de la Plataforma de Banda Ancha del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo. Iglesias es ingeniero de telecomunicación y previamente trabajó como Consultor de Estrategia y Operaciones para el sector de Tencología, Medios y Telecomunicaciones en Deloitte.


El desarrollo de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones (TICs) está cambiando el panorama de la región de Latinoamérica y El Caribe (LAC), permitiendo la transformación de sectores como los de educación y salud, y favoreciendo el crecimiento económico y la inclusión social. Existe un elemento crucial para el desarrollo de las TICs y es la banda ancha, gracias a su carácter dinamizador e integrador. Atendiendo a los conceptos microeconómicos de oferta y demanda, LAC está experimentando una brecha digital de banda ancha en acceso (oferta), adopción y uso (demanda), lo cual se convierte en un desafío crítico para el desarrollo económico y social. A modo de ilustración, un estudio reciente del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) muestra que un aumento del 10% en la penetración de servicios de banda ancha en la región lleva asociado un incremento promedio del 3,2% del Producto Interno Bruto (PIB) y un aumento de la productividad de 2,6 puntos porcentuales22. La complejidad de la banda ancha hace que ésta deba concebirse como un ecosistema que necesita de un entorno institucional y regulatorio que facilite la competencia y la inversión privada para acelerar el acceso, adopción y uso de servicios de banda ancha. Los países de la región deben ser conocedores, en primer lugar, del estado de su ecosistema para identificar el grado de su brecha digital. La medición del mismo, tradicionalmente, se viene haciendo con indicadores como la penetración de servicios de banda ancha, la velocidad y los precios. Este artículo presenta un nuevo e innovador Índice de Banda

Ancha (IDBA), desarrollado por el departamento de Competitividad, Tecnología e Innovación (IFD/CTI) del BID, que es un enfoque integral a la medición de la brecha digital desde los cuatro componentes que lo explican: 1) infraestructura; 2) regulación estratégica; 3) políticas públicas y visión estratégica; y 4) aplicaciones y capacitación. Lo que hace de este índice una referencia única es que permite hacer análisis globales y detallados de dicha brecha digital gracias a su granularidad, pues está compuesto de 28 variables. 1. El índice de banda ancha: un enfoque innovador en el mundo para medir la brecha digital El IDBA examina la situación de los 26 países de la región y añade, además, un estudio análogo para 37 países adicionales que son relevantes para el análisis23 de modo que

permite observar la brecha digital desde dos perspectivas: dentro de LAC y con el resto del mundo. El IDBA permite, a la vez, identificar puntos débiles así como buenas prácticas que sean aplicables en otros países. 2. La metodología de computación del IDBA El IDBA se compone, en primer lugar, de cuatro dimensiones claves (i.e. pilares) correspondientes a los cuatro componentes que explican la banda ancha. Cada uno de los cuatro pilares está compuesto de una serie de variables, 28 en total, basados en indicadores extraídos de fuentes de prestigio internacional24. 2.1 La formulación del índice Cada uno de los pilares recibe un peso específico, al igual que sus variables. (ver figura 1).

figura. 1 ESTRUCTURA LÓGICA DEL ÍNDICE

35


2.2 La estructura del índice (Ver figura 1) a. Los pilares del índice Los pilares son sub-índices que agrupan las 28 variables del análisis. El peso otorgado a cada pilar es diferente y responde a su importancia dentro del ecosistema de banda ancha. Estos cuatro pilares son los ejes globales de actuación para fomentar el desarrollo de la banda ancha y de las TICs: i. Políticas públicas y visión estratégica: mide la importancia que los gobiernos otorgan a las políticas de desarrollo de las TICs en todos los ámbitos (gobierno, educación, empresas, salud, empresas). ii. Regulación estratégica: mide el desarrollo del estado de la regulación de telecomunicaciones y su efectividad (e.g. grado de competencia). iii. Infraestructura: mide el estado de las infraestructuras de telecomunicación y del equipamiento que los usuarios necesitan para hacer uso de ellas (e.g. computadoras por hogar). iv. Aplicaciones y capacitación: mide el grado de formación de la sociedad en TICs así como el uso de las mismas por parte de ciudadanos, administraciones públicas y empresas. b. Las variables del índice Las variables del IDBA son las unidades mínimas de información y las palancas más directas de actuación. Se ha considerado que las variables dentro de un pilar son de igual importancia y, además, cabe destacar que se ha llevado un proceso de normalización con cada una de ellas.

36

2013

i. Variables del pilar de políticas públicas y visión estratégica: • Potenciación de las TICs por parte del gobierno • Prioridad del gobierno en las TICs • Importancia de las TICs en el futuro para el gobierno • Estado actual de los planes de desarrollo de banda ancha ii. Variables del pilar de regulación estratégica: • Suscripción banda ancha fija internacional • Número de competidores en servicio de banda ancha fija • Número de competidores en servicio de banda ancha móvil • Efectividad del fondo para el acceso al servicio universal • Índice de competencia en Internet y telefonía • Visión de las leyes del sector TIC iii. Variables del pilar de infraestructura: • Proporción de población de cobertura de la red móvil • Servidores de Internet • Hogares con ordenador personal • Líneas de banda ancha fija • Líneas de banda ancha móvil • Velocidad banda ancha fija • Velocidad banda ancha fija internacional • Líneas de telefonía fija • Hogares con acceso a Internet iv. Variables del pilar de aplicaciones y capacitación: • Tasa de matriculación en educación superior • Acceso de Internet en las escuelas • Tasa bruta de matriculación en educación secundaria • Facilidad de acceso al contenido digital • Uso de las redes sociales, personal y empresarial

• Vídeos cargados a YouTube • Nivel de adopción de tecnología en empresas 3. Resultados en breve (ver anexos 1 y 2) Chile está destacado como el país con la mejor clasificación en el IDBA entre los países de LAC. Al igual que Barbados y Brasil, Chile se encuentra dentro de los 30 primeros países de la región clasificados en el IDBA. En cuanto a la infraestructura, se puede observar que los países de LAC se encuentran por debajo del promedio en comparación a los países más desarrollados. Solamente Barbados esta categorizado dentro de los 30 primeros, seguido poco después por Chile, Brasil y Uruguay. De acuerdo a la clasificación de aplicaciones y capacitación se puede obtener una estimación de adopción y uso de la banda ancha. La región tiene una posición superior al resto de los subíndices, lo que pone de manifiesto el potencial de crecimiento que existe en la misma. El caso de Uruguay, Barbados y Costa Rica es particular, ya que aun teniendo buenos resultados en tres de sus índices presentan un reto en la dimensión de regulación estratégica. Esto demuestra la necesidad de invertir en un entorno regulatorio preparado para afrontar los retos del futuro. Asimismo, la complejidad de la banda ancha hace que ésta deba concebirse como un ecosistema. Este breve análisis está lejos de ser concluyente y pretende ser un primer paso para despertar el interés de trabajar hacia la promoción de la banda ancha, permitiendo así el desarrollo económico y la inclusión social.


Anexo 1. Ranking IDBA y clasificación para los subíndices de política públicas y estrategia regulatoria (debido al límite de espacio, mostramos sólo los resultados para LAC). Rnk IDBA

Cód. País

País

Ranking de Políticas Públicas y Visión Estratégica

Valor de Políticas Públicas y Visión Estratégico

Ranking de Regulación Estratégica

Valor de Regulación Estratégica

26

CHL

Chile

22

5,82

2

7,53

27

BRB

Barbados

20

6,04

59

4,52

30

BRA

Brasil

21

5,87

7

7,34

36

PAN

Panamá

16

6,22

44

6,56

39

URY

Uruguay

27

5,67

56

4,83

40

COL

Colombia

32

5,31

12

7,27

41

MEX

México

36

4,79

48

6,18

42

ARG

República Argentina

57

2,98

35

6,74

44

ECU

Ecuador

39

4,54

43

6,59

46

JAM

Jamaica

40

4,44

50

6,04

47

PER

Perú

48

3,80

32

6,86

48

CRI

Costa Rica

35

4,92

57

4,80

49

DOM

Rep. Dominicana

38

4,58

47

6,43

51

TTO

Trinidad y Tobago

37

4,78

60

3,98

52

BHS

Bahamas

NA

NA

53

5,46

53

VEN

Venezuela

59

2,92

52

5,87

54

PRY

Paraguay

56

3,00

39

6,62

55

GTM

Guatemala

50

3,39

46

6,48

56

NIC

Nicaragua

55

3,08

38

6,65

57

HND

Honduras

44

4,07

55

5,41

58

SLV

El Salvador

60

2,36

51

5,94

59

GUY

Guyana

33

5,06

63

1,92

60

BOL

Bolivia

53

3,19

54

5,46

61

SUR

Surinam

41

4,24

62

3,14

62

BLZ

Belice

61

1,97

58

4,66

63

HTI

Haití

62

1,35

61

3,34

Anexo 2. Ranking IDBA y subíndice de infraestructuras y de aplicaciones y capacitación

Rnk IDBA

Cód. País

País

Ranking de Infraestructuras

Valor de Infraestructuras

Ranking de Aplicaciones y Capacitación

Valor de Aplicaciones y Capacitación

26

CHL

Chile

35

4,43

32

5,04

27

BRB

Barbados

22

5,67

23

5,79

30

BRA

Brasil

38

4,12

36

4,48

36

PAN

Panamá

42

3,70

35

4,63

39

URY

Uruguay

36

4,27

31

5,09

40

COL

Colombia

47

3,24

44

4,05

41

MEX

México

41

3,85

45

3,93

42

ARG

República Argentina

39

4,03

40

4,28

44

ECU

Ecuador

46

3,28

53

3,22

46

JAM

Jamaica

45

3,29

47

3,91

47

PER

Perú

49

3,04

48

3,82

48

CRI

Costa Rica

43

3,52

38

4,31

49

DOM

Rep. Dominicana

52

2,88

49

3,72

37


Acce d e r p a r a

Crecer: Políticas TIC en América Latina

La inclusión de una política de sociedad de la información en la agenda gubernamental conlleva al desarrollo por Viviana Urueña Moyano y Pedro Oswaldo Hernández Santamaría

Economista de la Universidad de los Andes de Colombia y estudiante de Maestría en Desarrollo Económico y Estudios Internacionales en la Universidad Friedrich-AlexanderUniversitat (FAU), Alemania. Es miembro de la Corporación Colombia Crece, organización cívica y social, y hace parte del equipo de trabajo en el área de Proyectos. Recientemente trabajó en Computadores para Educar, un programa social del sector público que promueve el acceso a las TIC para la educación en Colombia. Sus intereses profesionales se enmarcan en las áreas de política pública, desarrollo social y económico, planeación y gerencia de proyectos.

38

2013

Pedro Oswaldo Hernández Santamaría

Viviana Urueña Moyano

En los últimos años, se ha resaltado la influencia de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones (TIC) en el desarrollo social y económico. De hecho, las TIC se han convertido en un motor de los procesos de ampliación de las

capacidades y oportunidades de la sociedad; específicamente, de los segmentos más vulnerables de la población, a través de estrategias focalizadas como por ejemplo: en el acceso con calidad a servicios como la salud o la educación.

Estudiante de Economía y Ciencia Política con estudios complementarios en Gobierno, Desarrollo y Función Pública. Becario Quiero Estudiar de la Universidad de Los Andes y miembro del Programa de Fortalecimiento de la Función Pública en América Latina de la Fundación Botín. Cofundador del proyecto de emprendimiento social “Ágora Latinoamérica” que propende por la concientización acerca de la discapacidad, la educación inclusiva y la formación en valores democráticos en la juventud y la niñez. Interesado en temas relacionados con Políticas Públicas, Sector Público y Gobierno, Economía social y del desarrollo, así como en teología cristiana y liderazgo.

Además, las TIC propician mejoras en la productividad empresarial gracias a progresos en eficiencia; y a nivel agregado, movilizan a la ciudadanía al promover espacios de participación, facilitar la disponibilidad de la información y fomentar la transparencia del sector público. Una política de sociedad de la información es una iniciativa integral que se orienta al acceso masivo a las TIC, a la capacitación de recursos humanos y a la generación de contenidos y aplicaciones electrónicas en los diversos sectores de la sociedad.25 No se trata de iniciativas aisladas; se trata de una agenda digital Es esta articulación alrededor de una política integral de TIC la que se convierte en el elemento fundamental para impulsar el desarrollo. La importancia de tener una política TIC en los países está en que permite la conjunción de distintas iniciativas. Estas iniciativas pueden estar activas en diferentes sectores, pero si se implementan de forma fraccionada o separada pueden no tener un impacto significativo en el bienestar. Por esto, cuando un gobierno asume el liderazgo de las iniciativas, no sólo adopta una estrategia nacional sostenible y comprehensiva – otorgando una mayor legitimidad a los proyectos– sino que también


eleva el nivel de compromiso, seguimiento y regulación sobre los mismos. No obstante, esta estrategia nacional debe ir de la mano con el sector privado y la sociedad civil, en la medida que deben ser esfuerzos compartidos que permitan obtener resultados óptimos. En relación con lo anterior, en América Latina se ha planteado como estrategia de desarrollo regional la centralidad de las políticas para la sociedad de la información,26 considerando a las TIC como una herramienta estratégica para el desarrollo que impulsa la innovación, el crecimiento económico y la inclusión social.27 De este modo, hace más de una década que se empezaron a desarrollar políticas nacionales de TIC, con diferentes ritmos y avances en diseño e implementación, que obedecen a las condiciones del país y al grado de institucionalización de las estrategias nacionales de TIC. Lo anterior significa, por un lado, que el grado de compromiso y coordinación depende de la jerarquía política del organismo encargado de las políticas digitales y los actores relacionados con estas. Cuanto mayor es el grado de institucionalización, mayor es la jerarquía de la autoridad de aplicación y su capacidad de interlocución institucional. Por otro lado, debe tenerse en cuenta que la naturaleza de estas agencias responsables difiere entre los países, distinguiéndose por ejemplo, entidades de tipo estratégico (visión) y otras de naturaleza más operativa (implementación). No obstante, en general la etapa estratégica se asigna a un nivel jerárquico más alto que el nivel al cual se asigna la etapa de implementación operativa. Por ejemplo, en el caso de Chile y Colombia la estrategia es asignada

a una comisión interinstitucional y la operación en una secretaría ejecutiva ministerial. En contraste, en Argentina se les atribuye a un comité presidencial y a una subsecretaría (respectivamente); mientras que en Venezuela se encarga a un solo ministerio ambas etapas. Continuando con el objetivo del presente artículo, a modo de comparación, se analizarán los casos de Colombia, Chile, Venezuela y Argentina, resaltando el grado de maduración en la formulación de políticas en países como Colombia y Chile, quienes iniciaron con anterioridad sus políticas frente a Argentina y Venezuela. En general, acerca de las prioridades temáticas, el despliegue de una infraestructura TIC universal y moderna así como la formación y el gobierno electrónico,28 concentran la atención de todos los países analizados, ya que la disminución de la llamada “brecha digital” es una de las preocupaciones centrales de los gobiernos.29 Las estrategias de Colombia y Chile, como parte de la segunda generación de políticas TIC se encuentran en una etapa avanzada de ejecución y seguimiento, destacándose el Plan Vive Digital de Colombia.30 Estas políticas incluyen objetivos tanto estratégicos como operativos, mientras que las de Argentina y Venezuela se centran solamente en objetivos estratégicos, visiones generales que no necesariamente se traducen en planes de acción concretos, con el riesgo de que en la práctica no representen más que una expresión de deseo, que no encamine acciones reales.31 Colombia y Chile han presentado amplios avances en indicadores de TIC en la última década, asociado precisamente a su política de inclusión tecnológica. Sus indicadores sociales, políticos y

económicos plantean cierta posición ventajosa frente a países como Venezuela y Argentina. El estado de maduración de las TIC de un país se puede relacionar con el porcentaje de usuarios de internet, pues a través de la masificación del acceso y uso del internet se reduce la brecha digital y del conocimiento. Así, los países con una política nacional de TIC tienen mayor porcentaje en el uso del internet que países con políticas menos maduras, como el caso de Venezuela y Argentina. Estudios como los de CEPAL (2007)32 y Fedesarrollo (2011),33 demuestran que un mayor acceso a Internet tiene un impacto positivo sobre el crecimiento. Un aumento de 1% en la penetración de banda ancha o en la infraestructura TIC, genera un crecimiento positivo sobre el PIB de un país, a través del aumento del gasto en innovación tanto pública como privada. No obstante, debe tenerse en cuenta que el aumento en el gasto no necesariamente es favorable para el desarrollo de un país si éste no es eficiente y focalizado, es decir, si no va encaminado a acciones o proyectos concretos que mejoren la productividad.

Un aumento de 1% en la penetración de banda ancha o en la infraestructura TIC, genera un crecimiento positivo sobre el PIB de un país. 39


En relación con la penetración de las TIC en las empresas, se han visto avances importantes en Chile y Colombia, países que junto con Brasil, lideran en América Latina el acceso y apropiación de las TIC en el sector productivo. Esto se evidencia en la creciente proporción de empresas que usan internet para hacer transacciones con organismos gubernamentales, bancos y que poseen intranet.34 No obstante, estas afirmaciones deben recibirse con cautela, ya que la apropiación de las TIC en las empresas latinoamericanas aún es muy precaria. Específicamente, el acceso a la computadora personal, la línea fija y la banda ancha para el uso de correo electrónico, la creación de sitios web y la estandarización o automatización de procesos

40

2013

administrativos que caracteriza a estos países, corresponde a etapas iniciales de desarrollo digital que posteriormente deberán migrar hacia usos más complejos como el e-commerce, los servicios transaccionales, la articulación de áreas a través de una intranet, etc. Si bien, el aprovechamiento aun es precario, los avances que ha tenido América Latina han mejorado la productividad de las empresas permitiendo visualizar en el corto y mediano plazo una siguiente etapa en la apropiación de las TIC por parte de las empresas latinoamericanas, así como mejoras en la eficiencia de los procesos y actividades de las empresas, impactando así el crecimiento y el desarrollo de los países. Por otro lado, de acuerdo a indicadores de gobierno electrónico de la ONU,35 en 2012, Colombia y Chile se ubicaron dentro de los 40 primeros países con administraciones nacionales que tienen voluntad y capacidad de usar las TIC para la prestación de servicios públicos. Esto se mide a través del índice de Gobierno Electrónico (EDGI),36 destacándose que “el creciente papel del gobierno electrónico en la promoción de un desarrollo inclusivo y participativo ha ido de la mano con la creciente demanda de transparencia y rendición de cuentas en todas las regiones del mundo”.37 En este sentido y según este estudio, Colombia y Chile, frente a Argentina y Venezuela, han mostrado un resultado favorable en indicadores políticos relacionados con democracia y tecnología. Lo anterior se puede relacionar con el hecho que las TIC propician una reducción en los costos relacionados con la participación política, el reconocimiento por parte de los ciudadanos del aparato político y el funcionamiento del

Las TIC propician una reducción en los costos relacionados con la participación política, el reconocimiento por parte de los ciudadanos del aparato político y el funcionamiento del sistema democrático. sistema democrático (como el voto, Vragov y Kumar, 2013), además de revolucionar las posibilidades de activismo y movilización gracias a las facilidades que las TIC plantean para la coordinación y la conversación entre las personas, de forma simple, segura e instantánea (Land et al. 2012). Al mismo tiempo, las TIC facilitan la rendición de cuentas por parte del gobierno nacional y local lo que propicia un mayor conocimiento de las políticas en curso, su direccionamiento, los resultados de la ejecución, de esta forma, la ciudadanía está en la capacidad de recibir y exigir respuestas y de sancionar. En suma, todo lo anterior otorga “mayor oportunidad para los ciudadanos a exigir un mejor funcionamiento en las instituciones, una mayor representación y legitimidad de los agentes políticos y administrativos”.38 Ahora bien, para


complementar estos resultados es necesario que organizaciones como Freedom House, Transparency International, entre otros, consideren la formulación de índices que contemplen la incidencia de las TIC dentro de los procesos democráticos y en la lucha contra la corrupción. Para el caso del índice de corrupción, este realiza una aproximación a través de encuestas de percepción por lo que es necesario que sus preguntas se asocien al uso de las TIC y además se requiere una unificación de la metodología para todos los años pues hasta el momento no es posible comparar los resultados por países año a año39. En conclusión, resaltan la importancia de una política nacional de TIC dentro de la agenda de los gobiernos es más, debe ser visto como una transformación hacia la nueva era de la Sociedad de la Información. Con el fortalecimiento de las TIC los países de América Latina encontrarán una vía eficiente, sostenible y deseable hacia la integración de los gobiernos con la sociedad civil, lo que sin duda promueve el desarrollo. Las TIC mejoran la calidad de servicios como la educación (laptops o tabletas para que los estudiantes o “nativos digitales” tengan un aprendizaje más interactivo y de acuerdo a sus capacidades), salud (telemedicina para atender zonas de difícil acceso), entre otros. Los bajos costos que está teniendo la tecnología más el aprovechamiento de sus economías de escala es un escenario que los países están llamados a estudiar y atender. Es así, que los beneficios producto de una estrategia integral se convierten en un llamado a la acción para los países latinoamericanos y para las agencias internacionales interesadas en estudiar a fondo las dinámicas políticas de los países.

ReferencIAs

Alonso, J. A. y Ocampo, J. A. (2011). Cooperación para el desarrollo en tiempos de crisis. Madrid: Fondo de Cultura Económica. Association for Progressive Communications (APC). (2003). ICT Policy: A Beginner’s Handbook. Chris Nicol (Ed.). STE Publishers: Johanesburgo, Sudáfrica. Disponible en: http://www.apc.org/en/system/files/policy_handbook_ EN.pdf Baquir, M., Nemati, H., y Palvia, P. (2009). Evaluating Government ICT Policies: Extended Design-Actuality Gaps Framework. Second Annual SIG GlobDev Workshop. Phoenix, USA. Disponible en: http://www.globdev.org/files/ proceedings2009/21-FINAL_Baqir-et_al_Evaluating_ Government_ICT_2009.pdf Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL). (2005). Políticas públicas para el desarrollo de sociedades de información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en:

en América Latina: ¿una misma visión? Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas, 2010. Disponible en: http://www.eclac.org/ddpe/publicaciones/xml/1/39181/ W314Esp.pdf Hilbert, M., Bustos, S. y Ferraz, J. C. (2005). Estrategias nacionales para la sociedad de la información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas, 2005. Disponible en: http://www.eclac.org/publicaciones/xml/4/21594/ lcw17.pdf Land, M., Meier, P., Belinsky, M., & Jacobi, E. (2012). # ICT4HR: Information and Communication Technologies for Human Rights. M. Land, P. Meier, M. Belinsky and E. Jacobi,# ICT4HR: Information and Communication Technologies for Human Rights, World Bank Institute, Nordic Trust Fund, Open Development Technology Alliance, and ICT4Gov.

CEPAL. (2010). Monitoreo del Plan eLAC2010: Avances y desafíos de la Sociedad de la Información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en:

Latin American Economic Outlook (Latameconomy.org). (2013). “Las TIC en las pymes latinoamericanas: acceso y apropiación”. En Perspectivas Económicas de América Latina 2013. Disponible en: http:// www.latameconomy.org/es/a-fondo/perspectivaseconomicas-de-america-latina-2013/pymesinnovacion- y-desarrollo-tecnologico/las-tic-en-laspymes-latinoamericanas-acceso-y- apropiacion

http://www.eclac.org/publicaciones/xml/9/41729/ Monitoreo_Parte2.pdf

Naser, A., y Concha, G.. (2011). El gobierno electrónico en la gestión pública.

CEPAL. (2010). Las TIC para el crecimiento y la igualdad: renovando las estrategias de la sociedad de la información. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en:

Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http://www.eclac.org/publicaciones/xml/9/43219/ SGP_N73_Gobierno_electronico_en_la_GP.pdf

http://www.eclac.cl/publicaciones/xml/5/21575/ Politicas%20Publicas.esp.pdf

http://www.eclac.org/ddpe/publicaciones/xml/5/41725/ LCG2464.pdf Comisión Económica y Social para Asia y el Pacífico (ESCAP). (1999). Considerations for ICT policy formulation in developing countries. Disponible en: http://www. unescap.org/stat/gc/box-ch8.asp Criado,I & Corojan, A. (Criado, J. I., & Corojan, A. (2010). ¿Pueden las TIC cambiar la transparencia, lucha contra la corrupción y rendición de cuentas en los gobiernos latinoamericanos? Un enfoque comparado sobre los países centroamericanos. 200 años de Iberoamérica (1810-2010), 2037-2072. Disponible en: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/ halshs-00531527 Fedesarrollo. (2011). Impacto de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones (TIC) en el Desarrollo y la Competitividad del País. Bogotá: Fedesarrollo. Disponible en: http://www.fedesarrollo.org.co/ wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Impacto-de-lasTecnolog%C3%ADas-de-la-Informaci%C3%B3n-y-lasComunicaciones-TIC-Informe-Final-Andesco.pdf

Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU). (2013, 16 de marzo). “La Organización de las Naciones Unidas presenta el Informe anual sobre Gobierno Electrónico – 2012”. Disponible en:http://www.un.org/es/publications/ pdf/un_e-government_survey_2012.pdf Rovira, S. (2008). El Impacto Económico de las TICs. Presentación del IV Taller sobre la Medición de la Sociedad de la Información en América Latina y el Caribe, San Salvador. Disponible en: http://www.eclac.org/socinfo/noticias/ noticias/7/32357/Sebastian_Rovira.pdf Uribe E., F. (1998). Región: punto de fuga, Encuentros y Desencuentros. Bogotá: Universidad de los Andes, Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios sobre Desarrollo (CIDER). Vragov, R., y Kumar, N. (2013). The impact of information and communication technologies on the costs of democracy. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications.

Guerra, M., y Jordán, V. (2010). Políticas públicas de Sociedad de la Información

41


Data Collection Opportunities: Experience from a Large Scale Impact Evaluation

Juliana Chen Peraza

By Juliana Chen Peraza

Juliana Chen is a Research Fellow in the Inter-American Development Bank’s Research Department. Currently she works on several education projects in Costa Rica, including Geomate. This project focuses on the effects and costs of varied ICTs on mathematics education at the seventh grade level. Previously she worked as a consultant for the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program as part of the impact evaluation team focusing on the economic and health benefits of a global sanitation and hygiene intervention on early childhood development. A native of Guatemala, she obtained a Masters in environmental economics and policy from Duke University and a Bachelor in economics from the University of Chicago.

42

2013

The Inter-American Development Bank’s research department recently concluded an experiment in Costa Rica to assess the impact of the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), specifically laptops and interactive smart-boards, on the teaching and learning of mathematics in secondary schools. More broadly, Latin America and the Caribbean are heavily investing in classroom technology as a way to boost academic achievement in the region.40 41, As more impact evaluation studies involve assessing the role of technology on some dependent variable (education in our case), we have the opportunity to use better data collection technologies embedded within the technology we are evaluating and studying. This opportunity to improve data collection has not been effectively focused on previous studies or literature and I believe we are missing a chance to revolutionize data collection methodologies. This paper is a retrospective analysis of our recent ICT4D study,

emphasizing data collection. As a research assistant for this project, I worked first hand on the data collection process. This allowed me to see the potential drawbacks and missed opportunities of studies like this one. Specifically, I will review our data collection methodologies and suggest improvements including more thorough data logging using computers and standardizing data collection forms via web applications with form validation (which ensures the respondent provides all the necessary information in the proper format). Prior to addressing our data collection methodologies, I will provide an overview of the impact evaluation study. The experiment randomly assigned 85 public schools in urban and peri-urban areas of Costa Rica into a control group and four treatment groups. In total, 190 teachers and 18,000 seventh grade students participated in the experiment. Three of the treatment groups received technology either by giving each student a


laptop, equipping schools with computer laboratories (with a two-to-one computer to student ratio), or equipping classrooms with interactive smart-boards. An important innovation of this study is that it combined technology with a new pedagogical approach to teaching math, focusing on seventh grade geometry. Therefore, one of the treatment groups served as a placebo group with a new curriculum but no technology. The project went a step further than simply providing hardware by setting up the technology with a mathematics learning software, which enabled students to take a more active learning role and changed the curriculum from a teacher-centered to a studentcentered approach. Data collected for this study came from various sources. First, as is the norm for impact evaluations, baseline and endline geometry tests and surveys were administered to students and teachers in our sample of approximately 5,000 students and 190 teachers. In addition, other data collection tools were used to more closely follow the implementation and fidelity of our experiment as well as augment our study (get covariates for our regressions) by collecting school level data. These tools included three handwritten logs that the teachers filled out throughout the course of the treatment (3 months), the automated computer logging that saved the name and time the students would open a program, and the schools’ administrative data that contained the names and grades of the students. In order to obtain the teacher logs and the administrative data, we emailed Excel workbooks to each school for them to fill out. These were filled out in inconsistent

A key component of this intervention was the use of a free and open source mathematical software called Geogebra to help students have a more active role in learning. ways that changed the original formatting of the files, which made it difficult to combine the data from all the schools. A simple solution to this would have been to use web-based forms. Web forms accomplish several goals including form validation, to ensure the appropriate data type is provided for each field. For instance, if two students should not be allowed to have the same student id (i.e. the teacher should not enter duplicate IDs), then a uniqueness constraint can be added to prevent duplicates. The teacher will then be alerted to his or her mistake and can fix the error at the point of data entry. Such web form capabilities are readily available for free from services such as google forms42, for a cost from web survey companies like surveymonkey43, and are easily created by web developers if more specific requirements exist. A key component of this intervention was the use of a free and open source mathematical software called Geogebra to help students have a more active role in learning by exploring and discovering mathematical concepts. Therefore, it was important to the context of our study and to ensure treatment was implemented correctly that students used Geogebra on their computers. We attempted to verify this by analyzing the computer logs saved by the computers in the one-

to-one and laboratory treatment groups. There were several problems we encountered when analyzing this data to look at the behavior of the students and answer questions such as: were they using Geogebra or were they simply using the computer to browse other internet pages like Facebook. Unfortunately, the log data from the computers only gave us the name and timestamp when a program was first opened. Thus, we were unable to see whether a student had opened Firefox and used it for Geogebra applets (which can be used through a browser) or if they had opened other tabs (perhaps simultaneously) to browse the internet. Another shortcoming from the log data was the inability to know for how long students were using each software. The computer logs only showed when the program was opened not when it was closed. One can assume that if the program appeared again then it was closed and reopened throughout one class, but we do not know for how long it was initially opened or how long it was closed before re-opening. There have been significant advances in logging technology by the software development community in general and by the operations/system administrator and monitoring community in

43


Data Collection Opportunities

44

particular. These tools are aimed at monitoring the technological infrastructure (for example, the various servers and all of their related software processes). These tools are free and open source and would help to improve the logging capabilities currently employed by NGO studies. For instance, both Chrome and Firefox, the most popular open source web browsers, have logging modes that log all the HTTP requests (i.e. all the websites visited) to a file.44 Further, there are several recent projects that aim to consolidate logs into more manageable and analyzable datasets. These new tools focus on time series data, which requires multiple observations of the same subject through time. One such program, Logstash, aggregates logs; parses

the log data according to regular expressions; tags it with the appropriate timestamp; indexes the data, and enables it to be searched, exported, and graphed.45 These solutions are costly for a single study to implement thoroughly; however, if we adopt conventions and codify best practices for logging technologies and web based data collection, we can dramatically reduce the cost and spur further adoptions. In addition, if we can utilize open source monitoring and logging tools being developed by the startup community, we can then gain the frontier of data logging tools and contribute to a community that focuses entirely on this problem. This essay highlights but a few ways in which the data collection process of our study could have

been augmented with the use of simple, free, and available technology. There are many more ways ICT can help development, some of which may not be as practical as others. But at least, simply looking at the ways in which this particular project attempted to collect data, technology could have provided solutions that would not have been so difficult (or expensive) to implement differently and thus greatly increase the value of our results. One of the most valuable contributions that technology can bring to field of development is reducing the high cost of data, thus increasing the effectiveness of development programs and policies through improved monitoring and evaluation.

If we adopt conventions and codify best practices for logging technologies and web based data collection, we can dramatically reduce the cost and spur further technologies.

2013


Working across our Hemisphere to make a world of difference. We want you to join us. /padforg @padforg

padf

P A N A M E R I C A N D E V E L O P M E N T F O U N D AT I O N

1889 F St NW, 2nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel: 202.458.3969

padf.org

HOPKINS IS

advancing careers

Effective communication requires mastery of social science and digital technology, paired with strong practical skills. Johns Hopkins University’s

MA IN COMMUNICATION combines all three of these elements. Take a look at some of our courses: > Communication.org: Not for Profits in the Digital Age > Communicating for Social Change > Using Social and Digital Media > International Public Relations and Public Diplomacy > Intercultural Communication Take your career to the next level and join a flexible, part-time program with classes available in Washington, DC or online.

Get started here:

communication.jhu.edu


Entrevista

Connexio tuvo la oportunidad de entrevistar a la especialista líder de la comunidad de aprendizaje pymesprácTICas del FOMIN (Fondo Multilateral de Inversiones) del Grupo BID. A continuación, Aminta nos comparte sus perspectivas sobre las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC) basada en sus 15 años de

Aminta Perez-Gold

experiencia en esta área, desde Aminta es una profesional de las Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación con más de 15 años de experiencia en la gestión de iniciativas de desarrollo a través de proyectos TIC en América Latina y el Caribe. Desde su incorporación al Fondo Multilateral de Inversiones (FOMIN) del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) en el 2002, ha tenido una intensa actividad en la promoción de la innovación y adopción de las TIC en las pequeñas y medianas empresas como vía de incremento de su competitividad. Actualmente coordina el Portafolio de Proyectos TIC, el cual ha apoyado más de 60 proyectos con una inversión de US$ 78M que ha beneficiado a mas de 150.000 MSME. Antes de unirse al BID fue Directora del área de e-Business en PSINet Latinoamérica y Vicepresidenta de Sistemas de Información en el Banco Mercantil de Venezuela. Tiene experiencia de 12 años en docencia en Ciencias de la Computación y ha sido expositora en eventos realizados en diferentes países de la Región.

46

2013

el boom de la burbuja “punto com,” a la telefonía móvil, a algunos de los temas más oscuros y sensibles de las TIC como su afecto nocivo en el ambiente y la brecha digital. Por Rebecca Van Roy y Stephanie Suber


Después de la explosión de la burbuja “punto com,” la mayoría de los proveedores de servicios TIC se enfocaban en los grandes clientes como el gobierno. De hecho, la oferta de servicios TIC para la Pequeña y Mediana Empresa (PYMES) era bien limitada. Nos encontrábamos en un entorno en el cual los proveedores competían por los mismos clientes, viendo el beneficio inmediato ahí, mientras que las PYMES quedaban

ejecutores de proyectos. Esto dio origen al nacimiento del Clúster de TIC del FOMIN y a pymespracTICas, la comunidad de aprendizaje virtual que da soporte al Clúster. PymesprácTICas nace originalmente como una comunidad cerrada: sólo participaban los ejecutores, consultores y fominólogos de los proyectos, hasta que hace dos años y medio la abrimos al público para hacerla totalmente inclusiva. Ha ido creciendo como un ente de referencia en la región de LAC en temas de adopción de las TIC

deben soportar el mejoramiento de modelos de negocio que se traduzcan en beneficios para las empresas en términos de eficiencia, acceso a mercado, ventas, etc. Sin embargo, la realidad es que muchas veces se desarrollan plataformas “supply driven”, y sus potenciales usuarios no perciben el beneficio asociado a su uso. El reto con las PYMES es precisamente ese: convencerlas de sus beneficios, que la mayoría de las veces, en su lenguaje se traduce el incremento de sus negocios/ingresos en el inmediato plazo. Conseguir el “buy-in” sobre

pymesprácTICas del FOMIN

¿De dónde surge la necesidad de la intervención del FOMIN en el campo de las TIC para desarrollo de las PYMES?

[pymespracTICAS] ha ido creciendo como un ente de referencia en la región de LAC en temas de adopción de las TIC por la micro y pequeña empresa. desatendidas; potencialmente con demanda, pero sin oferta. Dentro de esta disyuntiva interviene el FOMIN. Buscando cerrar esta falla del mercado, el FOMIN conecta al sector público y privado en tres líneas de acción: i) demanda: desarrollando soluciones TIC enfocadas en las PYMES; (ii) oferta: fortaleciendo a las PYME de la industria de software de la región; (iii) gobierno: apoyando el uso de TIC para el mejoramiento de la relación entre gobiernos y las PYME. De estas tres áreas surge el Portafolio de TIC del FOMIN. Hoy en día contamos con 60 proyectos. Sin embargo, muchos de estos proyectos a veces duplicaban esfuerzos y además estaban generando en forma individual un conocimiento y experiencias no aprovechables por otros proyectos. Es entonces cuando el FOMIN crea la figura de “clústers” a fines de compartir el conocimiento y resultados generados entre los

por la micro y pequeña empresa y actualmente consolida y disemina el conocimiento y experiencias sobre el uso de las TIC no solo por el FOMIN y sino también por otras iniciativas “intra” y “extra” de la región.

Hoy en día las TIC se han convertido en un “buzz word,” resaltando su gran potencial en fomentar el desarrollo económico ¿Qué opinas al respecto? ¿Cuáles son las directrices fundamentales para determinar las plataformas más adecuadas y sostenibles para proyectos de ICT4D (TIC para el desarrollo)? Tenemos que estar claros en una cosa: las TIC no se utilizan en las empresas por el simple hecho de que están de moda, sino que el uso de las TIC tiene que obedecer a una razón de negocio. Las TIC

la adopción de TIC en las PYMES puede volverse desgastador. También, hay que tener en cuenta que en el caso de las PYMES las TIC solas no hacen milagros, sino que tienen que ir acompañadas de capacitación, entrenamiento, y trabajo colaborativo. La experiencia del portafolio nos indica que las plataformas/ soluciones TIC más adecuadas para las PYMES deben responder a sus necesidades/demandas y generarles beneficios en el corto plazo. Estas son las principales razones que las motivarían a pagar por su uso, aspecto indispensable para asegurar la sostenibilidad de los proyectos. Sobre su impacto en el desarrollo económico, tiene definitivamente que existir una estrategia TIC a nivel de país, a nivel nacional, vinculada a diferentes sectores económicos y diferentes políticas públicas.

47


¿Cuál consideras que ha sido la transformación significativa en el mundo de las TIC y por qué? Aparte de la aparición de los PC, la transformación más significativa ha sido originada por la Internet y el gran “boom” de la tecnología móvil. Ésta ha permitido socializar a las TIC y responder a ese problema que siempre hemos tenido de acceso a la tecnología. Ha hecho a las TIC más inclusivas haciendo posible su acceso desde lugares inimaginables y en tiempo real. La tecnología móvil ha marcado un hito en el acceso a las TIC.

Connexio tiene como objetivo fomentar un análisis crítico y comprensivo con perspectivas divergentes sobre las TIC en el desarrollo. Por esta tangente, qué piensas sobre el debate que las TIC están creando una brecha digital? ¿Qué retos principales tenemos para disminuirla y quiénes son vitales para ello?

48

2013

La brecha digital es un problema que requiere de diversas acciones. Por una parte, solucionar el acceso. En zonas urbanas existen diversidad de ofertas/precios para servicios de a banda ancha. Sin embargo este no es el caso de las zonas rurales. Proveer estos servicios en zonas rurales/remotas requiere de inversiones cuantiosas, que quizás los gobiernos por si solos no pueden asumir. Se necesitan alianzas con los grandes proveedores de infraestructura. El detalle aquí está en que estos proveedores no ven negocio y rentabilidad en esta inversión. También contribuyen a la brecha digital el costo de los equipos, aunque la tendencia es a su disminución (ya hay tablets en India con un costo de U$40) y la falta de contenidos. En la Región no no existe un oferta de contenidos digitales en muchos temas de interés y de actualidad en español o el idioma local. En otras palabras, ¿cuál es el punto de conectarse cuando no hay información comprensible para el usuario final?

Otro aspecto a considerar es el que hemos percibido a través de los años de intervención en el sector y que consiste en la resistencia de proveedores TIC en ofrecer sus servicios a pequeños empresarios, al no considerarlos un segmento atractivo para sus negocios. La adopción de TIC en las PYMES es un proceso que requiere de mucha capacitación y acompañamiento, y que genera bajos márgenes de ganancia. Por ello, los proveedores prefieren concentrar sus esfuerzos en las grandes empresas, sector financiero y gobierno, lo cual implica la existencia de una oferta limitada de servicios TIC para PYME.

¿Qué opinas sobre los efectos nocivos que pueden tener los desechos TIC en nuestro medio ambiente? ¿Crees que este tema merece más atención? Este es un problema latente. Desgraciadamente, nadie ha querido ponerle mucha atención al tema dado su complejidad y sensibilidad. Parece tratarse de un problema de reciclaje. Sin


embargo, el detalle aquí está en que muchos de los componentes de las TIC no son reciclables. Hay casos donde por ejemplo, alguien hace una donación de equipos TIC y esto puede verse como una forma de transferir el problema al receptor. De esta manera, se crea un círculo vicioso que no soluciona al problema de raíz, sólo lo transfiere. ¿Que acciones deben tomarse? Necesitamos más concienciación sobre el problema y manejarlo bajo esquemas de seguridad. Pero, la realidad es que existe toda una “desinformación” y hay que empezar por ahí. Tenemos que enseñarle a las personas, empresas, y gobiernos que las TIC pueden tener un efecto negativo en el medio ambiente. Ya hay casos donde se está atacando el problema desde “la raíz” al realizarse investigaciones (R&D) para desarrollar componentes TIC no dañinos. Definitivamente aquí queda un camino largo y esta es un área dónde necesitamos más líderes, más conocimiento y más diseminación de ideas y soluciones.

Las TIC tienen un poder transformador sobre todo en los países subdesarrollados. ¿Qué está haciendo el FOMIN en términos de educar a la población sobre el potencial de las TIC en el desarrollo y en la reducción de la pobreza en la región de LAC? ¿Qué métodos han tenido más éxito?

Las TIC se han vuelto transversales y por ello no hay prácticamente intervención del FOMIN que no incluya el desarrollo de un componente TIC. Esto incluye acciones tanto para desarrollo del sector privado, que requieren de sistemas de información sofisticados para integración de cadenas de valor, acceso a mercados, diseño de productos, inclusión financiera, etc, como para el mejoramiento de la calidad de vida de poblaciones de bajos ingresos, donde los teléfonos celulares juegan un papel importante y por ellos muchos los consideran “el computador de los pobres”.

¿Cuales considerarías las tres lecciones más importantes que has aprendido del efecto de las TIC en America Latina y el Caribe? Pienso que una de las lecciones más importantes es que “no es uso de TIC por el uso de TIC”. Si queremos que definitivamente haya una apropiación de las TIC en las PYMES y un impacto en su competitividad, las soluciones TIC deben de ser “demand-driven” y responder a una razón o necesidad de negocio, generar crecimiento, penetración de mercado, eficiencia, diferenciación de producto. Otra lección aprendida es que es difícil lograr el escalamiento de proyectos pilotos exitosos. Quizá lo estoy viendo desde un punto de vista FOMIN, porque nosotros

pymesprácTICas del FOMIN

En la Región no contamos con contenidos digitales en español o el idioma local. En otras palabras, ¿cuál es el punto de conectarse cuando no hay información comprensible para el usuario final? hacemos proyectos pilotos. Lograr su escalamiento requiere de un esfuerzo grande de promoción y de articulación de actores sector público privado que no es simple y requiere de tiempo y esfuerzos. Por eso es que la nueva generación de proyectos del FOMIN incluye entre sus componentes acciones dirigidas a lograr la continuidad y escalamiento de los proyectos. Por último, la necesidad de que exista una estrategia país para la adopción de TIC e impactar en el desarrollo económico. No hay que inventar la rueda, sino seguir el ejemplo de países como Korea. En la Región tenemos el caso de Chile con una agenda TIC bien definida y Colombia quien ha creado un ministerio de TIC y tiene unas metas bastante agresivas para cerrar la brecha. Una estrategia país es clave y requiere acciones en diversos frentes entre los que se incluyen academia/talento humano, acceso, oferta de servicios/contenidos, campañas de sensibilización/ capacitación, etc. Evidentemente tiene que ser implementada en colaboración con los grandes “players” del sector privado y academia, entre otros. No podemos olvidar sin embargo, que hay países en la Región cuya prioridad y atención está dirigida a la resolución de problemas básicos y no tienen todavía a las TIC en sus agendas. Pero esto sin duda contribuye a la ampliación de su brecha digital respecto al resto del mundo.

49


The Next Industrial Revolution of Latin America: Technology, Institutions and Networks Nima Veiseh

By Nima Veiseh

Nima Veiseh is currently an Economist at Baker & McKenzie and focuses primarily on technological investment with the private and public sectors. He has formerly worked as an economic and strategy consultant at the Breakthrough Institute, the MicroEquity Development Fund and BlackRock, and has also taught at Columbia University. He is a graduate of Georgetown University, Columbia University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The views expressed in this article are independent of the author’s related-parties and employers. For more information, visit www.nimaveiseh.com.

50

2013

Economies are networks: networks of agents that constantly exchange information and goods for mutual benefit. Industrial revolutions are characterized by paradigm shifts in not only the way we exchange human, physical and information capital, but the speed with which we exchange it as well. The Steam Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries brought about unparalleled abilities to move physical capital and goods across

continents, as trains strengthened the vertices that connected the nodes of economic centers. Electrification and automation in the first half of the 20th century enabled the work of human capital to be transformed into physical goods at unprecedented rates, leading to an increase in the rate at which economic nodes transform capital. Now, Latin America is faced with an Information Revolution, where the rate at which


economic nodes and the vertices that connect these nodes in the network are simultaneously growing in a compounding fashion due to advances in Internet, telecom and mobile technology. This doublesided expansion is an inflection point in economic development, and Latin America must be prepared in order to reap its benefits.

Exhibit 1 Before the Steam Revolution, networks were largely disparate:

During the Steam Revolution, vertices were strengthened by transportation technology, allowing for permanent relationships to be established between economic nodes:

During Electrification and Automation, the goods could be produced at economic nodes at faster rates and volumes:

The Information revolution is adding to this feedback cycle, where goods and ideas can be propagated instantaneously across networks, and transactions move even faster across networks:

Each stage where economies experience a boom in economic growth can be measured by a simultaneous change in technology, how we invest ourselves in that technology, and the institutions charged with managing the process of economic expansion. While the pyramids took decades to build, the ability to move materials by steam engine allowed large structures like the Eifel tower to be built in two years. The transition we are experiencing means that we are able to create and distribute capital across the globe as quickly as our institutions and minds can process the transactions. This point can be seen in everything from UN Millennium Goals to end global poverty, to the explosion in the drop shipping business, and contract manufacturing. While it is difficult to predict which technology or business model will change the economic landscape in the future, studying how institutions facilitate the dissemination and application of new technology can help policy makers to optimally keep countries on a balanced-growth path. This article first examines the unique economic position of Latin America vis-a-vis historical examples of countries attempting to maintain their own balanced growth path. Second, it explores possible policy ramifications that need to be addressed in order to ensure that Latin America maintains the integrity of its institutions.

Will internet be accessible to all, or just the few that can afford it?

Latin America is unique in its economic position for four reasons:

1.

Latin America does not need to develop its own telecommunications and network technologies. The internet, computerization, and the means to construct all necessary infrastructure already exists–the challenge lies in how Latin America can absorb the technology. Will internet be accessible to all, or just the few that can afford it? This depends on the priority that policy makers place on encouraging their constituents to connect and exchange goods, as technology and communications are not the most heavily publicized facets of policy discourse, despite their importance in democratic institutions and economic stability. The speed at which the governments of Latin America invest in disseminating technology and infrastructure that address these issues will determine the speed at which states and economic networks converge to first world output levels.46 Private enterprises are not necessarily incentivized to build this infrastructure everywhere, because they may not satisfy their zero-profit condition. In the United States, telecommunications infrastructure is heavily subsidized by the government. As recently as 1996, the US Congress passed the Telecommunications Act, which mandated for the creation of a Universal Service Fund that provides indiscriminant access of telecommunications lines to all Americans. Latin America must follow this policy lead. While Latin America is a follower in pushing the technological development frontier, as most of their technologies were developed outside of the region, it has an opportunity to converge 51


The Next Industrial Revolution of Latin America

to the economic output rates of the most-developed countries. As institutions help to manage the involvement of global capital markets in Latin American development the overall income levels will rise as well.47 To temper costs that will naturally rise as well, policymakers must find ways to subsidize telecommunications as a public good, enabling citizens to gain access without distorting the private market.

2.

Latin America is in the position of a “Big Push� for outside investment, in a way that the formerSoviet states could not have done after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. In their seminal 1989 paper, Murphy, Shleifer and Vishny examine how a large push in investment and aggregate demand spillovers help move an economy from nongrowth equilibrium to a balanced growth path.48 When the former Soviet states where hoping for a push into the global economy, the Communist system had, over many years, curbed the ability of economic agents to satisfy demand.49 Latin America is not subject to such initial conditions. Both Latin America and the former-Soviet Union had opportunities to make major investments in their own economies, however, the former Soviet states did not purge their economic system of the institutions necessary to facilitate the incoming flux of investment. Latin America is in a similar position to accept a large influx of know-how and investment, but they are gifted with the necessary institutions to utilize such investment already in place. Additionally, the unique characteristic of telecom technology is that it is inherently filled with many demand spillovers: the existence of a telecom infrastructure creates

52

2013

the unique characteristic of telecom technology is that it is inherently filled with many demand spillovers. a demand for cellular technology. Consequently, a demand for cellular technology creates a demand for social connectivity and greater access to consumer goods. This cycle leads to more access to social connectivity and goods, which means that economic agents are more consistently demanding more varied goods. This process creates a positive feedback loop for demand and accelerates the rate at which economic agents exchange information and goods.

3.

Latin America is linguistically homogenous. Although there are about 600 million people across 20 countries, that vast majority of the population speak either Spanish or Portuguese. 50 First, the ability to communicate across countries is essential to the integrity of vertices that enable economic agents to trust and engage in business with each other. Second, linguistic homogeneity enables economies of scale. For example, a web-app developed in Portuguese can be distributed instantly through telecom networks to the nearly 200 million citizens of Brazil, and similarly for a product in Spanish.

4.

Latin America is geographically blessed with access to both physical and intellectual capital. The vast majority of Latin American countries have access to the oceans and the markets they offer. Also, Latin America shares time zones and spatial proximity with the United States, so advances

in telecommunications provides an opportunity to establish business relationships. Latin America is geographically in an even better position to receive outsourcing than either China or India. While China and India are currently able to offer low wages and technical infrastructure, making them hotbeds for outsourcing, there are various reasons why Latin America may become equally as competitive in the future. First, China and India’s currencies have both been steadily appreciating over the last decade, so relative wage rates will soon converge toward Latin America. Second, technical and major business centers are concentrated in a small number of places in China where the majority of transactions are performed through near-Costal cities like Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong. Similarly, in India, 71% of foreign offices are located in only 2 of 28 states.51 Third, China and India both suffer from a lack of local demand because their populations are relatively poor. Local demand is a necessary condition for economic development, because the creation of local markets and know-how helps to stimulate further demand, expertise and innovation.52 In fact, according to the World Bank 2012 rankings, out of the 10 Latin American countries that have more than 10 million people, India ranks above none in income per capita, and China ranks above only one.


1.

Education must be the main priority of every Latin American government. In the 19th and 20th centuries, literacy was the major initiative of education, from urban to rural regions. However, just literacy is no longer sufficient for today’s world. Major advances in technology mean that citizens must be literate in both the ability to use new technologies and create with those technologies. Mayor Bloomberg of New York City has started a first-of-its-kind initiative in order to make the learning of computer programming mandatory coursework for secondary school children. Latin America should emulate such policies, by spearheading technical education at the pre-College level. At each economic revolution, there is a major push for education reform: the first public school houses arrived during the steam revolution; the need for a college degree was understood by those writing the G.I. Bill during the post WW-II electrification and Automation revolution; and, Mayor Bloomberg seems to predict the same happening with the Information Revolution. In order to prevent a divergence in skills and wealth, and to reduce inequality, policies must be put in place to provide technological literacy to all individuals.

2.

Infrastructure is the second major priority. It is not sufficient for one person to have internet access, because the benefits of internet connection are magnified as connectivity increases. As illustrated in Exhibit 2, we can see how the

number of vertices in a network increases according to the function V(N)= N (N-1)/2, where N is the number of nodes that are added to the network.

Exhibit 2 2 Nodes, 1 Vertex:

3 Nodes, 3 Vertices:

4 Nodes, 6 Vertices:

Each vertex that is added to the network is a new potential economic transaction, a new market, and a new opportunity for economic development. It must become the priority of government to connect as many of its citizens to the network as possible in order to increase the potential for these vertices to connect economic agents for their mutual benefit.

3.

Institutions are responsible for the maintenance of the information framework of the network. As Peruvian Economist Hernando DeSoto Polar demonstrates, unreported, unrecorded, and unaccounted economic activity means that many agents at the lowest rung of the economic totem pole have cannot document their ownership

and property rights. Without documentation of property rights is harder to obtain credit and start a business.53 The beauty of telecommunication technology is that it inherently leaves a paper trail of accountability, and the rights behind each transaction are easy to track, making negotiating property rights a more transparent process. For the first time in history, institutions have the opportunity to track property rights in a costless, real-time manner: no longer will farmers have to stand before judges arguing over whose livestock belongs to whom – now transactions can be monitored and documented as they occur. For an example, we can look to Ghana, where farmers have been able to stabilize the price volatility of the crops they sell, smooth their consumption, and reduce business corruption by sharing and tracking transaction information over cell phones. Telecommunication infrastructure is itself evolving into an institution for economic development. The telecommunication and information revolution make development faster and less resource intensive than ever before. Latin America has a unique opportunity to implement policy and institutional measures to converge in competitiveness with low-wage driven economies like China and India. It is now up to Latin America to seize this opportunity. Policymakers can no longer think of their constituents as disconnected economic agents, but rather, they must be seen as members of a vast network of transactions, and policies must the implemented with a new type of system thinking.

53

Technology, Institutions and Networks

To capitalize on these network effects, Latin America must make several policy priorities.


End Notes 1.

LISTA is a Spanish acronym for Logrando Inclusión con Tecnología y Ahorro or “Achieving Inclusion with Technology and Savings”. More information can be found at www. fundacioncapital.org

2.

This rotation methodology was designed by Fundación Capital specifically for the Colombia LISTA pilot project, based on a series of field studies and visits.

3.

http://www.theinterdependent.com/ contributors/article/an-interview-withambassador-susan-rice

4.

http://www.sipiapa.org/upload/notisip/ file_sp_24.pdf

5.

http://www.theinterdependent.com/ contributors/article/an-interview-withambassador-susan-rice

6.

http://blog.transparency.org/2012/12/05/ the-americas-economies-grow-democraciesshrink-what-does-corruption-have-to-dowith-it/

7.

Id.

8.

http://mirror.undp.org/magnet/policy/ chapter1.htm

9.

http://ais.paho.org/chi/brochures/2012/ BI_2012_ENG.pdf

10.

Note that we include the caveat that social media might contribute with alternatives but not solve problems from their roots.

11. http://caracas.eluniversal.com/ caracas/120428/parturientas-son-devueltasen-la-maternidad-concepcion-palacios 12. http://www.conatel.gob.ve/#http://www. conatel.gob.ve/index.php/principal/ indicadoresanuales 13. http://www.conatel.gob.ve/files/Indicadores/ indicadores_2012_anual/internet_13.pdf 14.

the Western Hemisphere, but lived amongst other Africans or intermixed with Indigenous groups, often known to maintain cultural beliefs, religions, and language. The Garifuna Indigenous people are known as un-enslaved people of African, Caribbean and Arawak descent. (Jonhson, 2007). 20. For the purposes of this article, ICT comprises computers, internet, software, mobile & fixed telecommunications, and associated devices and networks. 21. Although the definition of micro, small and medium-sized businesses varies across countries, here we define them in the following terms: Micro, 5 employees or less. Small, 5-19 employees. Medium, 20-99 employees. 22. Impacto socioeconómico de la banda ancha en los países de América Latina y el Caribe. A. Garcia-Zaballos y R. López-Rivas. Nota Técnica. BID, 2011. http://www.iadb.org/document. cfm?id=37257082. Nota: El estudio econométrico mide la correlación entre las variables estudiadas, no una relación de causalidad. 23. Los de la OCDE más otros clave como Rusia, India, China, Sudáfrica e Indonesia 24. Las fuentes incluyen la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, el Foro Económico Mundial, las Naciones Unidas, INSEAD, el Banco Mundial o el propio Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo 25. Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, CEPAL. (2010). Las TIC para el crecimiento y la igualdad: renovando las estrategias de la sociedad de la información. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http://bit.ly/ecLyEy 26.

Id.

15. http://www.conatel.gob.ve/files/Indicadores/ indicadores_2012_anual/telefonia_movil13. pdf 16. http://www.conatel.gob.ve/files/Indicadores/ indicadores_2012_anual/internet_13.pdf

27.

Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, CEPAL. (2010). Las TIC para el crecimiento y la igualdad: renovando las estrategias de la sociedad de la información. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas.

28.

Gobierno electrónico se define como el uso de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones (TIC) en las administraciones públicas, con el fin de mejorar los servicios públicos y los procesos democráticos y reforzar el apoyo a las políticas

17. http://mentoringelsalvador.appspot.com/. 2011. 18. Para conocer más sobre el Programa de Mentores para El Salvador, visita el sitio web www.mentoringelsalvador.org o escribe a: info@mentoringelsalvador. org. 19. Un-enslaved, refers to Africans brought to the Americas during the TransAtlantic Slave Trade that were never captive as slaves once they reached

54

2013

Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, CEPAL. (2010). Monitoreo del Plan eLAC2010: Avances y desafíos de la Sociedad de la Información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http://bit. ly/181f04i

públicas. Criado, J. I., & Corojan, A. (2010). ¿Pueden las TIC cambiar la transparencia, lucha contra la corrupción y rendición de cuentas en los gobiernos latinoamericanos? Un enfoque comparado sobre los países centroamericanos. 200 años de Iberoamérica (1810-2010), 2037-2072. 29.

Hilbert, M., Bustos, S., y Ferraz, J. C. (2005). Estrategias nacionales para la sociedad de la información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http:// bit.ly/1baZOqa

30.

CEPAL. Op cit.

31.

Guerra, M., y Jordán, V. (2010). Políticas públicas de Sociedad de la Información en América Latina: ¿una misma visión? Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http:// bit.ly/aJ38KD

32.

Rovira, S. (2008). El Impacto Económico de las TICs. Presentación del IV Taller sobre la Medición de la Sociedad de la Información en América Latina y el Caribe, San Salvador. Disponible en: http://bit.ly/robVOY

33.

Fedesarrollo (2011). Impacto de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones (TIC) en el Desarrollo y la Competitividad del País. Bogotá: Fedesarrollo. Disponible en: http://bit. ly/16H5yjM

34.

Latin American Economic Outlook. (2013). “Las TIC en las pymes latinoamericanas: acceso y apropiación”. En Perspectivas Económicas de América Latina. Disponible en: http://bit.ly/1fAPWoQ

35.

Organización de las Naciones Unidas, ONU. (2013, marzo 16). “La Organización de las Naciones Unidas presenta el Informe anual sobre Gobierno Electrónico – 2012”. Disponible en: http://bit.ly/12qxZE8

36.

Este índice pondera no sólo el alcance y calidad de los servicios en línea del gobierno –que permite conectar a los gobiernos y a los ciudadanos-, sino también el estado de la infraestructura de telecomunicaciones y el capital humano que involucra.

37.

ONU. Op. cit. Ver también: Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, CEPAL. (2005). Políticas públicas para el desarrollo de sociedades de información en América Latina y el Caribe. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http:// bit.ly/181ie7U y Naser, A., y Concha, G. (2011). El gobierno electrónico en la gestión pública. Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas. Disponible en: http:// bit.ly/rlT8ql


38.

Criado,I & Corojan, A. (2010). ¿Pueden las TIC cambiar la transparencia, lucha contra la corrupción y rendición de cuentas en los gobiernos latinoamericanos? Un enfoque comparado sobre los países centroamericanos. Disponible en: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/ halshs-00531527/

39.

En el documento que se encuentra en: cpi.transparency.org/files/content/ pressrelease/2012_CPIUpdatedMethodology_ EMBARGO_EN.pdf se deja claro que no es posible realizar comparaciones por las diferencias en la metodología.

40.

Economista de la Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

41.

Estudiante de Economía y Ciencia Política de la Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

42.

Development Connections: unveiling the impact of new information technologies (Berlinski et al., 2011).

43.

For instance, the One Laptop Per Child initiative (OLPC) in countries like Peru (Cristia et al., 2012) and Uruguay.

54. The O-Ring Theory of Economic Development. Michael Kremer. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 108, No. 3. (Aug., 1993), pp. 551-575. 55. De Soto, Hernando. 1989. The Other Path. New York, NY: Basic Books.

44. http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer. py?hl=en&answer=87809 45.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/

46. Chrome: http://www.chromium.org/fortesters/enable-logging Firefox: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/ docs/Mozilla/Debugging/HTTP_logging 47. http://www.logstash.net/ 48. Barro, Robert J. & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1995. “Technological Diffusion, Convergence and Growth,” Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-26, March. 49. Barro, et al, 1992. “Convergence,” Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 246, April. 50. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1989. “Industrialization and the Big Push,” Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1003-26, October. 51.

Darden, Keith A., “Economic Liberalism and Its Rivals: The Formation of International Institutions Among the Post-Soviet States,” Cambridge Press, 2009.

52. “CIA – The World Factbook”. Cia.gov. Retrieved 2013-04-23. 53.

Lok Sabha, “Unstarred Question”, No.2935, Dec. 2004, available on www.indiastat.com.

55


Chocolate

Order Today! www.tastyimage.com mercedes@tastyimage.com Direct: 301-547-9009

IDB YOUTH Unit: Promoting Social Innovation and

Participation for Development in Latin America and the Caribbean Nearly 40 percent of the population in Latin America and the Caribbean is under the age of 30. The growth and development of this sector has major implications for governments, economies, communities and the environment. The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) values youth as partners in development. In 1995, the IDB created IDB YOUTH to respond more effectively to the needs of young people in the region and to promote their participation and leadership in the development process. IDB YOUTH’s main area of work is social innovation by promoting active youth participation through community service or volunteerism, access to technology, social and business entrepreneurship, road safety, sports for development and climate change. IDB YOUTH coordinates a regional network of more than 10,000 organizations representing youth and youth serving organizations, as well as social and business entrepreneurs and volunteers dedicated to improving their communities and countries. Network members receive support through capacity building, communication, technical and financial support and information sharing. Join this growing network of agents of change, by visiting: www.iadb.org/idbyouth For more information write to us at: IDB YOUTH UNIT Inter-American Development Bank 1300 New York Ave NW Washington, D.C. 20577

www.iadb.org/bidjuventud Facebook: Red de Jóvenes BID JUVENTUD Follow us on twitter @bidjuventud


YOUNG CONNECTION 2013

Y

oung Connection (YC) is a community of practice for young professionals working at the Inter-American Development Bank to share ideas, experiences, and passions, as well as to transform enthusiasm and leadership into action. YC focuses on expanding the potential of its members, creating opportunities for development, and causing a positive impact. YC offers a platform to young professionals where they can develop their own initiatives, take on leadership roles, and develop social entrepreneurship skills. Some of our current initiatives are:

Connexio:

offers young people all over the world an opportunity to raise concerns, voice their opinions and discuss topics relevant to Latin America and the Caribbean.

Food 4 Thought:

is an informal lunch setting where a senior manager or executive at the IDB can share his or her own work experience and career path with a small group of young professionals. The experience is part mentoring, part networking and usually inspires attendants to do some valuable introspection into their own career choices and options.

Integration:

facilitates integration and networking among young professionals at the IDB and other multilateral organizations in DC through fundraising activities, networking events, sport events and film festivals among others.

ACT: focuses on bringing social impact and giving back to our local community through volunteering activities. Play 4 Development:

our most recent graduate and soon to become an officially registered NGO, started as a YC initiative in 2009 to create a collaborative network of individuals and institutions who are passionate about sports and want to impact youth in Latin America and the Caribbean through sport related development projects.

WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST IN YC AND HOPE THAT YOU ENJOY THIS YEAR’S EDITION OF CONNEXIO. SHOULD YOU HAVE ANY FEEDBACK OR QUESTIONS, PLEASE DON’T HESITATE TO CONTACT US AT YCONNECTION@IADB.ORG

Young Connection Team 2013

General Coordination Committee 2013 Alexandra Vega & Sandra Murcia


w w w.youngco nnec ti o n .o r g

Inter-American Development Bank 1300 New York Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20577, USA www.iadb.org

Profile for Young Connection

Connexio 9th Edition: ICT4D  

How are technology and communication changing development? This special edition on ICT4D (Information and Communication Technologies for Dev...

Connexio 9th Edition: ICT4D  

How are technology and communication changing development? This special edition on ICT4D (Information and Communication Technologies for Dev...

Advertisement